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Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Reports 1997-98


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H R D C

HRDC Annual Report 1997-98 Horticultural Research & Development Corporation

Horticultural Research & Development Corporation Annual Report 1997 - 98

ERRATA

Page 11: Queensland Fruit & Vegerable Growers Should read:

Queensland Fruit & Vegetable Growers

Page 38: Colembally Irrigation Should read Coleambally Irrigation

Page 100: Mr Dennis Richards Director (up to 15 August 1997) Mr Peter Walker Director (up to 15 August 1997) Mr Paul Ziebarth Director (up to 15 August 1997) Should read:

Mr Dennis Richards Director (from 16 August 1997) Mr Peter Walker Director (from 16 August 1997) Mr Paul Ziebarth Director (from 16 August 1997)

Page 113: Total Equity 1,246,31 Should read: Total Equity 1,246,314

H R D C

Horticultural Research & Development Corporation

Annual Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

H R D C

For enquiries please contact:

Horticultural Research & Development Corporation Level 6, 7 Merriwa Street Gordon NSW 2072 Australia Tel. + 6 1 2 9418 2200 Fax. +61 2 9418 1352 Email, hrdc@hrdc.gov.au

© Commonwealth of Australia 1 998 ISSN 1035-8013

C o n t e n t s

Letter of Transmittal ii

Section 1 Year in Review - 1 9 9 7 /9 8 Highlights 1

Section 2 Partners in R&D 15

Section 3 Corporate Governance 33

Section 4 R&D Program 49

Section 5 Corporate M anagem ent 71

Section 6 Financial M anagem ent 85

Section 7 Glossary 123

Section 8 Appendices 127

A Statutory Levy legislation/regulations 1 28 B Principles for the determination of Primary Industry Levies 129

C Retiring Board Members of the Corporation 130

D Projects Funded by the Corporation 132 E Publications of the Corporation 158

F Contact details 164

G Industry organisations and agencies consulted in 1997/98 166

Section 9 Index 177

Section 10 Compliance Index 183

HRDC A nnual Report 1997-98 i

L e t t e r of T r a n s m i t t a l

ν' Λ HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Partnership in horticulture

30 September 1998

Senator The Hon. Judith Troeth Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Senator

In accordance with:

- Part 7 of Schedule 7 to the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act, 1997; and

- Section 29 of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Act,

the Board of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation submits its Annual Report including its achievements, activities, financial statements and the Auditor General's report for the year beginning 7 July 7997 and ending 30 June 1998.

Yours sincerely

1987,

Lindy Hyam Executive Director

Level 6, 7 Merriwa Street, Gordon NSW 2072 Australia Tel. +61 2 9418 2200 Fax. +61 2 9418 1352

James McCeoch Chairman Email, hrdc@hrdc.gov.au

ii HRDC Annual Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Year in Re v i e w

Who we are and what we do Who we are What we do We are able to do this through Vision

Mission The Corporation's Charter Chairman's and Executive Director's Report 4

R&D Program Highlights 7

Horticultural R&D at a glance 11

Growth in industry R&D involvement 14

in (n i n η η n

YEAR IN REVIEW W h o w e a r e a n d w h a t w e do

We achieve our role by taking a unique, holistic, national and cross industry approach to research

and development through:

• Planning in conjunction with industry • Making it happen - using our knowledge

base and

network/connections • Facilitating application of results to business.

Who we are The Horticultural Research & Development Corporation (HRDC) is a Commonwealth Statutory Authority established in 1988. Our

Board of nine Directors provide the Corporation with knowledge and skills across a range of areas including industry experience, corporate, strategic and business management, research management, horticultural production, marketing and communication. The Board sets the strategic direction for HRDC.

The Board are supported by a team of highly skilled staff including Program Managers who are strategically located across Australia in Western Australia, New South Wales, Tasmania, Queensland and Victoria and who have a national focus and a wide range of

professional experience.

We work closely with industry associations, other industry leaders, R&D providers and many in the non-production sector. These partnerships provide the fundamental building blocks for supporting innovation and technology adoption in horticulture.

What we do • We have national responsibility for funding and managing research and development for

Australian horticultural industries, including fresh and processed fruit, vegetables, nuts, nursery products, cutflowers and foliage, and turf.

• To meet our objectives we focus on experimentation, analysis and the application of knowledge in the fields of

science, technology, marketing and economics. By emphasising technology adoption, the Corporation is able to have a significant impact on the sustainability and profitability of Australian horticulture.

• We achieve our role by taking a unique, holistic, national and cross industry approach to research and development through:

- Planning in conjunction with industry - Making it happen - using our knowledge base and network/connections

- Facilitating application of results to business.

We are able to do this through • Our knowledge base of horticultural science, R&D management, and industry

issues and strategies • Effective partnerships • A national focus • International linkages • Cross industry learning and

programs • Multidisciplinary and multi project planning and coordination • Information brokerage through

national communication channels • Alternative and appropriate solution identification • R&D management, coordination

and commissioning • Management and provision of funding and resources • Transparent accountability

process

2 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Who w e a r e a n d w h a t w e do

YEAR IN REVIEW

• HRDC actively seeks investment in R&D from a wide range of current and potential investors including industries, companies and individuals. We are able to add further benefit by matching

industry funds with Federal Government monies for the advancement of horticulture.

Vision In collaboration with the horticultural community, the HRDC

will be increasingly innovative and strategic in its approach to R&D Management. Industry HRDC programs will continue to strengthen their market focus and achieve significant industry and

public benefit outcomes.

Mission To improve the sustainability, profitability, international competitiveness and value of

Australian horticulture through efficient use of R&D resources.

The Corporation's Charter Under the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Act, 1987, the main objectives of the Corporation are to:

• identify priority areas of horticultural R&D • improve the efficiency and effectiveness of horticultural

R&D

• make more effective use of the resources available for horticultural R&D • make more effective use of he

the skills available in the community particularly the scientific community, for

horticultural R&D • develop, in Australian horticultural industries, an

awareness of the contribution R&D can make to improve their efficiency and competitiveness • further the sustainable

management and use of natural resources • increase economic, environmental and social

benefits to industry and the community by improving production, processing, storage, transport and marketing of

horticultural products • ensure sound accountability for expenditure on horticultural R&D.

Under the Act, the Corporation has a strategic plan (1995-2000) which includes a statement of the strategies and policies it intends to

adopt. The Corporation also presents an Annual Business Plan and this Annual Report to the Minister for Primary Industries and

Energy.

In collaboration with the horticultural community, the HRDC will be increasingly

innovative and strategic in its approach to R&D Management. Industry

HRDC programs will continue to strengthen their market focus and achieve significant

industry and public benefit outcomes.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 3

YEAR IN REVIEW C h a i r m a n ' s a n d Executive D i r ec t or ' s Report

Since the inception of HRDC the horticultural industry has developed a culture of R&D, of expecting R&D

to deliver targeted outcomes and of increasing collaboration and reduced parochialism.

This has led to increased productivity and profitability, adoption of

sustainable farming practices and improved international competitiveness.

The 1997/98 year The 1997/98 year has been a one of significant change for both the horticultural industry and the

Horticultural Research & Development Corporation. The Asian currency situation presented a major challenge to many parts of the industry with subsequent flow on effects across the R&D program.

Since the inception of HRDC the horticultural industry has developed a culture of R&D, of expecting R&D to deliver targeted outcomes and of increasing collaboration and reduced parochialism. This has led to increased productivity and profitability, adoption of sustainable farming practices and improved

international competitiveness.

The Corporation has been managing national investment in horticultural R&D for ten years and that maturity, coupled with prudent structural and operational review ensures the HRDC is in a strong

position to provide support to this industry. Demonstration of that maturity, is highlighted by the development of formal partnership agreements with our industry partners. These agreements specify the negotiated obligations and level of service between forward thinking

partners and nullify possible ambiguity in the relationship. Partnership agreements are currently being developed with the stone fruit, macadamia, apple and

pear and nursery industries and are expected to be in place in 1998/99.

The HRDC R&D portfolio comprises nearly 500 projects covering 40 horticultural industries. The continued growth in the Corporation's activities

demonstrates a real commitment by our horticultural industries to invest in their own future.

Strategic Planning The HRDC has begun a major review its 3rd Strategic Plan 1995 - 2000. It is expected that the new Strategic Plan will take effect in

1999/2000 and will remain relevant with subsequent planned minor and major reviews. The new Strategic Plan will clearly define the Corporation's objectives, strategies and policies and will state expected outcomes and performance indicators for the four years ahead.

The planning framework has been agreed and the review process will be exhaustive. Wide communication, consultation and

involvement with key stakeholders are a feature of this framework. The Corporation is planning a public exhibition of the Draft Plan in February 1998 to enable wider industry comment.

Partnership/Collaboration and Change Management The Corporation continues to develop close and harmonious partnerships with industry R&D committees, peak industry bodies, public and private research providers, the business community and other Government agencies. Such a focus is important in developing and managing future R&D programs that will have direct public as well as industry benefit.

Horticultural Industry Alliance During 1997/98, the Corporation initiated a number of related projects which focus on meeting the needs of horticulture as an industry.

4 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C h a i r m a n ' s a n d Exec ut i ve D i r e c t o r ' s Repor t YEAR IN REVIEW

The need to closely link R&D with marketing is recognised by the HRDC Board. Industry, HRDC, AHC and Government are currently

investigating the potential for one industry organisation, to best meet marketing and R&D needs of horticulture. A steering committee, named the Horticultural Industry Alliance, was formed in March

1998 to undertake this review and will look at options to form a single organisation by the year 2000.

Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee There has been momentum over recent times from the HRDC Board and the horticultural industry to commission R&D projects which fall across a large section of the

horticultural industry. To better facilitate this the Australian Horticultural Industry R&D

Committee has been formed.

The Committee will assess priorities and make recommendations to the HRDC Board for multi industry involvement and funding and has agreed to set aside 5% of available funds in 1999/2000 for such

projects over and above current joint funded activities.

Members were asked to commit sufficient existing funding to support three multi industry projects which were agreed upon

to be commissioned in 1998/99. These are:

• in the area of food safety • an environmental audit in horticulture • market development including

access issues such as disinfestation.

The new Committee will also act as a key point of contact when making recommendations on the role of horticulture in national

issues, such as the Horticultural Emergency Management Plan and the Australian Plant Health Council.

Graham Gregory Awards Approximately 948 research and extension professionals work in partnership with HRDC to conduct

horticultural R&D for some 40 industries in Australia each year. These researchers have, and will continue to, provide the skills and commitment necessary to maintain

a competitive horticultural industry.

