Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Australian Film, Television and Radio School—Report for 2020-21


Download PDF Download PDF

1

About this report

Copyright and Publication

The text in this Annual Report is released subject to a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND licence, except for the text of the independent auditor’s report. This means, in summary, that you may reproduce, transmit and otherwise use AFTRS’ text, so long as you do not do so for commercial purposes and do not change it. You must also attribute the text you use as extracted from the Australian Film Television and Radio School’s Annual Report.

For more details about this licence, see https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ deed.en_GB . This licence is in addition to any fair dealing or other rights you may have under the Copyright Act 1968. You are not permitted to reproduce, transmit or otherwise use any still photographs included in this Annual Report without first obtaining AFTRS’ written permission.

The report is available at the AFTRS website: http://www.aftrs.edu.au

Australian Film, Television and Radio School Building 130 The Entertainment Quarter Moore Park NSW 2021

PO Box 2286 Strawberry Hills NSW 2012

T 1300 131 461 T +61 (0)2 9805 6611 F +61 (0)2 9887 1030

aftrs.edu.au

© Australian Film Television and Radio School 2020

Published by the Australian Film Television and Radio School ISSN 0819-2316

2 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Acknowledgement of Country

The Australian Film, Television and Radio School acknowledges Traditional Owners, the Bidjigal and Gadigal peoples of the Eora Nation, on whose land we meet, work, study, learn and teach.

We pay our respects to Elders and Knowledge Holders past and present and extend our respect to Aboriginal and Zenadth Kes (Torres Strait) Nations from all parts of this land.

3

4 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

5

Contents

1 Chair’s Introduction 6

2 CEO’s Perspective 9

3 About Us 12

Our Strategic Direction 13

4 Corporate Governance 14

Enabling Legislation 14

Council 17

Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee 21

Academic Board 24

Executive Team 26

5 Performance 28

Portfolio Budget Statement and Key Performance Criteria 28 Annual Performance Statement: AFTRS 2020-21 30

Analysis of Performance Against Purpose 46

6 Statutory Reporting 47

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO - Workplace Diversity) 47 Workplace Culture and Communication 48

Staffing, Establishment and Appointments 49

Remuneration Information 53 Staff Training and Development 55 Industrial Relations 56

Work Health and Safety 56

Freedom of Information 58

Privacy 58

Ministerial Directions and Government Policies 58

Judicial Decisions and Reviews by Outside Bodies 59 Fraud Control 59

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Officers 59

Environmental Management 59

7 Financial Statements 61

Contents 61

8 Appendices 94

Appendix 1: Applications and Enrolments 94

Appendix 2: Scholarships 95

Appendix 3: Bridge to Industry 97 Appendix 4: 2021 AFTRS Graduates 104

Appendix 5: Student Achievements 108

Appendix 6: Award Course Program 111

Appendix 7: Engagement: Outreach 115

Appendix 8: Industry Practitioners at AFTRS 117

Appendix 9: Public Programs 120 Appendix 10: Financial Resource Summary 125

Index 128

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 131

6 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

1 Chair’s Introduction This has been an extraordinary year. COVID accelerated the growth of Australia’s screen and broadcast industries and the rapid disruptions and opportunities of digitisation. Our students were again faced with periods of change, uncertainty, and lockdowns.

But throughout this period, AFTRS has demonstrated its resilience and enduring value to industry and its graduates.

The School exists to deliver world-class skills, training and talent to the Australian screen and broadcast industries. Over the course of the year, that remit has never felt more pressing as these industries have experienced significant and rapid growth.

Generous government incentives, such as the Location Incentive and production offsets, Australia’s world-class facilities and talent and the Government’s management of COVID-19 over this period, have led to significant industry growth.

Leading international studios such as Industrial Light & Magic (ILM), Marvel Studios, and NBC Universal have established long term bases in Australia and are seeking Australian talent and skills in areas such as visual effects at a scale we haven’t seen before. The creative industries as a whole, contributing more than $90 billion to the national economy annually, have grown 34% over the last ten years.

A pressing question for AFTRS through this period has been how we best support the Australian industry in this time of growth and how we best equip our graduates. Our offerings, extending across degree programs, short courses, industry-partnered training, partnerships with communities, masterclasses, and research, have engaged with new skills

and capacity building, as well as those vital legacy skills needed to tell a good screen and audio story. But as we head into a digitally disrupted COVID world, perhaps the biggest question of all that we have grappled with is how we enable our graduates to be bold, brilliant, and resilient and lead meaningful, colourful, creative lives.

The tremendous support the School provides our graduates and our industry is laid out in the remarkable achievements documented in this report, in the ambitious targets we set ourselves and that we have, to a very impressive degree, met. Reflecting on my fourth year as Chair of AFTRS’ Council, I am again struck by the commitment that AFTRS’ staff and students have to the School and its founding idea —that we are an institution created in the service of culture, enriching Australian creativity and storytelling. I would like to single out some achievements of note that reflect the passion and skill of the AFTRS’ team and the AFTRS’ values that underpin all that we do.

Mastery, merit, and the pursuit of excellence are at the heart of AFTRS’ approach to education and training. Honouring creative mastery was the focus of this year’s graduation, a particularly joyful event. AFTRS awarded honorary degrees to three extraordinary trailblazers in the Australian cultural landscape. Lynette Wallworth was awarded a Doctor of Arts, Film and Television (honoris causa) in 2019, but we were unable to confer this award in 2019 as our graduation was cancelled. But we were able to confer the degree this year - along with two other brilliant recipients.

7 Section 1 Chairs Introduction

An Emmy and AACTA award-winning Australian artist and filmmaker whose immersive installations, VR and film works reflect on the connections between people and the natural world, Lynette was the School’s first Artist in Residence in 2020 and a recipient of our inaugural Creative Fellowship in 2010. Lynette talked eloquently about the importance of receiving this support from the School —not only in recognition of her achievements but also in acknowledgement of the School’s awareness of the power of story and the delicate, determined business of making great work. Our 2020 recipients, Mitch Torres and Cherie Romaro, were awarded a Doctor of Arts, Film and Television (honoris causa) and a Doctor of Arts, Radio (honoris causa), respectively. Mitch Torres was SBS’ first Indigenous presenter. She’s had a truly impressive journalism career across radio and television and has written and directed a range of dramas, documentaries, and theatrical plays. Cherie Romaro has led a remarkable career in both the Australian radio and television industries and was the nation’s first-ever female Music Director. Like Lynette, both Mitch and Cherie are extraordinary models of the imagination, resourcefulness, and grit that a creative career demands.

This year was also a celebration of daring and working together.

AFTRS is committed to recognising and embedding First Nations’ culture in everything we do. This year AFTRS and Netflix announced the Netflix Indigenous Scholarship Fund. This will provide USD 400,000 to promote and support First Nations and Indigenous voices across the Australian screen and broadcast industries. Administered by AFTRS and supported by a selection panel including Indigenous leaders from industry and educational institutions funds, this is an inspiring example of different groups coming together for a shared cause of elevating Indigenous talent and creativity across Australia.

The daring and determination of our students in responding to the challenges posed by COVID-19 were ably demonstrated by our radio students at this year’s Easter Show. The 2021 Sydney Royal Easter Show was the largest event to take place globally at that time since the emergence of the pandemic. It was a sell-out event, with crowds of 60,000 per day. AFTRS’ Graduate Diploma Radio students ran the official station of the Show - Show Radio —and did an incredible job.

The AFTRS’ value of generosity was a particular and salutary highlight. The year has proven tough both financially and emotionally for students, with some losing jobs due to the pandemic and others being separated from families and support networks. This year we were able to award 57 scholarships to AFTRS’ students, which provides critical support that allows our students to complete their studies during a difficult and unpredictable time and continue on their paths into the Australian screen and broadcast industries. But even more significantly, the whole AFTRS’ community —students, staff, and Council members, have been abundantly generous with their time, good ideas and patience in supporting the School activities this year.

I would like to thank the Minister for the additional funding the School received to mitigate against the impact of COVID-19 and allow us to focus on our remit to industry and grow as a global beacon of excellence in screen and broadcast training and education.

Council notes the extraordinary levels of activity undertaken by the School in 2020-21. In a year that saw the world struggle with a pandemic, this activity, and our gains across multiple areas, such as partnerships, scholarships, diversity, and inclusion, have been remarkable.

Council passes on its gratitude to all the staff at AFTRS for the dedication, commitment and resourcefulness shown throughout the year and congratulates our CEO, Dr Nell Greenwood, and the Executive team, who have demonstrated outstanding leadership and resourcefulness throughout this remarkable year.

8 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

I would like to express my deep thanks to all members of the Council for their contribution over this period. In particular, I would like to thank Peter Tonagh for the service, generosity, and insights he brought to his time on Council and Professor Mark Rose for his inspired and generous leadership as Chair of the AFTRS’ Academic Board.

Russel Howcroft Chair of Council Australian Film Television and Radio School

9 Section 2 CEO’s Perspective

2 CEO’s Perspective Over this period, the AFTRS community has demonstrated extraordinary levels of ingenuity and determination in navigating the ongoing disruptions of COVID to meet our remit to find, support and develop Australian talent.

In preparation for the launch of a new five-year Corporate Strategy in 2021, the Executive team was restructured to refocus and align expertise to support our mission to offer world-leading creative education across Australia. This restructure introduced two new roles to our Executive team —the Director of First Nations & Outreach position to ensure that First Nation’s needs, values, culture, and knowledges remain at the heart of our decision-making, and the Director of Partnerships & Development position to keep the strategic focus on impactful engagement with industry and to ensure we remain sustainable, adaptive and fit-for-purpose in this world of change and opportunity.

COVID-19 Response

This year was a demonstration of both the School’s and the industry’s capacity for recovery and resilience.

Working closely with Screen Australia, SPA, the MEAA and the Chief Medical Officer’s Team, AFTRS took the lead in co-ordinating COVIDSafe Screen Production Guidelines for the Australian screen sector. As with industry, adopting these guidelines for all AFTRS productions allowed us to return to production in July 2020 swiftly and safely. Student-facing Protocols were shared amongst our tertiary colleagues, including VCA and NIDA. Our Radio team also produced Safe Studio Principles for Radio & Podcasting with Commercial Radio Australia, the ABC, First Nations Media Australia, SBS, TAFE NSW and community training and broadcast organisations.

The level and quality of hands-on production over the year was extraordinary. During this time of duress and challenge, it was inspiring and heartening to see students’ resourcefulness and creativity flourish across screen production, audio, and radio.

Industry Engagement

With the growth of international and domestic production in Australia and the emergence of clear skills gaps in local talent, a particular focus for AFTRS this year was working closely with industry to create a sustainable pipeline of skilled talent. After conversations with State Agencies and large local production houses, we embarked on training partnerships with Screen Queensland, SAFC and Matchbox / NBC Universal in Virtual Production.

This was also a great year for the AFTRS Graduate Program. Despite the challenges COVID-19 presented, Fremantle Australia, Sky News, Endemol Shine Australia, ABC and SBS all offered paid internships to several of our very talented BA graduates. A testament to the success of the program and the strength of our graduates is that all interns went on to secure paid employment after completing their internships. This year, Marvel Studios also offered eight paid traineeships, and 110 students accessed industry opportunities, including internships, placements, paid positions, and workshops.

10 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Our Industry Masterclass program, including panels, workshops, and Q&A Sessions, brought over 2000 practitioners from across our screen and broadcast community together to hear candid insights from some of Australia’s most skilled luminaries such as Philip Noyce, Helen Bowden, Tim Minchin, Mitch Torres, Emile Sherman, Joshua Oppenheimer, and Beck Cole. Over this period, AFTRS online content and events period reached over 4.7 million hits. Evidence of this close working relationship with industry is AFTRS’ employment rates -83% of Master of Arts Screen graduates (2019-2020) are currently working on, or have worked on, a production in Australia.

Graduates & Alumni

This year, AFTRS’ graduates and alumni once again shone on the national and international stage, showcasing brilliant creative storytelling talent. AFTRS’ alumni Vanessa Gazy’s (Master of Arts Screen 2014) series Eden premiered on the streaming platform Stan. And we had a stand-out year at Flickerfest with 2019 Master of Arts Screens Graduates Naomi Fryer and Jorde Heys, both winning awards for their AFTRS Capstone projects.

AFTRS is extremely lucky to have 48 years of dedicated and active alumni. This year a focus was to re-engage and reactivate this network, and the School appointed an Alumni Program Manager. Development has started on renewing and updating the alumni database and creating a program of events to bring our alumni together.

Flexibility and Digital Acceleration

Capitalising on the increased confidence of staff and students across the school in digital learning and the success of the Government’s Tech Future initiative and its drive for digital inclusion, AFTRS expedited its work to make its world-class learning accessible and available to the most talented learners across Australia.

Two new courses launched on the online FutureLearn platform and engaged over 2,200 fully participating learners. The feedback from both students and staff who facilitated the courses was overwhelmingly positive, with 93% of students saying that the Essential

Finance course either met or exceeded their expectations and 97% of Production Design students stating that the course met or exceeded their expectations.

AFTRS Master of Screen: Business also moved to online delivery this year. The online delivery of the course has so far been a success, and the increasing numbers of students applying for the course reflect the changing needs and expectations of learners in engaging with their studies.

An Inclusive School Community

As part of the strategic restructure, this year, the School welcomed Dr Romaine Moreton to the new role of Director, First Nations & Outreach, to lead us in meaningfully embedding First Nations values in all that we do and to build and articulate pathways into the School for under-represented communities. Romaine has led the team to consolidate and build on the great work already achieved in this area. A training highlight was the engagement of First Nations videographer, filmmaker and AFTRS alumnus Cornel Ozies to deliver a Mobile Content Creation workshop online for First Nations community journalists from around Australia.

AFTRS exceeded its target for the period with a total of 26 community and cultural partnerships with diverse organisations. The 2020-21 period was the first year AFTRS has included female and non-binary targets in our Corporate Performance Measures. Setting tough measures is key to ensuring the student population at AFTRS is representative of the Australian population and that the make-up of our industry is representative of the Australian population. With a target of 51% female or non-binary enrolments at the census date, the school fell just short of this goal, reaching 47% of enrolments, but there was a notable 5% growth from the last period. While there is further work to be done, the School is making strong gains in ensuring those who have the most potential to gain from an AFTRS education can access the School —regardless of gender, culture, or background.

11 Section 2 CEO’s Perspective

AFTRS proudly continued its partnership with Bus Stop Films this year. The School supported two-year-long paid internships to work within the AFTRS Production team over the year. The interns live with intellectual disability and attend Bus Stops’ Accessible Films Studies Program hosted at AFTRS. This partnership included Bus Stop’s Inclusion in Action training for staff, which equipped participants with the skills and knowledge to be more confident about and open to employing and working alongside people with disability within the screen industry.

Research

This year saw a reinvigorated approach to research at AFTRS. AFTRS appointed a Head of Research in this period to ensure this vital work remains central to the school’s ongoing work. In January, AFTRS commissioned research from Parrot Analytics on how Australian content travels internationally. This data was presented at a well-attended session at Screen Forever in January.

This period also saw the commencement of our inaugural Artist in Residence, Lynette Wallworth. Her research project for the residency is exploring the creative potential of audio narratives. The Artist in Residence project ensures Australia’s best talent and storytellers are supported by having a semester at the School with the space, facilities, support, and time to experiment in their craft.

Sustainability & Agility

Responding to the pressures and opportunities of the COVID-19 pandemic and the accelerated impact of digitisation on both the screen and broadcast and educational sectors, AFTRS’ focus through this period has been to build its capacity to be more agile to respond to the needs of industry and learners. Building sustainability remains a central focus of the School. Over this period, under the new Director of Partnerships & Development, Con Apostolopoulos and the team have done incredible work in growing our own-source revenue.

I would like to express a heartfelt thanks to the AFTRS staff and students who have demonstrated patience, grace, ingenuity, and an unwavering commitment to and belief in the power and necessity of good Australian stories through a time of challenge and change. I would also like to thank the Executive team who have shared experiences, insights, and resources to lead the School through this period.

On behalf of the Executive team and myself, thank you to Council for their guidance, wisdom, and contribution over this period. A special thank you to Peter Tonagh for his service to the AFTRS’ Council; you will be missed.

AFTRS is looking forward to launching its new five-year strategy in 2021 —to deliver world-leading creative education across Australia and support Australian talent and culture to thrive at home and around the world.

Dr Nell Greenwood Chief Executive Officer Australian Film, Television and Radio School

12 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

3 About us Introduction The Australian Film, Television and Radio School (AFTRS) leads the nation’s screen and broadcast sector by fostering excellence and innovation in industry-focused education, training, and research.

The School collaborates with local and global partners to deepen its connections with industry, platforms, and creatives in all forms of storytelling practice and maintain Australia’s reputation as a world-renowned, professional workforce in the film and broadcast industry.

The AFTRS 2020-21 Annual Report reflects the School’s purpose, vision and values associated with the final year in delivering on the School’s five-year strategy, ‘The Rise of the Creative Entrepreneur’, launched in 2016. In 2021, AFTRS launched its new five—year strategy, ‘Creating the Future’, exhibited in the School’s 2021-22 Corporate Plan.

Our Purpose To find and empower Australian talent to shape and share their stories with the world by delivering future-focused, industry-relevant education, research, and training.

Support the development of a professional screen arts and broadcast culture in Australia, including through the provision of specialist industry-focused education, training, and research. -Portfolio Budget Statement Outcome, 2020-21

Our Vision Be the focal point for innovation in screen, sound, and storytelling, globally.

Our Values We strive for Mastery

We know that mastering this craft is a life-long endeavour. There is always more to learn.

We encourage Daring

Nothing great comes from playing safe. We are bold. We take risks.

We believe in Merit

Talent always gets a fair go here, wherever it comes from.

We practise Generosity

We are open to the world and to each other. The stories we share nurture our culture.

We work Together

We are in this together, working to create a whole that is bigger than ourselves.

13 Section 3 About Us

Our Strategic Direction

At the close of FY 2020-21, the School celebrated the successful conclusion of the AFTRS five-year corporate strategy: The Rise of the Creative Entrepreneur, launched in 2016.

In this same year, AFTRS CEO Dr Nell Greenwood and the Executive Team have worked to formulate the AFTRS’ new five-year corporate strategy: Creating the Future, launching in the second half of 2021.

The new strategy builds on the School’s prior achievements and greets the contemporary challenges of an increasingly dynamic and expanding operating landscape by working hand-in-hand with our screen and broadcast industries in meeting its purpose of being a global centre of excellence that provides Australians with the highest level of screen and broadcast education, training, and research.

To deliver world-leading creative education across the nation, so Australian talent and culture may thrive at home and worldwide, the strategy, as expressed in the FY 2021-2022 Corporate Plan, is built upon three pillars: National Reach, Excellence and Sustainability.

1 National Reach

As the national screen and broadcast school, talent across Australia must be able to access our world-class training and educational opportunities. Our curriculum must be flexible in its delivery and reflect the breadth of Australian screen and broadcast culture in its design.

2 Excellence

As one of the top screen and broadcast schools in the world, AFTRS is committed to the pursuit of excellence in all that we do. Our unique approach to screen and broadcast education is driven by a close working relationship with industry and a transformative curriculum that fosters deep skill-building, creative experimentation, and an understanding of the power of collaboration.

Our graduates are sought-after for their outstanding craft skills and artistry. They are enterprising, highly creative, and professional. They understand the power of Australian story, underpinned by First Nations culture, enriched by the diversity of our country, to engage, entertain and connect audiences.

3 Sustainability

Finally, we must ensure that our work in delivering world-class education across the country is sustainable. Our offering is scalable and adaptive, allowing us to grow our business and meet local, regional, and state and territory needs while working to our staff’s capacity, school resources, and industry.

14 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

4 Corporate Governance Enabling Legislation AFTRS was established by the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 (AFTRS Act). It is the national institution for education and training in Australia’s screen arts and broadcast industries.

A number of regulations and other legislative instruments have been made under the AFTRS Act since it commenced. AFTRS also operated under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) as a Commonwealth statutory authority.

AFTRS’ functions as laid out in the AFTRS Act are:

Section 5 (1)

a) to provide advanced education and training by way of the development of the knowledge and skills required in connexion with the production of programs;

b) to conduct and encourage research in connexion with the production of programs;

c) to conduct such seminars and courses of education or training for persons engaged, or to be engaged, directly or indirectly, in connexion with the production of programs as are approved by the Council;

d) to co-operate and make arrangements with other institutions and persons for purposes in connexion with the production of programs or the provision of education or training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a);

e) for purposes in connexion with the production of programs or the provision of education or training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a), to provide facilities for, and to offer the services of the staff of the School to, such other institutions or persons as are approved by the Council;

f) to make grants of financial assistance to persons to enable or assist those persons to receive education or undergo training of the kind referred to in paragraph (a);

g) to award such degrees, diplomas and certificates in relation to the passing of examinations or otherwise in relation to the education and training provided by the School as are specified in a determination under section 6A; and

h) to do anything incidental or conducive to the performance of the foregoing functions.

Section 5 (2)

The School shall exercise its functions with a view to enabling and encouraging the production of programs of a high degree of creativeness and of high technical and artistic standards.

15 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Council

Under the AFTRS Act, the School is governed by a Council accountable to the Federal Parliament through the Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, The Hon Paul Fletcher MP.

Under the AFTRS Act, AFTRS is a corporate Commonwealth entity, the Council is the accountable authority for the entity, and the members of Council are entity officials.

Composition

There are nine members of the Council, specified under the AFTRS Act:

· Three members appointed by the Governor-General

· Three members appointed from convocation by the Council

· The Director of the School (Chief Executive Officer), ex-officio

· A staff member elected by staff each year

· A student member elected by students each year.

Members represent the interests of the School and the screen arts and broadcasting sector, contributing expertise in a range of areas, including education, policy, film and television production, commercial activities, and management.

The Governor-General appoints the Chair, and the Council selects the Deputy Chair. These positions may not be held by the ex-officio, staff, or student member of the Council.

Members appointed by the Governor-General, and those appointed from convocation, hold office for a term of up to three years.

The Governor-General appoints the Director of the School (Chief Executive Officer) on the recommendation of the Council

The staff member holds office for one year and ceases to be a Council member if they leave the School.

The student member holds office for one year and can no longer be a member once they cease to be a student of the School.

The maximum appointment period for an elected member is two terms. Casual vacancies for elected positions may be filled with the approval of the Minister until the current term for that position expires.

Council members are non-executive directors apart from the Chief Executive Officer, who is an executive director. The CEO manages the affairs of the School and oversees daily operations and activities according to general policy approved by the Council.

On appointment, Council members are provided access to the Corporate Governance Handbook setting out their responsibilities and duties.

AFTRS Council convened five meetings during FY 2020-21:

· 17 July 2020

· 11 September 2020

· 4 December 2020

· 12 February 2021

· 23 April 2021

16 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period

Current Report Period (2020-21)

Mr Russel Howcroft Ms Carole Campbell Mr Peter Tonagh

Qualifications of the

Accountable Authority

Bachelor of Business

(Marketing) Monash

University

Bachelor of Economics

Macquarie University

Fellow of Chartered

Accountants Australia and

New Zealand (FCA)

Graduate Member of

Australian Institute of

Company Directors (GAICD)

Bachelor of Commerce

UNSW Australia

Master of Business

Administration INSEAD

Experience of the

Accountable Authority

Nine, Broadcaster

Sayers Group, Partner and

Brand Designer

AFTRS, Finance Audit and

Risk Management (FARM)

Committee Chair

GUD Holdings Limited,

Non-Executive Director and

Audit Committee Chair

Southern Cross Media

Group Limited (SXL),

Non-Executive Director

Humm Group Limited

Non-Executive Director and

Audit Committee Chair

Bus Stop Films,

Chairman

Village Roadshow,

Non-Executive Director

Position Title/Position Held/

Executive/Non-Executive

Chair,

Non-Executive

Appointed by the

Governor-General

Deputy Chair,

Non-Executive

Convocation Member

of Council

Non-Executive

Appointed by the

Governor-General

Period as the accountable

authority or member within

the reporting period

- Date of Commencement

- Date of cessation

1 July 2017

30 June 2023

Cessation of second and

final permitted term

5 April 2018

4 April 2024

Cessation of second and

final permitted term

29 May 2018

28 May 2021

Number of meetings of

accountable authority

attended

5 5 5

Number of meetings relevant

to the term of member

5 5 5

17 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Ms Annabelle Herd Ms Tanya Hosch Mr Chris Oliver-Taylor

Qualifications of the

Accountable Authority

Bachelor of Laws, Bachelor

of Arts (Asian Studies)

The Australian National

University

- Bachelor of Arts

(Public Policy Analysis),

(University of Brighton)

Experience of the

Accountable Authority

Network Ten, Chief

Operating Officer

AFL, General Manager,

Inclusion & Social Policy

Australian National

University (ANU),

Council member

United Nations Association

of Australia (UNAA),

Goodwill Ambassador for

the Rights of Indigenous

Peoples

Circus Oz, Board of

Directors Member

NAB, Indigenous Advisory

Group Member

Fremantle,

Chief Executive Officer

Film Victoria, Board member

Position Title/Position Held/

Executive/Non-Executive

Non-Executive

Appointed by the

Governor-General

Non-Executive

Convocation Member

of Council

Non-Executive

Convocation Member

of Council

Period as the accountable

authority or member within

the reporting period

- Date of Commencement

- Date of cessation

14 December 2017

13 December 2023

Cessation of second and

final permitted term

18 October 2018

17 October 2021

1 July 2020

30 June 2023

Number of meetings of

accountable authority

attended

5 4 5

Number of meetings relevant

to the term of member

5 5 5

18 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Dr Nell Greenwood Ms Maija Howe Dr Marty Murphy

Qualifications of the

Accountable Authority

AFTRS Chief

Executive Officer

AFTRS Staff Member AFTRS Staff Member

Experience of the

Accountable Authority

AFTRS Chief

Executive Officer

AFTRS Lecturer,

Creative Practice & Theory

AFTRS A/G Senior Lecturer

in Story

Position Title/Position

Held/Executive/Non-Executive

Executive Director

Ex-Officio Member

of Council

Staff-Elected Member

Outgoing

Staff-Elected Member

Incoming

Period as the accountable

authority or member within

the reporting period

- Date of Commencement

- Date of cessation

5 March 2020

4 March 2025

27 February 2020

26 February 2021

5 March 2021

4 March 2022

Number of meetings of

accountable authority

attended

5 3 1

Number of meetings relevant

to the term of member

5 4 1

Ms Bethany Stewart Ms Cleo Baldwin

Qualifications of the

Accountable Authority

AFTRS Student Member AFTRS Student Member

Experience of the

Accountable Authority

Enrolled third-year Bachelor

of Arts Screen: Production

Enrolled second-year

Bachelor of Arts Screen:

Production

Position Title/Position Held/

Executive/Non-Executive

Student-Elected Member

Outgoing

Student-Elected Member

Incoming

Period as the accountable

authority or member within

the reporting period

- Date of Commencement

- Date of cessation

28 April 2020

9 December 2020*

19 April 2021

18 April 2022

Number of meetings of

accountable authority

attended

3 1

Number of meetings relevant

to the term of member

3 1

* Original term cessation date reported in 2019-20 was 27 April 2021. The student ceased to be a student of the School on 6 December 2020 and therefore ceased to

be a Council member in accordance with the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 s 10(4).