HRDC honours two individuals with an Award for excellence in the fields of research and development in support of the Australian

horticultural industries each year. The Award commemorates the outstanding contribution made by

the inaugural Chairman of HRDC, the late Graham Gregory AM to horticultural science. The winners of the 1997 awards, Noel Vock

(Development) and Ken Bevington (Research), epitomise the excellence of individuals in horticultural R&D.

Industry Development A recent review of Industry Development Officers (IDOs)

supported by HRDC found that they are a unique and valuable part of the Australian horticulture industry. IDOs facilitate cohesion

and unity in an ever increasingly complex industry. They develop networks and structures that assist industry to embrace change and

adopt new practices and

Since the inception of HRDC the horticultural industry has developed a culture of

R&D, of expecting R&D to deliver targeted outcomes and of

increasing collaboration and reduced parochialism. This has led to

increased productivity and profitability, adoption of sustainable farming

practices and improved international competitiveness.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 5

C h a i r m a n a n d E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r ' s Re p o r t

technologies.

HRDC is developing strategies to enhance participation by women in horticulture and embrace ethnic diversity across the industry. The development of people within the industry, particularly in gaining new skills is critical to industry development.

The Corporation continues to develop close and harmonious partnerships with

industry R&D committees, peak industry bodies, public and private research providers, the business

community and other Government agencies.

Such a focus is important in developing and managing future R&D

programs that will have direct public as well as industry benefit.

Conclusion We are in an exciting stage of horticultural development in Australia with high quality sciences

and strong expertise in agricultural management. There is significant opportunity for increased product quality, raising consumer confidence, improved industry

productivity, and overall increased industry profitability.

HRDC will continue to improve its business practices in line with our customer requirements. The Corporation will build on the collaborative relationship it currently enjoys with industry and

R&D providers.

Lindy Hyam Executive Director

James McGeoch Chairman

6 HRDC Annual Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

R&D P r o g r a m H i g h l i g h t s

YEAR IN REVIEW

MARKET REQUIREMENTS AND ECONOMIC STUDIES

Nursery statistics The 1997/98 statistics collection for the Nursery Industry will be

released in August for public purchase. These updated figures provide a comprehensive study of the Industry and include data collected from production nurseries through to chain stores. This information will be used both by individual businesses and the industry overall as a strategic planning tool.

Chestnut industry market research The findings of a chestnut industry market research project were

released at the Australian Nut Industry Council Conference in August 1998. The project identified and characterised the key target

segments (current consumers and potential consumers) for chestnuts. The barriers to increased chestnut consumption were found to be lack

of availability, lack of consumer knowledge and difficulty in peeling and preparation. Opportunities for processing and value adding were also identified and this information will be used to plan future research

into processing opportunities.

DISINFESTATION/MARKET ACCESS

Verification trials and market access Australia has successfully conducted verification trials in the last year for

"easy peel" citrus to Japan and for oranges and lemons to Korea.

These trials are the last market access process to be undertaken by the Australian side. Access to these two markets will provide a valuable economic boost to the citrus

industry.

Recently, Australian apples were granted access into China. Other commodity market access issues also being actively progressed

include:

• additional mango cultivars into Japan; • mangoes into China; • Tasmanian red 'Fuji' apples into

Japan.

Several submissions for improved export market access conditions are currently, or soon to be, under negotiation. These

include:

• pest free area access; • in-transit disinfestation of citrus.

NEW AND VALUE ADDED PRODUCTS

Melon quality Research funded by the melon industry through HRDC aims to

guarantee the flavour of fruit offered to consumers. This project has developed a non-destructive method for sorting fruit by sweetness using Near Infra Red

(NIR) Spectroscopy combined with powerful computer systems which convert the readings of light reflectance into a measure of sugar content. The melon industry aims is to integrate the new technology

into fruit packing lines over the next two years.

GENETIC IMPROVEMENT The recent Australian Banana

Australia has successfully conducted verification trials in the last year for "easy

peel" citrus to Japan and for oranges and lemons to Korea.

These trials are the last market access process to be undertaken by the Australian side. Access to these two markets will provide a valuable economic boost to the citrus industry.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 7

YEAR IN REVIEW R&D P r o g r a m H i g h l i g h t s

Fruit flies are a major issue in gaining access to new markets. A review of fruit fly R&D

was undertaken to identify the priorities for horticultural industries for the

short-term and recommend progress to a national management plan.

industry R&D Planning forum identified new varieties through biotechnology as a high national priority. HRDC and its industry partners reviewed the banana improvement program in order to rationalise R&D in this area. Following a consultative process by key stakeholders a single program was supported. The industry is now

looking to an international banana biotechnology consortium, managed by the World Bank, to provide the most cost effective solution to major pest and disease challenges.

POSTHARVEST

Stonefruit "cool chain" research Recent consumer research has found that purchasers of stonefruit are often disappointed by fruit which is attractive but which is of poor flavour and texture as a result of immaturity at harvest and poor cool chain management in the marketing chain. This project identified the problem areas in the cool chain from field to retailer. Grower "cool groups" have been established in all production regions to increase grower awareness of the

importance of cool chain management. This information is also being used in wholesaler and retailer education programs. Awareness is being further

heightened through a regular cool chain newsletter.

The use of data loggers and temperature recorders to monitor fruit temperature throughout the cool chain is also being promoted.

Increased grower, retailer and wholesaler awareness of the

importance of cool chain management has already been demonstrated as a result of this project. The improved stonefruit quality as a result of increased awareness should result in increased returns to all sections of the marketing chain in coming seasons.

CULTURAL/HARVESTING PRACTICES

Setting guidelines for sustainable production Growers in Queensland have contributed to the development of documented good farming practice guidelines for each crop. This three- year project has involved wide consultation to identify potential areas of environmental risk in the production of each crop. Issues included fertiliser and water use, managing dust, noise and declared weeds and disposing of waste. Practices to manage and reduce these risks have been documented in recommended farm practice manual for each crop. This exercise will help growers comply with environmental and safety

requirements while containing, or reducing costs.

PEST AND DISEASE MANAGEMENT

Fruit fly review Fruit flies are a major issue in gaining access to new markets. A review of fruit fly R&D was undertaken to identify the priorities for horticultural industries for the short-term and recommend progress to a national management

8 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

R&D P r o g r a m H i g h l i g h t s

plan. It advocates immediate support for the R&D aimed at improving fruit fly traps and baits, and the sterile insect technique

program associated the activities of the Tri-State Fruit Fly Committee. Recommendations on proceeding to a National Fruit Fly Strategy will

be pursued with the newly formed Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee.

Alternatives to Methyl Bromide R&D associated with the phase-out of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant has successfully demonstrated the efficacy of alternative strategies. Lower rates of

methyl bromide and new products have been shown to be equally effective as full rates of the fumigant.

While grower adoption of alternative treatments has increased through national road show meetings and on-farm trials, there is

a degree of urgency now to complete the testing of alternatives to methyl bromide in all other horticultural crops due to the total

phase out of methyl bromide by 2005.

TOTAL WASTE MANAGEMENT

Alternatives to black plastic The disposal of black plastic sheeting used as a mulch in several horticultural crops has become a

major environmental issue. A project supported by members of the packaging and food starch industries has developed

biodegradable formulations as alternatives to standard polythene sheet. The challenge is to maintain

the benefits of the mulch; ie moisture retention, weed control and a clean crop; by ensuring the film does not break down too

quickly and to keep the cost of the alternative mulch down. The best formulations are now under test on larger trial plots in key growing areas. In the meantime, a separate

project has developed a baler to retrieve and compact standard plastic mulch after cropping.

QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Quality compendium Recognising that consistency of product quality and food safety are

the most significant issues faced by horticulture in this decade, the Corporation published a compendium of case studies of quality implementation, "The

Competitive Edge: how to make quality systems work for you" in June 1998. The compendium also contains information about the

various quality systems available and where to seek further information. Almost 40,000 copies have been made available to growers through insertion in

industry publications or direct mailed in response to requests.

TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION

Citrus pest field guide To support the citrus industry in adopting Integrated Pest Management (IPM) principles, the

Corporation funded the production and distribution of a 130-page field guide. This handbook complements the detailed book "Citrus pests and their natural enemies", funded by

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

YEAR I N REVI EW

R&D associated with the phase-out of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant has successfully demonstrated the efficacy of alternative strategies. Lower rates

of methyl bromide and new products have been shown to be equally effective as full

rates of the fumigant.

YEAR IN REVIEW R&D P r o g r a m H i g h l i g h t s

the citrus levy through HRDC. The field guide is weatherproof and designed for regular use in monitoring for major pests and

predators. It is available free of charge to all Citrus levy payers through the IDO and Cittgroups networks.

Recognising that consistency of product quality and food safety are the most significant issues faced

by horticulture in this decade, the

Corporation published a compendium of case studies of quality implementation, "The

Competitive Edge: how to make quality systems work for you" in June 1998.

10 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

YEAR IN REVIEW

TOTAL COMMODITIES

Almond Apple/Pear Asparagus Avocado Banana Blueberry Canning Fruit Cherry Chestnut Citrus Custard Apple Cutflower Fresh Tomato Fresh Stonefruit Ginger Hop Longan Lychee Macadamia Mango Melon Mushroom Nashi Nursery Olive Onion Papaw

Passionfruit Pecan

Persimmon Pineapple Pistachio Poppy

Potato Processing Tomato Pyrethrum Rubus Sportsturf Strawberry Table Grapes

Vegetable Walnut

Value of horticulture $4.2 billion *

Number of growers 80,000 *

Fruit and vegetable process workers 10,200 *

Number of levy paying industries (apple/pear, avocado, cherry, chestnut, citrus, custard apple, macadamia, nashi, nursery, potato, fresh stonefruit, strawberry, vegetable

lalmond - new 1997/981)

14 13

Number of voluntary R&D levy paying industries (canning fruit, mushroom, 4 4

processing tomato, pyrethrum)

Number of industries considering a levy (cutflower, melon, onion, table grapes [lychee, mango, passionfruit - new 1997/98])

7 5

Number of voluntary contributors, of which Queensland Fruit & Vegerable Growers is the largest

269 190

Number of R&D applications received 695 694

Value of R&D applications received $35.3 m $29 m

Number of R&D applications approved 494 521

Value of R&D applications approved $25.3 m $23 m

Number of industries involved in the R&D program 40 38

Number of continuing projects 202 247

Value of continuing projects $13.2 m $13 m

Number of new projects 292 274

Value of new projects $12.1 m $10 m

Number of researchers involved in R&D Program 948 965

Number of research centres 352 342

* Source: Department o f Primary Industries and Energy. All other figures as approved by the HRDC Board as of May 1998.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 11

YEAR IN REVIEW

VALUE OF 1 9 9 7 /9 8 STRATEGIC ACTIVITIES

No. of Value

Strategy projects (Million)

1997/98 1996/97 1997/98 1996/97

Market/Economic Studies 26 12 $1.1 $0.5

Market Access/Disinfestation 18 22 $1.2 $1.1

Quality Management 20 29 $0.8 $0.6

Technology Transfer 136 137 $4.6 $3.8

New/Value Adding Products 5 12 $0.3 $0.9

Genetic Improvement 78 90 $4.0 $4.5

Postharvest 29 18 $1.5 $0.6

Cultural/Harvesting Practices 71 76 $3.3 $3.0

Pest/Disease Management 108 122 $8.3 $6.7

Waste Management 3 3 $0.2 $0.9

Of the 494

applications approved, 59% were 'N ew ' applications in 1997/98 while 41%

were 'Continuing', compared to 53% and 47% respectively in 1996/97.

1 9 9 7 /9 8 INDUSTRY R&D PROGRAM

Continuing Projects-41% 202 applications worth $13.2 million

New Projects - 59% 292 applications worth $12.1 million

12 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

YEAR IN REVIEW

1997/98 R&D PROGRAM BY AGENCY

Private Enterprise - 9% CSIRO/CRCs - 7%

State Agencies -

- 20%

- 12%

Other-4%

The R&D program maintains its focus on government agricultural agencies, however, both private enterprise and industry continue to increase their involvement. Universities increased their participation by 3% on the previous year, while only 7% of the program will be

undertaken by CSIRO/CRCs.

1997/98 R&D PROJECT SOURCE OF FUNDS

Of the applications approved, 43% of the funds were sourced from levies and 38% from voluntary

contributions in 1997/98. A number of programs (15%) link funds from both levies and voluntary contributions, across

industries or across sections of the same industry. 4% of funds involve unmatched contributions from organisations such as Citrus Market

Development Group (CMDG).

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 13

YEAR IN REVIEW G r o w t h in I n d u s t r y R&D I n v e s t m e n t

Millions

Note: Figures rounded to the nearest $1,000

Levy industries: AL - almond; AP - apple/pear; AV - avocado; BS - strawberry; CH - chestnut; CT - citrus; CU - custard apple; O ' - cherry; M C - macadamia; NA - nashi; NY - nursery; PT - potato; SF - stonefruit; VC - veg­ etable;

14 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Par t ner s in R&D

HRDC Partner Groups 16

Industry 17

Research Providers 24

Market access 26

Government 28

Horticultural Industry Alliance 31

PARTNERS IN R&D H R D C P a r t n e r G r o u p s

Ψ

HRDC PARTNER GROUPS

*

STATUTORY LEVY CONTRIBUTORS

VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTORS

BENEFICIARIES

• Statutory levied growers and processors

♦

Matched $

• Levied (voluntary) growers and processors • Growers • Processors • Industry associations • Commercial entities • Finance sector entities • Emerging levy industries • Purpose-specific contributors

---------- 1Unmatched $• Australian Horticultural Exporters' Association (AHEA)• Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs)• Queensland Fruit and Vegetable Growers (QFVG) • Other rural industry R&D

corporations • State and Commonwealth agencies • CSIRO (for some projects) • Citrus Market Development

Group (CMDG) • Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS)

HRDC PROVIDER PARTNERS

FU ND IN G PROVIDERS

• Industry • Commonwealth Government • Voluntary

contributors

SKILLS/ KNOWLEDGE PROVIDERS

• State agricultural agencies • Universities • Private research

agencies • CSIRO •CRCs • ACIAR • Consultants • Resellers • Overseas agencies

SERVICES/ GOODS PROVIDERS

• Technology and communication networks • Information

deliverers - media - industry associations • Financial services

Those who benefit directly or indirectly from industry/HRDC activities

• Direct consumers of product • General public • Downstream firms - growers

- processors - agents - wholesalers - transporters - retailers - advertisers/marketers

- packagers • Agribusiness - chemical suppliers - fertiliser suppliers

- consultants • Government agencies

POTENTIAL PARTNERS

HRDC has the opportunity to build strong partnerships with a number of potential providers

• Overseas research agencies • Overseas funders • Corporate and financial busi­ nesses servicing horticulture

• Private sector researchers • Consumer associations • Retailers • Wholesalers • Transporters • Exporters • Resellers • Local government and utility

agencies for environmental issues

16 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

PARTNERS IN R&D

Peak Industry Leaders' Meeting "Partnership in Horticulture - Shaping our future to beyond 2000" To assist in providing strategic leadership within horticulture and in response to requests from industry associations, the Corporation held a meeting with Peak Industry Associations in July 1997 to achieve the following outcomes:

• A clear understanding of the direction that R&D is heading in terms of:

- a broader industry R&D perspective; - HRDC perspective; and - the political/Government perspective.

• Specific identification and discussion of issues for inclusion in the HRDC Strategic Plan Review.

• Strengthening of partnerships between industry sectors, between industry bodies and the HRDC.

• Resolution of outstanding issues between HRDC and peak industry bodies.

The meeting resulted in the Corporation clarifying issues to underpin the reviews of Industry Development Officers and R&D Committees and resulted in the introduction of the two stage application process for 1998/99, a year ahead of schedule. Options for cross commodity research funding were also explored with commitment gained to fund an effective

mechanism for this purpose.

Presidents' Council Meetings "Building on the strategic alliance between HRDC and Peak Industry Bodies" Following the successful Peak Industry Leaders Forum held in July 1997, the HRDC again met with the Presidents and Chairmen of Peak Industry Associations in February 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss

issues that impact on the partnership between HRDC and Peak Industry Associations of levy paying industries.

The meeting resulted in:

• the establishment of the Horticultural Reference Group (later renamed the Australian Horticultural Industry Research & Development Committee) for multi-industry R&D; • adoption of the policy for HRDC to hold 1% security interest in

intellectual property (IP); • R&D Committees reporting directly to Peak Industry Associations who then make recommendations to HRDC; • agreement to progress commissioning for R&D projects; and

• agreement to furthering the alliance between HRDC and AHC.

Chairpersons and Executive Officers from horticultural industries, AHC, HRDC and

Government unanimously voted for the establishment of a working group to consider the creation of a single body for marketing and

research and development. The decision followed a day of discussions

which reflected a strong spirit of consultation, cooperation and unity.

"Building on the strategic alliance between HRDC and AHC" A further meeting was held on 18 March 1998, where forty Chairpersons and Executive Officers from horticultural industries, AHC, HRDC and

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 17

PARTNERS IN R&D H R D C P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

A Working Party would be established to review the creation of a single body to incorporate marketing,

research and development on behalf of the whole Australian Horticulture

Industry by the year 2000 .

Government unanimously voted for the establishment of a working group to consider the creation of a single body for marketing and research and development. The decision followed a day of discussions which reflected a strong spirit of consultation, cooperation and unity.

The meeting was jointly convened by HRDC and AHC to build on the strategic alliance between the Corporations and industry as a direct outcome of discussions between the Chairmen of the industries and AHC and HRDC. Senator Troeth, the Parliamentary Secretary responsible for

Horticulture, opened the meeting and stayed on as an observer.

The participants unanimously agreed that:

• A Working Party would be established to review the creation of a single body to incorporate marketing, research and development on behalf of the whole Australian Horticulture Industry by the year 2000.

• The Working Party would consist of five (5) industry representatives chosen by industry, the Chairmen of AHC and HRDC, their two Executive Directors and a Government Representative plus an independent Chairperson to be nominated by the above members of the Working Party.

• Industry representatives would be nominated by their own members on the basis of their skills, knowledge and experience of horticulture and their capacity to gather and distribute information to their horticultural counterparts. Further assistance would be provided to the Working Party by co-opting skills as required.

• The Terms of Reference and funding would be agreed by the Working Party before the end of April 1998.

• Milestones, timing and reporting would be established by the Working Party and include, where required, Joint Board meetings, reconvening of the 18 March workshop for further consultation and a single point of dissemination of progress reports to the whole horticultural industry.

The aim would be to have recommendations completed by early 1999 to allow for the creation of a new single body by the year 2000. This new, single body would not have an agripolitical role.

Industry R&D Committees As a result of consultation with the:

• R&D Committee Chairpersons meeting, February 1997 and February 1998 • Peak Industry Association Leaders meeting, July 1997 • pilot group survey using a select group of Industry Leaders, R&D

Committee members and Industry Development Officers to finalise survey format and note trends, August 1997 • industry representative survey using Industry Leaders, R&D Committee members both past and present and Industry Development Officers to

define requirements, October 1997, and • follow up survey with Presidents' Council, January 1998 the Corporation revised its R&D Committee policy.

18 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

PARTNERS IN R&D

A questionnaire addressing:

• role and purpose • representation • funding and support • accountability and effectiveness

was developed and completed by R&D Committee members, Peak Industry Leaders and Industry Development Officers.

Further comment was sought from Peak Industry Leaders on a number of issues, specifically:

• the draft role statements for R&D Chairs and R&D Committee members; • nomination based on specific skills and regional representation; • the issue of continuity and the process of selection; and • the mechanism for R&D Committees to report back to Peak Industry

Associations.

The revised policy was approved by the Board at the May meeting and implemented for the 1998/99 program year. Under this policy, the Corporation will no longer meet the running costs of one of these meetings for each levy industry each year and will reallocate these funds to the employment of a Legal and Commercialisation Officer in 1998/99.

The Corporation undertook a review of R&D Committees and introduced the two stage application process for 1998/99.

R&D Chairs' Meeting "Key issues involving the R&D Program" The Corporation has met each year with the Chairs of industry R&D Committees to discuss various issues and meet other industry members. As a result of the meeting in February 1997, the Corporation undertook a

review of R&D Committees and introduced the two stage application process for 1998/99. In February 1998, the R&D Chairs met to further address issues concerning the quality of product, process and service and to participate in training forums about R&D management. These topics included:

• commissioning of R&D • strategic planning at an Industry level and at HRDC • implications for HRDC and R&D Committees of the Commonwealth Authorities & Companies Act, 1997

• economic evaluation of R&D, and • management of multi industry R&D projects.

An update of progress of the R&D Committee review was also presented including the outcomes of the final survey with the Presidents' Council in February 1998.

Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee At the Presidents' Council meeting on 24 February 1998, the meeting resolved "to form a Horticultural Reference Croup subject to Terms of

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 19

PARTNERS IN R&D H R D C P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

Reference and principles for funding being established".