19 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee The Council of AFTRS established the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee in compliance with section 45 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and section 17 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

The main objective of the FARM Committee is to assist the Council to perform the following functions for AFTRS:

· Review the appropriateness of Councils:

- Financial reporting - Performance reporting - System of risk oversight - System of internal control.

· Provide a forum for communication between the Council, senior management, and the internal and external auditors; and

· Consider other matters, as referred to the FARM Committee by the Council.

The Committee convened four meetings in FY 2020-21:

· 4 September 2020

· 27 November 2020

· 4 February 2021

· 3 June 2021.

Duties and Responsibilities

The FARM Committee may consider any matters relating to AFTRS’ financial affairs and risk management.

The FARM Committee duties include:

Financial Reporting

· to examine the Annual Report before submission to Council, focusing particularly on:

- Any changes in accounting policies and practices - Areas where significant judgement is required, such as provisions or

contingent liabilities - Significant adjustments resulting from the audit - Compliance with accounting standards

- Compliance with Government and legal requirements - Reports prepared by management for release to the stakeholders.

· to provide any other advice to the accountable authority about the accountable authority’s obligations under the PGPA Act and other relevant legislation.

Performance reporting

· to satisfy itself that AFTRS has an appropriate performance reporting framework linked to its objectives and outcomes.

System of risk oversight

· to review the process for identifying major risks to which AFTRS may be exposed

· to review all significant transactions that do not form part of AFTRS’ normal business

· to review any current and pending litigation which could pose a significant financial risk to AFTRS

20 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

· to consider significant cases of employee and student conflict, misconduct, or fraud

· to evaluate AFTRS’ exposure to fraud

· to consider the internal audit program and ensure the internal audit function is adequately resourced and has appropriate standing within AFTRS

· to promote co-ordination between management and internal and external auditors

· to review any significant matters reported by the internal auditors and ensure management’s response is adequate

· to ensure the internal auditors are independent of the activities they audit

· to discuss with the external auditor the audit’s nature and scope before it commences

· to discuss issues and/or reservations arising from the interim and final audits

· to consider the external auditor’s management letter and management’s response

· to request and review special audits or investigations as may be necessary.

System of internal control

· to verify that the internal control systems are adequate and functioning effectively

· to discuss and review with management its philosophy with respect to business ethics, corporate conduct, the AFTRS Code of Conduct and values

· to review with management or the internal auditors or both the philosophy with respect to controlling the AFTRS’ assets and information systems, the staffing of the key functions and the plans for enhancement of operations

· to consider compliance with any regulatory or statutory requirements.

Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee Charter:

https://www.aftrs.edu.au/governance/ corporate-documents/

Composition

The FARM Committee consists of up to five members but no less than three members who have appropriate qualifications, knowledge, skills, or experience to assist the Committee to perform its functions.

The FARM Committee may include Council members (excluding the Chair of Council and the CEO as the ex officio Council member), AFTRS’ officers and employees (excluding the CEO and CFO) and independent members as may be determined by Council from time to time.

The majority of the FARM Committee members must not be AFTRS’ employees.

The Chief Executive Officer, Head of Governance, Chief Operations Officer and Head of Finance have a standing invitation to attend FARM Committee meetings as observers. The internal and external auditors are also in attendance.

21 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Details of the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee during the reporting period

Current Report Period (2020-21)

Ms Carole Campbell Mr David Sturgiss Mr Don Cross

Membership type Council member of the

FARM Committee

Independent member of the

FARM Committee

Independent member of the

FARM Committee

Qualifications, knowledge,

skills, or experience

Bachelor of Economics

(Macquarie University)

Fellow of Chartered

Accountants Australia and

New Zealand (FCA)

Graduate Member of

Australian Institute of

Company Directors (GAICD)

Ms Campbell is an

experienced Non-Executive

Director, CFO, and

corporate adviser with over

30 years’ experience in

various industries, including

professional services,

financial services, media,

mining, and industrial

services.

Ms Campbell is currently a

Non-Executive Director of:

· GUD Holdings

Limited (GUD)

· Humm Group

Limited (HUM)

· Southern Cross Media

Group Limited (SXL).

Bachelor of Commerce

UNSW Australia

Mr Sturgiss is a Non-Executive Director and

Chartered Accountant

working in the Higher

Education sector with over

40 years’ experience.

Mr Sturgiss is a Fellow of

the Institute of Chartered

Accountants, an Associate

Member of the Australian

Institute of Company

Directors, and a Certified

Finance & Treasury

Professional.

Mr Sturgiss is currently a

Non-Executive Director:

· Australian Maths Trust

· The Social Research

Centre Pty Ltd

· University of Canberra:

Council Member and

Finance Committee Chair

Bachelor of Arts in

Accounting University

of Canberra

Master of Business

Administration University

of Canberra

Mr Cross was a senior

partner at KPMG and a

lead partner for KPMG’s

key strategic government

accounts. Mr Cross has

experience in government

program delivery and

reform, financial statement

audit and internal audit

for policy, regulatory and

service delivery agencies.

Mr Cross holds professional

memberships in accounting,

fraud control, business, and

auditing and is a Fellow of

the Institute of Chartered

Accountants and a Certified

Practicing Accountant.

Mr Cross is currently

Non-Executive:

· DJX Advisory; and

Audit Committee

member of:

· Australian Competition

and Consumer

Commission, and

the Australian Energy

Regulator

· Australian Fisheries

Management Authority

· Australian Office of

Financial Management

22 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Cont'd Ms Carole Campbell Mr David Sturgiss Mr Don Cross

Qualifications, knowledge,

skills, or experience

· Australian Pesticides

and Veterinary Medicines

Authority

· Australian Office of

Financial Management

· Australian Pesticides

and Veterinary Medicines

Authority

· Department of Home

Affairs

· Department of the

Treasury: Audit

Committee Chair

· Environment, Planning,

Sustainability and

Development Directorate

· Major Projects Canberra

· National Competition

Council

· National Film and Sound

Archives

· Organ Transplant

Authority

Relevant Term/s Third term:

1 July 2019 - 4 April 2021

Fourth term:

5 April 2021 - 4 April 2023

First term:

12 October 2018 -

11 October 2021

First term:

1 July 2019 - 30 June 2022

Number of meetings

attended/total number of

meetings applicable to

members term

4 / 4 4 / 4 4 / 4

Total annual remuneration $17,813* $5,720 $5,720

*The figure is inclusive of, not in addition to, the remuneration reported in KMP

23 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Academic Board The Academic Board is a subcommittee of the AFTRS Council.

Duties and Responsibilities

The functions, duties and responsibilities of the Academic Board are:

· Oversee the quality assurance of teaching, learning and research activities of the School

· Approve new curricula

· Approve major changes to courses of study

· Ensure curricula is designed to meet the standards of the higher education sector

· Review policies, procedures and guidelines related to the admission, enrolment, assessment, and progress of students in approved courses of study

· Make recommendations directly to the Chief Executive Officer and/or to the Council as appropriate relating to academic matters and student support

· Report on any issues referred by the Council or the Chief Executive Officer

· Make recommendations to Council regarding the conferring of degrees or any other award.

The Academic Board convened six meetings in 2020-21:

· 7 July 2020

· 2 September 2020

· 17 November 2020

· 12 February 2021

· 7 April 2021

· 29 June 2021

Composition The Academic Board consists of up to eight members, but not less than four members. It includes the independent chair, that is a higher education specialist with professorial qualifications; two or more independent members with higher education experience, which can include an appointee from independent members of AFTRS Council; the CEO; the staff-elected member of teaching staff; and the student-elected member of Council.

24 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Details of the Academic Board during the reporting period Current Report Period (2020-21)

Member name Membership type Qualifications,

knowledge, skills, or

experience

Relevant Term/s Number of meetings

attended/total number

of meetings applicable

to term

Prof. Mark Rose Independent

member of

Academic Board,

Academic Board

Chair

Dip. T, BA, M. Ed. Admin,

PhD RMITRMIT, College

of Business, School of

Management, Professor

of Management

10 March 2019 - 9

March 2022

6 / 6

Ms Rachael Weiss Independent

member of

Academic Board

BA (Hons) University

of Sydney University

of Sydney, University

Quality Manager

9 July 2018 - 8 July

2021

3/ 6

Assoc. Prof.

Christine Burton

Independent

member of

Academic Board

BA, M. Arts Admin,

PhD UTSUTS,

Associate Professor of

Management Discipline

Group and Associate

Dean Education of

Business School

8 December 2018 -

7 December 2021

6 / 6

Assoc. Prof.

Vaughan Rees

Independent

Member of

Academic Board

Dip. T, BFA, MA, PhD

James CookUNSW,

Associate Professor

of Art, and Design

and Associate Dean

International and

Engagement in Faculty of

Art and Design

8 December 2018 -

7 December 2021

5/ 6

25 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Member name Membership type Qualifications,

knowledge, skills, or

experience

Relevant Term/s Number of meetings

attended/total number

of meetings applicable

to term

Other members of the Academic Board

Dr Nell

Greenwood

- 6 / 6

Mr Simeon Bryan AFTRS staff-elected, teaching

staff member of

Academic Board

Senior Lecturer,

Cinematography

First term: 20

February 2020

- 19 February

2021Second and

final permitted

term:21 February

2021 - 19 February

2022

6 / 6

Ms Bethany

Stewart

AFTRS student-elected member of

Council Outgoing

Enrolled third-year

Bachelor of Arts Screen:

Production

28 April 2020 - 6

December 2020*

3/3

Ms Cleo Baldwin AFTRS student-elected member of

CouncilIncoming

Enrolled second-year

Bachelor of Arts Screen:

Production

19 April 2021 -18

April 2022

1/1

*Original term cessation date reported in 2019-20 was 27 April 2021. The student ceased to be a student of the School on 6 December 2020 and therefore ceased to be a Council member in accordance with the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 s 10(4).

26 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Executive Team The Chief Executive Officer manages the affairs of the School and oversees daily operations and activities according to the general policy approved by the Council. The CEO leads the Executive team, comprising divisional directors who manage key strategic and operational activities and report to the CEO.

· Chief Executive Officer Dr Nell Greenwood

As at 30 June 2021, the Executive team were:

· Director of Teaching & Learning Mr David Balfour

· Chief Financial Officer Mr Shomal Parekh

· Chief Technology Officer Vacant

· Director of Partnerships & Development Mr Con Apostolopoulos

· Director of First Nations & Outreach Dr Romaine Morton

· Director of People and Culture Ms Louise Hope

27 Section 4 Corporate Goverance

Organisation Chart

AFTRS COUNCIL

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Teaching and Learning

- Award Courses - Curriculum - Faculty - Faculty Development

- Industry Certificates - Program and Course Leaders - Program Resourcing - Short Courses

- Timetabling

Production, Technology and Information

- Business Applications and Infrastructure - CRM

- Facilities and Building Maintenance - Post Production - Producing Production Resources - Production Technology

- Sales and Distribution - Systems and Network - Technology Procurement - Tech Support

Partnerships and Development

- Alumni Engagment - Brand

- Business Development - Corporate Communications - Digital Content and Communications - Events and Program

- Industry Engagment - International - Internships - Marketing Campaigns

- Partnerships - Student Recruitment

Finance

- Financial Services

First Nations and Outreach

- Community Engagment - Cultural Awareness, Saftey and Educational Resources - Outreach

- Screen Diversity and Inclusion Network

People and Culture

- Human Resources - Information Services - Injury Managment - Library

- Organisation Development and Learning - Payroll

- Student Services - Workforce Planning - Work Health and Saftey

CEO Office

- Academic Governance - Corporate Governance - Policy

- Research - Secretariat - Strategy

28 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

5 Performance 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statement and Key Performance Criteria

Outcome 1

Support the development of a professional screen arts and broadcast culture in Australia, including through the provision of specialist industry-focused education, training, and research.

Program 1.1

Delivery of specialist education to meet the diverse creative needs of students and the skill requirements of industry by means of Award courses, activities and events and through its Open Program.

Delivery of Program 1.1

Program 1.1 is delivered through higher education award courses, industry skills courses and workshops, outreach and schools programs, corporate courses, and research activities and publications. Target groups comprise potential and current film, television and radio students, members of the screen and broadcast industry, cultural and industry partners, and Indigenous Australians.

Portfolio Budget Statement Performance Information

Performance criteria: 2020-21 Targets AFTRS 2020-21 Actuals

Outreach: Build awareness and

appreciation of Australian screen and

broadcast culture and empower all

Australians to tell their stories, wherever

they come from and whoever they are.

3,000 participants in AFTRS training 4,188 participants in AFTRS training.

50,000 views of AFTRS

content and events

4.7 million views of AFTRS

content and events.

10 partnerships a year to deliver

training nationally

>20 partnerships a year to deliver

training nationally.

Talent Development: Educate and

train new talent to ensure innovative,

relevant Australian content creators

are supported on their journey into the

screen and broadcast industry.

425 Award course

applications received

573 Award course

applications received.

300 new and ongoing Award course

student enrolments

401 of new and ongoing Award courses

student enrolments was achieved.

80% eligible completions 93% of eligible completions.

Industry Training: Ensure current

Australian screen and broadcast

practitioners have the highest levels

of skills required to compete in the

international marketplace.

200 industry practitioners 229 industry practitioners were trained

through Industry Certificates or Industry

Partnered workshops

Triennial consultation on national

skills requirements of industry

Undertaken in FY 2018-19.

The next consultation is due

in FY 2021-22

2 industry research projects per year 3 industry research projects undertaken

29 Section 5 Performance

30 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Annual Performance Statement: AFTRS 2020-21

Introductory Statement The Annual Performance Statement meets the requirements of paragraph 39 (1) (a) of the PGPA Act for the 2020-21 financial year and accurately represents AFTRS performance in accordance with subsection 39 (2) of the PGPA Act.

Entity Purpose AFTRS’ purpose is to provide high-quality education and training at a range of levels to advance the skills and knowledge of talented individuals and meet the evolving needs of Australia’s screen and broadcast industries. AFTRS educates and inspires the storytellers of the future and encourages innovative engagement with technology to disseminate those stories to audiences.

AFTRS meets the education and training needs of industry, delivers activities and programs for schools and Indigenous Australians, and partners with cultural and commercial institutions in joint initiatives making a unique contribution through its creative expertise and educational capacity.

AFTRS collaborates with industry to deliver relevant education and training opportunities and shares its facilities, services and resources with industry organisations, associations, and enterprises to support a diversity of developmental initiatives, activities, and events.

AFTRS conducts industry research, holds forums, and disseminates ideas to stimulate conversation about the converging screen and broadcast industries.

31 Section 5 Performance

Results Against Our Corporate Plan

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Finding Talent, Strategic Focus: 4.1 Outreach

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key

Activities

Performance Criterion

2020-21 Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

1 4.1.1

Find and

develop

new talent,

whatever their

background or

circumstance,

to contribute

to Australian

screen culture.

Develop and

implement

Outreach

Strategy

950 participants in

Youth programs/

Introductory courses/

Outreach courses

(including Talent

Camp)/ Indigenous

workshops and

training

597 participants.

Cancellations impacted participation numbers due to

the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, the School did

not run State Talent Camps in FY 2020-21, resulting

in a conservative collective impact of an estimated

330 participants.

· Youth course figures historically contribute to approx.

250 participants; however, no Youth courses were

undertaken in this FY due to COVID-19 restrictions or

concerns. Some Youth courses originally scheduled

on-site between December 2020 - January 2021

were forced to cancel due to a spike in COVID-19

cases at that time. The School made the difficult

decision to not proceed with the April 2021 School

Holiday Program due to the high risk of cancellation

and associated disruption. On-site resources

were directed to increased need connected

with Award courses catch-up due to COVID-19

related rescheduling.

· 324 participants in Introductory courses: The School

achieved growth in engagement due to a combination

of topic selection and exclusive online delivery.

· 273 individuals participated in Outreach courses,

which included workshops and access made possible

through multiple community partnerships, including

organisations such as: Centre for Stories, Edmund

Rice Centre, Footscray Community Arts Centre, Form

Dance Projects, Information & Cultural Exchange

(ICE), Wide Angle and My Place.

· State Talent Camp is a biennial activity usually

attracting well over 80 participants. In FY 2020-21,

the School facilitated the National Talent Camp, which

engages with far fewer selected participants than

the state project and involved 18 participants. Three

Short Course scholarships and four mentorships were

awarded to successful ‘Talent Campers’.

· 23 participants in Indigenous workshops and training

access. The School facilitated two workshops (VIC/

TAS and NSW/NT) of First Nations Filmmakers

Survival Kit training and a workshop for Mobile

Content Creation for Community; and provided four

Indigenous training access subsidies.

32 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key

Activities

Performance Criterion

2020-21 Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

2 2200 Unique users

to the Media Lab

website

2,199 Unique users to the Media Lab website.

Disappointingly, the target for the period was not met by

just one unique user.

The website had 2,180 new users on the platform and

reached 742 resource downloads.

In 2021, the School began reviewing and updating

existing resources, and with the involvement of the newly

formed Education Outreach Committee, endeavour to

reach more unique users in the coming FY.

Due to COVID-19 and the disruption in teaching for

schoolteachers across the country, the team focused

on developing new resources in place of marketing the

existing resources.

3 Run

workshop/

activities

6 AFTRS hosted

activities per year

10 AFTRS hosted activities with a focus on inclusion and

First Nations.

· 3 First Nations Masterclasses were held, including

guests: Gillian Moody, Mitchell Stanley, Mitch Torres,

and Lorena Allum.

· 4 sessions and presentations facilitated, including:

Elder-in-Residence session; First Nations Storytelling;

Industrial Light & Magic (NAIDOC week); Origins of

National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance

Committee with Dr Lou Bennett on Sovereign

Language Rematriation: Language Pedagogy through

song composition (NAIDOC week).

· 3 First Nations workshops were delivered for

filmmaking and content creation.

4 Review the

Student

Recruitment

Strategy

425 applications

for award courses

received

573 applications for award courses received.

5 25% of enrolled

students are first-in-family in higher

education (as at

census date)

10% of enrolled students were first-in-family (FIF) in

higher education as at census date, Semester 1, 2021.

Whilst not having met the target of 25%, this year’s

results are consistent with results in Semester 1, 2020.

· Of the new 2021 enrolled students, 6% were FIF.

· Of the 2020 cohort, 17 graduates were FIF.

Enrolment observation: This year, 59% of new enrolled

students had complete/incomplete higher education

award course, VET courses, and enabling or bridging

courses. These categories prevent a student from

qualifying as FIF.

33 Section 5 Performance

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key

Activities

Performance Criterion

2020-21 Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

6 15% of enrolments

are from outside NSW

(as at census date)

15% of enrolments were from outside of NSW as at

census date, Semester 1, 2021.

Enrolment observation: A comparison of the new student

enrolments from outside of NSW indicates a growing

awareness of AFTRS nationally, with 52 new student

enrolments in 2021, compared to 31 new student

enrolments in 2020 from outside NSW.

7 51% of enrolments

identify as female

or non-binary (as at

census date)

47% of enrolments identified as female or non-binary as

at census date.

Whilst not having met the target, there has been a 5%

improvement from the 2019-20 result of 42% female

enrolments.

AFTRS will continue to support initiatives aimed at

attracting more females into the industry. This will

include partnering with Women in Film and Television

(WIFT) and Raising Film, as well as sourcing and

promoting more inclusive scholarships aimed at

supporting study at AFTRS.

8 15% of enrolments

identify as CALD (as

at census date)

23% of enrolments identify as CALD as at census date,

Semester 1 2021.

9 Indigenous

student

recruitment

6 representations at

Indigenous career

expos/ career

expos/ community

engagement events/

Indigenous outreach

events

14 representations at Indigenous career expos/ career

expos/ community engagement events/ Indigenous

outreach events.

There were no First Nations specific expos in the period;

however, expos, where students come from various

cultural and socio-economic backgrounds, are actively

prioritised by the School.

Between July 2020 - March 2021, six expos were

cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Expos where

School representation was possible during that period,

included: C-A-C Online Workshop; My Journey Virtual

Career Expo; and Virtual Big Day In, Wangaratta.

2021 expos kicked off in April 2021, with two planned

expos requiring cancellation also due to the COVID-19

pandemic. Expos where School representation was

possible during that period, included: My Journey Virtual

Career Expo; Victorian Careers Expo; Hunter Valley

Careers Expo; Australian Virtual Careers Expo; HSC

and Careers Expo; Sydney Schools Career Convention;

C-A-C Careers Expo, Campbelltown; and Yr. 13 Expo.

Representations at community engagement and First

Nations outreach events included: the annual Yabun

Festival; an AFTRS hosted panel for the Australian

International Documentary Conference (AIDC) and

Screen NSW; and the First Nations Media Australia’s

Converge conference.

34 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key

Activities

Performance Criterion

2020-21 Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

10 5% of enrolments

identify as Indigenous

(as at census date)

5% of enrolled students identified as Indigenous as at

census date, Semester 1, 2021.

· 22 enrolled Indigenous students made up of eight

new students and 14 progressing students.

11 80% Indigenous

Student Retention

94% retention of Indigenous students was achieved.

12 4.1.2

Partner within

and outside

the industry to

identify talent

Pursue

community,

corporate,

education

and cultural

partnerships

10 community and

cultural partnerships

with diverse

organisations across

Australia per year

to offer workshops,

scholarships,

and other skills

development

opportunities.

>30 community and cultural partnerships with diverse

organisations across Australia were entered into during

the period to provide workshops, scholarships, and

other skills development opportunities.

This included partnerships with organisations such as:

ABC; Asia Education Foundation; Australian Writers

Guild (AWG); Campbelltown Arts Centre; Carriageworks’

Solid Ground; Centre for Stories; Commercial Radio

Australia (CRA); Cultural Exchange (ICE); Djed Press; Digi

Youth Arts; Documentary Australia Foundation; Edmund

Rice Centre; Film Victoria; Footscray Community Arts

Centre; Form Dance Projects; Kenneth Myer Fellowship

Trust; Lone Star Group; MyState Film Festival; Onbass

Media; Outloud; Screen Australia; Screen Canberra;

Screen NSW; Screen Queensland; Screen Tasmania;

Screen Territory; ScreenWest; Scripted Ink; South

Australian Film Corporation; We are the Mainstream; and

Wide Angle.

13 Scholarships 20 student

scholarships per year

57 scholarships were awarded in 2021.

A new approach to the delivery of available scholarships

was introduced in the period. The School commenced

two rounds of equity scholarships and initiated a review

of scholarship values and the number of scholarships

available. The final round of equity scholarships was

finalised on 28 June 2021.

· Scholarships are awarded for the specific

Scholarship/prize duration and are awarded based on

merit and/or equity.

· The School continues to maintain relationships,

ensuring another year of Scholarships with

existing partners, including: ABC; CRA; and

Onbass/Giant Steps.

· The School is also committed to exploring new

opportunities for the growth of its scholarship

program and has engaged a dedicated resource to

cultivate relationships and partnerships to broaden

the program’s reach.

See also Appendix 2. Scholarships

35 Section 5 Performance

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Developing Talent, Strategic Focus: 4.2 Talent Development

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

14 4.2.1

Offer world-class,

industry-relevant

education

and skills

Deliver BA,

Graduate Diploma

and MA Award

Courses

300 new

and ongoing

enrolments in

Award courses

401 of new and ongoing enrolments was achieved

in Award courses.

See also Appendix 1. Applications and Enrolments,

for complete student statistics

15 80% eligible

completions

93% of eligible completions.

See also Appendix 1. Applications and Enrolments;

and Appendix 4. 2020 AFTRS Graduates

16 80% Indigenous

student

completions.

83% Indigenous student completions.

17 Review and

implementation of

Teaching Learning

Plan

- The AFTRS Learning and Teaching Strategy (LTS)

2021 - 2026 was developed over the past year.

It sets out the key strategic goals to ensure the

School continues to achieve excellence in screen

and broadcast education.

The strategy is based on a pedagogy that fosters

AFTRS graduates’ unique combination of high-level craft skill and artistry.

The plan was developed following national and

international benchmarking, consultation with

industry, and AFTRS staff and students.

18 Develop and

implement a

Graduate Program

100 students

accessing

internships/

placements/

competition/

initiatives

110 opportunities were provided, consisting of

paid and unpaid internships, paid traineeships,

real positions/jobs, MA placements, Radio

work placements, competitions, and workshop

initiatives.

The AFTRS Graduate Program consists of paid

internships offered on a competitive basis to

graduating BAY3 students. At the end of 2020, five

students were offered paid internships at ABC,

Endemol Shine Australia, Fremantle Media, SBC,

and Sky News.

See also Appendix 3. Bridge to Industry

36 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

19 4.2.2

A curriculum

focused on

creativity and

entrepreneurship.

Creativity and

entrepreneurship

embedded into

curriculum through

all graduate

capabilities and

course learning

outcomes

2 course learning

outcomes make

references

to creativity/

entrepreneurship

2 course learning outcomes refer to creativity and

entrepreneurship.

Both Masters programs (MAS and MASB) contain

graduate capabilities that relate directly to notions

of creativity and entrepreneurialism.

· The MAS contains the capability: ‘Entrepreneurs

possessing the business skills and knowledge

of the industry to sustain long term careers and

generate opportunities for themselves and the

wider community’,

· The MASB contains the capability: ‘Creative

entrepreneurs possessing the business skills

and knowledge of industry, audiences and

customers, to sustain long term careers and

generate opportunities for themselves and the

wider community.’

· In addition, one of the hallmarks of the MASB

program is entrepreneurialism and business

acuity, with one branch of the program explicitly

devoted to the development of new business

ideas in a creative cultural landscape.

20 Teach students to

pursue audience

outcomes for their

work

2 episodic series

delivered in BA

2 episodic series were delivered in the period.

· BAY2, Semester 2 focus area was Episodic. The

students collaborated to produce two separate

episodic series for their production period,

responding to a set brief and style

bible requirements.

· The two episodic series produced in the period

were ‘What’s Your Flava?’ and ‘Life Goals’.

· Both episodic productions are being run

over several years, with each year creating a

separate series.

21 4.2.3

Generate an

inclusive culture

supporting

creative

risk-taking

Develop Wellbeing

and Creative

strategy

- Wellbeing and Creativity Strategy has

been developed, with several smaller pilot

projects commencing.

37 Section 5 Performance

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

22 Create a safe,

creative culture

for work and

study through

AFTRS Charter

commitments and

safe conversation

officer program

Minimum

of 7 Safe

Conversation

Officers (SCOs)

will be available

during the

semester with

1 supervision

session accessed

per semester

During FY 2020-21, the School increased its

numbers of listed SCOs to 211.

Each cohort was assigned two SCOs as a

particular contact for their production block call

sheets.

4 supervision sessions are scheduled throughout

the year, with attendance monitored by the

School’s Counsellor and Student Engagement

Managers.

23 Ensure accessible

and quality student

support, including

for students from

underrepresented

communities

80% eligible

completions for

students from

underrepresented

communities

91% eligible completions were achieved for

students from underrepresented communities.

24 80% of eligible

completions

for students

with special

consideration/

learning access

plan completions

92% of eligible completions were achieved for

students with special consideration/ learning

access plan completions.

25 Student Centre

provides support

for a minimum

of 100 students

per year

The Student Centre provided support for 287

students during the reporting period—Semester 2,

2020 and Semester 1, 2021.

· Pastoral Care and Financial Hardship continued

to be provided to eight Graduands during

January and February 2021 who were still

completing courses

Student support observation: In Semester 1,

2021, more than 180 students required support,

equalling 45% of the student cohort, indicating a

sharp rise in student need during the period.

1 SCO details for students https://libguides.aftrs.edu.au/StudentSupport/SCOs

38 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Supporting Talent, Strategic Focus: 4.3 Industry Training

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

26 4.3.1

Work with

industry to offer

relevant training

Partner in

training

delivery

10 training

partnerships

delivered

nationally

>25 partnerships were developed to provide training

nationally.

Partnerships ranged from a single to multiple

collaborations with organisations such as: Asia Education

Foundation; AWG; Bus Stop Films; Campbelltown Arts

Centre; Carriageworks’ Solid Ground; Centre for Stories;

Documentary Australia Foundation; Edmund Rice Centre;

Film Victoria; ICE; MyPlace; Outloud; Screen Australia;

Screen Canberra; Screen NSW; Screen Producers

Australia (SPA); Screen Queensland; Screen Tasmania;

Screen Territory; ScreenWest; Scripted Ink; South

Australian Film Corporation (SAFC); and We are

the Mainstream.

27 Inform training

with Industry

Advisory

Panels

30 participants in

Industry Advisory

Panels

47 participants across four Industry Advisory Panels

(IAPs) in 2021.

· IPAs are held twice a year to inform the direction of the

industry training program.

· 4 IAP meetings were held in September 2020.

· New IPAs were formed in 2021, and four meetings

were held over April and May 2021.

28 Triennial

consultation

on national

skills

requirements

of Industry

conducted

- The next consultation on national skill requirements of

Industry is due to be conducted FY2021-22.

See Application of learnings from Industry conducted

research

29 Application

of learnings

from Industry

conducted

research

- In response to feedback from the 2019 Skills Survey

conducted by AFTRS highlighting knowledge gaps and

an industry desire for short (i.e., less than one full day)

education offerings, the School continued to offer half-day Professional Development Seminars throughout FY

2020-21.

· 8 “Short, Sharp and Immediately Useful” (SSIU)

seminars were delivered on topics such as: Raising

Finance; Impact Producing; Inclusive Filmmaking; The

Business of Podcasting; Managing Creative Teams;

Social Media; and Ideation Testing and Validation.

39 Section 5 Performance

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

30 4.3.2

Upskill

practitioners

through

industry training

Offer Industry

Certificates

200 industry

practitioners

trained through

Industry

Certificates or

Industry Partner

workshops

229 industry practitioners were trained through Industry

Certificates or Industry Partner workshops.

· 120 practitioners completed Industry Certificates.

· 90 completed two Screen Business Essentials

Short Courses offered in partnership with SPA.

· 19 practitioners attended Indigenous

practitioner workshops.

31 Offer industry

short courses

1,100 Industry

Practitioners

undertaking

Industry Short

courses

1,539 industry practitioners undertook

industry short courses.

32 Offer industry

talks/

masterclasses

2,000 participants

in industry

masterclasses

2,019 participants in industry masterclasses.

The delivery format of Industry Masterclasses ranges

from workshops to talks and Q&A sessions, delivered

exclusively online due to the COVID-19 pandemic and

included:

· 3 internal student Masterclass events facilitated by

Teaching and Learning included sessions with Actor

and Producer Claudia Karvan; Artist in Residence

Lynette Wallworth; and organisation Australians in Film.

· 3 online Emerging, Gifted and X (EGX) Masterclasses

were facilitated by First Nations and Outreach Division.

The masterclasses featured some of the most

exceptional and talented screen creatives who come

from diverse backgrounds. Guests included: Violeta

Ayala; Linda Ung; and Tinzar Lywn.

· 12 external and internal student Masterclass events

were held and included a vast assembly of Industry

talent, including: Alexs Stadermann; Jacquie Trowell;

Richard Jeffery; Janine Cooper; and Cathie Scott;

Julie Hanna; Ben Ulm; David Galloway; Robyn Butler;

Wayne Hope; Zoë White; Sherree Philips; Julie-Anne

De Ruvo; Mia Stewart; Debbie Lee; Sophia Zachariou;

Alex Mitchell; Karla Arnall; Trisha Morton-Thomas,

Rachel Clements; Karina Holden; Jacob Hickey;

Stephen Oliver; Paul Weigard; Chloe Rickard;

Nathan Anderson; Angus Ross; Michael Carrington;

and Nick Forward.

40 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Supporting Talent, Strategic Focus: 4.3 Industry Training

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

· 3 First Nations-led Masterclasses were held, including

guests: Producer Mitchell Stanley; journalist, presenter

and producer, Lorena Allam; and Producer, Writer,

director, journalist, broadcaster, playwright and

presenter, Mitch Torres.

· Additionally, the external and student Masterclasses

drew further engagement with 2,216 participants

accessing Masterclasses through catch-up.

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Supporting Talent, Strategic Focus: 4.4 Research and Innovation

33 4.4.1

Explore new

frontiers of

storytelling,

technology,

and business

models

Generate and

run applied

industry

Innovation

projects

2 applied industry

innovation

projects per year

3 industry research projects were in progress during the

period.

The School launched the Artist-in-Residence program.

AFTRS Artist-in-Residence, Ms Lynette Wallworth’s

research project for the residency explores audio

narratives’ creative potential. The project invites the most

talented and creative storytellers in Australia to spend a

semester at the School and have the space, support, and

facilities to reflect on and test their craft.

· During FY 2020-21, the School commissioned

research by Parrot Analytics examining how Australian

content travels globally. Findings were presented at

SPA, Screen Forever conference in February 2021.

· AFTRS commissioned Career Pathways industry

research by Screen Audio Research Australia (SARA).

The research project was initiated in 2021, with

expected completion in FY 2021-22.

· In 2021 the School also appointed a Head of Research

who has commenced work on a Research Policy

Framework to establish and guide future activity and

Research Committee implementation.

41 Section 5 Performance

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

34 4.4.2

Establish

AFTRS as a hub

for innovation,

creativity, and

ideas

Generate

thought

leadership

activities

10 thought

leadership

activities/

representations in

industry forums/

panels/ guidelines

and papers per

year

40 thought leadership events and representations in

industry forums and panels

· 11 Online ‘Talks @ AFTRS’ masterclass events held

online featuring Industry leaders in conversation. These

were also converted into a podcast series.

· 6 ‘Meet The Creators’ events were held at AFTRS and

ACMI in Melbourne.

· 2 ‘Meet the Filmmaker’ online talks co-hosted with

Ausfilm and Netflix with visiting US Filmmakers.

· School representation at the Yabun Festival —an

annual celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander cultures in Australia.

· 3 ‘Emerging Gifted’ and X (EGX) online masterclass

events featured screen creatives from diverse

backgrounds.

· 1 AFTRS hosted and produced ‘Data Analytics’

session at Screen Producers Association (SPA) Screen

Forever conference.

· 3 papers were presented by six AFTRS Staff at the

screen and broadcast teaching conference, ASPERA.

· 5 AFTRS, Heads of Discipline are on related Guild

leadership boards.

· 7 workshops were delivered on Emerging Creative

Practice to the Asian Broadcasting Union.

· Representation at Radio Days Asia by three

AFTRS Radio staff.

See also Appendix 9. Public Program

42 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Effective Organisation, Strategic Focus: 4.5 Inclusion

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

35 4.5.1

Diversity

supported

across all school

activities

Review and

develop

Inclusion

Strategy;

includes the

review of the

four pillars

of Inclusion

Strategy:

Accessibility

Action Plan;

Reconciliation

Action plan;

LGBQI+ Action

Plan; and

First Nations

Strategy

- The Inclusion and Belonging Strategy has been

developed in collaboration with First Nations and

Outreach Division.

Staff and Student Network Groups have been launched.

Groups have been supported to develop action plans

that will commence implementation FY 2021-22.

36 Student diversity see 4.1.1

AFTRS Staff

composition

includes:

37 3% Indigenous; 3% Indigenous

This is an improvement of 1% since the previous

reporting period.

Throughout FY 2020-21, AFTRS sustained the

changes to improve this area by advertising every role

with the Koori Mail, actively maintaining relationships

with Indigenous recruitment agencies, and delivering

unconscious bias sessions to all recruitment panels and

decision-makers.

38 4% People living

with disability;

4% People living with disability.

In meeting the target, the figure has increased by 1%

since FY 2019-20.

This also has exceeded the Schools previous YoY

increases of 0.5%.

In FY 2020-21, work successfully continued to provide

clearer reasonable adjustments available via the online

recruitment system, the delivery of unconscious bias

sessions to all recruitment panels and decision-makers,

and to actively maintain ongoing relationships with

specialist recruitment agencies and the Australian

Network on Disability.

43 Section 5 Performance

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

39 25% CALD; and 26% Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) was

achieved, maintaining the result from FY 2019-20,

which was a 3% increase from the prior year.

The School benefited from the recruitment strategy

employed during the period, delivering unconscious

bias sessions to all recruitment panel participants and

decision-makers, and actively maintaining ongoing

relationships with specialist recruitment agencies.

40 51% of people in

leadership roles

identify as female

or non-binary

48% of people in leadership roles identifying as female

or non-binary.

While the School did not meet the target, the School

maintained the ground made in the prior period. In FY

2020-21, the School made efforts to improve this area

by actively seeking women or non-binary identifying

individuals for available leadership and traditionally

male-dominated roles, introducing the unconscious

bias sessions for all recruitment panels participants and

decision-makers, and ensuring all recruitment panels

have gender balance.

41 >85% Staff

Retention (*<15%

Staff Turnover)

90% retention / 10% staff turnover.

This is the first year of reporting on this measure.

42 Promotion of

First Nations

culture

throughout the

School through

recognition of

First Nation

events, cultural

competency

training, and

First Nations

curriculum

included into

Award courses.

- The first 12 months of the First Nations and

Outreach Division has been a period of revision of

prior understanding of First Nations cultures within

AFTRS to identify how First Nations cultural values

can be embedded within AFTRS in a meaningful and

transformative way.

Activities include internal engagement with key

stakeholders, interrogating systems, and contracting

external First Nations senior consultants and knowledge

holders.

The transition from cultural competency to one

of cultural safety has focused on innovating and

reinvigorating School culture by repositioning First

Nations community governance models, beliefs,

knowledges, and technologies as central to our

methodology.

43 Support

good practice

through the

School’s five

diversity and

inclusion

network groups

5 key projects per

year undertaken

by diversity and

inclusion network

groups

Whilst launched in FY 2020-21, the network groups’

deliverables were purposefully delayed until FY 2021-

22, accommodating the return to the School building

and the introduction of flexible work arrangements.

The groups formed include: Access (Neuro-Diverse/

Disability /Carers); CALD/POC; First Nations; LGBTQI+;

Older Adults (45+); and Women.

44 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Effective Organisation, Strategic Focus: 4.6 Operations

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

44 4.6.1

Ensure an

efficient and

effective

financially

sustainable

organisation

Develop

Divisional

Business Plans

under the new

structure

25% of AFTRS

funding is made

up of own-source

revenue

25% of AFTRS funding is made up of own-source

revenue.

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the School’s

anticipated ability to substantively exceed the target.

In 2020, to further develop the AFTRS business

development action plan, the School engaged a

Business Development Manager, supported by two

Account Coordinators, to build sustainable alternative

revenue streams that complement AFTRS’ core

offering.

45 Undertake

School

resources audit

- The School undertook and completed a building and

technology audit as an initial phase of developing a

resources plan to ensure that the School’s infrastructure

is fit-for-purpose and supports the ambitions of the

new Corporate Plan.

46 Annual review

of Technology

Plan and Capital

Expenditure

Plan

- The School reviewed and implemented its annual

Technology Plan and completed a rolling 5-Year CapEx

Plan.

The annual planning and budgeting calendar was

reviewed, including the budget setting process for

Revenue, Capex and Opex, and identifies compliance

to deadlines (PBS, Corp Plan, FY Budget, Reforecast,

MYEFO).

45 Section 5 Performance

Criterion Source: Corporate Plan 2020-21, Effective Organisation, Strategic Focus: 4.7 Communications

Ref

Line

Desired

Result

Key Activities Performance

Criterion 2020-21

Targets

Result Against

Performance Criteria

47 4.7.1

Position AFTRS

as a leading

international

centre of

innovation in

education for

the screen

and broadcast

industries

Development

of Alumni

Engagement

Strategy

4 Alumni

screening /events

1 Alumni event was held during the year— AFTRS

Alumni Reunion.

The AFTRS Alumni Film Club had their 2020 scheduled

screenings cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic,

and these screenings did not resume in 2021 also due

to the pandemic.

Over the last year, the School has developed an

Alumni Engagement Strategy —a 3-year plan to create

a dynamic, sustainable alumni community through

improved communications, networking, and promotion.

48 Build traffic

through AFTRS

communication

channels

3% increase to

AFTRS website

traffic

AFTRS website traffic decreased during the period by

8.3%.

A significant contributor to the result was a 13.52%

decline in traffic to Short course pages owing to the

reduced Short course offering due to the COVID-19

pandemic. However, there was a focused approach

to content marketing through mechanisms such as

news, blogs, social media, improved SEO, and monthly

newsletter. While the school experienced an overall

traffic downturn, interest in MA was up by 14.83%,

BA by 296.1%, Blogs traffic increased by 51%, and

interest in AFTRS alumni (news and search) recorded

an increase of 67.37%.

49 3 million views of

AFTRS content

across platforms

4.7M content views across all platforms —FB, Twitter,

YouTube, Instagram, and LinkedIn.

The School has exceeded the content views target

for the period, achieving significant growth across all

social platforms. LinkedIn continues to be AFTRS’

fastest growing platform, with Instagram and YouTube

following closely. Facebook played a vital role for the

School in FY 2020-21, with regular masterclasses and

panel discussions streamed live for participants.

46 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Analysis of Performance Against Purpose

In 2020-21, the performance targets set in the 2020-21 Corporate Plan, both qualitative and quantitative, were principally completed, in some cases exceeding targets set. Of the 47 key activities and associated performance criteria targets, 8 were not met by the School. 39 of the targets were achieved, accomplishing 83% completion, an increase of 5% on the previous period.

The School experienced an improvement in its staff and student diversity composition, meeting most targets in the areas such as Indigenous, people living with disability, CALD, and enrolments outside of NSW. However, a shortfall was experienced in the staffing category of women or non-binary in a leadership position and the student category of women or non-binary in enrolments. Whilst both categories either saw the School maintain the percentage achieved in the previous year or experience an increase of 5% in the result, both shortfalls ranged between 3% - 4% from the target. Another student category falling short of the target was first-in-family in higher education. This category has a high threshold for a student to meet classification, which impacted the expected figures. However, the overall improvements indicate that reach, a more accessible application process, and the staff recruiting processes are having a positive impact on student and staff composition.

In the period, the School encountered an overall decline in the website traffic, having been impacted by a condensed short course offering due to COVID-19 restrictions and the progressive easing of the visitation rate against those pages. However, the compressed offering saw an increase in traffic of 14.83% to MA pages and an increase of 296% to BA pages, demonstrating improved engagement with the Schools offering of Awards courses.

Online participation in training and masterclasses exceeded anticipated results; this is particularly pleasing given the COVID-19 pandemic caused significant disruption during the period, requiring the School, where possible, to limit or reschedule and, in many circumstances, cancel regular programs or not move forward with opportunities. COVID-19 has had a bearing on overall participation numbers reflected in some of the activity participation categories in the performance statement.

The School’s strategic direction is to deliver against the School’s key impact agendas. This included having provided high-level, partnered training across Australia, growing own source revenue, continued engagement with the national and international screen and broadcast industry, advancing inclusion, belonging, and our First Nations culture and supporting innovation across the sector. The areas of strategic focus are detailed in AFTRS’ four-year Corporate Plan for the period 2021-25.

47 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

6 Statutory Reporting Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO - Workplace Diversity)

The Diversity Taskforce was formally disbanded, and a review commenced to identify new and best practice models for inclusion and belonging at AFTRS. Initially established in 2017 to increase the diversity of our staff and students, the taskforce had over 40 engaged staff members, and over the course of four years, continued to identify and address opportunities to make the School a more inclusive environment.

Following a formal review in 2019-20, the School launched six network groups to staff and students to foster belonging and ensure a support network in the AFTRS community and a safe space for strategic information and idea-sharing to empower relevant groups within AFTRS and industry-wide. The Network Groups include both staff and students and are supported to work on discreet projects aimed at empowering, educating, and highlighting the value of each group, making AFTRS a more supportive, safe, and inclusive space for all. The Inclusion Taskforce was launched to coordinate inclusion activity strategically across the School, acting as the steering committee for the Network Groups. The Taskforce works cohesively to identify potential issues/barriers to inclusion and work with the Network Groups to look at and recommend solutions.

Each of the Network Groups has designated staff and student co-chairs. Membership for each group has started to build, and simple mechanisms for joining, meeting, and sharing information have been developed. Each group has commenced discussions around key

actions and initiatives they would like to work on during the coming financial year.

The People and Culture Team continued to embed practices within the recruitment process to help panel members consider and identify unconscious bias. This resulted in strong, diverse recruitment outcomes, with 69 roles filled by 58% women, 22% from non-English speaking backgrounds, 3% Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples, and 3% people living with disability.

Making AFTRS a safe and inclusive space for First Nations candidates and candidates with a disability remains a priority for AFTRS, with further inclusive recruitment strategies rolled out to support First Nations candidates and neuro-diverse people. The School partnered with Bus Stop Films to pilot a Production Internship program, intending to build an employment pathway into the School for people living with disability.

The School continues to work hard to create an environment where everyone can bring their whole selves to work, regardless of gender, cultural identity, age, sexual preference, work style or whether they identify as having a disability. The School has continued to provide development opportunities to all staff to increase their knowledge and confidence when working with all individuals. This included Inclusion in Action workshops in partnership with Bus Stop Films and Autism Awareness Training collaborating with Xceptional.

48 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

AFTRS continues to seek staff input through multiple forums, including the staff survey, onboarding and exit surveys, the Staff Consultative Committee, the WHS Committee and Monthly Staff drop-in sessions.

Workplace Culture and Communication The People and Culture Team continued their focus on embedding the Work Culture Strategy and ensuring values alignment in all that we do, with activities including:

· Establishing and supporting the staff and student Network Groups

· Continuing to refine and embed flexible work practices across the School to support connection and collaboration

· Leading a review and School-wide consultation on the AFTRS Values to ensure alignment to the new Corporate Strategy

· Delivering the Staff Survey and leading debrief and action planning activities to respond to staff feedback and continue to make AFTRS an inclusive, safe, supportive, and welcoming environment

· Rolling out workshops to both staff and students with a focus on building capability around inclusion best practice

· Consulting on and developing a creativity and wellbeing strategy which aims to improve staff and student wellbeing and boost personal and professional creative outcomes, ensuring the long-term sustainability of individuals within the school community and AFTRS

· Continuing to roll out a school-specific leadership program to support People Leaders and equip them with the capability to support effectively, coach, develop and motivate staff to achieve performance goals

· Continuing to roll out and promote the Workplace Giving Program and a Volunteer Day to bring the values of “Together” and “Generosity” to life. The volunteer day aims to provide staff with opportunities to connect externally and bring learning back to the School to improve the student experience

· Review and revise the staff-led Reward and Recognition Program to recognise and celebrate values-led performance and excellence in teaching and support.

The team also continued to work on moving manual, paper-based processes into the online HRIS system. This has streamlined the completion and approval process, as well as increasing compliance and timeliness.

The CEO’s Office led further work to bring staff together to consult and provide input to the new Corporate Strategy. This was well-received, with staff feeling valued and engaged.

To ensure clear and consistent communication and connection throughout the pandemic, we implemented more regular all-staff meetings, with monthly Town Halls and monthly all-staff drop-in sessions to allow staff to ask questions, share concerns and connect with colleagues from across the School. This practice has been well received and is expected to continue post-COVID.

The AFTRS online anonymous whistleblowing form did not receive any reports during this period. In addition, individual email addresses were advertised for Authorised Officers to receive complaints under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 2013. We have promoted this channel on the staff intranet and our website. No Public Interest Disclosure reports were received this year.

49 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

Staffing, Establishment and Appointments The beginning of FY 2020-21 saw an organisational restructure with the structure of the Executive team changing along with their teams. The organising principle for teams and work is now around the student experience, and each Executive now has KPIs relating to the student experience. This change saw the Executive team reduce from nine to six, with an even make-up of male and female.

As at 30 June 2021, there was 160 staff at AFTRS, 53 of whom worked part-time (a slight decrease from last year). Staff from non-English speaking backgrounds occupied 41 positions at all levels across the School (a decrease of one from the previous year), six were occupied by people identifying as having a disability (an increase of two to the prior year), and three members of staff identified as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (no change from last year).

Overall, the representation of women at AFTRS has decreased slightly from 59% to 58% of staff.

The percentage of leadership positions held by women has remained unchanged at 48% this reporting period. Women in lecturer roles have decreased from 71% to 65%, with 46% of Senior Lecturer roles occupied by women, and the number of women occupying technical roles has remained at three.

AFTRS’ staff members are selected on merit. Of the 69 appointments AFTRS made during the year, 40 were women, 15 were from a non-English speaking background, two were from an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander background, and two identified as having a disability. All equity-related policies are available on AFTRS’ intranet.

The AFTRS Corporate Plan commits the School to ensure that AFTRS reflects Australian society by supporting diversity across the School’s activities. AFTRS will continue to put measures in place to ensure that its processes and culture facilitate this commitment and track progress against its inclusion and belonging objectives.