Representatives were nominated and selected on the basis of the broad areas consistent with the groups in the HRDC Research Report 1996/97:

• Group 1 Vegetables and Other Crops

• Group 2 Temperate Fruit and Nuts

• Group 3 Citrus, Tropical Fruits and Nuts

• Group 4 Nursery and Flowers.

The Corporation is seeking to develop a multi industry approach, through the

Australian

Horticultural Industry R&D Committee, to establish a means of identifying and adequately resourcing agreed priority issues.

The first meeting of the Horticultural Reference Group on 10-11 June 1998 discussed research and development issues for action including:

• multi-industry fruit fly issues/disinfestation • soil and water management issues • the Horticultural Industry Draft Emergency Management Plan; and • agreed the priority areas its:

- emergency management - disinfestation/fruit fly management - chemical residues - soil/water issues

- food safety - environmental sustainability, - market development.

The group also agreed to change the name to the Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee; elected Tim Dyer, President, Australian Processing Tomato Industry Council as the Chairman; elected Mark Panitz, Assistant General Manager, Queensland Fruit and Vegetable Growers as Secretary; and, agreed to the draft Terms of Reference.

Key issues discussed covered:

• a role statement for members • draft terms of reference • multi industry R&D issues identified to date.

A draft Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was prepared by HRDC and circulated to industry for comment. Within the framework of an overall horticultural industry strategic plan, the MOU defines the role and purpose of the Committee as to:

• develop a multiple industry R&D plan with priorities; • recommend priority projects for funding within the multiple industry R&D program; • recommend policy positions for the HRDC Board for multiple industry

R&D;

• recommend multiple industry R&D funding mechanisms; • recommend mechanisms for management of multiple industry R&D; and • develop strategies for communicating with stakeholders.

20 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

The meeting agreed that 5% of the total R&D budgets for all industries would be committed to the multi industry R&D fund in 1998/99. Confirmation of this industry commitment is currently being sought.

Partnership Agreements with Industry To facilitate the relationship between the HRDC and its industry partners and to ensure that each organisation meets its roles and responsibilities under the legislation, the HRDC is entering into Partnership Agreements with eligible industry bodies.

Clarification of the services provided by HRDC to industry and the actual cost of those services are essential ingredients of accountability and transparency to both government and industry. The Corporation currently charges a 10% management fee. However, cost management analysis of the

business has indicated that costs associated with different size projects and industries vary considerably based on industry maturity, size and infrastructure. The Corporation anticipates that a new fee structure will be developed in the future in consultation with its industry partners.

A pilot group consisting of Apple & Pear, Macadamia, Nursery and Stonefruit have entered into negotiation with the Corporation from which a proforma agreement will be developed for negotiation with the Corporation's other industry partners.

Industry Consultation Costs Peak industry Associations of levy paying industries are eligible, under Section 10.2 of the HRDC Act, to claim costs from the levy for administration and travel associated with consultation with the Corporation.

While ultimate responsibility and accountability for such expenditure from levy funds is at the discretion of the Board, guidelines were issued by DPIE in 1991 indicating to whom, for what purpose and how such payments would be made.

At the Peak Industry Leaders meeting in July 1997, such costs were discussed at length by industry and Senator Brownhill, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy who was responsible for horticulture at that time. The Senator indicated that the guidelines would be reviewed in light of both Government and industry concerns. In anticipation of this review, the Corporation also reviewed its

own policy in this area in November 1997 in consultation with those industries with current consultation cost projects with the Corporation and with Department of Primary Industries and Energy policy officers.

The revised Ministerial guidelines were received in July 1998 and the Corporation further reviewed its policy of 1997 in August 1998 to ensure compliance with the new guidelines.

In 1997/98, the Corporation submitted the following industry consultation costs over and above costs for travel as required under Section 10.2(b) of the Act in its Business Plan. Each industry's consultation program was separately approved by the Board subject to submission of a final

To facilitate the relationship between the HRDC and its industry partners and to ensure that each organisation meets its

roles and responsibilities under the legislation, the HRDC is entering into

Partnership Agreements with eligible industry bodies.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 21

PARTNERS IN R&D

Adoption of research outcomes remains a clear priority for the HRDC. A recent review of the roles of Industry

Development Officers (IDOs) as industry based change agents found the IDO system to be unique, effective

and a vital part of future industry development. IDOs were also said to

provide the social cohesion and communication necessary for industries to embrace

new technologies.

H R D C P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

program of activity related to the stated outcomes and consistent with HRDC objectives.

Strawberries Australia subsequently applied for funds ($3,000) to meet consultation costs in 1997/98. The Corporation sought and received on 25 June, 1998 the Senator's approval for that addition.

Industry Business Plan 1997/98 Approved by

HRDC Board

Apple/Pear (AAPGA) $51,000 $51,250

Nursery (NIAA) $8,000 $9,696

Potato (APIC) $6,000 $3,669

Fresh Stonefruit (AFSFCA) $19,000 $18,400

Vegetable (AUSVeg) $59,000 $58,800

Strawberry (SA) $0 $2,946

Total $143,000 $144,761

IDO Review Adoption of research outcomes remains a clear priority for the HRDC. A recent review of the roles of Industry Development Officers (IDOs) as industry based change agents found the IDO system to be unique, effective and a vital part of future industry development. IDOs were also said to provide the social cohesion and communication necessary for industries to embrace new technologies.

The Review recommended that all positions be closely linked to industry development plans and that three roles and titles be recognised:

• Industry Development Manager (IDM) - national coordination and facilitation, • Industry Development Officer (IDO) - state or regional development, and • Project Officer - project focus eg adoption of quality assurance.

The review also recommended an evaluation process for IDOs and further guidance from HRDC on protocols for management committees employing IDOs. These protocols are currently being developed.

22 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s - I n d u s t r y

PARTNERS IN R&D

EXAMPLES OF NEW COLLABORATIVE INDUSTRY PROGRAMS

Apple/Pear & Stonefruit FR97036 Technology transfer in the canning stone and pome fruits & fresh pear and stone fruit industries.

HG97029 Industry Development Officer - NSW Deciduous Tree Fruits

Apple/Pear; Cherry & Stonefruit HC97023 Maintenance of fruit fly marker stocks

Avocado & Macadamia HG97010 Ecology and behaviour of fruitspotting bugs

Nursery; Potato; Strawberry & Vegetable HG97007 National strategy for the management of western flower thrips and tomato spotted w ilt virus

Nursery; Potato & Vegetable F1G97038 Attendance at the IMI Fungal Identification Course, UK

Nursery & Vegetable HG97017 Development of a national I PM program in greenhouse/protected crops

Potato & Vegetable VG97011 Remote sensing as an aid to horticultural crop recording and husbandry VG97050 Biofumigation - bioactive Brassica rotations for I PM of soil

borne pests and diseases

VG97081 Sustainable use of reclaimed effluent water for horticultural irrigation on the Northern Adelaide Plains, South Australia

Stonefruit & Vegetable HG97031 User needs analysis and design for a horticultural Intranet

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 23

PARTNERS IN R&D HRDC P ar t ne r Gr ou ps - Research Providers

To facilitate the introduction of the revised research agreement; to improve

the relationship between the HRDC and its research partners; and, to

ensure that each organisation meets its roles and responsibilities under

the legislation, the HRDC is also entering into Partnership Agreements with its

key research providers.

Research Provider Meeting "Partnership in leading and managing horticultural R&D" The Corporation met with significant agency partners in July 1997 to further review a number of key procedures namely:

• the application process • the R&D Committee process • communications strategy, and • technology transfer strategy.

The meeting resolved to move to a two phase application process in 1998/99, twelve months earlier than initially planned. This was successfully achieved with concept development proposals due at the end of September 1997 and full applications due by end December 1997.

Intellectual Property Review The Corporation undertook an external review of 1997/98 projects with commercialisation and/or intellectual property (IP) issues in January 1998. The Board's Risk Management and Audit Committee considered the review outcomes and recommendations and met with the Corporation's key agency partners in May 1998 to resolve those issues.

Research and Development Agreement The Corporation undertook modification of the Research Agreement in 1997/98 to cover milestone management and life of project funding. To address both IP issues and the Board's accountability under the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act, 1997, the Corporation undertook a major revision of the Research and Development Agreement in 1998 in consultation with its research partners.

The Corporation met with major research partners in May 1998 and established a working group for the development of a Heads of Agreement containing both a Partnership Agreement and the Research, Development and Commercialisation Agreement. As at 30 June, 1998, the consultation process is still underway with the expectation of new contracts coming into effect in early 1999.

Partnership Agreements To facilitate the introduction of the revised research agreement; to improve the relationship between the HRDC and its research partners; and, to ensure that each organisation meets its roles and responsibilities under the

legislation, the HRDC is also entering into Partnership Agreements with its key research providers.

24 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s - Re s e a r c h Pr o v i d e r s PARTNERS IN R&D

1997/98 MULTI-RESEARCH PROVIDER PROGRAM BY INDUSTRY

Apple/Pear

Avocado Strawberry

Chestnut Citrus Cherry

Fruit General

Hort. Gen.

Macadamia Mushroom Nashi Nuts General

Nursery

Other Products Potato Stonefruit

Proc. Tomato Turf Vegetable

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 %

% Multi Research Provider Organisation Projects

Of the 1997/98 program, 43% (214 projects) of approved projects involve more

than one research provider organisation. While approximately 50% of these projects

involve only 2 agencies, 5% involve 6 or more agencies.

in approved industry program

1 997/98 MULTI-RESEARCH PROVIDER R&D PROGRAM

5 Agencies - 9%

4 Agencies - 14%

3 Agencies - 23%

— 6 Agencies - 2%

>6 Agencies - 3%

2 Agencies - 48%

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 25

PARTNERS IN R&D H R D C P a r t n e r G r o u p s - M a r k e t Access

Recommendations for progressing a national R&D program and management plan for field and disinfestation

control of fruit fly will be presented to the Australian Horticultural Industry

R&D Committee for multiple industry funding commitment.

Disinfestation Review The HRDC submitted a White Paper titled Proposed New Management Framework for Australia's National Fruit Fly Disinfestation Research Program into 2000 and Beyond for consideration by the State Committee for Agricultural and Resource Management (SCARM) at its meeting in February

1998.

The purpose of the White Paper was to advise the current situation with regards to the national disinfestation research program and market access issues and to obtain agreement to a series of recommendations relating to rationalising the research framework and the management and coordination of the national disinfestation research program into the year 2000 and beyond. It was developed after an extensive and independent

review and consultation process with industry, research and other related agencies conducted throughout 1997.