Comparison Tables

All Ongoing and Non-Ongoing Employees

All Ongoing Employees Current

Report Period 2020-21

NSW

Male Full-time 34

Part-time 6

Total Male 37

Female Full-time 33

Part-time 15

Total Female 48

Indeterminate Full-time -

Part-time -

Total Indeterminate -

Total 85

NSW

Male Full-time 30

Part-time 7

Total Male 37

Female Full-time 31

Part-time 11

Total Female 42

Indeterminate Full-time -

Part-time -

Total Indeterminate -

Total 79

All Ongoing Employees in Previous

Report Period 2019-20

50 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

NSW

Male Full-time 22

Part-time 8

Total Male 30

Female Full-time 21

Part-time 24

Total Female 45

Indeterminate Full-time -

Part-time -

Total Indeterminate -

Total 75

NSW

Male Full-time 23

Part-time 10

Total Male 33

Female Full-time 25

Part-time 26

Total Female 51

Indeterminate Full-time -

Part-time 2

Total Indeterminate 2

Total 86

All Non-Ongoing Employees Current

Report Period 2020-21

All Non-Ongoing in Previous

Report Period Employees 2019-2020

Staffing Information

Staffing Information: 2020-21

As at 30 June 2021 Male Female X Total NESB

Senior Management* 3 3 - 6 1

Management/Heads of Department 16 7 - 23 5

Teaching 14 26 - 40 11

Teaching/Training Support 2 21 - 23 5

Administration 14 27 - 41 13

Technical 13 3 - 16 5

Production 3 4 - 7 -

Support 2 - - 2 1

Education - 2 - 2 -

Total 67 93 0 160 41

*Includes 1 PEO

51 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

Staffing Information: 2019-20

As at 30 June 2020 Male Female X Total NESB

Senior Management* 2 4 - 6 -

Management/Heads of Department 13 9 - 22 6

Teaching 16 28 - 44 10

Teaching/Training Support 4 21 1 26 5

Administration 13 28 1 42 15

Technical 12 3 - 15 5

Production 3 2 - 5 -

Support 2 - - 2 1

Education 1 2 - 3 -

Total 66 97 2 165 42

*Includes 1 PEO

Staff are employed at AFTRS under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973. The majority of staff are covered by the AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2017, with three staff on Individual Flexibility Arrangements or Individual Variable Remuneration.

SES equivalent staff are employed on a maximum term contract basis.

The appointed holder of the Principal Executive Office is covered by a performance appraisal scheme, which allows for an annual performance-related payment.

Representation of EEO Target Groups within Salary Bands

Representation of EEO Target Groups within Salary Bands: 2020-21

Salary Band as at

30 June 2021

NESB ATSI PWD Women LGBTQIA+

To $45,619 - - 1 - -

$45,620 - $59,934 - - 2 2 -

$59,935 - $63,814 - - 2 - -

$63,815 - $85,245 10 1 - 29 8

$85,246 - $97,064 9 0 0 13 2

$97,065 - $119,295 17 2 3 33 8

Over $119,295 5 1 - 24 5

Total 41 4 6 93 23

52 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Representation of EEO Target Groups within

Salary Bands: 2019-20

Salary Band as at

30 June 2020

NESB ATSI PWD Women LGBTQIA+

To $45,619 - - - - -

$45,620 - $59,934 1 - 1 2 -

$59,935 - $63,814 1 - - 3 -

$63,815 - $85,245 12 - - 35 10

$85,246 - $97,064 10 1 1 20 5

$97,065 - $119,295 12 2 2 24 7

Over $119,295 6 - - 13 2

Total 42 3 4 97 24

The tables above show the representation of the five EEO target groups (Non-English- Speaking Background (NESB), Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI), People with a Disability (PWD), Women, and LGBTQIA+ status of the AFTRS staff. The data is drawn from information provided voluntarily each February.

Work and Private Commitments

AFTRS has a flexible work policy to accommodate private commitments by offering part-time work, job sharing, home-based work, flexible working hours, personal leave (which can also be used for religious/cultural observances), and recreation leave at half-pay, and leave without pay. AFTRS also allows individual flexibility based on genuine agreement.

53 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

Remuneration Information The following tables cover the arrangements for Key Management Personnel, other Executives, and other highly paid staff.

Remuneration for Key Management Personnel

Short-term Benefits Post-

employment

Benefits

Other long-term

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Name

Position Title

Base Salary *BonusesOther Benefits and Allowances Superannuation Contributions Long Service Leave Other Long-Term Benefits TOTAL REMUNERATION

Nell Greenwood

Chief Executive Officer

302,779 - - 22,253 12,789 - - 337,821

Shomal Parekh

Director, Finance &

Technology / Chief

Financial Officer

243,654 - - 21,488 - - - 265,142

Russell Howcroft

Chair of Council

52,714 - - 5,013 - - - 57,727

Carole Campbell

Council Member /

Chair of Finance, Audit

and Risk Management

Committee

42,687 - - 4,060 - - - 46,747

Annabelle Herd

Council Member

26,357 - - 2,506 - - - 28,863

Peter Tonagh

Council Member

24,537 - - 2,283 - - - 26,820

Chris Oliver-Taylor

Council Member

26,357 - - 2,506 - - - 28,863

Tanya Hosch

Council Member

26,357 - - 2,506 - - - 28,863

Bethany Stewart

Council Member

11,411 - - 1,084 - - - 12,195

Cleo Baldwin

Council Member

5,352 - - 511 - - - 5,863

Total 762,204 - - 64,210 12,789 - - 839,204

*For the CEO and CFO, the Base Salary incudes accrued annual leave.

54 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Remuneration for Senior Executives

Short-term Benefits Post-

employment

Benefits

Other Long-term

Benefits

Termination

Benefits

Remuneration Band Number of Senior Executives Average Base Salary* Average Bonuses Average Other Benefits and Allowances Average Superannuation ContributionsAverage Long Service Leave Average Other Long- Term Benefits Average Termination Benefits AVERAGE TOTAL REMUNERATION

$0 -$220,000 4 103,207 - - 9,120 94 0 0 112,421

$220,001 -

$245,000

2 210,165 - - 18,644 2,422 - - 231,231

*The Average Base Salary incudes accrued annual leave.

Remuneration for Other Highly Paid Staff

Nil to report.

Remuneration for the Council Members, including the Council Chair and Chair of Academic Board, is set by the Remuneration Tribunal as outlined in the Remuneration Tribunal (Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Part-time Public Office) Determination 2020 as at 30 June 2021.

Remuneration for the Principal Executive Officer is also set by the Remuneration Tribunal as outlined in the Principal Executive Offices— Classification Structure and Terms and Conditions Determination that may vary from time to time.

The Principal Executive Officer may also be eligible for up to 15% annual performance payment pending a performance review with the Chair of the Council.

Remuneration at all other levels, including the Senior Executive level, is assessed using the Mercer Job Evaluation System, ensuring job analysis and evaluation consistency. Assessments are conducted by the People and Performance team. Senior Executive assessments are reviewed by the Principal Executive Officer, who is the decision-maker on Senior Executive remuneration.

The primary aim of the evaluation process is to provide a means of applying appropriate and equitable rates of remuneration to all employees at all levels, considering both the School environment and the broader Australian Public Sector as a whole.

55 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

Staff Training and Development The Performance Conversations and Professional Development Planning Program is core to staff training and development. This FY saw a continued focus on capacity building workshops and “just in time” one to one coaching and training delivered internally as a response to the ongoing COVID-19 situation and online teaching delivery. COVID-19 also impacted staff’s ability to attend external training and conferences, which remained significantly lower than usual.

Professional Development

Professional Development Type # Attended # Attendees Total Cost

Internally Facilitated Workshops 46 508 $59,325

Externally Facilitated Workshops 29 157 $78,966

Conferences 6 35 $8,727

Total 81 699 $147,018

Average expenditure per attendee $210

Average expenditure per FTE $1,014

A combined total of 113 days of Professional Development Leave —an entitlement under the Enterprise Agreement, and study leave were approved for 11 members of staff: one staff member working on a Diploma, one staff member working on a Bachelor Degree, two staff members working on a Graduate Certificate; four staff members working on their Masters Degrees, and three staff working on their PhD submissions. This is a 117% increase from last year and a 264% increase from FY 2018-19, demonstrating a clear and continued commitment to supporting the continuing professional development of staff.

In addition to developing core capabilities such as leadership and customer service, staff participated in a range of training relevant to the changing COVID-19 work environment.

Training undertaken included:

· Project Management Training

· Conflict Management and Mediation Skills

· Inclusivity training including, Neurodiversity Training and Inclusion in Action Workshops

· Productivity and Wellbeing Workshops

· Online Classroom Management

· Zoom training

· Leadership Training

· Risk Management Training

· Counselling Fundamentals

· First Aid Training

· Mental Health First Aid Training

56 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Industrial Relations AFTRS continued to refine and improve the way we involve staff in decision-making processes. The School has staff elected members on the governing Council, Academic Board, and the Staff Consultative Committee. Staff representatives have input through various committees, including the Health and Safety Committee, Staff Consultative Committee, Inclusion Taskforce, HR and Union Representatives meetings and the Employee Voice forums with HR and the CEO. Staff input is also provided through regular departmental and divisional meetings. Also, when the School is seeking input about change, extensive and detailed consultation takes place, and anonymous methods of providing comments have also been made available.

Information is available to staff primarily through email, noticeboards, the AFTRS intranet, and website, and ‘all School’ meetings

The Modern Award and Agreement Making

Minimum staff terms and conditions of employment are currently established by the Australian Government Industry Award 2016, containing provisions specific to the School. This took effect in August 2016, replacing the AFTRS Award 2000.

The AFTRS Enterprise Agreement 2017 has been in place since the Fair Work Commission formally approved it in March 2018. This contains the terms and conditions for all AFTRS employees, excluding SES staff.

Work Health and Safety AFTRS continues to identify and promote best practice work health and safety (WHS) management and is committed to reducing workplace-related incidents, illnesses, and injuries. AFTRS is committed to implementing and adherence to all relevant government WHS policy and legislation.

During 2020-21, several documents were developed or reviewed, including the following:

· Workplace Bullying and Harassment

· Student Handbook - including all safety information

· Flexible Work Arrangements Policy

· Business Continuity Plan

· Pandemic-related procedures including:

- COVIDSafe plan - COVID Risk and Threat Assessment - COVIDSafe Production Protocols - Room and space assessment to safeguard

social distancing - COVIDSafe sign-in procedure for Staff, Students and Guests.

A program of ongoing review continued, including risk assessment processes; ergonomic assessments - particularly important with staff working from home; identification and examination of high-risk activities; emergency evacuation and critical incident drills; handling of hazardous chemicals; and workplace inspections. Measures were taken to address identified risks as required.

The School is a member of the Cultural Institutions Health and Safety network, the Commonwealth Safety Managers Forum, and the Comcare Health and Safety Forum.

57 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

WHS Consultation The Health and Safety Committee, the key consultative body for WHS issues, held regular meetings during the reporting period. Staff are represented on the Committee by Health and Safety Representatives from each division (workgroup) within the School and senior management and executive representatives.

All Health and Safety Representatives have undergone training. Two Executive team members attend Committee meetings and report directly back to the Executive team on health and safety-related issues.

AFTRS staff have access to the minutes and action tracker via the AFTRS intranet, and the representatives share outcomes with their teams after each meeting. Staff are also regularly consulted on health and safety-related issues by their managers or specialist staff.

Staff are encouraged to communicate WHS concerns, either directly to the committee or through their representatives, and are welcome to attend meetings. The Senior First Aid Officer group meets prior to each Health and Safety Committee meeting and reports to the larger meeting.

WHS Personnel As part of AFTRS’ commitment to health and safety, the School currently has the following trained personnel:

· 11 Health and Safety Representatives

· 7 Senior First Aid Officers plus Contract Security Officers

· 45 Mental Health First Aid Officers

· 21 Safe Conversation Officers

· 20 Emergency Wardens

· 3 Rehabilitation Case Managers.

Safe Conversation Officers and Mental Health First Aid Officers have access to quarterly counselling supervision to ensure they feel adequately supported.

Incident Reports During 2020-21, there were 28 incidents reported, which remains consistent from last year. However, considering COVID-19 restrictions, and the number of staff and students working and learning remotely, and noting an increasing number of reports from students, this result reflects the ongoing work of the Committee and the Production team to encourage a collective community safety culture with staff and students reporting all hazards, near misses and incidents they observe or encounter.

One incident was reportable as it resulted in hospitalization (trip injury reported below), and all are closed. We continued to streamline the incident reporting process and early identification of issues through the WHS Committee. We also maintained a clear focus on mental health and well-being throughout the COVID period to identify issues early.

There were no lost-time injuries; however, one worker’s compensation claim was related to a trip injury lodged during 2020-21. Absences were minimal, with the employee utilising flexible work options to remain engaged. The employee has a case manager assigned to ensure ongoing support and monitoring.

58 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Privacy

Freedom of Information AFTRS also publishes information resulting from FOI access requests, information to which AFTRS routinely gives access in response to FOI access requests, and information routinely provided to Parliament. AFTRS’ website offers details of the information published under the IPS requirements at https://www.aftrs.edu.au/ governance/freedom-of-information

Formal requests may also be made for information about AFTRS and its operations under the FOI Act. These requests are referred to AFTRS’ FOI officer. AFTRS received one FOI request during the reporting period.

AFTRS is subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and, under Part II of the FOI Act, is required to publish a broad range of information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). AFTRS displays a plan on its website that shows what information it publishes per the IPS requirements. This information includes details of AFTRS’ structure, functions, appointments, annual reports, consultation arrangements, and FOI officer.

AFTRS collects five broad categories of personal information: personal records, contractor records, student records, volunteer records, and mailing lists.

AFTRS continued to comply with its obligations under the Privacy Act 1988 concerning collecting, use, disclosure, quality, security, access to and correction of personal information. AFTRS also continued to take relevant Privacy Commissioner Guidelines into account in dealing with personal information.

AFTRS received no complaints under the Privacy Act 1988 during the reporting period.

Ministerial Directions and Government Policies Ministerial directions may be issued under specific provisions of the School’s enabling Act or another Commonwealth legislation. During the reporting period, no ministerial directions that applied to the School were issued under the enabling or other Commonwealth legislation.

Under section 22 of the PGPA Act, no government policy orders applied to the School during the reporting period.

59 Section 6 Statutory Reporting

Judicial Decisions and Reviews by Outside Bodies There were no judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that have had or may have a significant effect on the operations of AFTRS.

Fraud Control During the reporting period, AFTRS maintained its Fraud Control Policy and two-year Fraud Control Plan. The Policy and Plan reflected the fraud risk assessment prepared by AFTRS.

AFTRS management is satisfied that AFTRS has appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting, and data collection procedures and processes that meet AFTRS’ specific needs and that all reasonable measures are taken to minimise the incidence of fraud within AFTRS.

Indemnities and Insurance Premiums for Officers Professional Indemnity Insurance and Directors and Officers Liability insurance for the year ending 30 June 2021 was provided by Comcover. The premium for liability insurance was $52,440.

Environmental Management AFTRS continues to identify aspects of its operations that impact on the environment. The School is committed to developing a continual improvement process to control its environmental impacts concerning energy, water, and waste management through its Environmental Management Plan. In preparing its new five-year strategy to be launched in the second half of 2021, AFTRS has included environmental initiatives as part of its ‘Sustainability’ pillar.

The AFTRS program of environmental activities aims for:

· Recording energy use to identify energy efficiency opportunities

· Low-landfill output due to recycling programs and reuse of materials

· Lower water usage through preventive maintenance programs

· Continued environmentally friendly disposal of all obsolete computer and production equipment

· Increased awareness of our commitment to sustainability —informing staff and students through the Environmental Management Plan, based on ecologically sustainable development (ESD) principles.

No reports about AFTRS were made by the Auditor-General (other than a report on the financial statements), a Parliamentary Committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman, or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

60 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Environmental Performance Reporting

Activity Alignment with ESD principles Advancement of ESD principles

Managing contracts

Tenders and contracts for potential suppliers contain environmental evaluation and conditions

Procurement decisions and contracting integrates long-term environmental aims

Environmental Management Plan implementation

Review and modify environmental policies and management plans Provides the basis of our environmental management

program

Maintain initiatives from plan Provides a plan and target for

initiatives and energy use

Energy efficiency

AFTRS has the following initiatives in place to reduce energy consumption:

· Switchable lighting so unused areas can be switched off

· Signage to inform staff and students to switch off lights and equipment

· Low energy LED lighting replacement program

· Motion sensors for lighting and mechanical services to reduce overrunning in unused areas

· Routine maintenance of the air-conditioning systems to ensure they run efficiently and as designed

Collection and review of consumption data manually on-site and periodical energy audits

Waste AFTRS continues to implement recycling programs that separate waste at source and aim to reduce waste by providing kitchen areas with crockery and utensils and reducing waste to landfill by encouraging recycling

Ensuring engagement with staff on environmental matters and maintaining the program

Water AFTRS makes use of water-efficient devices, including showerheads, dual flush toilets, water-saving washers on taps and low-water usage dishwashers

Monitoring water consumption and encouraging efficient use

61 Section 7 Financial Statements

7 Financial Statements Contents Certification

Primary financial statements

Statement of Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Cash Flow Statement

Overview

Notes to the financial statements

Financial Performance

1 Expenses 2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

Financial Position

3 Financial Assets 4 Non-Financial Assets 5 Payables 6 Interest Bearing Liabilities

Funding

7 Appropriations

People and Relationships

8 Employee Provisions 9 Key Management Personnel Remuneration 10 Related Party Disclosures

Managing Uncertainties

11 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 12 Fair Value Measurement 13 Financial Instruments

Other Information

14 Current/Non-Current Distinction For Assets and Liabilities 15 Assets Held In Trust

62 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

63 Section 7 Financial Statements

64 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

65 Section 7 Financial Statements

Statement of Comprehensive Income

For the year ended 30 June 2021

NOTES

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 1A 17,753 17,233 16,799

Suppliers 1B 8,665 6,474 10,090

Depreciation and amortisation 4A 6,571 6,370 6,539

Finance costs 1C 695 742 698

Write-down and

impairment of other assets 1D 51 152 -

Total expenses 33,735 30,971 34,126

Own-source income

Own-source revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 2A 8,327 7,739 8,785

Interest 2B 58 180 74

Other revenue 23 82 18

Total own-source revenue 8,408 8,001 8,877

Gains

Reversal of write-downs

and impairment

2C - 60 -

Total gains - 60 -

Total own-source income 8,408 8,061 8,877

Net cost of services 25,327 22,910 25,249

Revenue from Government 2D 25,059 22,605 25,059

Deficit on continuing operations (268) (305) (190)

66 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

NOTES

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification

to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation reserve 43 910 -

Total other comprehensive income 43 910 -

Total comprehensive income/(loss) (225) 605 (190)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

All variances above $150k and 2% of the relevant category are considered significant and explained below:

Employee benefits: expenses were higher than budget by $954k (2.8% of Total expenses) primarily due to the mix between

casual staff and contractors that were engaged during the year. Specifically, AFTRS used more casual staff (categorised

as Employee benefits) and fewer contractors (categorised as Suppliers) than expected. Additionally staff members took

less annual leave and long service leave than expected due to COVID-19 restrictions, thereby increasing salary and wages

expense.

Suppliers: expenses were lower than budget by $1,425k (4.2% of Total expenses) primarily due to the mix between

casual staff and contractors that were engaged during the year. Specifically, AFTRS used fewer contractors (categorised

as Suppliers) and more casual staff (categorised as Employee benefits) than expected. Supplier expenses were also lower

than budget due to staff members undertaking some work that would normally be expected to be performed by suppliers,

because staff members took less annual leave and long service leave than expected due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Additionally there were reduced expenditure requirements stemming from the cancellation of face-to-face courses as a result

of the impact of COVID-19.

Revenue from contracts with customers: was lower than budget by $458k (5.2% of Total own-source income) due to the

cancellation of face-to-face courses as a result of the impact of COVID-19.

67 Section 7 Financial Statements

Statement of Financial Position

As at 30 June 2021

NOTES

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 3A 7,941 7,589 7,165

Trade and other receivables 3B 4,955 143 3,067

Total financial assets 12,896 7,732 10,232

Non-financial assets 1

Buildings 4A 52,868 56,955 53,448

Plant and equipment 4A 7,385 7,749 7,796

Intangibles 4A 829 1,209 1,037

Other non-financial assets 4B 962 508 509

Total non-financial assets 62,044 66,421 62,790

Total assets 74,940 74,153 73,022

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 5A 1,380 1,180 1,179

Other payables 5B 5,111 674 3,678

Total payables 6,491 1,854 4,857

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 6A 53,019 57,136 53,601

Total interest bearing liabilities 53,019 57,136 53,601

68 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

NOTES

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

Provisions

Employee provisions 8A 3,282 2,790 2,379

Total provisions 3,282 2,790 2,379

Total liabilities 62,792 61,780 60,837

Net assets 12,148 12,373 12,185

EQUITY

Reserves 1,097 1,069 1,070

Retained surplus 11,051 11,304 11,115

Total equity 12,148 12,373 12,185

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. Right-of-use assets are included in the following line items: Buildings, Plant and equipment

69 Section 7 Financial Statements

Budget Variances Commentary

All variances above $150k and 2% of the relevant category are considered significant and explained below:

Cash and cash equivalents: were higher than budget by $776k (1.1% of Total assets) due to lower cash outflows for

suppliers and purchase of property, plant & equipment.

Trade and other receivables: were higher than budget by $1,888k (2.6% of Total assets) due to the timing of student

enrolments for semester 2 occurring in June 2021 rather than July 2021, with a corresponding offset in Other payables

(deferred income).

Buildings: were below budget by $580k (0.8% of Total assets) due to the CPI rent increase for the building in February 2021

being lower than expected, which has an ongoing impact on the value of the right-of-use asset and lease liability.

Plant and equipment: was below budget by $411k (0.6% of Total assets) as a result of delays to asset projects due to the

impact of COVID-19.

Intangibles: were below budget by $208k (0.3% of Total assets) as a result of delays to asset projects due to the impact of

COVID-19.

Other non-financial assets: were higher than budget by $453k (0.6% of Total assets) due to a large prepayment for our IT

network infrastructure project.

Suppliers: were higher than budget by $201k (0.3% of Total liabilities) related to the timing of supplier payments.

Other payables: were higher than budget by $1,433k (2.4% of Total liabilities) due to the timing of student enrolments for

semester 2 occurring in June 2021 rather than July 2021, with a corresponding offset in Trade and other receivables.

Interest bearing liabilities: were below budget by $582k (1.0% of Total liabilities) due to the CPI rent increase for the

building in February 2021 being lower than expected, which has an ongoing impact on the value of the right- of-use asset

and lease liability.

Employee Provisions: were higher than budget by $903k (1.5% of Total liabilities) as staff members took less annual leave

and long service leave than expected due to COVID-19 restrictions.

70 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Statement of Changes In Equity

For the year ended 30 June 2021

Retained earnings

Asset

revaluation

reserve TOTAL EQUITY

2021

$000

2020

$000

2021

$000

2020

$000

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

Opening balance 11,304 10,930 1,069 175 12,373 11,105 12,375

Adjustment on initial

application of AASB 16 - 663 - - - 663 -

Adjusted opening balance 11,304 11,593 1,069 175 12,373 11,768 12,375

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (268) (305) - - (268) (305) (190)

Other comprehensive income - - 43 910 43 910 -

Transfers between equity components 15 16 (15) (16) - - -

Total comprehensive income (253) (289) 28 894 (225) 605 (190)

Closing balance as at 30 June 11,051 11,304 1,097 1,069 12,148 12,373 12,185

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

All variances above $150k and 2% of the relevant category are considered significant and explained below:

Deficit for the period: was $268k and is primarily due to the implementation of AASB 16 Leases which replaces rent

expense and the reduction of the lease incentive liability with depreciation and finance costs, resulting in a higher total

expense of $190k.

Other comprehensive income: was higher than budget by $43k due to the revaluation

of fixed assets.

71 Section 7 Financial Statements

Cash Flow Statement

For the year ended 30 June 2021

NOTES

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 2D 25,059 22,605 25,059

Sale of goods and rendering of services 7,983 7,601 9,127

Interest 126 210 74

Net GST received 1,178 1,101 1,100

Other - - 18

Total cash received 34,346 31,517 35,378

Cash used

Employees 17,192 16,929 17,472

Suppliers 10,119 6,820 11,190

Interest payments on lease liabilities 695 742 698

Total cash used 28,006 24,491 29,360

Net cash from operating activities 6,340 7,026 6,018

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment 2 3 -

Total cash received 2 3 -

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant & equipment 1,425 1,565 1,851

Total cash used 1,425 1,565 1,851

Net cash used by investing activities (1,423) (1,562) (1,851)

72 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

NOTES

2021

$000

2020

$000

Original

Budget

$000

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Principal payments of lease liabilities 4,565 4,435 4,591

Total cash used 4,565 4,435 4,591

Net cash used by financing activities (4,565) (4,435) (4,591)

Net increase in cash held 352 1,029 (424)

Cash and cash equivalents at the

beginning of the reporting period 7,589 6,560 7,589

Cash and cash equivalents at the

end of the reporting period 3A 7,941 7,589 7,165

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

All variances above $150k and 2% of the relevant category are considered significant and explained below:

Sale of goods and rendering of services: was less than budget by $1,144k (3.2% of Total cash received from operating

activities) due to the cancellation of face-to-face courses as a result of the impact of COVID-19 and fewer student payments

for semester 2 2021 enrolments received during June than expected.

Employees: Cash used was $280k lower than budget (1.0% of Total cash used by operating activities) due to the timing of

employees accruals.

Suppliers: Cash used was $1,071k lower than budget (3.6% of Total cash used by operating activities) primarily due to a

large portion of supplier expenditure being incurred in May and June, with invoice payments occurring in July 2021 rather

than during the financial year. Additionally there were reduced expenditure requirements stemming from the cancellation of

face-to-face courses as a result of the impact of COVID-19.

Purchase of property, plant & equipment: Cash used was $426k lower than budget (23.0% of Total cash used by

investing activities) as a result of delays to asset projects due to the impact of COVID-19.

73 Section 7 Financial Statements

Overview

Basis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting)

Rule 2015 (FRR) ; and

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian

Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with historical cost convention, except

for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on

the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars

unless otherwise specified.

New Australian Accounting Standards

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to

the current reporting period did not have a material effect on AFTRS’ financial statements.

Standard/Interpretation Nature of change in accounting policy, transitional provisions, and adjustment to financial

statements

AASB 1059 Service

Concession

Arrangements:

Grantors

AASB 1059 became effective from 1 July 2020.

The new standard addresses the accounting for a service concession arrangement by a

grantor that is a public sector entity by prescribing the accounting for the arrangement from

a grantor’s perspective.

Prior to the issuance of AASB 1059, there was no definitive accounting guidance in Australia for

service concession arrangements, which include a number of public private partnerships (PPP)

arrangements. The AASB issued the new standard to address the lack of specific accounting

guidance and based the content there of broadly on its international equivalent: International

Public Sector Accounting Standard 32: Service Concession Arrangements: Grantor.

The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions

and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Taxation

AFTRS is exempt from all forms of taxation except for fringe benefits tax (FBT) and the goods and services tax (GST).

Events After the Balance Sheet Date

There were no subsequent events which had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial

activities of AFTRS.

74 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Financial Performance This section analyses the financial performance for the year ended 30 June 2021

2021

$000

2020

$000

1. EXPENSES

1A. Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 13,647 13,084

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 2,018 1,911

Defined benefit plans 162 174

Leave and other entitlements 1,855 1,786

Separation and redundancies 71 278

Total employee benefits 17,753 17,233

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and relationships section.

1B. Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants and professional fees 549 319

Contractors 2,732 1,525

Travel 67 210

IT related expenses 587 420

Repairs and maintenance (non IT related) 472 248

Stationery 67 154

Utilities 344 378

Building services 610 512

Marketing 748 692

Other 2,434 1,953

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 8,610 6,411

75 Section 7 Financial Statements

2021

$000

2020

$000

Goods and services are made up of:

Goods supplied 3,088 2,527

Services rendered 5,522 3,884

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 8,610 6,411

Other suppliers

Workers compensation expenses 50 56

Low value leases 5 7

Total other suppliers 55 63

Total suppliers 8,665 6,474

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1C, 4 and 6A.

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

AFTRS has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a

lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). AFTRS recognises the lease payments

associated with these leases as an expense

on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

1C. Finance costs

Interest on lease liabilities 695 742

Total finance costs 695 742

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1B, 4 and 6A.

Accounting Policy

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1D. Write-down and impairment of other assets

Proceeds from sale (2) (3)

Fixed assets written off 53 155

Total write-down and

impairment of other assets 51 152

76 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

2021 $000

2020 $000

2. OWN-SOURCE REVENUE AND GAINS

2A. Revenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods 2 4

Rendering of services 8,325 7,735

Total revenue from contracts with customers 8,327 7,739

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Major product / service line:

Award courses 6,517 5,724

Non-Award courses 1,771 1,984

Other 39 31

8,327 7,739

Type of customers:

Individuals 7,800 7,316

Businesses 527 423

8,327 7,739

Timing of transfer of goods and services: 8,288 7,708

Over time 39 31

Point in time 8,327 7,739

Accounting Policy

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

The following is a description of principal activities from which AFTRS generates its revenue: AFTRS runs undergraduate and post-graduate award courses, short courses and industry certificates, and runs training for corporate and industry partners. In all cases the performance obligations are satisfied at the end of the course. In all cases customers simultaneously receive and consume the benefits provided by AFTRS. Revenue is recognised evenly over the duration of each course, which for most courses is wholly within a single financial year.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which AFTRS expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

77 Section 7 Financial Statements

2021

$000

2020

$000

2B. Interest

Interest on deposits 58 180

Total interest 58 180

Accounting Policy

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

2C. Reversal of write-downs and impairment

Revaluation increments - 60

Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments - 60

2D. Revenue from Government

Appropriations

Departmental appropriations 25,059 22,605

Total revenue from Government 25,059 22,605

Accounting Policy

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are

recognised as Revenue from Government when the entity gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts

that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.

Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities (appropriated to the non-corporate

Commonwealth entity as a corporate Commonwealth entity payment item for payment to this entity) is recognised as

Revenue from Government by the corporate Commonwealth entity unless the funding is in the nature of an equity

injection or a loan.

2021

$000

2020

$000

2E. Unsatisfied obligations

AFTRS expects to recognise as income any liability for unsatisfied

obligations associated with revenue from contracts with customers

within the following periods:

No more than 12 months 4,703 412

More than 12 months - -

Total unsatisfied obligations 4,703 412

The liability for unsatisfied obligations is represented on the Statement of Financial Position

as Other Payables and is disclosed in note 5B as Deferred income.

78 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Financial Position This section analyses AFTRS’ assets held as at June 30 to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result

2021

$000

2020

$000

3. FINANCIAL ASSETS

3A. Cash and cash equivalents

Cash at bank 7,941 7,589

Total cash and cash equivalents 7,941 7,589

Accounting Policy

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes:

a) cash on hand;

b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less

that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant

risk of changes in value.

AFTRS had the following financing facilities in place at 30 June 2021 and 30 June 2020.

A bank guarantee facility with the Commonwealth Bank of Australia

Total facility 4,145 4,145

Amount used 4,145 4,145

Amount unused - -

AFTRS had a credit card facility of $110,000 (2020: $110,000) with the

Commonwealth Bank of Australia, with the balance cleared monthly.

3B. Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables

Goods and services 4,765 29

Total Goods and services receivables 4,765 29

79 Section 7 Financial Statements

2021

$000

2020

$000

Other receivables

Interest receivable 9 77

GST receivable 199 48

Other sundry receivables 4 4

Total other receivables 212 129

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 4,977 158

Less: Impairment allowance for other receivables/(payables) (22) (15)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 4,955 143

All receivables are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months.

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where

the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that

are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest

method adjusted for any loss allowance.

80 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

4. NON-FINANCIALASSETS

4A. Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles

Buildings Leasehold improvements Plant and equipment Motor vehicles Computer software Course

development

costs TOTAL

$000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000 $000

As at 1 July 2020

Gross book value 61,435 4,722 3,012 65 1,358 1,093 71,685

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (4,480) - (12) (38) (460) (782) (5,772)

Total as at 1 July 2020 56,955 4,722 3,000 27 898 311 65,913

Additions

Purchase - 78 1,112 - 112 - 1,302

Right-of-use assets 448 - - - - - 448

Revaluations recognised in other

comprehensive income - - - 43 - - 43

Revaluations recognised in

net cost of services - - - - - - -

Depreciation / amortisation expense - (372) (1,133) (5) (259) (233) (2,002)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets (4,535) - (21) (13) - - (4,569)

Disposals - (48) (5) - - - (53)

Net book value 30 June 2021 52,868 4,380 2,953 52 751 78 61,082

Net book value as of 30

June 2021 represented by

Gross book value 61,883 4,749 4,117 78 1,470 1,093 73,390

Accumulated depreciation / amortisation (9,015) (369) (1,164) (26) (719) (1,015) (12,308)

Net book value 30 June 2021 52,868 4,380 2,953 52 751 78 61,082

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 52,868 - 71 8 - - 52,947

81 Section 7 Financial Statements

No indicators of impairment were found for leasehold improvements, plant and equipment or motor vehicles.

No indicators of impairment were found for course development costs or computer software.

AFTRS expects to sell or dispose of some minor technology assets within the next 12 months as they get replaced by new

assets or due to obsolescence.

Revaluations of non-financial assets

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated in Note 12. An independent valuer

performed a desktop valuation of fixed assets as at 30 June.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of leasehold

improvements, plant, equipment and intangibles

No significant contractual commitments for the acquisition of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment or

intangibles existed at 30 June 2021.

Accounting Policy

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and

liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for

purchases costing less than $2,000 which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group

of similar items which are significant in total).

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount,

initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by

Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column

as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 AFTRS has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any

provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an

impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is

recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial

recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

82 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) and motor

vehicles are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations

are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the

assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of

movements in market values for the relevant assets. The current policy is to assess fair values at least every three years.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of

asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that

was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in

the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the

net amount restated to the revalued amount of the asset.

Depreciation and amortisation

Depreciable plant and equipment, motor vehicles, and intangibles are written off over their estimated useful lives to AFTRS

using, in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight line

basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease. Depreciation/

amortisation rates (useful lives) and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised

in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the

following useful lives:

2021 2020

Equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

Motor vehicles 8 to 25 years 8 to 25 years

Computer software 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years

Course development 5 years 5 years

Leasehold improvements lease terms lease terms

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of

the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

83 Section 7 Financial Statements

Accounting Policy (continued)

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is

estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the

present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset

is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the entity

was deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are

expected from its use or disposal.

Intangible assets

Intangible assets consist of purchased software and capitalised course development costs. Based on a thorough industry

survey and feedback from alumni, AFTRS has adopted a new strategy for award courses.

While the research and maintenance cost components are charged to expenses as incurred, the development elements are

capitalised in accordance with AASB 138 after satisfying the requirements of that accounting standard. They are amortised

over 5 academic years, matching the flow of future economic benefits. These costs are identifiable with each course and

recorded as individual intangible assets. Other costs relating to new courses which will not be delivered in the immediate

future have not been capitalised.

2021

$000

2020

$000

4B. Other non-financial assets

Prepayments 962 508

Total other non-financial assets 962 508

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

5. PAYABLES

5A. Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 1,380 1,180

Total suppliers 1,380 1,180

All supplier payables are current. Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Accounting Policy

Trade creditors and accruals are recognised at their amortised amounts, being the amounts at which the liabilities will be

settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received.

84 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

2021

$000

2020

$000

5B. Other payables

Salaries, wages, and superannuation 408 262

Deferred income 4,703 412

Total other payables 5,111 674

All other payables (except for a portion of the lease incentive) are current.

6. INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES

6A. Leases

Lease Liabilities 53,019 57,136

Total leases 53,019 57,136

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2021 was $5,260,000

Maturity analysis - contractual undiscounted cash flows

Within 1 year 4,659 4,557

Between 1 to 5 years 22,202 22,187

More than 5 years 26,158 30,392

Total leases 53,019 57,136

AFTRS in its capacity as lessee leases premises in Moore Park, Sydney. Rent is subject to a CPI increase each year.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1B, 1C and 4.

Accounting Policy

For all new contracts entered into, AFTRS considers whether the contract is, or contains a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a

contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange

for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially measured at the present value

of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate

is readily determinable, or the department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased for interest. It

is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease liability is remeasured, the

corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right-of-use asset or profit and loss depending on the nature of the

reassessment or modification.

85 Section 7 Financial Statements

Funding This section identifies AFTRS’ funding structure.

2021

$000

2020

$000

7. APPROPRIATIONS

7A. Annual appropriations ('recoverable GST exclusive') Refer to 2D

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 25,059 22,605

Total departmental 25,059 22,605

7B. Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

Total comprehensive income/(loss) - as per the

Statement of Comprehensive Income (225) 605

Plus: depreciation/amortisation of assets funded through appropriations - -

Plus: depreciation of right-of-use assets1 4,569 4,505

Less: lease principal repayments1 (4,565) (4,435)

Net Cash Operating Surplus/ (Deficit) (221) 675

1. The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principal

repayment amount reflects the impact of AASB 16 Leases, which does not directly reflect a change in appropriation

arrangements.

86 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

People and Relationships This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

2021

$000

2020

$000

8. EMPLOYEE PROVISIONS

8A. Employee provisions

Annual leave 1,407 1,218

Long service leave 1,834 1,501

Redundancies 41 71

Total employee provisions 3,282 2,790

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the

reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefit liabilities are measured at the present value of estimated future cash outflows to be made

in respect of services provided by employees up to the

reporting date.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied

at the time the leave is taken, including AFTRS' employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is

likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined internally as at 30 June 2021. The estimate of the present value of the

liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases.

Separation and Redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. AFTRS recognises a provision for termination when it

has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out

the terminations.

Superannuation

AFTRS staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

(PSS) or the PSS Accumulation Plan (PSSap), or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by

the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules

and notes.

AFTRS makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be

sufficient to meet the current cost of the superannuation entitlements. AFTRS accounts for the contributions as if they were

contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

87 Section 7 Financial Statements

9. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL REMUNERATION

Key management personnel are those with authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of

AFTRS, directly or indirectly, whether executive or otherwise. At AFTRS, they are members of the Council, the CEO and the

Chief Financial Officer. Their remuneration is summarised below.

2021

$000

2020

$000

Short-term employee benefits

Salary 721 628

Performance Bonus - 24

Annual leave accrued 41 35

Total short-term employee benefits 762 688

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 64 60

Total post-employment benefits 64 60

Other long-term employee benefits

Long-service leave 13 14

Total other long-term employee benefits 13 14

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 839 761

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table is 10 individuals (2020:11).

1. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the

Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal

and are not paid by AFTRS.

88 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

10. RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES

Related party relationships:

AFTRS is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to AFTRS are Council Members, Key Management

Personnel including the Portfolio Minister and Executive, and other Australian Government entities. The Kenneth Myer

Fellowship Trust, of which the Council, on behalf of AFTRS, is the trustee, is a related party of AFTRS.

Transactions with related parties:

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as

ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education

loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

The following transactions with related parties occurred during the financial year:

· AFTRS issued scholarships to students on behalf of the Kenneth Myer Fellowship Trust to the value of $118,750.

The Kenneth Myer Fellowship Trust reimbursed AFTRS $118,750. (2020: $152,500)

Managing Uncertainties

This section analyses how AFTRS manages financial risks within its operating environment.

11. CONTINGENT ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

AFTRS is not aware of the existence of any significant potential claim which might impact on its financial affairs.

Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the

notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of

which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually

certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

12. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENT

Accounting Policy

AFTRS adopts a policy of stating its fixed assets (except for computer software and capitalised course development

expenses) at fair value. A review of fair values as at 30 June was carried out by an independent external valuer.

An asset class is revalued if the difference between the carrying amount and the fair value is material.

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2021

$000

2020

$000

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements 4,380 4,722

Plant and equipment 2,953 3,000

Motor vehicles 52 27

Total non-financial assets subject to regular fair value assessment 7,385 7,749

89 Section 7 Financial Statements

2021

$000

2020

$000

13. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

13A. Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash at bank 7,941 7,589

Receivables for goods and services 4,765 29

Other receivables 9 77

Total financial assets at amortised cost 12,715 7,695

Total financial assets 12,715 7,695

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors 1,380 1,180

Other payables 408 262

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 1,788 1,442

Total financial liabilities 1,788 1,442

90 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the entity classifies its financial assets

in the following categories: financial assets at fair value through profit or loss; financial assets at fair value through other

comprehensive income; and financial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash

flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the

contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the

contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the

principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that

are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting

contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as a result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in

other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial assets either doesn't

meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or

loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using

the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where

risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance

as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the

financial asset.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities.

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

91 Section 7 Financial Statements

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments

are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the

financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities

are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on

an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or

services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

2021

$000

2020

$000

13B. Net gains or losses on financial assets Refer to 2B

Financial assets at amortised cost

Interest income from bank deposits 58 180

Net gains on financial assets at amortised cost 58 180

92 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Other Information

2021

$000

2020

$000

14. CURRENT/NON-CURRENT DISTINCTION FOR ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Assets expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents 7,941 7,589

Trade and other receivables 4,955 143

Other non-financial assets 676 321

Total no more than 12 months 13,572 8,053

More than 12 months

Buildings 52,868 56,955

Plant and equipment 7,385 7,749

Intangibles 829 1,209

Other non-financial assets 286 187

Total more than 12 months 61,368 66,100

Total assets 74,940 74,153

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

Suppliers 1,380 1,180

Other payables 5,111 674

Leases 4,592 4,560

Employee provisions 1,552 1,351

Total no more than 12 months 12,635 7,765

More than 12 months

Leases 48,427 52,576

Employee provisions 1,730 1,439

Total more than 12 months 50,157 54,015

Total liabilities 62,792 61,780

93 Section 7 Financial Statements

15. ASSETS HELD IN TRUST

Purpose - Monies provided by AFTRS and Kenneth & Andrew Myer to fund study activities

including annual Indigenous scholarships and advancement of the role of the creative

producer.

Apart from the operating cash kept in a bank account, the remaining trust funds are invested

with the Australian Communities Foundation.

2021

$000

2020

$000

Trust funds

Fund opening balance 1,660 1,863

Increase / (decrease) in value of investment 292 (50)

Management fees paid (25) -

Scholarships paid (119) (153)

Fund closing balance 1,808 1,660

Represented by:

Cash - 1

Australian Communities Foundation 1,808 1,659

Total funds 1,808 1,660

END OF AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

94 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

8 Appendices Appendix 1: Applications and Enrolments The allocation of places in the Award Courses Program is competitive and based on merit. Applicants must complete the published application tasks and meet the selection criteria to be considered for a place in their preferred course.

Courses offered in the relevant reporting period were at three levels:

· Bachelor (AQF 7)

· Graduate Diploma (AQF 8)

· Masters (AQF 9)

Applications and Enrolments Statistics

2021 Semester 1 Intake Applications Offers Enrolments*

Degree

Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production - New students 287 117 86

Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production - Continuing students - - 167

Sub-total 287 117 253

Post-Graduate

Graduate Diploma in Radio, Full-Time 32 27 17

Graduate Diploma in Radio, Part-Time - New students 17 16 6

Graduate Diploma in Radio, Part-Time - Continuing students - - 9

Sub-total 49 43 32

Master of Arts Screen - New students including International 208 80 41

Master of Arts Screen - Continuing students 40

Master of Arts Screen: Business - New students 29 29 21

Master of Arts Screen: Business and Leadership - Continuing students - - 14

Sub-total 237 109 116

Total 573 269 401

*Source: Based on submitted Department of Education enrolment data.

95 Section 8 Appendices

Appendix 2: Scholarships

Scholarship title Basis of

award

Details Value Volume

The AFTRS

Executive

Scholarship Fund

Awarded

based on

equity

The purpose of this scholarship is to

expand and enrich the school’s student

community by supporting a student

relocating from interstate and/or a regional

or remote area to take up their place in

their course.

This scholarship is intended to support

commencing and returning students with

their studies by contributing to a living

allowance or towards relocation costs,

study resources, fees or other costs,

and a return flight from Sydney to their

hometown.

Valued at $5,000

for one year

The School

awarded three

Scholarships

to two Master

of Arts: Screen

students and

one Bachelor

of Arts Screen:

Production

student

AFTRS/ABC

Selwyn Speight

Diversity Radio

Scholarships

Awarded

based on

merit

The purpose of this scholarship is to

expand and enrich the school’s student

community by recognising and supporting

an outstanding Graduate Diploma in Radio

student, selected based on merit from

eligible students from diverse backgrounds.

Valued at $15,000 The school

awarded one

Scholarship

to a Graduate

Diploma Radio

Full-Time student

Bachelor of

Arts: Screen

Scholarships

Awarded

based on

equity

Through the financial support of the

Kenneth Myer Fellowship Trust and

AFTRS Financial Hardship Fund, AFTRS

offered Equity Scholarships for BA Screen:

Production students. Established in 2015,

this scholarship supports students from

lower socio-economic backgrounds or

those who are under-represented in higher

education. These scholarships are offered

twice a year.

Valued up to

$3,500 for one

semester

The value of the

scholarships

depends on the

student’s personal

circumstances

The School

awarded 20

Bachelor of

Arts Screen:

Production

scholarships

to 18 students

across the

two rounds of

applications

Craft Excellence

and Equity Fee

Scholarship

Awarded

based on

merit and

equity

This scholarship is intended to support

students from a low socioeconomic

background or those who would otherwise

be unable to study and can demonstrate

excellence in an identified craft area.

Valued at $26,016.

This covers the

cost of the first year

of study

The School

awarded one

Scholarship to a

Master of Arts:

Screen student

96 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Scholarship title Basis of

award

Details Value Volume

Commercial

Radio Australia

(CRA) Podcast

Scholarship

Awarded

based on

merit and

equity

Partnering with AFTRS, the CRA Podcast

Scholarship enables a student from

interstate and/or regional or remote areas

to study the AFTRS Graduate Diploma

in Radio. The scholarship is intended to

support students by contributing to living

expenses and relocation to Sydney.

Valued at $7,500

for one year

The School

awarded one

Scholarship

to a Graduate

Diploma Radio

Full-Time student

First Nations

Scholarships

Awarded

based on

merit or

equity

The scholarships are intended to assist

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

undergraduate or postgraduate students,

who may otherwise be under-represented,

with the costs associated with higher

education at AFTRS, including study

resources and relocation costs.

The value of the

scholarships

varies depending

on the course

and the student’s

circumstances.

Valued between

$6,250 - $25,000

The School

awarded 17

First Nations

Scholarships

Onbass

Giant Steps

Scholarship

Awarded

based on

merit or

equity

The Onbass/Giant Steps Scholarship is

awarded to support and develop the career

of a gifted storyteller who may not be able

to afford to study full-time in Sydney, giving

them the opportunity to do so by providing

them with a 3-year commitment per

recipient. The scholarship is intended to

support students commencing their studies

by contributing to a living allowance or

towards relocation costs, study resources,

fees, or other costs.

Valued at $22,500

($7,500 per year for

three years)

The School

awarded one

Scholarship to

a Bachelor of

Arts Screen:

Production

student

Master of

Arts: Screen

Scholarships

Awarded

based on

equity

Through the financial support of the

Kenneth Myer Fellowship Trust and

AFTRS Financial Hardship Fund, AFTRS

offered Equity Scholarships for MA Screen

students. The scholarships provide

much-needed living allowance support

to students from lower socio-economic

backgrounds and assist disadvantaged

students with higher education costs.

Valued up to

$10,000 for one

semester.

The value of the

scholarships

depends on the

student’s personal

circumstances

The School

awarded 13

Master of

Arts: Screen

scholarships to 9

students across

the two rounds of

applications

97 Section 8 Appendices

Appendix 3: Bridge to Industry During this past year, the school has continued to focus on helping students cross the bridge from course to career. The Partnerships and Development Division has allocated staff to enable the school to strengthen that approach further, along with the committed Teaching & Learning staff supporting curriculum-related placements and paid and un-paid industry opportunities.

AFTRS works closely with industry to help students navigate the transition to working in the industry. This is achieved through:

· Developing and managing internships, placements, and attachments; and

· Working with key industry partnerships such as the Sherman Centre for Creativity and Ideas (SCCI), Australians in Film (AiF), the ABC, SBS and The Commercial Radio and Podcast Industry

The School continues to be a conduit between study and industry opportunities, including full-time and part-time employment, and actively supports our talent to bridge this gap. We work to best match skillsets to available paid employment opportunities for our students, graduates, and alumni with our industry partners. A key example of this is the AFTRS Graduate Program, which consists of paid internships offered on a competitive basis to graduating BA year 3 students. At the end of 2020, five students were offered paid internships at the ABC, SBC, Sky News, Fremantle Media, and Endemol Shine Australia.

In Radio and Podcasting, most graduates enter full-time and part-time roles within three months of finishing the course, with employment outcomes between 70-90% for the last twelve months.

Examples include:

· Podcast Production Assistant, iHeart Radio Sydney

· 2EC Mornings Announcer, Bega NSW

· Announcer and Production Manager at 949 Power FM Shoalhaven and Southern Highlands

· Podcast Producer - LiSTNR Original Podcast Team in Melbourne

· Announcer and Commercial Production Manager at Eagle FM Goulburn; and

· Content/Audio Production with the ACE Network in Hamilton, Victoria.

Many students and recent graduates engaged in the selection process for each opportunity on offer. This included pitching and the submission of supporting documents. Students and graduates are given direct mentoring and advice on crafting compelling responses to expected industry standards and provided with guidance on CV, showreel, and interviewing skills in each stage.

Internships, Placements and Attachments

AFTRS facilitates professional and work placements and paid and unpaid internships with production companies, TV networks, radio stations, podcast networks, studios and organisations in various roles that could lead to employment. The industry approaches AFTRS with opportunities directly via an AFTRS staff industry contact. The Industry team in Partnerships & Development and each discipline across the School also actively reach out to the industry on behalf of our students and graduates.

AFTRS focuses on identifying specific students/graduates and matching them to an identified skillset and opportunity. A good example is the Marvel Traineeship Program, with various paid traineeship roles on offer.