The central recommendation sought SCARM agreement to the establishment and funding in early 1998 of a National Disinfestation Research Restructure Steering Committee to progress analysis of needs and to propose a new rationalised and consolidated national management framework for the conduct of Australia's fruit fly disinfestation research

program. SCARM did not endorse the recommendation as presented believing that it was an issue for HRDC to manage and that industry needed to contribute more significantly to funding disinfestation research.

HRDC is seeking industry commitment to a multi-industry market access program, including disinfestation, through the Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee.

Fruit Fly Review HRDC and the citrus industry commissioned a project to review the R&D program for control of fruit fly in the field to provide a strategic plan for a national fruit fly strategy. Both industry and HRDC were concerned at the increasing demand for funds for work on Queensland and Mediterranean fruit fly and apparent duplication of effort and resources.

The prior R&D program on fruit fly and previous attempts to establish a national plan were reviewed by the team of consultants. Industry and government were widely consulted culminating in a planning workshop and detailed report.

The review identified a strategic program for funding in 1998/99. Immediate support was given to projects aimed at improving fruit fly traps and baits, and the sterile insect technique (SIT) program associated with the activities of the Tri-State Fruit Fly Committee. Recommendations for progressing a national R&D program and management plan for field and disinfestation control of fruit fly will be presented to the Australian

Horticultural Industry R&D Committee for multiple industry funding commitment.

26 FIRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s Ma r k e t Access

PARTNERS IN R&D

Horticultural Market Access Committee (HMAC)

This committee, chaired by the Australian Horticultural Corp­ oration, meets three to four times per year to determine national

priorities for industry's comm odity market access proposals.

Strategic Working Group (SWG) of HMAC

This is an HMAC subgroup composed of representatives from HRDC, Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS), Australian Horticultural Exporters Association (AHEA) and HMAC to

progress issues emerging from HMAC meetings.

Australian Horticultural Exporters Association Board of Management (AHEA-BOM)

Originally set up to administer over recovery funds from AQIS. Now limited to a reporting function only

for projects in the market access/ disinfestation research program funded by over recovery funds.

Citrus Market Development Group (CMDG)

Administers the use of a special Federal grant of $8.4 million over five years for the Citrus Market Development Program. HRDC

participates to negotiate funding of and report on project proposals in HRDC's Market Access/ Disin­ festation Research Program.

Interstate Plant Health Regulation Working Group (IPHRWG)

This group meets on a quarterly basis to resolve interstate quarantine issues. HRDC reports on export market access issues and participates in the discussion of interstate market access issues and

the determination of quarantine security decisions. (Under review by SCARM.)

Methyl Bromide Consultative Group (MBCG)

This Committee consists of representatives from Environment Australia, RIRDC, HRDC, and agrochemical and horticultural

industries to consider the effects of MB phase-out on Australian horticulture, and to implement the National Methyl Bromide Response

Strategy.

National Methyl Bromide Alternatives Research Coordination Committee

Established to advise MBCG and manage the development of alte­ rnative controls to methyl bromide through R&D. HRDC's role ensures

that the R&D program fits the joint objectives of HRDC, horticultural industries and government.

Quarantine and Pre­ Shipment Methyl Bromide use Committee (QPSMBC)

Set up by Environment Australia and chaired by HRDC to develop an Australian "position" on the possible international move to cancel the present exclusion of

quarantine and pre-shipment uses of methyl bromide from the inter­ nationally agreed phase-out of MB fo r agricultural uses. (Title still

under review).

Plant Industries Incursion Management Consultative Committee (PIIMCC)

HRDC represents the horticultural industries on the Steering Comm­ ittee for conduct o f a scoping study

into incursion management planning for the plant industries. (Role currently under review.)

Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)

HRDC participates in the ACIAR Annual Postharvest Program Rev­ iew to ensure collaboration bet ween HRDC and ACIAR programs.

Queensland Department of Primary Industries (QDPI) North Region Market Access Committee

This committee was established after the outbreak of Papaya Fruit Fly (PEE) in north Queensland, and is presently under review to

determine whether the role should be extended to the whole state of Queensland. It meets approximately three times per year to consider matters concerning market access in relation to PEE.

Papaya Fruit Fly Consultative Committee (PFFCC)

This sub-committee was formed to determine national research requir­ ements following the outbreak of PEE. Its ongoing role is dependent on the eradication of PEE

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 27

PARTNERS IN R&D H R D C P a r t n e r G r o u p s - G o v e r n m e n t

To promote protection and enhancement of Australia's natural resource base, one of

the Corporation's strategic goals is to establish environmentally

sustainable

management practices that make efficient use of the natural resource base and reduce

industry reliance on chemical inputs.

Strategic Plan Review In recognition of the Government's strategic priorities, the appointment of a new Board and the dynamics of the horticultural industries, the Corporation has commenced a review of its strategic plan and will prepare a new plan to lead the Corporation into the new millennium by June 1998/99.

Action Plan for Australian Agriculture The Corporation was involved through the Executive Director in the SWOT analysis conducted by the Department of Primary Industries and Energy as essential input into the Government's Action Plan for Australian Agriculture. The plan is aimed at ensuring that Australian agriculture is based on "profitable, competitive and sustainable family farm businesses that are world leaders in efficient production techniques, product quality, innovation and the ability to supply and respond to market needs".

The Corporation's new strategic plan will take the direction set out in that document into account.

Government Priorities:

The Corporation's existing strategic plan builds on the achievements of the previous plan and takes into account the following Government priorities:

• identify strategic market access and investment opportunities and develop strategies to take advantage of these opportunities • increase productivity of the land, labour and capital resource in the horticultural industry • encourage the investment in and up-take of high quality Australian

products through improved food quality and safety • focus on creating a competitive Australian export and import replacement through increased processing and value adding • protect and enhance Australia's natural resource base and • identify both the direct and indirect public benefit from any funded

projects.

These priorities were considered in terms of the 1997/98 R&D program.

Environmentally Sustainable Development To promote protection and enhancement of Australia's natural resource base, one of the Corporation's strategic goals is to establish environmentally sustainable management practices that make efficient use of the natural

resource base and reduce industry reliance on chemical inputs.

A number of projects across a range of horticultural industries have helped move horticulture toward this goal. For example, projects in the vegetable industry have developed practical farmer guidelines for sustainable production, compared losses of nutrients and soil under different soil management systems, and developed a system of permanent soil beds as a means of maintaining soil quality and production. New ways

28 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC P a r t n e r G r o u p s - G o v e r n m e n t PARTNERS IN R&D

of establishing orchards which overcome previous soil structural limitations have been developed in the Goulburn Valley and are currently being tested in a number of commercial situations. New South Wales nurseries have taken part in workshops aimed at improving the efficiency of their water use, thereby minimising nutrient and pesticide flow to storm water.

The Corporation is keen to encourage a cooperative approach to resource management issues, and believes such an approach is appropriate for many issues, particularly those which involve off-farm environmental effects. Such effects include effects on water and produce quality, aquatic ecology, stream siltation and soil salinity. Accordingly, the Corporation is seeking to develop a multi industry approach, through the Australian

Horticultural Industry R&D Committee, to establish a means of identifying and adequately resourcing agreed priority issues.

EXAMPLES OF PROJECTS UNDERTAKEN IN COLLABORATION WITH OTHER RDCs, SMAs AND GOVERNMENT AGENICES

Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research FR96016 Implementing strategic control of burrowing nematode on bananas FR97012 Development of a pineapple plant not prone to natural

flowering using gene

VG97014 Advancing the integrated management of diamondback moth in Brassica vegetables

Australian Horticultural Corporation MC97016 A review of the export marketing structure of the Australian macadamia industry

Cotton R&D Corporation HG96016 Pre-emptive research into the biology and biological control of silver leaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B VG97037 Silverleaf whitefly management

Grape & Wine R&D Corporation FR95060 Development of oils for the control of grape powdery mildew and other pests and diseases of grapes

Grape & Wine R&D Corporation/ Dried Fruits R&D Council FR96025 Improved soil borne disease management practices in vine nurseries

Rural Industries R&D Corporation FR97025 Assessment of olive yield and oil quality and cultivar identification

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 29

I PARTNERS IN R&D HRDC Partner Groups - Government

MU94008 Optimisation of an innovative method for cultivating exotic mushrooms particularly shittake

Rural Industries R&D Corporation (Methyl Bromide Levy) FR96050 Evaluation of plant back periods for methyl bromide and alternative fumigants used for soil disinfestation in the strawberry industry

HG95015 Alternatives to soil fumigation with methyl bromide in the strawberry and ornamental industries VC96033 Management of soil-borne pathogens in vegetable cropping systems at Bundaberg, Queensland

Rural Industries R&D Corporation/ Grains R&D Corporation HG96003 PCR based diagnostics for Phytophthora

All R&D Corporations HG001 Australian Rural Research in Progress (Infoscan Pty Ltd) HG97033 Training and Development Scholarships on Course 5 of the Australian Rural Leadership Program

30 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

H o r t i c u l t u r a l I n d u s t r y A l l i a n c e - Η IA

PARTNERS IN R&D

Horticultural Industry Alliance (HIA) Steering Committee The Horticultural Industry Alliance (HIA) was formed as an outcome of the Presidents Council Meeting of 18 March, 1998 "Building on the strategic alliance between HRDC and AHC". In the lead up to that meeting and since that time, HRDC has committed both resources and funds to ensure that an appropriate process was implemented to determine industry support for and financial commitment to the concept of a single entity for horticulture.

An election process was undertaken by industry and representatives on the HIA Steering Committee were nominated as:

• Richard Armstrong, Chairman, QFVG • Brian Carroll, Chairman, AUSVeg • David Cliffe, President, Nursery Industry Association of Australia • Rod Dalton, President, Australian Avocado Growers Federation • Jon Durham, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Apple & Pear Growers

Association.

Other Steering Committee members as agreed are:

• Lindy Hyam, Executive Director, HRDC • James McGeoch, Chairman, HRDC • Mark Mapper, Acting Executive Director, AHC (now Executive Director)

• Bob Seldon, Chairman, AHC, and • Michael Macnamara, Assistant Secretary, Horticulture and Wine Branch, Crops Division, Department of Primary Industries and Energy.

Since that time, Richard Armstrong has resigned for personal reasons and a replacement representative from the voluntary contributing industries to HRDC is being sought by industry nomination.

The Steering Committee identified their vision and mission as:

VISION:

One body servicing the horticultural industry by the year 2000.

MISSION:

Identify the advantages and opportunities for developing and recommending a new model for delivery of services to the horticultural industry, through extensive consultation and communication with industry and other stakeholders.

Terms of Reference were drafted but are to be further developed. Industry financial support to proceed with the development of the single entity is currently being sought with industry funding commitment required by end September, 1998.

Independent Chairman The second meeting on June 17 confirmed appointment of the independent chairman as Denis Byrne, a commercial solicitor from

The Mission of the Horticultural Industry Alliance is to:

Identify the advantages and opportunities for developing and

recommending a new model for delivery of services to the horticultural industry,

through extensive consultation and communication with industry and other stakeholders.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 31

PARTNERS IN R&D H o r t i c u l t u r a l I n d u s t r y A l l i a n c e - Η IA

Brisbane who is a member of the Federal Treasurer's Corporations and Securities Panel. He was a partner in Freehill Hollingdale & Page in both Brisbane and Canberra and he was President of the Law Council of Australia. He has considerable experience in Agribusiness as well as acquisitions and mergers.

32 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o r p o r a t e G o v e r n a n c e

Legislative Framework 34

Enabling legislation 34

Governing Legislation 34

Ministerial Powers and Directives 34 HRDC Objects 35

HRDC Functions & Powers 35

Role 36

HRDC Board 37

Board of Directors 37

Term of Employment 37

Current Directors 37

Board Meetings 40

Sub-Committees of the Board 41

Finance Committee 42

Risk Management and Audit Committee 43

Strategic Goal Committees 43 Industry Relationship Committees 44 HRDC Board Membership Selection Committee 45

Joint Sub-Committee with the Australian Horticultural Corporation 45

Board and Corporate Performance 46 Corporate Team 47

CORPORATE G O V E R N A N C E L e g i s l a t i v e F r a m e w o r k

Enabling Legislation The Horticultural Research and Development Corporation is a statutory authority of the Commonwealth Government established under the

Horticultural Research and Development Act, 1987 (the Act). Under this legislation, the Corporation is directly responsible to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy. The Minister has delegated responsibility for HRDC and all R&D Corporations to the Honourable Senator Judith Troeth, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy.

Governing Legislation The introduction of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act, 1997 (the CAC Act) requires the Corporation to also report to the Minister for Finance and Administration.

Reporting requirements under the CAC Act are subject to the Minister for Finance and Administration's Guidelines for the Report of Operations required under Schedule 1 of the Act. These guidelines have yet to be developed and as yet do not apply.

Ministerial Powers and Directives Under the enabling legislation, the Minister may:

• Appoint Members of the Corporation other than the Executive Director (Section 15) • Request the establishment of a Selection Committee for the purpose of appointing the nominated Members of the Corporation (Section 57) • Appoint a nominated member of the Corporation to be Deputy

Chairman (Section 14) • Terminate the appointment of the Chairman or a nominated Member of the Corporation in certain circumstances as specified in the legislation (Section 23) • Approve the Executive Directors terms and conditions of appointment

in relation to matters not provided for by legislation (Section 36) • Establish written guidelines covering the payment by the Corporation to an eligible industry body for expenses incurred in connection with consultation with the Corporation (Section 10(2)b) • Request the Corporation to revise a research and development program

(Section 27) • Determine by regulation the gross value of production of the horticultural industry for the purposes of establishing the limit of matching payments by the Commonwealth to the Corporation under

section 46 of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Act 1987, and • Approve the Corporation's long term plan and annual operating program (Section 26).

34 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Legi sl at i ve F r a m e w o r k

HRDC Objects (a) to improve the efficiency and competitiveness of Australian horticultural industries by:

(i) identifying priority areas of horticultural research and development; (ii) improving the efficiency and effectiveness of horticultural research and development; (iii) making more effective use of the resources available for horticultural

research and development; and (iv) making more effective use of the skills available in the community in general and in the scientific community in particular for horticultural research and development.

(b) to develop in Australian horticultural industries an awareness of the contribution that can be made by horticultural research and development in improving their efficiency and competitiveness.

(c) to further the sustainable management and use of natural resources.

(d) to increase the economic, environmental and social benefits to members of the Australian horticultural industries and the community in general by improving production, processing, storage, transport and marketing of the products of horticultural industries.

(e) to ensure sound accountability for expenditure on horticultural research and development.

HRDC Functions and Powers The functions (Section 6 of the Act) of the Corporation are:

(a) to investigate and evaluate the requirements of horticultural research and development and, on the basis of such investigation and evaluation:

(i) to prepare a research and development plan under Section 26 and (ii) to review and revise the research and development plan; (b) to prepare a research and development program under Section 27 for each financial year; (c) to carry out, and coordinate and fund the carrying out of horticultural

research and development projects; (d) to monitor and to report to the Parliament, the Minister and Australian horticultural industries on horticultural research and development projects that are carried out or funded, in whole or in part, by the

Corporation; (da) to facilitate the dissemination, adoption and commercialisation of the results of horticultural research and development; and (e) such other functions in relation to Australian horticultural industries as

are conferred on the Corporation by or under this Act or any other Act.

Subject to the enabling legislation, the Corporation has the powers (Section 7) to do all things necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the performance of its functions and in particular may:

(a) make applications, including joint applications, for patents;

EE— I

The Corporation's objectives are:

To improve the efficiency and competitiveness of Australian horticultural industries.

To develop in Australian horticultural industries an

awareness of the contribution that can be made by horticultural R&D in

improving their efficiency and competitiveness.

To further the sustainable management and use of natural

resources.

To increase the economic, environmental and social benefits to

members of the Australian horticultural industries and the

community in general.

To ensure sound accountability for expenditure on horticultural R&D.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 35

A

CORPORATE G O V E R N A N C E L e g i s l a t i v e F r a m e w o r k

The Corporation has national responsibility for funding and managing research

and development for Australian horticultural industries including fresh and processed

fruits, vegetables, nuts, nursery products, cut flowers and foliage and turf.

(b) deal with patents vested in the Corporation or in the Corporation and other persons; (c) make charges for work done, services rendered and goods and information supplied by it; (d) enter into agreements under Section 8 for the carrying out of

horticultural research and development projects by other persons; (e) enter into agreements under Section 9 for the carrying out of horticultural research and development projects by the Corporation and other persons; (f) accept gifts, grants, bequests and devises made to it, and act as trustee

of money and other property vested in it on trust; (fa) acquire, hold and dispose of real and personal property for the purposes of this Act; (fb) join in the formation of a company; and (g) do anything incidental to any of its powers.

Where the Corporation holds a controlling interest in a company, the Corporation must ensure that the company does not do anything that the Corporation itself is not empowered to do.

Role The Corporation has national responsibility for funding and managing research and development for Australian horticultural industries including fresh and processed fruits, vegetables, nuts, nursery products, cut flowers and foliage and turf.

The HRDC focuses on experimentation, analysis and the application of knowledge in the fields of science, technology, marketing and economics.

By emphasising technology adoption, the Corporation is able to have significant impact on the sustainability and profitability of Australian horticulture.

36 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC B o a r d

Board of Directors The Corporation is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of nine members drawn from the horticultural, research and business communities. The directors include the Chairman, appointed by the Minister for Primary

Industries and Energy; an Executive Director appointed by the Corporation; a Government Member nominated by the DPIE and appointed by the Minister; and, six members nominated by representatives of the horticultural industries and appointed by the Minister. A Deputy Chairman is nominated by the Board and appointed by the Minister.

Term of Appointment Directors are appointed for a term not exceeding three years except for the Government Member (who holds office at the Minister's pleasure) and the Executive Director whose term is determined at the time of appointment.

The current Board was announced by the Honourable Senator Brownhill, in his role as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy, on 17 July and appointed on 16 August 1997. A successful handover strategy was implemented at the first meeting of the

new Board in October 1997 to ensure a smooth succession of the new Board (see Appendix C for retiring Board members).

Current Directors

Mr James McGeoch (Chairman) Managing Director, Birkdale Nursery Brisbane, Qld Tel: (07) 3207 2533 Fax: (07) 3207 5998

Mr McGeoch is chairman o f the Wholesale Ornamental Nurserymen Pty Ltd, and a member o f the advisory group for the formation of the Queensland Institute for Horticulture. He is also a member o f the Australian Indonesian Horticultural Task Force and past president o f the Queensland Nursery

Industry Association and the Flower Export Council of Australia. He was a member of both the Board of the HRDC and the AHC from 7994 - 7997 and was appointed Chairman of the Board of the HRDC effective 76 August, 7997.

Ms Lindy Hyam (Executive Director) Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Gordon, NSW Tel: (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352

Ms Hyam commenced her appointment with the Corporation on January 73, 7997. She was previously the Director, Organisational Development at Warringah Council, NSW where she was responsible for leading significant

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

CORPORATE G O V E R N A N C E

HRDC Board

Chairman Mr James McGeoch

Executive Director Ms Lindy Hyam

Deputy Chairman Mr Tony Biggs

Government Member Mr Mike Macnamara

Members Mr Jim Croll Dr Ann Hamblin Mr Dennis Richards

Mr Peter Walker Mr Paul Ziebarth

1

C O R P O R A T E G O V E R N A N C E H R D C B o a r d

organisational wide reform. Her work experience spans three levels of Government and includes senior consultancy and management experience in all facets of corporate management and policy development with organisations including the NSW Premier's Department, NSW Police Service and NSW Department o f Education. She has a Masters Degree in Business Administration, a Bachelor of Education and a Diploma in Teaching.

M r Tony Biggs (Deputy Chairman) Principal Consultant, Cardinal Horticultural Services

North Richmond, NSW Tel: (02) 4571 1231 Fax: (02) 4571 3262

Mr Biggs is a horticultural consultant with specialised experience in vegetable crops, protected cropping and hydroponics. He is the founding editor o f Good Fruit & Vegetables, a national magazine for Australian industries and is the author o f four books on vegetable growing. He is past president o f the Australian Region of the International Plant Propagators' Society (IPPS). Mr Biggs has served on the Board o f the Corporation since

1991 and as Deputy Chairman since 1994.

M r Mike Macnamara (Government Member) Assistant Secretary, Horticulture and Wine Branch, Crops Division, Department of Primary Industries and Energy Canberra, ACT

Tel: (02) 6272 5488 Fax: (02) 6272 5672

M r Macnamara has had wide experience in public administration and the formulation of Government policy. He has served in a number of Government agencies including the Department o f Foreign Affairs, the Australian Uranium Export Office, the Department o f Trade, Austrade and the Department of Primary Industries and Energy. He most recently was an adviser to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy before taking up his present position at the beginning of 1998. His special expertise is in trade policy.