98 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Professional Placements

Name of Organisation Production name or Scheme Applicable cohort

ABC Catalyst MA Year 2

ADRENALINE PUMP - MA Year 2

AQUARIUS FILMS The Usual Suspects MA Year 2

CAUSEWAY FILMS Puff, the Magic Dragon MA Year 2

CJZ - MA Year 2

EASY TIGER PRODUCTIONS Doctor Doctor (Season 5) MA Year 2 x 2

EVERY CLOUD PRODUCTIONS Ms Fishers Murders MA Year 2 *

FRACTAL FILMS Unbecoming MA Year 2

GOALPOST PICTURES Carmen MA Year 2 x 6

MAKEUP EFFECTS GROUP Meg Effects MA Year 2

NEWSREADER PRODUCTIONS The Newsreader MA Year 2

NO COINCIDENCE MEDIA Cook NGA Pouwhena MA Year 2 x 3

SCREENTIME Bali MA Year 2

SEE SAW FILMS The Unknown Man MA Year 2 x 3

THREE THOUSAND YEARS OF

LONGING

Three Thousand Years of Longing MA Year 2 x 2

WTFN Space Invaders MA Year 2 x 2

99 Section 8 Appendices

Work Placements

Name of

Organisation

Production name or

Scheme

Position offered Applicable cohort

ABC Dubbo ABC Dubbo Assistant Producer and Multi-Media

Reporter

GDR (full-time)

ABC News Radio ABC Orange News Reporter and Producer of local

programming

GDR (full-time)

ABC Wagga ABC Wagga Assistant Producer and Multi-Media GDR (full-time)

ARN KIIS Sydney Assistant Producer / Music Director GDR (full-time)

ARN WSFM Digital Content Producer GDR (full-time)

Capital Radio

Network

2CC Canberra Assistant Producer and Multi-Media

Reporter

GDR (full-time)

Capital Radio

Network

Snow FM Jindabyne Producer and Audio Production GDR (full-time)

Grant Broadcasters 2ST & Power FM Nowra Announcer and Producer GDR (full-time)

Grant Broadcasters 96.5 WAVE FM

Wollongong

Nights Announcer and Audio Producer GDR (full-time)

Grant Broadcasters 981 Power FM

Wollongong

Audio Producer, Announcer GDR (full-time)

MAS AUDIO

DRAMA PODCAST

PROJECT

AFTRS Audio Producer GDR (full-time) x 1 & GDR

Part-Time Year 2) x 1

SCA Triple M Albury Announcer and Producer GDR (part-time Year 2)

SCA Triple M Gosford Assistant Producer GDR (full-time)

SCA Triple M Riverina Virtual

Placement

Announcer GDR (full-time)

100 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Paid Internships and Traineeship Opportunities made available

Name of Organisation Production name or

Scheme

Position offered Applicable

cohort

ABC 2020 AFTRS Graduate

Program

Factual Trainee - Industry

Internship Program

BA 2020

CHRONICLE STUDIOS - Intern BA 2020

ENDEMOL SHINE AUSTRALIA 2020 AFTRS Graduate

Program

Intern - Industry Internship

Program

BA 2020

FREMANTLE MEDIA 2020 AFTRS Graduate

Program

Intern - Industry Internship

Program

BA 2020

FREMANTLE MEDIA Gold Notetaker - Industry Internship

Program

MA 2020

MADE UP STORIES Wolf Like Me AD Attachment - Industry

Internship Program

BA 2020, MA

2020 *

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Extras Casting - Industry Trainee

Program

BA 2019

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Production Office - Industry

Trainee Program

BA 2020

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Camera - Industry Trainee

Program

BA 2020

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Security - Industry Trainee

Program

BA 2019

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Execs Runner - Industry Trainee

Program

Graduate

Certificate

Directing 2016

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Accounts - Industry Trainee

Program

BA 2019

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Editorial - Industry Trainee

Program

BA 2019

MARVEL STUDIOS Thor: Love and Thunder Assistant Director - Industry

Trainee Program

BA 2020

MISSILE FILM PRODUCTIONS Interceptor Intern BA 2020

NBC UNIVERSAL NBC Universal Internship

Program

Scripted Development - Industry

Internship Program

BA Y2 (2020)

Cohort *

NBC UNIVERSAL NBC Universal Internship

Program

Programming - Industry

Internship Program

BA Y2 (2020)

Cohort *

NBC UNIVERSAL NBC Universal Internship

Program

TV Advertising Sales - Industry

Internship Program

BA Y2 (2020)

Cohort *

101 Section 8 Appendices

Name of Organisation Production name or

Scheme

Position offered Applicable

cohort

NBC UNIVERSAL NBC Universal Internship

Program

Audience Research & Analysis -

Industry Internship Program

BA Y2 (2020)

Cohort *

NBC UNIVERSAL NBC Universal Internship

Program

TV Sales Administrator - Industry

Internship Program

BA Y2 (2020)

Cohort *

NBC UNIVERSAL NBC Universal Internship

Program

Partnerships - Industry Internship

Program

BA Y2 (2020)

Cohort *

NPC MEDIA - Operations Traineeship BA 2020. MA

2020 *

RABBIT CONTENT - Intern BA 2020

SBS 2020 AFTRS Graduate

Program

Intern - Industry Internship

Program

BA 2020

SKY NEWS 2020 AFTRS Graduate

Program

Intern - Industry Internship

Program

BA 2020

SQUARE PEG Podcast Podcast Editor and Producer GDR 2020

SYMMETRY MEDIA - Intern BA 2019

WTFN Sydney Harbour Force Editing - Industry Internship

Program

MA 2019 x2, MA

2020 x1

*These programs were not exclusive to only AFTRS students to apply; students from selected other tertiary institutions were also invited to apply.

Unpaid Internships

Name of

Organisation

Production name or

Scheme

Position offered Applicable cohort

ABC Catalyst Intern MA 2020

AQUARIUS FILMS The Usual Suspects Shooter/Producer/Director,

Second Boom Operator

MA 2019, AD Screenwriting

2019,

BA 2018, BA 2019

CORDELL JIGSAW Bondi Rescue Runner, Postproduction BA 2020 x 4

NINE NETWORK Travel Guides Intern MA 2021

SCA LiSTNR Podcast Producer GDR 2020

SYMMETRY MEDIA - Intern BA 2021

WTFN Space Invaders Cine Intern BA 2020

102 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Industry Partners and Competitions AFTRS collaborates with various industry partners, running competitions for students and graduates to make short film and audio content to a competition brief. This benefits the participants by providing them with experience developing ideas to a standard where they ‘pitch’ in a competitive environment.

Sherman Centre for Creativity

and Ideas (SCCI)

An excellent example of this type of partnership is AFTRS and the SCCI on their Fashion and Architecture hubs. For this project, the school runs a yearly competition for students and graduates to create work to be screened at SCCI events.

The winning teams in 2020 were ‘Dance Russe’ (MA Year 1, 2020 for the Collecting Clothes theme), ‘Woodchips’ (MA 2019 Graduates for the Adapting Architecture theme), and ‘A Style for Every Story’ (BA 2019 Graduates runner up for the Collecting Clothes theme], had their productions postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; however, were able to commence production in March 2021, and completed their projects in time to premiere at the SCCI and AFTRS commissioned, Student Film Festival on 4 May 2021. The festival also screened previous winning films ‘Who’s A Fly Bird’ (2018), ‘Building Worship’ (2018), ‘Cinderella’ (2019) and ‘The Caretakers’ (2019), to an audience of AFTRS students, graduates and staff, along with industry guests.

Following the screening, acclaimed documentary filmmaker Rod Freedman participated in a Q&A discussing the challenges and triumphs from each of the 2020 films; and the next round of projects to be commissioned was announced.

Pitch sessions for the SCCI 2021 Fashion and Architecture Programs were held simultaneously in February 2021. The winning films were awarded to ‘ Remember Us’ (BA 2020 Graduates, current BA 2021 student) and ‘Threads’ (BA 2020 Graduates) for the theme of Where Are We Now Fashion and Architecture.

The panel also awarded a runner up prize to ‘Stone & Water’ (MA 2020, current MA 2021 student).

Australians in Film (AiF)

Another exemplary example of this type of partnership is the Charlie’s Grant Virtual Residency. A collaboration between AFTRS and Australians in Film (AiF) offering AFTRS alumni access to mentoring and connections in the US film and TV industry and to assist with developing their projects.

Participants begin with an introductory meeting with AiF Staff, where they share their short and long-term goals, along with key industry targets, interests, projects, and career plans. They are also introduced to the AiF community via social media.

Three formal meetings require participants to complete a template with their action items and outcomes that are assessed and assisted by AiF staff. AiF remains available for participants throughout the residency for questions and provides industry connections where applicable, along with general advice, recommendations relevant to specific projects, and career development.

In 2021, four AFTRS alumni were selected as participants for the three-month AiF virtual residency. The first two selected participants were Tsu San Chambers (Graduate Certificate Screen: Creative Producing, 2018) and Samuel Herriman (Master of Arts Screen, 2019). They commenced their residency with AiF in early April 2021.

Ear Festival - Audio Fiction

Nicola Sitch, a Melbourne-based writer, produced a nine-minute audio fiction piece that was selected to play at the 2020 Ear Festival. Nicola was also the 2020 recipient of the Commercial Radio Australia podcast scholarship and has embarked on a full-time position in Audio Production with SCA’ LISTNR Melbourne.

103 Section 8 Appendices

Graduate Showcase

Each year AFTRS arranges a showcase event for our BA, MA, MASB and Graduate Diploma Radio graduates prior to graduation. This event aims to showcase the student’s work to industry and facilitate connections between graduates and industry. The Graduate Showcase, occurring in May 2021, shared the work of both 2020 and 2021 graduating cohorts as the COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 forced the 2020 event to be cancelled.

The 2021 Graduate Showcase event was primarily delivered via the school’s Accelevents online event platform and consisted of:

· An online Masterclass for graduates on jobs and networking

· An online showcase of all student films and graduates were given the opportunity to create an individual virtual booth resulting in 61 booths being created

· Seven Industry Panels delivered online or as a hybrid in-person/streamed events. Current students were also invited to attend

· Two in-person student film screenings: one documentary-specific at AFTRS, and the other focusing on ‘scripted’ at the Hoyts EQ with an associated networking event; and

· Virtual roundtables plus one-on-one networking sessions.

Attendance at and feedback on the event from industry was very positive, with:

· 136 Industry Professionals registered on the virtual platform to enable them to view films, attend screenings and participate in virtual networking

· 82 Industry practitioners either spoke on panels and/or participating in online networking; and

· 65 Industry representatives participated at the in-person screenings, in addition to students and staff.

104 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Appendix 4: 2020 AFTRS Graduates

Graduation Ceremony

In 2021, AFTRS held a Graduation Ceremony on Monday, 21 May at the Seymour Centre, Chippendale. A ceremony highlight was world-renowned VR artist Lynette Wallworth, broadcasting innovator Cherie Romaro, and pioneering broadcaster and filmmaker Mitch Torres, who received Honorary Degrees from AFTRS.

Graduation also saw 130 students graduate from four AFTRS courses —Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production; Graduate Diploma in Radio; Master of Arts Screen; and Master of Arts Screen: Business & Leadership.

There were also seven Alternative Exit degrees conferred —Graduate Diploma in Arts Screen; Diploma in Arts Screen: Production and Graduate Certificate Screen: Business & Leadership.

A significant achievement across all courses was the screen productions and radio broadcasts that students have completed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Amongst the first productions to go ahead in a COVID environment, AFTRS and its students notably led industry best-practice in COVIDsafe protocols.

105 Section 8 Appendices

Graduates

Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production

Danielle Abou Karam Rishi Golembiewski Simon O’Hagan

Uday Alexander William Hanson Mathew Panayiotou

Grace Anderson Carla Hedley Isabella Parker

Zachary Beckton Benjamin Holzwart Belinda Parry

Jordan Benjamin Emerson Hunt Thomas Pennell

Zoe Benjamin Anastasia James Eric Perry

Blaise Borrer Dylan Kennerson Scott Peters

Stuart Browne Otto Khoo Eli Potter

Joshua Cao Elisabeth Koernicke Noah Regan Roach

Sophie Chard Stavros Kourounis Rebecca Sawyer

Kerry Chavez William Lane Michael Sheppard

Ji Yoon Chung Tiansong Ling Kate Sowada Hicks

Xanda Cohen Courtney Mallon Thomas Stavropoulos

Louisa Compton Jasper Martin Bethany Stewart

Jaimie Conlon Felix Maude Jack Tait

Lily Culbertson Sebastian Maule Beatrice Tekiko

Marko Cvijanovic Jaeger May Holly Trenaman

Kate Diggins Kaitlyn McMurtry Kyle van Elten

Orla Doyle Annabel Mills Paul van Westing

Caitlin Farrell Molly Moloney Jack Voegt

Linus Ferris Joseph Murphy Samuel Walker

Lara Franzi Jess Murray Thomas Ward

Rachel Gammel Bronte Nener Caelan Wieczorski

Omri Goldberg Declan O’Byrne-Inglis Harrison Wild

Alternative Exit Award —Diploma in Arts Screen: Production

Marianna Galanopoulos Liam Kirley Sarah Meyn

106 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Graduates

Graduate Diploma in Radio

Daniel Bingham Daniel Mckenzie Wendy Searle

Jennifer D’Apice Robert Nice Brooke Sheehan

Bertie Fagan Lachlan Perry Romy Sher

Jay Gasser Haylee Potts Nicola Sitch

Samuel Glissan Benjamin Schonell Caroline Wagner

Master of Arts Screen: Business and Leadership

Joshua Algie Andrew George Aaron Wakem

Harriet Dixon-Smith Shane Grace

Lucinda Freedman Anokhi Somaia

Alternative Exit Award —Graduate Certificate Screen Business and Leadership

Merielee Rey

107 Section 8 Appendices

Graduates

Master of Arts Screen

Luke Cartwright Jayden Hua Samuel Steinle

Liam Clark Ismail Khan Jenna Sutch

Alexander Cox Michel Lawrence-Taylor James Taylor

Adam Daniel Petra Leslie Nathan Turnbull

Sophie-Eugenie Dessertaine-Williams Scott Majidi Chloe Turner

Sean Doyle James Mountain Ian Tyley

Cameron Dunlop Alexandra Muir Charlotte van Ewyk

Rebecca Evans Daniel O’Brien Kate Vinen

Adam Finney Julia Potter James Ward-Miller

Samuel Grimshaw Trudi Refshauge Daniel Weavell

Nathaniel Heinz Alexander Richmond Calum Wilson Austin

Jennifer Hicks Eirena Sapounas

Alternative Exit Award —Graduate Diploma in Arts Screen

Michael Bonner Jay Grant Joshua Winger

108 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Appendix 5: Student Achievements

Radio AFTRS Radio alumni are regularly recognised at national and international awards and festivals for Radio and Podcasting. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Australian Commercial Radio Award (ACRAs) could not take place.

This year Nicola Sitch, a Melbourne-based writer, produced a nine-minute audio fiction piece that was selected to play at the 2020 Ear Festival. Nicola was also the 2020 recipient of the Commercial Radio Australia podcast scholarship and has embarked on a full-time position in Audio Production with SCA’ LISTNR Melbourne.

Film AFTRS student and alumni films are entered into domestic and international film festivals and film awards, reaching audiences worldwide.

This year 30 films were selected for 62 festivals, with 92 selections, resulting in 14 award wins and 11 nominations.

Highlights include This River winning the Spectrum Films Award for Best Direction in an Australian Short Film at the Flickerfest International Short Film Festival in Sydney, and Lost Boy winning Best Short Film at the St. Kilda Film Festival, Melbourne.

Film Festival Selection

Due to the impact of COVID-19, many festivals adapted their program to a virtual or hybrid event this year.

Abbey and Moose’s Detective Agency (Angus Woodiwiss, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at London Short Series Festival, UK; Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; and Santa Monica Webfest, USA.

After the Away (Sacha Vivian-Riding, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at Kino Dzieci (Kids Kino) International Film Festival, Poland; and Canberra Short Film Festival, Australia. All Good Things (Simon Croker, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at Iris Prize Film Festival, UK.

An Athlete Wrestling A Python (Stephanie Day, Master of Arts Screen 2018) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Sydney, Australia.

Bala (Deborah Brown, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival, Canada; ImagineNATIVE, Canada; Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; Birrarangga Film Festival, Australia; Manchester Film Festival, UK; Gold Coast Film Festival, Australia; and Wairoa Māori Film Festival, New Zealand.

Barnacle Face (Jean-David Le Goullon, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Byron Bay Underground Film Festival, Australia.

Boldly Go (Christopher Cosgrove, Graduate Certificate Screen, 2017) screened at ReelAbilities Film Festival, New Jersey USA; Geelong Pride Film Festival Australia; Perlen Queer Film Festival, Hannover Germany; ReelAbilities Film Festival, Los Angeles USA; Queerfim Festival, Bremen Germany; Inside Out Film Festival, Toronto Canada; Queer Film Festival, Oldenburg Germany; Perth Queer Film Festival, Australia.

Brunch Shift Massacre (Adam Boys, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at Fantaspoa International Fantastic Film Festival, Brazil; and Anatomy: Crime & Horror Intl. Film Festival, Greece.

Chicken (Alana Hicks, National Talent Camp 2018) screened at BFI London Film Festival; Saint Tropez Cinema Des Antipodes France; Australian Short Film Today, New York (includes several screenings in US and Europe); Pasifika Film Festival, Australia; Aesthetica Film Festival, York UK; Human Rights Arts & Film Festival, Melbourne Australia.

109 Section 8 Appendices

Dust Cloud (Trudi Houston, Master of Arts Screen, 2020) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; Montreal Independent Film Festival, Canada; New York Independent Cinema Awards, USA; Venice Shorts California, USA; and Berlin Movie Awards, Germany.

Elagabalus (Xanthe Dobbie, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at CinefestOz, Australia; Newfest: New York’s LGBTQ Film Festival, USA; Uppsala International Short Film Festival, Sweden; FilmschoolFest Munich, Germany; Image+Nation Festival Film LGBTQUEER, Canada; Queer Film Festival (Gold Coast), Australia; Berlin Student Film Festival, Germany; and St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

Erwin (Lev Libre-Jutsen, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at St Kilda Film Festival, Australia; Miami Jewish Film Festival USA.

Gut Feeling (Hattie Archibald, Master of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at Miami Web Series Festival, USA.

Hyde (Ruby Challenger, Master of Arts Screen, 2020) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia.

Joy (Gabriel Morrison, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; and St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

Keys (Jeremiah Puni, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at the Pasifika Film Festival, Australia.

Like How I Remember (Brittany Xu, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Asian Film Festival Los Angeles Hollywood, USA; Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, USA; and Gold Coast Film Festival, Australia.

Lost Boy (Peter Skinner, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Brisbane International Film Festival, Australia; Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; and St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

Necktie (Jeremy Nicholas, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Adelaide Film Festival, Australia; and St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

Save Our Soul (Chloe Beckley, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Human Rights Arts and Film Festival, Australia.

Say Something (Nazareth Alfred, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2020) screened at Yirramboi First Nations Art Festival, Australia

Sunburn (Jaslyn Mairs, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at CinefestOz, Australia; Brisbane International Film Festival, Australia; Berlin Student Film Festival, Germany; Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; Gold Coast Film Festival, Australia; and Tel Aviv International Student Film Festival, Israel.

Sweet Tooth (Shannon Ashlyn, Master of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at Berlin Student Film Festival, Germany.

The End, The Beginning (Archie Chew, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Berlin Student Film Festival, Germany; Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; Providence Children’s Film Festival, USA; BUFF Malmo Film Festival, Sweden; Flickers Roving Eye Film Festival, USA; and St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

The Familiars (Millie Malcolm, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Flickers: Rhode Island International Film Festival, USA; Maniatic Film Festival Valencia, Spain; Telluride Horror Show, USA; San Sebastian Horror and Fantasy Film Festival, Spain; Revelation Perth International Film Festival, Australia; Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; HorrorHound Film Festival, USA; Imagine Film Festival, Netherlands; and St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

The Granny Flat (Rachel Mackey, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at the Canberra Short Film Festival, Australia; and Australian Women’s Film Festival, Australia.

The Retreat (Zaina Ahmed, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2020) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia.

110 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

The Swimming Chair (Matthew Taylor, Master of Arts Screen, 2020) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia.

This River (Naomi Fryer, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) screened at Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; WIFT V-Fest, Australia; St Kilda Film Festival, Australia; and Montreal Independent Film Festival, Canada.

Unwilted (Nicola Macindoe, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) screened at Melbourne Women in Film Festival, Australia.

Awards

Chicken (Alana Hicks, National Talent Camp 2018) won the Audience Award at Australian Short Film Today, New York.

Dust Cloud (Trudi Houston, Master of Arts Screen, 2020) won Best Student Film at the New York Independent Movie Awards, USA; and won Best Student Film at the Berlin Movie Awards, Germany

Elagabalus (Xanthe Dobbie, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) won the Juror’s Choice Award at the Berlin Student Film Festival, Germany.

Erwin (Lev Libre-Jutsen, Bachelor of Arts Screen 2018) won Best Original Score and was nominated for Best Short Film and Best Achievement in Cinematography at the St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

Gut Feeling (Hattie Archibald, Master of Arts Screen, 2018) was nominated for Best Dramedy at the Miami Web Series Festival, USA.

Joy (Gabriel Morrison, Bachelor of Arts Screen 2019) won Best Director and Best Achievement in Screenplay and was nominated for Best Short Film and Best Actor at St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

Like How I Remember (Brittany Xu, Bachelor of Arts Screen 2019) was nominated for Best Child Actor at the Asian Film Festival Los Angeles, USA.

Lost Boy (Peter Skinner, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) won Best Short Film at St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

The End, The Beginning (Archie Chew, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) won the AVID Award for Best Original Music in an Australian Short Film at the Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia.

The Familiars (Millie Malcolm, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) won the Youth Jury Award for Best Short Film at the San Sebastian Horror and Fantasy Film Festival, Spain; and was nominated for Best Achievement in Sound Post-Production and Best Young Actor at the St Kilda Film Festival, Australia.

The Granny Flat (Rachel Mackey, Bachelor of Arts Screen, 2018) won Best Comedic Film at the Australian Women’s Film Festival, Australia.

This River (Naomi Fryer, Master of Arts Screen, 2019) won the Spectrum Films Award for Best Direction in an Australian Short Film at the Flickerfest International Short Film Festival, Australia; won Best Student Film and Best Cinematographer, and was nominated for Best Film and Best Director at the WIFT V-Fest, Australia; and was nominated in the Virtual Monthly Competition at the Montreal Independent Film Festival, Canada.

111 Section 8 Appendices

Appendix 6: Teaching and Learning

Industry Certificates AFTRS Industry Certificates are practical and outcome-focused non-award courses taught by screen and broadcast professionals. The courses are developed in response to and mapped to identified media industry roles and skills requirements. The curriculum is informed and endorsed by AFTRS’ Industry Advisory Panels. These certificates provide the skills and knowledge for practitioners to succeed in an increasingly competitive landscape.

Over the reporting period, the school delivered 12 Industry Certificates to 120 students. These included production accounting, script assessment, post producer, TV assistant editor, content creation radio Producer, TV shooter producer, colour grading, digital producer and radio content, management & Leadership. Students that complete the courses are in demand, and industry often looks to AFTRS for recommendations for employment. Production accounting students have been highly sought after during the past year.

The COVID-19 pandemic continued to provide disruption to the volume and variety of Industry Certificates able to be offered onsite.

Short, Sharp, and Immediately Useful (SSIU) Seminars

Short, Sharp, and Immediately Useful (SSIU) is a series of professional development seminars designed for busy industry practitioners, including managers, executive producers, producers, and entrepreneurs, to help them get up-to-speed on the essential subjects for their career, company and/or projects.

Each seminar is specifically tailored for the creative industries. There is a wide variety of topics, informed by our unique industry intel. Over the reporting period, the School delivered eight SSIU seminars to 164 students on topics such as project financing, social media as part of your business strategy, developing your brand, managing creative teams, developing IP, and emerging tech.

Short Courses The AFTRS Industry Short Courses are taught by expert practitioners, providing relevant practical skills and knowledge to help screen and broadcast career progression. Industry Short courses are for students aged 18+ and are offered on campus and online. They provide introductory and intermediary training in various in-demand areas ranging from budgeting fundamentals, podcasting, presentation skills, screenwriting, and mobile content creation. They are delivered as one, two or five-day intensives or part-time remote, a few hours a week, typically over a five to ten-week period.

Over the reporting period, the school delivered 101 Short Courses to 1,539 students, covering writing, directing, producing, podcasting, mobile content creation, editing, prop making and more.

The COVID-19 pandemic continued to disrupt the volume and variety of Short courses that could be offered onsite.

112 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Award Course Program In 2021, AFTRS continued to offer award courses designed to ensure that the School is supporting a changing screen and broadcast industry with relevant, future-focused creative education. The School delivered a Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production, Graduate Diploma in Radio, MA Screen in ten Disciplines, and MA Screen: Business and Leadership.

This offering enables AFTRS to ensure a high-quality education experience for the maximum number of students.

2020 Number of Graduates by Course:

· Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production (AQF 7) - 73

· Graduate Diploma in Radio (AQF 8) - 15

· Masters of Arts Screen (AQF 9) - 35

· Masters of Arts Screen: Business and Leadership (AQF 9) - 7

Students enrolled into an award course and who are unable or choose not to continue their studies may be eligible to exit the course with the award for a lesser qualification, such as an Advanced Diploma and Graduate Diploma.

The Alternative Exit Qualification Awards are available to students who are withdrawing from their enrolled course of study and have successfully completed the required semester subjects. Not all award courses have an approved exit award.

The COVID-19 pandemic continued to significantly impact the delivery of education and training during the period. Hands-on learning was prioritised on Campus. All students were taught COVIDSafe Production Protocols, and CovidSafety Supervisors monitored the shoots. Production and broadcast briefs were altered, and students were required to develop COVIDSafe shooting plans which aligned their activities to industry.

Each subject in each course devised plans to move between remote and on-campus delivery as the situation remained variable.

Dealing with COVID-19, developed in consultation with students and faculty, was ongoing, ensuring the School could again be agile in its delivery if necessary.

Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production

The Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production (BASP) was launched in 2017 and continues to go from strength to strength. The BASP aims to meet the industry need for high-quality graduates who are adaptable generalists who are job-ready for work in the screen sector and can create content across various forms and formats and with the knowledge and skills to build a sustainable career.

In 2021, the School welcomed a new intake of 88 students into BA Year 1, with 86 students progressing into Year 2 and 79 students progressing into Year 3. These included two BA Year 1 students who have been on Leave of Absence during 2020 and returned to join 2021 students.

The course’s heart is a pedagogy that focuses on conceptual learning supported by industry-relevant production activities to enable students to develop lifelong skills to help them navigate changing industrial landscapes. The School is committed to continued course development and work resumed on workload modelling and contracting to maximise operational efficiencies. This has contributed to a more stable team of teachers that have enhanced course delivery through each iteration.

The BASP made significant alterations to its teaching and production activities in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the disruption, in semester 1, additional electives in Y3 were run in the summer to enable all students to complete their course requirements.

113 Section 8 Appendices

Graduate Diploma in Radio

The Graduate Diploma in Radio (GD Radio) is the School’s flagship radio course and produces industry-ready professionals. AFTRS Radio alumni are currently working in full-time positions in radio and podcasting. Since 2019, the course has been offered as a one-year full-time or two-year part-time course.

The GD Radio is a highly practical and intensive course that builds a broad range of skills through four pop-up radio stations and a range of podcasting opportunities. The skills developed during this course become more complex throughout the course. The course culminates in students building a radio station from the ground up and producing a live broadcast and podcast series. Work placements at radio stations across Australia are an essential component of this course and often leads to future employment. The GD Radio consistently has a remarkable employment success rate.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the GD Radio made alterations to its teaching and broadcast activities in 2020 and 2021, making the course more agile and responsive to the evolving situation. They also introduced cutting edge work practices and software that prepare students to work in a changing broadcast environment. The reconceived Radio Broadcasts, aligned to the revised industry broadcast, have allowed ongoing and more remote production. In 2021, using COVIDSafe Broadcast Protocols, AFTRS was able to deliver its longstanding relationship with the Royal Agricultural Society for a pop-up station at the Sydney Easter Show again.

Masters Program

During FY 2020-21, AFTRS continued its long and successful history of postgraduate study. AFTRS works closely with industry to ensure the Masters courses are relevant, innovative, and future-focused.

Master of Arts Screen: In 10 Disciplines

The Master of Arts Screen (MA Screen) offers a unique program of professional development, training, and mentorship to develop graduates who will fast track their careers in their chosen discipline. The course is structured around intense cycles of practical, industry-focused exercises and creative practice research. Students test and hone skill sets in a particular discipline and gain critical skills in resilience, adaptability, and creative leadership.

In 2021, the MA Screen was offered in 10 disciplines with 41 students enrolled across two years in Directing, Documentary, Editing, Music, Producing, Production Design, Screenwriting, Sound, and Animation.

The School has focused on the ongoing curriculum review of the practical, industry-led collaborations that distinguish this course. This gives students the best opportunity to create work that demonstrates their craft and collaborative skills and their artistic point of view. The theory and project development teaching were brought forward, allowing for skills-based learning that required access to specialist equipment to be programmed in the following semester (second half of 2020), where they could be conducted following COVIDSafe protocols. Students undertaking specialist production courses were, where possible, able to take equipment home to continue developing their craft skills.

114 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

In the Academic Year 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted the production and hands-on learning schedule, resulting in a redesign of the curriculum delivery. Crucially, AFTRS enacted COVIDSafe Production Protocols to get MAS Capstone productions started from July 2020. Hands-on learning was prioritised on Campus and consistent with the BASP, all students were taught COVIDSafe Production Protocols, and CovidSafety Supervisors monitored the shoots. Through serious collective effort, all productions were completed safely, and students could complete the final year of their course. Alongside that, Year 1 students developed hands-on skills in planning and managing COVIDsafe productions through exercises and then in their Capstone productions.

Master of Arts Screen: Business and Leadership

The Master of Arts Screen: Business (MASB) is a transformational program enabling students to succeed and thrive as creative leaders in today’s fast-moving, increasingly global screen industry. In 2021, there are 14 students enrolled across two years of the program. Over two years of weekend intensives, students studied the latest approaches to creative leadership and the strategic thinking needed to engage effectively with the global screen industry and its complexities. The course is also focused on entrepreneurial financing and opportunities arising from advances in technology.

At the end of the first year of the course, the students created and developed a career-focused, professional Business Plan. By the end of the second year, students are armed with the language and persuasive skills of ideas-based entrepreneurs. Students have pitched to a range of Australian and international industry leaders using their distinct leadership style and fully developed projects and proposals.

The MASB responded to the COVID-19 pandemic by moving classes to be delivered entirely online. Online learning has proved to be very popular with the students undertaking this course, especially those in the cohort who are not Sydney-based. With travel outside of Australia impossible, the students undertook a virtual business case study with international partners in the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union.

115 Section 8 Appendices

Appendix 7: Outreach

AFTRS’ Outreach programs are designed to attract the next generation of storytellers from across Australian society with the specific goal of enriching the stories we tell.

The Outreach team forms part of the First Nations & Outreach Division, newly established in July 2020. The Outreach team partners with a wide range of communities and organisations to deliver screen and broadcast skills development to those interested in a creative career. Current Outreach initiatives include Talent Camp, MediaLab, Community Workshops and Community Scholarships.

Outreach has also worked to make AFTRS more accessible to the public by offering some opportunities for community organisations to hold events at AFTRS, COVID-19 restrictions permitting. All the programs are also a vehicle for positive social change.

Community Workshops In 2020-21, AFTRS partnered nationally with community cultural organisations to create skill development opportunities.

These included:

· The Centre for Stories WA - AFTRS supported the participants with a lived experience of a disability further developed their storytelling techniques, facilitated by trained experts (WA)

· Edmund Rice Centre WA - AFTRS and ERC partnered to run six storytelling workshops for under 18s and those 18-25 years from underprivileged backgrounds (WA)

· Asia Education Foundation - AFTRS worked with AEF (a division of the University of Melbourne) to develop a storytelling resource for English teachers and students from Papua New Guinea. (PNG/VIC)

· Campbelltown Arts Centre - AFTRS has developed an ongoing partnership with Campbelltown Arts Centre; intended programming is on hold due to COVID-19 but will resume once it is safe to do so. (NSW)

· Outloud - AFTRS supported Outloud on their ‘Be Your Own Billboard’ project, working with queer young people from Western Sydney in self-expression (NSW)

· Bus Stop Films - AFTRS has an ongoing partnership with Bus Stop Films on a year-long program where approximately 50 filmmakers with intellectual disabilities attend fortnightly workshops and screenings at the AFTRS campus. Students complete drama and documentary productions as part of their studies (NSW)

· Djed Press - AFTRS supported the inclusion of two First Nations participants into Djed Press’ Featured Writers Program 2021, with the aim of supporting, upskilling and platforming new and emerging writers from First Nations backgrounds

· Information and Cultural Exchange - AFTRS supported the mentoring of Anthony Khoury, a vision-impaired filmmaker, as part of the partnership with ICE. AFTRS staff also participated as mentors

· Short Course Scholarships to participants from the following organisations - Footscray Community Arts Centre (VIC), Wide Angle Tasmania (Tas), My State Film Festival (Tas), Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) (NSW), and Form Dance (NSW)

Due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the School had to be agile in how it conducted its community workshops. It continued to provide more individual mentoring and offer access to online short courses to the organisations and individuals the School works with across Australia.

116 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Talent Camp Talent Camp is a national biennial project in partnership with Screen Australia, all state screen agencies, Scripted Ink and AWG. Talent Camp supports the skills and career development of emerging creatives from diverse backgrounds to develop new content and be employment-ready for the screen sector.

Talent Camp specifically targets emerging creative talent from under-represented communities, including First Nations peoples, culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD), disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, geographic disadvantage, and socioeconomic status.

Initiated and managed by AFTRS, Talent Camp was launched in June 2017 and has experienced sustained appeal. It has been held as a biennial project of State Talent Camp editions which converges into a National Talent Camp where two participants are chosen from each state (and one per territory) Talent Camp group. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the camp was postponed to December 2020 and was delivered online. Since three projects have been chosen for funding, with participants from Victoria, Queensland, and South Australia each receiving $25000 in funding to produce a short film/pilot/proof of concept for a project they developed while at Talent Camp.

Many of the state participants have received development funding, offered paid employment, developed new networks, and found producers/collaborators for their work. Past National Camp participants have gone onto win awards for their work, including at BFI and Academy accredited festivals.

Media Lab Launched in 2018, Media Lab continues to be a successful online screen literacy initiative that extends the reach of AFTRS into primary and secondary schools and positions AFTRS as a leader in Media Arts education.

Media Lab has offered a range of free online resources for teachers and students, levelling the screen literacy playing field for future creatives.

Teachers can now access lesson plans for media subjects: filmmaking, documentary, stop motion animation, podcasting, and screenwriting. Teachers can choose to follow the consecutive program or mix and match the content to suit their students’ interests. The resource features Australian screen examples, instructional videos, ethical dilemmas, and case studies.

This year AFTRS developed three new resources: Media Law, Storytelling and Journalism. All three are in various stages of development, and the School aims to launch all three before the end of 2021.

117 Section 8 Appendices

Appendix 8: Industry Practitioners at AFTRS AFTRS attracts industry members to lecture as guests in Award courses, Short courses, Industry Certificates, and the activities and workshops lead by the School’s First Nations and Outreach division. They also have contributed to online resources across all disciplines and specialisations. The contribution from Industry Guests has a profound impact on the learning experience of students across all courses. Further, the various talk series and sessions provided a place for industry to learn, connect, and stay up to date.

Short Courses and Industry Certificates

Lecturers

Jane Allen; Kate Ayrton; Dylan Blowen; Susan Bower; Liam Branagan; Anne Brooksbank; Josh Butt; Bridget Callow-Wright; Helen Campbell; Sally Chesher; David Clune; Carolyn Constantine; Jane Corden; Elissa Down; Rebecca Edwards; Tim Ferguson; Lucy Gaffy; Andrew Garrick; Rob Gunn; Louise Henry; Jill Hewitt; Madeline Joannou; Owen Johnston; Barry Keohane; Taylor Litton-Strain; Luciano Marigo-Spitaleri; Nicole McClure; Kristian McKenna; Melissa Maclean; Jonathan Ogilvie; Amin Palangi; Michael Philips; Louise Smith; Tracey Spicer; Mark Stewart-Pearson; Gareth Tillson; Dani Torresan; Donald Walker; Deanne Weir; Malinda Wink; Greg Woodland; Annie Wright; Alexa Wyatt; Tarra Van Amerongen

Guest lecturers/speakers

Todd Abbott; Drew Alexander; Zoe Angus, Andy Barclay; Jon Barrie; Amanda Beachcroft; Catherine Bishop; James Boyce; Jenny Brooks; Dee Brown; Jenevieve Chang; Trent Chapman; Anson Charody-bognar; David Clune; Colleen Clarke; Nick Cole; Chris Coote; Tracey Crane; Amanda Crittenden; Elle Curran; Max Dalton; Monica Davidson; Saxon Dixon; Liz Doran; Poppy Doyle; Mike Feghali;

Belinda Fithie; Riccy Felixberto; Andrena Finlay; Belinda Fithie; Allison Garoza; Michelle Gauntlett; Louise Gough; Sylvana Gregan; Julia Gretton-Roberts; Mark Grosser; Rebecca Hardman; Jessie Hildebrand; Michael Kammes; Sarah Lambert; Denby Edwina Waddy; David Mcewan; Dom Mccusker; Kit Mcdee; Michele Mcdonald; Tamara Meek; Steve Merry; Dan Miall; Denby Mitchell; Nerida Moore; Ian Murray; John Myers; Tony Nagle; Ben Nguyen; Diana Ngyuen; James Nowiczewski; Rachel Okine; Bali Padda; Martin Perrott; Kenny Pettigrew; Cristina Pozzan; Matthew Purchase; Dan Read; Lynette Reeves; Rob Sarroff; Ambar Sidhwani; Matt Tomaszewski; Tiare Tomaszewski; Paulo Vivan; Edwina Waddy; Phil Wade; Jamie Ware; Jaala Webster; Oliver Weidlich; Sophie Weisner; David Whealy; Jennifer Wilson; Ramadan Zekirovski; Tegan Zekirovski

Meet The Creators @ AFTRS & ACMI

Twice-monthly live event held in 2021 at AFTRS and ACMI, also live-streamed via YouTube in partnership with ACMI, Film Victoria and Media Mentors Australia.

Guest speakers

Tony Ayres; Laurence Billiet; Marty Benson; Corrie Chen; Beck Cole; Laurie Critchley; Debbie Cuell; Aaron Fa’Aoso; Ainsley Gardiner; Briar Grace-Smith; Naomi Higgins; Anita Jacoby; Nicole Minchin; Samuel Nuggin-Paynter; Deb Spinocchi; Amy Thunig; Sam Pang; Rikkie Proost; Leah Purcell; Samantha Strauss; Luke Tunnecliffe; Paul Walton; Majella Wiemers

118 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Talks sessions AFTRS established regular online masterclass/ talks sessions with industry practitioners as a part of the AFTRS response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Talks @ AFTRS

Nathan Anderson; Karla Arnall; Robyn Butler; Dee Brown; Michael Carrington; Rachel Clements; Janine Cooper; Annabel Davis; Julie-Anne De Ruvo; Elissa Down Denise Eriksen; Nick Forward; David Galloway; Andrew Garrick; Julie Hanna; Tommy Harper; Jacob Hickey; Jeremy Hindle; Karina Holden; Wayne Hope; Claudia Karvan; Joseph Kosinski; Debbie Lee; Shelley Lauman; Barbara McCarthy; Beverly McGarvey; Claudio Miranda; Alex Mitchell; Cathie Scott; Trisha Morton-Thomas; Luke O-Connor; Stephen Oliver; Chris Oliver-Taylor; Sheree Philips; Chloe Rickard; Charlotte Stoudt; Margaret Tilson; Angus Ross; Mia Stewart; Ben Ulm; Paul Wiegard; Janice Williams; Zoe White; Sophia Zachariou.

Graduate Showcase Panels: May 2021

Phillip Ashley-Brown; Jana Blair; Danielle Boesenberg; Grainne Brunsdon; Sally Caplan; Francis Coady; Gabrielle Cole; Steve Cooper; Fiona Donovan; Jenny Eskelin; Mia Falstein-Rush; Jimmy Fogg; Georgina Harris; Rob Gunn; Manda Hatter; Luke Hetherington; Nick Hunter; Sadhana Jethanandani; Madelein Joannou; Larry Laboe; Tanya Lambert; Corey Layton; Raymond Leung; Toni Malone; Kath McIntyre; Oliver Miller; Kasey Moore; Jenny Neighbour; Gerry O’Leary; Rani Seckold; Eren “Pinky” Sener; Lauren Shelley; Sarah Tan; Grant Tothill; Ralph Van Dijk; Ros Webb.

Award courses

Bachelor of Arts (Screen) : Guest lecturers

Kate Blackmore; Anna Borghesi; Nicolas Brown; Ishtar Cavagnino; Adam Daniel; Este Darin-Cooper; Emily Dash; Belinda Dean; Sherre DeLys Chambers; Aunty Rhonda Dixon-Grovenor; Karen Eck; Keane Fletcher; Lucy Gaffy; Hendrik Gericke; Mitzi Goldman; Will Hadinata; Michelle Hardy; Mary Hutson; Kerinne Jenkins; Sadhana Jethanandani; Belinda Jombwe; Danny Lachevre; Alexis Lane; Mabel Li; Luciano Marigo-Spitaleri; Luke Marsden; Dominique McCusker; Brendon McDonall; Gabrielle McKinlay; Annabel Mills; Reza Momenzada; Daniel Monks; Dr Romaine Moreton; Daniel Nettheim; Tanzy Owen; Wayne Pashley; Leah Pellinkhof; Sherree Philips; Claudia Pickering; Rolland Pike; Sandra Pires; Fiona Press; Amara Primero; Stevie Ray; Marissa Saroca; Eren Sener; Peter Skinner; Bradley Slabe; Isabella Stanhope; Paul Struthers; Ana Tiwary; Alexei Toliopoulos; Nadia Townsend; Thomas Wilson-White; Anousha Zarkesh; Samuel Zubrycki

Graduate Diploma of Radio: Guest lecturers

Steve Ahern; Dave Archer; Karla Arnall; Philip Ashley-Brown; Bill Bailey; Rowan Barker; Glen Bartholomew; Mariam Belle; Matthew Bevan; Felix Bray; Leroy Brown; Tim Brunero; Bruce Burke; Laurie Cardonna; Jaime Chaux; Danny Chifley; Michael Christian; Amy Collett; Pamela Cook; Mitchell Coombs; Rachel Corbett; Cassie Crofts; Glenn Daniel; Mark Daniel; Monica Davidson; Pete Davidson; Matthew Dickson; Matthew Eggleston; Emma Elias; Dave Evans; Melissa Femia; Masako Fukui; Sian Gard; Grace Garde; Jennifer Goggin; Joel Gosper; Sally Hanson; Claudia Hirst; Spencer Howson; Madeline Joannou; Brendan Jones; Amanda Keller; Nic Kelly; Ryan Khay; Taryn La Fauci; Danny Lakey; Angela Lavoipierre; Timothy Lee; Fanny Lumsden; Ash London; Cate Madill; Grant Maling; David Marchese; Daniel Markovski; Miles Martignoni; Nicole McClure; Rod McGuiness; Kristian McKenna; Michael McLennan; Luke McFarlane; Campbell

119 Section 8 Appendices

McNolty; Alex Mitchell; Michael Moffatt; Lauren Montgomery; Linda Mottram; Madeline Muir; Kim Napier; Ann-Maree Nolan; Jessica O’Callaghan; Luke O’Shea; Fiona Pepper; Natalie Peters; Brad Pottinger; Cherie Romaro; Brooklyn Ross; Sam Stove; Shayne Sinclair; Leah Stainstreet; Stephen Stockwell; Glen Stolzehein; Tom Tilley; Gareth Tillson; Heidi Tiltins; Talecia Vescio; Tom Whitaker; Mike Williams; Lyn Worsley.

Masters: guest lecturers

Felicity Abbott; Dan Ahern; Denson Baker; Hannah Barnes; Annie Beauchamp; Steve Bibb; Scott Bird; Sarah Bishop; Belle Blamey; Nicholas Buc; Tim Bullock ; David Burr; David Caesar; Bridget Callow Wright; Nicole Chamoun; Will Colhoun; Ella Colley; Robert Connolly; Katrina Cook; Michael Cordell; Amiel Courtin-Wilson; Fiona Crombie; Matthew Dabner; Kim Dalton; Monica Davidson; Essie Davis; Alexandre De Franceschi; Lillian Dell; Jed Dodge; Fiona Donovan; Brian Dorricott; Stefan Duscio; Bonnie Elliot; Aaron Fa’Aoso; Kim Farrant; Andrew Farrell; Liz Ferguson; Hollie Fifer; Eve Forman; Anna Fraser; Emma Freeman; Lucy Gaffy; Mara Garanzin ; Sandy George; Marcus Gillezeau; Mitzi Goldman; Christopher Gordon; Guy Gross; Geir Gunnarsson; Greg Haddrick; Allister Haire; Sheila Hanahan Taylor; Oli Harbottle; Lindi Harrison; Paul Healy; Alex Henery; Martin Hersov; Madeleine Hetherton; Liam Heyen; Damien Higginbotham; Simon Higgins; Hannah Hilliard; Anna Howard; Paul Huntingford; Simon Ingerson; Peter James; Emma Jensen; Annabelle Johnson; Carl Johnson; Steve Kaplan; Andrew Kotatko; Danny Lachevre; Maziar Lahooti; Alice Lanagan; Sam Lang; Melissa Lee Sayer; Sean Luther Hall; Angus Macdonald; Marian Macgowan; Tanith Glynn-Maloney; James Manche; Luciano Marigo; Marissa McDowell; Michelle McGahey; Susan McKinnon; Ian McLoughlin; Brita McVeigh; Virginia Mesiti; Nick Meyers; Sophie Miller; Julie Money; Georgia Moxham; Shannon Murphy; Nora Niasari; Joseph Nizeti; Jonathan Ogilvie; Rachel Okine; Coles Order; John Osmond; Karen Pearlman; Deborah Peart; Jen Peedom; Adrienne Pickering; Nigel Poulton; Kate Riedl; Gina Roncoli; Michael Rymer; Bassel Saroutim; Stephen Schutzem; Partho Sen-Gupta; Justine Seymour; Andrew Silke; Shakthi Sivanathan;

Adam Smith; Louise Smith; Dan Spielman; Vicki Sugars; Pariya Taherzadeh; Nerida Tyson-Chew; Samuel Wall; Kelly Wallwork; Lynette Wallworth; Greg Waters; Jen Waters; Alex Weight; Jessica Wells; Matt Weston; Greg White; Danielle Wiessner; Thomas Wilson; Caitlin Yeo; Anousha Zarkesh; Tom Zubrycki.

First Nations and Outreach Tutors, Speakers, and Industry

Lorena Allam; Violeta Ayala; Dr Lou Bennett OAM; Dr Nerida Blair; Beck Cole; Dena Curtis; Monica Davidson; Rhonda Dixon-Grovenor; Aaron Fa’Aoso; Patrick Goulding; Nancia Guivarra; Terri Janke; Tinzar Lwyn; Catriona McKenzie; Gillian Moody; Lorna Munro; Cornel Ozies; Jacob Round; Nardi Simpson; Sonia Smallacombe; Mitchell Stanley; Mitch Torres; Linda Ung

120 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Appendix 9: Public Programs

Open Days and Postgraduate Information Week

Virtual Open Day

Saturday, 8 August 2020

Open Day Event Sessions Views - 702. This event was conducted via Zoom and livestream, making it challenging to capture the entire reach of Open Day sessions; however, an encouraging indicator was the views each session received.

BA Course Information Session

Subject Leaders join Course Leader Joe Hepworth to give an overview of the Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production, sharing key insights and information on the undergraduate course designed for students with a passion for storytelling seeking a career in the screen industries.

Meet the Mentor Sessions

Participants were invited to join BA Meet the Mentor sessions facilitated by key BA staff, the Course Leader, senior lecturers, and tutors. Sessions provided an opportunity to meet the staff, hear insights into the BA program and participate in a Q&A.

Radio Course Information Session

Head of Radio Fyona Smith and Senior Lecturer Jess Campanaro, joined by alum Grant Maling, provide an overview of the Graduate Diploma in Radio, sharing key insights and information about this career-accelerating course.

Postgraduate Course Information Session

Course Leader Susan Danta and Head of Animation Krista Jordan took participants through the Master of Arts Screen, focusing on the 10 different disciplines, the course structure, the development, and the collaboration process.

Short Course Information Session

Head of Industry Programs Wendy Gray and Business Development Manager Helen Campbell provided an overview of the short course offerings —Industry Certificates, Corporate, Short Courses, and shared their insights and information about the slate of short course offerings.

Student Experience at AFTRS

This was an open session with the AFTRS Student Centre team about life on campus, including a candid Q&A.

First Nations at AFTRS

Current students and alumni shared their AFTRS experience with AFTRS Indigenous Project Coordinator Joseph Cardona.

What’s Your Flava? Screening and Panel Session

A marathon screening of the latest season of What’s Your Flava?, the dating and dining reality show produced by Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production students. The session included a panel discussion with the creators and an audience Q&A.

121 Section 8 Appendices

Postgraduate Info Week

Monday, 6 —Saturday, 11 July 2020 Attendance - 223

Numerous creatives from all over Australia and the world joined us at the first-ever virtual edition of our annual Postgraduate Information Week, from Monday 6 to Saturday 11 July, for a week-long focus on our Master of Arts Screen (offered in 10 disciplines), Master of Arts Screen: Business and Leadership and Graduate Diploma in Radio (full-time and part-time) programs. They got to know our lecturers, students, and alumni, learned about our courses, joined live discussions, took a virtual campus tour, enjoyed work produced at the School, and got some hot tips on how to ace their application for the 2021 intake.

Participants were invited to join discipline-specific information sessions facilitated by Heads of Discipline, Senior Lecturers, alumni, and students. Sessions provided an opportunity to ‘Meet our Mentors’ (key staff), hear insights of the Radio and MAS programs and participate in a Q&A with staff, students and alumni.

Events, Conferences, and Festivals

In 2020-2021 AFTRS held over 22 events and public programs, hosted at AFTRS’ facilities and ACMI in Melbourne or online via live streams to AFTRS Facebook page or YouTube.

· Number of events and public programs: 5

· Number of attendees: 243

· Number of online events: 17 plus the live streaming of the above five events

· Number of online viewers: 5267

Emerging, Gifted and X

Emerging, Gifted and X (EGX) is an online masterclass/conversation series of free, 30-minute discussions with some of the most exceptional and talented screen creatives from diverse backgrounds.

Thursday, 2 July 2020

Discussion with documentary maker Violeta Ayala. Moderated by Alejandra Canales.

Thursday, 26 November 2020

Filmmaker and all-rounder Linda Ung speaks with Gary Paramanathan.

Thursday, 10 December 2020

Discussion with factual Producer/ Director/Editor Tinzar Lwyn. Moderated by Gary Paramanathan.

122 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Indigenous Masterclasses

AFTRS’ Indigenous Masterclasses is a series of one-hour talks for emerging and current Indigenous students and practitioners to join online. Initiated in FY 2019-20, the program carried over into FY 2020-21.

Wednesday, 7 October 2020

In this session, Producer/Writer/director/ journalist/broadcaster/playwright/presenter Mitch Torres shared insights into the media industry with AFTRS’ Joseph Cardona.

Wednesday, 21 April 2021

This session featured journalist, presenter, and producer Lorena Allam in conversation with AFTRS’ Joseph Cardona.

Talks @ AFTRS A series of virtual masterclass/talks for the screen and broadcast industry.

TALKS @ AFTRS: Janine Cooper

and Cathie Scott - Tuesday, 14 July 2020

Discussion about the challenges and joys of making and running large format, big-budget primetime shows and during a pandemic.

Panel: Denise Eriksen (Co-Founder, Media Mentors Australia) (Moderator), Janine Cooper (Executive Producer - The Masked Singer, The Bachelor) and Cathie Scott (Executive Producer - Dancing With The Stars, Survivor).