Mr Jim Croll (Director) Director, Siddons Ram set Ltd and Colembally Corporation COLEMBALLY NSW Tel: (02) 9498 1740 Fax: (02) 9498 4283

]im Croll has been a member of public company boards almost continuously since 1970 and is a fellow o f the Australian Institute o f Company Directors. He is currently a Director o f Coleambally Irrigation Corporation and Siddons

38 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC B o a r d

Ramset Limited. He was a member o f the Sydney Market Authority Board from 1989 to 7997. He /s a/so an active chairman in The Executive Connection group and former Managing Director of CRT -Town & Country Croup (91-96).

Dr Ann Hamblin (Director) Principal Scientist, Bureau of Resource Sciences Canberra, ACT Tel: (02) 6272 3933 Fax: (02) 6272 4896

Ann Hamblin trained as a research scientist and has a PhD and MAgSc in soil science. She has worked in soil-plant-water relations, the sustainability of agricultural systems and the environmental impacts of agriculture. She now specialises in national and international development of indicators for sustainable agriculture and environment. She has had over twelve years in

research management having served as a Director on the Wheat Research Council and Sugar R&D Corporation before being appointed to HRDC. From 1994-98 she was the Director for the CRC for Soil and Land Management and is now Principal Scientist at the Bureau o f Resource Sciences, Canberra.

Mr Dennis Richards (Director) Director, Institute for Horticultural Development, Knoxfield, Vic Tel: (03) 9210 9205 Fax: (03) 9887 3609

Mr Richards has 30 years experience as a horticultural scientist and science manager with the Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria. Following a period of secondment to the Strategic Research Foundation, he was appointed as the inaugural Director overseeing the establishment o f Agriculture Victoria's Institute for Horticultural Development. He is currently the President o f the Australian Society of

Horticultural Science and Australia's voting Council member for the International Society for Horticultural Science.

Mr Peter Walker (Director) Manager, CA&PA Walker Citrus Growing and Management

Waikerie, SA Tel: (08) 8541 4100 Fax: (08) 8541 4101

Mr Walker has owned and managed citrus properties for over 30 years. He currently owns, in partnership with his wife, a 60 acre citrus property and manages a further 340 acres. He was a member o f the Citrus Board o f South Australia from 1993-97 and has been an active member for the past seven

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE H R D C Board

years o f the South Australian Citrus Improvement Society. He has been a Committee Member o f Citrus Growers South Australia since 7 995 and was Chairman o f the Sunlands Irrigation Board for three years. He is presently Chairman of Riverson Export Company, the principal exporter o f citrus to the US exporting 7.6 million boxes worth $65-$100 million in the 7998 year.

He also represents HRDC on the Citrus Market Development Group.

Mr Paul Ziebarth (Director) Quality Manager, MJ Ziebarth & Co Laidley, Qld Tel: (07) 5465 1021 Fax: (07) 5465 1296

Mr Ziebarth is Deputy Chairman of the Queensland Fruit and Vegetable Growers and has been actively involved in the Tomato Sectional Group Committee since 7997. He is a founding member o f the Board of the Queensland Horticultural Institute and serves on the industry relationship/advisory committees of organisations such as CSIRO and the CRC for Tropical Plant Pathology and CRC for Tropical Pest Management. He has a Masters o f Applied Science and is undertaking a PhD at the University o f Queensland. He was awarded a Churchill scholarship in 7997 to investigate the use of quality management systems in horticulture in New Zealand, Asia, USA and Europe and has completed the Australian Rural Leadership Training Program. He has worked in the horticultural industry in training and implementing quality management systems and managing horticultural enterprises since 7 982.

Board Meetings The Executive Director introduced a program of Board meetings which enabled a comprehensive handover from the retiring Board to the new Board; provided input from the new Board into Corporation strategy and future directions and ensured sound operation of the Corporations key

business functions consistent with its Charter and legislative requirements.

The Board met on seven occasions in 1997/98 as follows:

Board Meeting No. 42 Board Meeting No. 43 (Handover meeting) Board Meeting No. 44 Board Meeting No. 45 Board Meeting No. 46 (Strategy Meeting) Board Meeting No. 47 (Budget Meeting) Board Meeting No. 48

29-31 July 1997 Gordon NSW

7-8 October 1997 Gordon NSW

20-21 November 1997 Gordon NSW 19-20 February 1998 Gordon NSW 19-20 March 1998 Gordon NSW

7-8 May 1998 Gordon NSW

19 June 1998 Teleconference

40 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC B o a r d

Both retiring and newly appointed Board members attended the October 1997 meeting to complete the handover to the new Board. Dr Don Plowman, retiring Board member was unable to attend this meeting due to overseas travel (China).

The Chairman, M r James McCeoch was absent from the Board until 7 January, 1998 due to ill health. In his absence, the retiring Board Chairman, Mr David Minnis and the existing Deputy Chairman, M r Tony Biggs, chaired the October handover strategy Board meeting on respective days.

Mr Tony Biggs also chaired the November meeting.

In February 1998, the existing Government Member, M r Andrew Combe retired from the Board of the Corporation having served the Corporation in this role since 1989.

His successor, M r Michael Macnamara was appointed by Senator Troeth and joined the Board at the March 1998 meeting. M r Combe attended the March meeting to assist in the handover. In April 1998, M r Macnamara was officially appointed to the position of Government Member on the HRDC

Board.

Board meetings are structured such that they deal with:

• identification of conflicts of interest, both potential and real; • discussion items of a governance nature and in respect to the R&D program; • reporting on actions against Board decisions; and

• reporting to the Board on significant achievements, key issues and progress against the Corporation's strategic and business plans.

Two strategy meetings in March and July 1998 were held with the purpose of focussing on the future directions, strategies and policies of the Corporation in the context of ensuring a progressive and commercially oriented Corporation with proactive management.

The Board meetings also provide opportunity for presentation to the Board by third parties on relevant issues, e.g. internal auditor and those commissioned to conduct independent reviews of the Corporation.

Sub-Committees of the Board The Corporation may establish committees to assist it in the performance of its functions and the exercise of its powers. Such a committee may be constituted wholly by members of the Corporation or partly by members of

the Corporation and partly by other persons.

The delegation of various functions of the Board to the Committees does not relieve the Board of its duties and responsibilities but merely assists it in carrying out those responsibilities.

In 1997/98, the Corporation had the following sub-committees:

• Finance Committee • Risk Management & Audit Committee • Strategic Goal Committees • Industry Relationship Committees.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

CORPORATE G O V E R N A N C E

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE H RD C Board

In 1997/98, the Corporation had the following sub­ committees: • Finance Committee

• Risk Management & Audit Committee • Strategic Goal Committees

• Industry Relationship Committees

The membership of these committees comes from wholly within the

Corporation and includes both relevant staff and Board members.

The membership of these committees comes from wholly within the Corporation and includes both relevant staff and Board members.

In the formation of these Committees, consideration was given to:

• the previous Board's move towards focusing on cross industry issues rather than the more traditional "silo" approach of commodity by commodity • managing the impact of industry and corporate changes in policy,

strategic directions, structure and practice • managing government changes to and redirection of legislation and priorities • the importance of managing the ongoing relationship between industry

and the HRDC in the context of our partnership relationships • the current complement of skills within the Corporation and on the Board • the opportunities for the greatest "value adding" by the Directors of the

Board

• balance between research and application experience, and • accountability and governance requirements.

Finance Committee The primary role of the Committee is to assist the Board of Directors in fulfilling its responsibilities as they relate to:

• business ethics, policies and practices • management and internal controls; • accounting policies, and • financial reporting practices.

The Committee is empowered to examine any matters relating to the financial affairs of the Corporation.

The Finance Committee is composed of:

• James McGeoch, Chairman • Lindy Hyam, Executive Director • Jim Croll, Director

Marina Espiratu, Management Accountant for the Corporation acts as secretary to the Committee.

The Committee met three times in 1997/98 linked to Board meetings and considered and made recommendation to the full Board about:

• internal audit reports conducted by KPMC; • the external ANAO audit; • the existing investment strategy; • the existing financial system and future requirements; • legislative changes in respect to the Corporation's financial compliance

requirements; and • the cash position and financial performance of the Corporation.

42 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC B o a r d

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Risk Management and Audit Committee The Board of the Corporation is responsible for the overall corporate governance of the Corporation. To assist it ensure effective corporate governance in an efficient manner, the Board has established a committee

known as the Risk Management and Audit Committee.

The Committee aims to promote and monitor the pursuit of best practice by Management in the areas of external reporting, risk management and internal control, legal compliance and code of conduct within the Corporation.

The Risk Management and Audit Committee is composed of:

• James McGeoch, Chairman • Lindy Hyam, Executive Director • Mike Macnamara, Government Member • Dennis Richards, Director.

Jenny Longbottom, Business Manager for the Corporation acts as secretary to the Committee.

The Committee met three times during the year, linked to Board meetings, to consider and make recommendation to the full Board on such matters as:

• implications for the Corporation of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act, 1997; • outcomes of the Corporation commissioned Intellectual Property (IP) Review and IP issues during the year; • implications and outcomes of the ANAO Performance Audit; • outcomes of the ANAO External Audit;

• the annual report 1996/97; • development and implementation of a revised Research Agreement to reflect the revised Board policy on ownership and management of IP and more up to date management practices;

• implications of the millenium bug and development of a Year 2000 compliance strategy; • legal issues associated with the stonefruit breeding review final report; • the current lease of the Corporation at its Gordon, NSW site and future

accommodation options; • restructure of research providers and implications for the R&D program; • insurance of R&D Committees and Industry Development Officers to cover their R&D program function; and

• the revised R&D Committee policy.

Strategic Goal Committees Directors on the Strategic Goal Committees have responsibility for clarification as appropriate of Board policy for Program Management and for providing advice to the Board on policy, strategic direction and risk

management aspects of programs/projects across commodities on the basis of strategic goal areas.

The Risk Management and Audit Committee has met to consider and make recommendations to the full board on

matters such as:

• implications of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act, 1997; • outcomes of

Intellectual Property (IP) Review; • implications and outcomes of the

ANAO Performance Audit; • outcomes of the ANAO External Audit;

• the annual report 1996/97; • implementation of a revised Research

Agreement; • Year 2000 compliance; • legal issues

associated with the stonefruit breeding review final report; • leasing and future

accommodation options; • restructure of research providers

and implications for the R&D program; • insurance of R&D Committees and

Industry Development Officers to cover their R&D program function; and • the revised R&D

Committee policy.

43 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE H R D C Boa r d

The Strategic Goal Committees cover:

• Disinfestation • Quality Management • Technology Transfer • New and Value

Added Product Development • Genetic Improvement

• Postharvest • Sustainable Management (cultural/harvesting

practices)

• Disease and Pest Management • Waste Management • Food Safety.