TALKS @ AFTRS: Julie Hanna, Ben Ulm,

and David Galloway - Tuesday, 28 July 2020

Leading Australian factual television producers share their experiences, insights, and expectations in factual television.

Panel: Andrew Garrick (Writer, Producer and Director) (Moderator), Julie Hanna (ABC), Ben Ulm (ITV) and David Galloway (Lune Media)

TALKS @ AFTRS: Robyn Butler

and Wayne Hope - Tuesday, 11 August 2020

Robyn Butler and Wayne Hope are living proof of the mantra; versatility is a trademark of successful Australian producers - now more than ever. Sharing their stories about their career - from The Librarians to The Investigators and, most recently, Love in Lockdown.

Panel: Denise Eriksen (Co-Founder, Media Mentors Australia) (Moderator), Robyn Butler (Actor, Writer, Director and Producer, Gristmill) and Wayne Hope (Actor, Writer, Director and Producer, Gristmill)

TALKS @ AFTRS: Zoë White, Sherree Philips,

Julie-Anne De Ruvo, and Mia Stewart - Tuesday, 25 August 2020

Inspired by the ‘Who’s On Your Crew?’ campaign, this special edition featured four female AFTRS alumnae talking about their careers, their most recent projects and how film school gave them a leg up.

Panel: Wendy Gray (Head of Industry, AFTRS) (Moderator), Zoë White (Cinematographer - The Handmaid’s Tale, Westworld, Nancy), Sherree Philips (Production Designer - Babyteeth, Top of the Lake, Fighting Season), Julie-Anne De Ruvo (Editor - The Letdown, Please Like Me, Les Norton, Girls Can’t Surf) and Mia Stewart (Sound Editor - Lambs of God, Mad Max Fury Road)

TALKS @ AFTRS: Debbie Lee and

Sophia Zachariou - Tuesday, 8 September 2020

Two of Australia’s top producers discussed creating, making, and delivering scripted comedy and drama for Australian and international audiences.

Panel: Andrew Garrick (Writer, Producer and Director) (Moderator), Debbie Lee (Matchbox Pictures) and Sophia Zachariou (Bunya Productions).

123 Section 8 Appendices

TALKS @ AFTRS: Alex Mitchell and Karla Arnall

- Tuesday, 22 September 2020

In conversation with two of the top audio producers in the business: PodcastOne’s Alex Mitchell (Rusty’s Garage, The Chaser’s Extreme Vetting, The Big Questions, Health Hacker, Radical Fashionism) and freelancer Karla Arnall (CrossBread, Judith Lucy: Overwhelmed & Dying, The Pineapple Project), talking all things podcasting and audio storytelling.

Panel: Tony Rasmussen (Senior Radio Lecturer, AFTRS) (Moderator), Alex Mitchell (PodcastOne) and Karla Arnall (Freelancer).

TALKS @ AFTRS: Working Better Together

Mental health During COVID - Tuesday, 6 October 2020

This free industry event, live-streamed, featured key industry leaders discussing the importance of supporting the mental health of the film and television workforce in a COVID-safe production environment. The panellists will explore some of the recent real-life challenges and provide information and resources to access help.

Panel: Margaret Tillson (Moderator), Chris Oliver-Taylor (CEO, Asia- Pacific, Fremantle), Stephen Tate, (Head of Entertainment, Network Ten), Dee Brown (Senior HR Manager, Animal Logic), Annabel Davis (Acting CEO, Co-Curious) and Luke O’Connor (Industry Relations and Partnerships Manager, Support Act)

TALKS @ AFTRS: Trisha Morton- Thomas and

Rachel Clements - Friday, 13 October 2020

Founders of Brindle Films (8MMM Aboriginal Radio, Occupation: Native, The Song Keepers) and multi-award-winning producers discuss the upcoming multi-million dollar ABC and Netflix children’s series, MaveriX, running the Alice Springs-based production company and all the new projects they have in the works.

Panel: Denise Eriksen (Co-Founder, Media Mentors Australia) (Moderator), Trisha Morton-Thomas (Brindle Films) and Rachel Clements (Brindle Films)

TALKS @ AFTRS: Karina Holden, Jacob Hickey

and Stephen Oliver - Tuesday, 27 October 2020

Factual television producers discuss storytelling with impact, discovering unlikely heroes and exciting new projects in the works.

Panel: Andrew Garrick (Writer, Producer and Director) (Moderator), Karina Holden (Northern Pictures), Jacob Hickey (Blackfella Films) and Stephen Oliver (Manager of Documentaries at ABC) join Andrew Garrick

TALKS @ AFTRS: Paul Weigard, Chloe Rickard,

Nathan Anderson, and Peter Herbert Tuesday, 10 November 2020

Discussion about the evolution of their companies and sharing strategies and insights into today’s global screen media landscape.

Panel: Peter Herbert (Head of Screen Business, AFTRS), Paul Wiegard (Co-founder and CEO, Madman Entertainment, AFTRS alumni), Chloe Rickard (Partner, COO and Executive Producer, Jungle Entertainment), and Nathan Anderson (COO, Start Beyond)

Meet The Creators @ AFTRS&ACMI A new twice-monthly talks event held at AFTRS and ACMI with a live audience (when permitted) and a live stream to YouTube.

124 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Meet The Creators: Celebrating Women

- Tuesday, 9 March 2021 (@AFTRS)

In celebration of International Women’s Day, writer/director Corrie Chen, factual executive producer Debbie Cuell, director/writer/actor Leah Purcell, documentary producer Laurie Critchley and producer/writer Samantha Strauss discuss their recent projects and share insights into their exceptional careers with legend-in-her-own-right, Anita Jacoby AM.

Meet The Creators: Every One’s A Winner

- Tuesday, 23 March 21 (@ACMI)

In the first Melbourne outing of Meet the Creators @AFTRS & ACMI - live at ACMI and online around Australia - we are joined by four people who deliver some of Australia’s most successful programming: Tony Ayres, Laurence Billiet, Marty Benson, Naomi Higgins—discussing with MC Denise Eriksen of Media Mentors Australia, their secrets of success, and their career longevity.

Meet The Creators: From Concept to Broadcast - Tuesday, 13 April 2021

(@AFTRS)

Television showrunners have an extraordinary job: to take a raw concept and usher it through the brains and hands of hundreds of people, to make a piece of entertainment for Australians finally. Shows can begin with a throw-away comment in a conversation or through a format deal - but they always involve the meeting point of creativity and crazy logistics. Eureka’s Rikkie Proost, Screentime’s Deb Spinocchia and ITV’s Majella Wiemers discuss bringing the biggest shows on TV to our screens, from concept to broadcast, with MC Andrew Garrick.

Meet The Creators: Hitting it out Of the Park

- Tuesday, 27 April 2021 (@ACMI)

Focusing on shows that are ostensibly about sport but appeal far more broadly than just to sports fans, panellists Sam Pang (The Front Bar, Eurovision, Santo, Sam, and Ed’s Cup Fever, Have You Been Paying Attention), Luke Tunnecliffe (Head of Content for JamTV; Making Their Mark on Amazon Prime) and Nicole Minchin (Lowdown, The Record on Amazon Prime) share insights into how they

produce shows with broad appeal with Media Mentors’ Denise Eriksen.

Meet The Creators: May events were

cancelled/postponed due to COVID-19 lockdowns

Meet The Creators: Celebrating Collaborations

- Tuesday, 1 June 2021

This event was organised as an online-only event via YouTube due to Melbourne Lockdown

In this discussion of collaborations, director Beck Cole and writer Samuel Paynter talk about their chapter of an anthology feature film Cook 2020: Our Right of Reply  (entitled Ngā Pouwhenua in Aotearoa New Zealand). Teams from both countries worked together to develop a cohesive film. Producers Aaron Fa’Aoso and Paul Walton also talk about their collaboration on Strait to the Plate - an exploration of life on the Torres Strait islands through an entertaining and vibrant cooking show for NITV and SBS.

Meet The Creators: Te AO MAORI: Making Cousins - Tuesday, 8 June 2021 (@AFTRS)

This edition featured the filmmakers behind the New Zealand film Cousins: producer and co-director Ainsley Gardiner and writer, co-director, and actor Briar Grace-Smith in conversation with academic and writer Amy Thunig. Cousins is an adaptation of Patricia Grace’s eponymous novel and features an all-Maori female cast and key creative team. Tikanga Māori (Māori cultural practice) is an integral part of Māori culture and is at the heart of the Cousins’ story.

125 Section 8 Appendices

Appendix 10: Financial Resource Summary

Financial Performance AFTRS generated a deficit of $268,000 for the 2020-21 financial year. The deficit is primarily due to the implementation of AASB 16 Leases which replaces rent expense and the reduction of the lease incentive liability with depreciation and finance costs, resulting in a higher total expense of $190,000.

The remainder of the deficit ($78,000) was primarily due to a reduction in revenue stemming from the cancellation of short courses in the last week of June due to COVID-19 restrictions in Sydney.

The total revenue received was $33,467,000, with appropriations from government accounting for $25,059,000 of this amount.

The balance of $8,408,000 was generated through AFTRS’ activities and mainly comprised student fees. Award Courses produced $6,517,000, with $1,771,000 generated from short courses to industry, corporate groups, and schools. Other revenue sources such as interest, donations and royalties produced the remaining $120,000.

AFTRS’ operating expenditure totalled $33,735,000. This included $17,753,000 for employee benefits, $8,665,000 for suppliers, $6,571,000 for depreciation and amortisation, $695,000 for finance costs relating to the building lease and $51,000 for write down and impairment of other assets.

AFTRS reviewed its asset fair values as at 30 June 2021. The motor vehicles asset class was revalued upwards by $43,000.

External Audit The Australian National Audit Office performs the external audit of AFTRS.

Internal Audit AFTRS has engaged KPMG to provide an independent internal audit service. The contract for audit services with KPMG is for a period of three years, with a Contract end date of 31 July 2021. At the time of this report, the School was preparing to renew the contract with the service provider.

Internal Audit is administratively responsible to the Chief Operations Officer and is accountable to the Finance, Audit and Risk Management (FARM) Committee. Representatives from the internal auditors and a representative of the Australian National Audit Office attend FARM Committee meetings.

Internal Auditors provide the FARM Committee with a three-year audit plan annually. While the plan is reviewed annually, the FARM Committee re-evaluates the plan at each FARM Committee meeting with consideration to conditions within the School.

During the 2020-21 period, the audits conducted were:

· August 2020 - IT General Controls

· November 2020 - Course and Unit Development, Performance and Profitability

· April 2021 - Wage Compliance and Payroll

· June 2021 - Student Wellbeing & Mental Health

126 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Risk Management AFTRS’ Risk Management Framework is overseen by the Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee. It demonstrates how governance, policies, processes, review, and consultation work together to meet the requirements of the PGPA Act 2013 and promote a well-informed decision- making framework.

AFTRS’ risk tolerance, as set out in the Business Risk Register, is informed by AFTRS’ Administrative Orders and the Financial and Human Resource Delegations. Any risk at a high or significant level is escalated to the CEO and reported to the Finance, Audit and Risk Management Committee. The Business Risk Register is reviewed monthly by the AFTRS Executive team and considers changes to the School’s risk environment and relevant strategies, goals, and endeavours.

Prior to the end of the FY, the School initiated consultation with KPMG to assess AFTRS Risk Management Framework and Business Risk Register with the objective of continuous improvement and to ensure it is aligned to best practice.

Claims and Losses There were no major losses during the year ending 30 June 2021.

Purchasing AFTRS’ purchasing procedures are consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. The AFTRS Council delegates certain powers and functions, including purchasing levels, to occupants of specific AFTRS management positions through the Administrative Orders. This is subject to the limits prescribed under the Australian Film, Television and Radio School Act 1973 and the Council-approved policies, programs, and procedures of AFTRS.

To the best of the School’s knowledge, all properly rendered invoices were paid within the agreed trading terms. AFTRS participates in some whole-of-government contracts where appropriate, including the Travel

Services contract and contracts for the provision of stationery and office supplies. Information technology equipment and general goods purchases used both state and federal contracts where appropriate. The School buys capital items in accordance with the annual capital plan.

Competitive Tendering and Expressions of Interest

The AFTRS’ Administrative Orders require purchases of more than $100,000 to be obtained through formal processes that may involve either public or selected tender (RFQ/ RFP/RFT), which could include an expression of interest phase. Purchases greater than $350,000 require public tender, which may also include an expression of interest process.

In general, consideration is given to the following factors to determine the method of approach to the market:

· The urgency of the requirement

· A limited number of known potential suppliers

· The competitiveness of the marketplace

· A supplier’s prior knowledge or experience with a particular activity that other suppliers could not build up unless extensive additional costs and time delays were incurred

· Compatibility with existing equipment.

In 2020-21, AFTRS sought written quotes for the following services (over $100,000):

· Network infrastructure refresh 2021

127 Section 8 Appendices

Consultancy Services AFTRS engages consultants with specialist skills to help with defined projects. During the reporting period, the School entered into 25 specialist consultancies, involving an expenditure of $548,572.

Four consultancies had a value exceeding $20,000.

Consultancy Service provided Amount

Substance Studio

Pty Ltd

Student on-boarding

and other experiences

improvement

recommendation

93,210

New Romans Pty

Ltd

Preparation of

Leadership Strategy

and stakeholder

research

53,333

McCrindle

Research

Pty Ltd

AFTRS market

research

40,000

Voice Project Pty

Ltd

Staff survey 27,210

The School also engaged other consultants to provide regular, ongoing services.

Contractors Each year AFTRS engages a range of independent contractors. Most are industry practitioners that support the School’s core activities of teaching and learning. (See note 1B in Financial Statements.)

Property Use AFTRS’ headquarters are located at the Entertainment Quarter, Moore Park, NSW.

The building (12,964m2) features a specialist screen and radio teaching and production facilities. The cost of leasing, outgoings, and other property costs for 2020-21 totalled $5,229,000.

128 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

Index

A

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander 41, 96

Academic 8, 23, 24, 25, 27, 54, 56, 114

board 8, 23, 24, 25, 54, 56

governance 27

accessibility 10, 37, 46, 115

plan, AFTRS 42

accountable authority 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,

128, 129, 130

accounting standards 15, 16, 17, 18, 19,

128, 129, 130

Acknowledgement of Country 2

Administrative Orders 126

AFTRS

Act 14,15 See also Australian Film,

Television and Radio School Act 1973

Enterprise Agreement 51, 56

website 1, 45

Alumni 10, 27, 45

engagement 45

program 10

Annual Performance Statement 30, 46

Introductory statement 30

Statement of Preparation 29

Applications 28, 32, 94

ASPERA 19, 20, 125

Audit 16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 53, 125, 126, 130

external 19, 20, 125

independent report 62

internal 19, 20, 125

Australian Film, Television and Radio

School Act 1973 14, 18, 25, 51, 126

See also AFTRS: Act

Australian Qualifications Framework

(AQF) 94, 112

Award

course program 112

courses 112

B

Bachelor of Arts Screen: Production 18,

25, 94, 95, 96, 104, 105, 112, 120

2020 graduates 105

guest lecturers 118

Baldwin, Cleo 18, 25, 53

Balfour, David 26 See also Director of

Teaching and Learning 26

Bryan, Simeon 25

Burton, Christine, Associate

Professor 25

C

Campbell, Carole 25

Capital Expenditure Plan 44

CEO Office 27

Chair of Academic Board 23, 24, 54

See also Rose, Mark, Professor

Chair of Council 68, 15, 16, 53, 54

See also Howcroft, Russel

Chief Executive Officer (CEO),

AFTRS 11, 15, 17, 20, 23, 26, 53

See also Greenwood, Nell, Dr

Chief Financial Officer (CFO), AFTRS

See also Parekh, Shomal

Chief Technology Officer (CTO) 26

See also Executive team

Claims 126

Claims and Losses 126

Comcare 56

Comcover 59

Communications 15, 27, 45

Community Workshops 115

complaints 48, 58

completions 28, 35, 37

compliance 19, 20, 44, 48, 128

conferences 55

Consultancy Services 127

Contractors 74, 127

Corporate Governance 14-27

handbook 15, 56

Corporate Plan 12, 13, 30-46

Council 6, 7, 8, 11, 14, 15-18, 19, 20, 21,

22, 23, 25, 26, 53, 54, 56, 87, 88, 126

Courses See also Award course program

introductory short 111

Short Courses 6, 39, 76, 115, 125

COVID-19 6, 7, 9, 11, 31, 32, 33, 39, 44,

45, 46, 55, 57, 66, 69, 72, 102, 103, 104, 108,

111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 118, 124, 125

COVIDSafe 9, 56, 112, 113, 114

COVIDSafe plan 56

Production Protocols 56, 112, 114

Cross, Don 21, 22

culturally and linguistically diverse

(CALD) 116

Customer Relationship Management

(CRM) system 27

D

Developing Talent 35

Director of First Nations & Outreach

9, 26 See also Morton, Romaine, Dr

Director of Partnerships & Development

9, 11, 26 See also Apostolopoulos, Con

Director of People and Culture 26

See also Hope, Louise

Director of Teaching & Learning 26

See also Balfour, David

disability 11, 42, 46, 47, 49, 115, 116

diversity 7, 13, 30, 42, 43, 46, 47, 49

and Inclusion 27

taskforce 47

E

Elder-in-Residence 32 See

also Smallacombe, Sonia

Emerging Gifted and X (EGX) 41

Executive 7, 9, 11, 13, 20, 23, 26, 49, 51,

53, 54, 57, 88, 95, 122, 123, 126

team 7, 9, 11, 26, 49, 57, 126

Expressions of Interest 126

F

Facilities 6, 11, 14, 30, 40, 78, 121, 127, 129

Festivals 108, 116

Finance, Audit and Risk Management

Committee 19-22, 125, 126

charter 20 See also Finance Divison,

Organisation Chart 26

financial

performance 61-93, 125

statements 59, 61, 73, 81, 86

Finance Division 27

Finding Talent 31

129 Section 8 Appendices

First Nations 7, 9, 10, 13, 26, 27, 31, 32,

33, 39, 40, 42, 43, 46, 47, 96, 109, 115, 116,

117, 119, 120

& Outreach 9, 10, 26, 115

Tutors, speakers and industry 119

Fletcher, Paul, The Hon 15 See also

Minister for Communications, Urban

Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts

Fraud Control 59

freedom of information 58

Freedom of Information Act 1982

(FOI Act) 58

G

Government policy orders 58

Governor-General 15, 16, 17

Graduate 36, 76, 104

program 9, 35, 97, 100, 101

showcase 103, 118

panel guests 118

Graduate Diploma in Radio 94, 95, 96,

104, 106, 112, 113, 120, 121

2020 graduates 104, 106

guest lecturers 119

graduation 6, 103

Greenwood, Nell, Dr 7, 11, 13, 18, 25, 26

See also Chief Executive Officer

(CEO), AFTRS

H

Health and Safety Committee 56, 57

Herd, Annabelle 17, 53

Honorary degrees 6 See also Romaro,

Cherie See also Wallworth, Lynette See

also Torres, Mitch

Hope, Louise 26 See also Director of

People and Culture, AFTRS

Hosch, Tanya 17, 53

Howcroft, Russel 8, 16 See also Chair of

Council, AFTRS

Howe, Maija 18

I

Inclusion 7, 10, 32, 43, 46, 47, 48, 49,

85, 115

taskforce 47, 56

Indigenous 7, 17, 28, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35,

39, 42, 46, 93, 120, 122

masterclasses 122

scholarships 93

students 34, 122

workshops 31

Industrial Relations 56

Industry 9, 12, 13, 28, 30

Advisory Panels 38, 111

Certificates 27, 28, 39, 111, 117, 120

Forums and panels 41

Masterclasses 39

Partnerships 97

practitioners 103

Short Courses 111

Skills Survey 38

Training 28, 38, 40

Information Publication Scheme (IPS) 58

Internships 9, 11, 35, 97

placements and attachments 97

J

Jerzy Toeplitz Library 27

See also Library

Judicial Decisions 59

K

Kenneth Myer Fellowship Trust 34, 88,

95, 96

Key Performance Criteria 28-45

KPMG 21, 125, 126

L

Life Goals 36

M

masterclasses 6, 39, 45, 46

Master of Arts Screen 10, 94, 102, 104,

106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 113, 114, 120, 121

2020 graduates 107

2020 scholarships 96

Master of Arts Screen: Business

and Leadership 94, 106, 114, 121

2020 graduates 106

Masters

guest lecturers 119

program 113

Media Lab 32, 116

Meet The Creators 41, 117, 123, 124

guest speakers 117

Mentorship 113

Minister for Communications, Urban

Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts 15

See also Fletcher, Paul, The Hon

Ministerial Directions 58

Murphy, Marty, Dr 18

N

NAIDOC 32

O

Oliver-Taylor, Chris 17, 53, 118, 123

Online learning 114

operations 15, 20, 26, 58, 59, 65, 78, 129

Organisation Chart 27

Outreach 9, 10, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32, 39, 42,

43, 115, 117, 119 See also First Nations

& Outreach

P

Parekh, Shomal 23,53 See also Chief

Financial Officer, AFTRS

Partnerships 9, 10, 28, 31, 34, 38, 97

and development division 27, 97

people and culture division 27, 47, 48

performance 26-46

reporting 19

podcasting 9, 38, 97, 108

Portfolio Budget Statement (PBS) 12, 28

privacy 58

Privacy Act 1988 58

procurement 27, 60, 126

production, technology and

information 27

professional development 55

staff 38

student 111, 113

property use 127, 129

Q

Quality assurance 23

130 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

R

Radio 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 18, 25, 34, 35,

41, 51, 94, 95, 96, 97, 99, 102, 103, 104, 106,

108, 112, 113, 118, 120, 121, 123, 126

Rees, Vaughan, Associate

Professor 24

research 6, 11, 12, 13, 14, 23, 28, 30, 38,

40, 83, 113, 127

risk 16, 19, 20, 21, 53, 55, 56, 125, 126, 130

Risk Management 16, 19, 20, 21, 53, 55,

125, 126, 130

framework 126

Romaro, Cherie 7, 104, 119 See

also Honorary Degrees

Rose, Mark, Professor 8 See

also Chair of Academic Board, AFTRS

S

safe conversation officer 37

program 37

scholarships 7, 31, 33, 34, 88, 93, 95, 96

Screen Diversity and Inclusion

Network 27

Sherman Centre for Creativity and

Ideas (SCCI) 97

Short, Sharp and Immediately Useful

(SSIU) Seminars 38, 111

Smallacombe, Sonia 119 See also Elder-in-Residence

Staff

appointments 49

composition 46

consultative committee 48, 56

reward and recognition program 48

survey 48

training and development 55

Stewart, Bethany 18, 25, 53, 105

Strategic Direction 13

Student 6

achievements 108

applications 27, 35, 94

centre 37, 120

enrolments 28, 33, 69

experience 48, 49

statistics 94

support 28

wellbeing 48

Sturgiss, David 21, 22

Supporting Talent 38, 40

T

Talent Camp 31, 108, 110, 115, 116

Talks @ AFTRS 41, 118, 122

guests 118

Teaching and Learning 27, 111

Tenders 60

Thought leadership 41

Tonagh, Peter 8, 11, 16, 53

Torres, Mitch 7, 10, 32, 40, 104, 119, 122

See also Honorary Degrees

Triennial industry survey 28, 38

V

Values, AFTRS 48

Vision, AFTRS 12

W

Wallworth, Lynette 6, 11, 39, 40, 104, 119

See also Artist in Residence;

Honorary Degrees

Weiss, Rachael 24

What’s Your Flava? 36, 120

whistleblowing 48

women in leadership, AFTRS 7, 46

Work and Private Commitments 52

work health and safety (WHS) 56

Workplace

culture 48

diversity 47

Y

Youth Program 31

YouTube, AFTRS channel 45, 117, 121,

123, 124

131 Section 8 Appendices

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

PGPA Rule Reference Description Page number

17BE

17BE(a) details of the legislation establishing the body. 14

17BE(b)(i) a summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in legislation. 14

17BE(b)(ii) the purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan for the reporting period. 12

17BE(c) the names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers.

15

17BE(d) directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period. N/A

17BE(e) any government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act.

N/A

17BE(f) particulars of non-compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act. N/A

17BE(g) annual performance statements in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the rule. 30-46

17BE(h), 17BE(i) a statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under

paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance. N/A

17BE(j) information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period. 16-18

17BE(k) outline of the organisational structure of the entity (including any subsidiaries of the entity). 27

Reference Index

PGPA Rule Reference Description Page number

17BE(ka) statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; 49-50

(b) statistics on part-time employees; 49-50

(c) statistics on gender; 49-52

(d) statistics on staff location. 49-50

17BE(l) outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity. 127

17BE(m) information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period.

14-27

17BE(n), 17BE(o) decision-making process is undertaken by the accountable

authority for making decisions under certain circumstances

N/A

17BE(p) any significant activities and changes that affected the operation or structure of the entity during the reporting period. N/A

17BE(q) particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity. N/A

17BE(r) particulars of any reports on the entity given by:

(a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. N/A

17BE(s) an explanation of information not obtained from a subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report.

N/A

132 AFTRS Annual Report 2020-2021

PGPA Rule Reference Description Page number

17BE(t) Details of any indemnity that applied during the reporting period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs). 59

17BE(ta) Information about executive remuneration.

53-54

17BE(taa) The following information about the audit committee for the entity:

(a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee; 20

(b) the name of each member of the audit committee; 21-22

(c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the audit committee; 21-22

(d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee; 21-22

(e) the remuneration of each member of the audit committee. 21-22

17BF Disclosure requirements for government business enterprises N/A