The Committees are constituted as follows:

• Disinfestation - Lindy Hyam, Mike Macnamara and Peter Walker (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Quality Management - Mike Macnamara, Lindy Hyam, Peter Walker and Paul Ziebarth (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Technology Transfer - Lindy Hyam, Dennis Richards and Peter Walker,

(and/or nominated Program Manager) • New and Value Added Product Development - Jim Croll, Lindy Hyam, James McGeoch and Mike Macnamara (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Genetic Improvement - Lindy Hyam, Dennis Richards and Paul

Ziebarth (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Postharvest - Lindy Hyam, Dennis Richards and Peter Walker (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Sustainable Management (cultural/harvesting practices) - Tony Biggs,

Ann Hamblin and Lindy Hyam (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Disease and Pest Management - Tony Biggs, Lindy Hyam and Paul Ziebarth (and/or nominated Program Manager) • Waste Management - Ann Hamblin, Lindy Hyam and Mike Macnamara

(and/or nominated Program Manager) • Food Safety - Ann Hamblin, Lindy Hyam, James McGeoch and Paul Ziebarth (and/or nominated Program Manager) (new area not separately identified in current Strategic Plan).

A number of these strategic goal areas were reviewed in 1997/98 to provide direction in the development of a new strategic plan for the Corporation.

The Committee membership was drawn upon on an out of session basis to provide strategic and policy advice on a range of projects before the Corporation for funding and management consideration.

Industry Relationship Committees Industry Relationship Committees aim to:

• promote the development and maintenance of working relationships with HRDC's industry partners • ensure that HRDC's policies and strategies provide leadership to industries and support industry priorities and R&D needs • ensure that issues of concern are identified to the Board of the HRDC

and resolved • enhance communication, re Corporate changes and activities, to industry partners and to ensure a smooth transition if shifts in Board policy and direction are required • assist in representation of Government priorities with respect to public

funding in horticulture and to enhance the industry/HRDC approach to addressing such priorities and • provide advice in a timely and efficient manner to the Program

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

HRDC B o a r d

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Management team where specific funding application advice is required.

The Industry Relationship Committees meet on an as needs basis and are drawn upon to provide out of session advice on industry and project related matters. As of March 1998, they are constituted as follows:

• For Temperate Fruit and Nuts, the Committee Members are Tony Biggs, Lindy Hyam, James McGeoch, Mike Macnamara, Dennis Richards and Peter Walker (and/or nominated Program Manager)

• For Vegetables and Other Crops, the Committee Members are Tony Biggs, Jim Croll, Ann Hamblin, Lindy Hyam, James McGeoch, Mike Macnamara and Paul Ziebarth (and/or nominated Program Manager)

• For Tropical and Sub Tropical Fruits including Citrus and some Nuts, the Committee Members are Lindy Hyam, James McGeoch, Mike Macnamara, Peter Walker and Paul Ziebarth (and/or nominated Program Manager) and • For Nursery and Flowers including Turf, the recommended Committee

Members are Ann Hamblin, Lindy Hyam, James McGeoch, Dennis Richards, Peter Walker and Paul Ziebarth, (and/or nominated Program Manager).

HRDC Board Membership Selection Committee The Presiding Member of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Selection Committee, Ms Helen Lynch AM, wrote to the Minister on 20 June 1997 providing details of the Selection Committee's

nominations for industry membership of the new Board. The new Board entered into operation on 16 August, 1997 and the Selection Committee has not been required to meet during the 1997/98 year. The Presiding

Member disbanded the Selection Committee on 4 September, 1997.

Joint Sub-Committee with the Australian Horticultural Corporation (AHC) This Committee was formed in November 1996 to investigate opportunities for better coordination and collaboration between the two organisations. The terms of reference are:

AHC and HRDC will work together to develop policies and strategies that collectively add value to and maximise the potential of Australian horticulture, in Australia and internationally, through:

1. Enhancing communication between the two Corporations at all levels on strategic and operational issues 2. Identifying areas for cooperation and collaboration and implementing programs 3. Ensuring that research and development activities and outcomes along

with marketing requirements and consumer demands are fully integrated.

The Industry Relationship Committees cover:

• Temperate Fruit and Nuts • Vegetables and Other Crops • Tropical and Sub

Tropical Fruits including Citrus and some Nuts • Nursery and Flowers

including Turf.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 45

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE H R D C Boa r d

Specific areas for cooperation between AHC and HRDC include:

• market issues with respect to export marketing • export of

horticultural technology and provision of education and training

• pursuit of areas for achievement of efficiencies across the two organisations

• joint strategic planning and priority setting at the Corporation level • integrated R&D and

marketing strategic planning for common levy paying industries • closer liaison on

communication to industry • reciprocal membership of AHC Marketing Forums and

HRDC R&D Committees

• joint participation in industry meetings and conferences where appropriate

• regular meetings between AHC and HRDC management and staff.

Specific areas for cooperation include:

• Cooperation on market issues with respect to export marketing • Export of horticultural technology and provision of education and training in horticulture to our near markets in Asia • Pursuit of areas for achievement of efficiencies across the two

organisations • Joint strategic planning and priority setting at the Corporation level • Integrated R&D and marketing strategic planning for common levy paying industries • Closer liaison on communication to industry in such areas as industry

statistics, export statistics, research information and marketing, crop forecasting and horticultural market intelligence • Reciprocal membership of AHC Marketing Forums and HRDC R&D Committees in consultation with and agreed to by the R&D Committees • Joint Corporation participation in industry meetings and conferences

where appropriate • Regular joint meetings between AHC and HRDC management and staff.

Progress towards addressing specific areas for cooperation focussed mainly on:

• agreement by the HRDC to match AHC funds as a voluntary contribution for market research related activities underpinning AHC market promotion activities; • joint participation at industry conferences, at marketing forums and

R&D Committees; • joint projects such as review of marketing systems for macadamias; • joint involvement in preparation of publications such as "The Competitive Edge: How to make quality systems work for you;" • joint participation in the Market Access Committee's Strategic Working

Group; • joint meetings of HRDC and AHC staff; and • joint planning and preliminary work towards the establishment of the

Horticultural Industry Alliance (HIA).

As the HIA is now established with an independent Chairman, the two Corporations have set processes in place to resume focus on the Sub­ committee's specific areas for further collaboration with a review of the market access area for horticulture being the primary focus.

Board and Corporate Performance The Corporation is investigating and preparing a performance framework for the Board for consideration in 1998/99. This will be included in the overall performance system for the Corporation, which now includes R&D

Program, Executive Director and staff performance measures.

46 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o r p o r a t e Te a m

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The Corporation is headed by the Executive Director who leads a team of highly skilled people in managing the industry's multi million dollar program. The most significant developments in 1997/98 included:

• The decentralisation of program management staff with the location of Program Managers in Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales and Western Australia. The decentralisation strategy has enhanced accessibility to HRDC services and expertise and provided greater understanding of industry and research provider needs.

• Enhanced complementarity of the skill base amongst R&D program managers with employment of subject specialists as well as industry generalists. Integrated pest management, natural resource sustainability and export marketing skills have added significant value to the strategic focus of the HRDC program.

• Training and development opportunities for Program Managers.

• An emphasis on a team approach in managing the Corporation's business such that groups of three Program Managers provided review and advice on R&D programs/projects. Special project teams focussed on key corporate issues such as information management and reporting, commercialisation issues and strategic planning.

The corporate team members as at 30 June 1998 were:

Executive Director Lindy Hyam (Member of the Baord) • The Executive Director is selected and appointed by the HRDC Board with remuneration approved by the Minister.

Corporation Board and Support Services Professional Assistant to the Executive Director Ann Banham (part role)

Customer Services Officer Joanne Baker (maternity leave) Neil Cubitt

Business Management Services Business Manager Jenny Longbottom Legal & Commercialisation Officer

TBA

The most significant corporate team developments in 1997/98 included:

• The decentralisation of program management staff.

• Enhanced complementarity of the skill base amongst R&D

program managers with employment of subject specialists as well as industry

generalists.

• Training and development opportunities for up and coming R&D

Program Managers.

• An emphasis on a team approach in managing the Corporation's business.

Financial Management Services Management Accountant Marina Espiratu

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 47

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE C o r p o r a t e Team

Assistant Accountant Geoff Chamberlain

Communication Services Communications Manager Matt Darcey (part role)

Publications Manager Cefn Ridout

Corporate Public Relations Ann Banham (part role)

Program Management Program Managers Libby Abraham (Gordon, New South Wales)

Les Baxter (Hobart, Tasmania) Grantley Chaplin (part time- Gordon, New South Wales) Matt Darcey (part role - Gordon, New South Wales) Jonathan Eccles (Gordon, New South Wales)

Kim James (part time - Perth Western Australia)) Gerard McEvilly (Gordon, New South Wales) Mark Smith (Knoxfield, Victoria) Leigh Sparrow (part time - Launceston, Tasmania) John Tyas (Brisbane, Queensland)

Technology Transfer Technology Transfer Manager Matt Darcey (part role)

Information Management Services Administration Services Officer Vacant

Information Management Officer - Program Management Kylie Martin Robyn Smith

Library Management Part time role contracted out

Note: See Appendix F for further details of program management responsibilities and contact information.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

R&D P r o g r a m

Planning Framework 50

Strategic Plan 1995-2000 51

Strategic Goal Area: Market Focus 53

Market Requirements and Economic Studies 53

Disinfestation/Market Access 54 Quality Management 55

Postharvest 56

Technology Adoption 57

New and Value Added Products 58 Genetic Improvement 59

Sustainable Production 60

Pest and Disease Management 60 Cultural/Harvesting Practices 62 Total Waste Management 63

Industry Leadership and Partnership 64 R&D Management 66

Corporate Management 68

P l a n n i n g F r a m e w o r k

HORTICULTURAL C O M M UNITY

R&D SPECIFIC STRATEGIC & POLICY FRAMEWORKS

Industry strategic

R&D plans

Agency strategic

R&D plans

R&D corporations

strategic plans

Multiple-agency

R&D strategies

c■

WIDER COM M UNITY

GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRY STRATEGIC & POLICY FRAMEWORKS

Commonwealth

legislation, regulations,

policies and plans

State Government

policies and

strategic plans

Industry strategic plans

Specific multiple-agency

strategies

HRDC

STRATEGIC GOALS

Market Focus

Industry Leadership

Sustainable Production

R&D

Management

\ Corporation Management

/

1

& Summary

GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC ACCOUNTABILITY

EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT A N D STAFF ACCOUNTABILITY

Annual Executive Management Plan

Monthly Achievement Report to HRDC Board

50 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r at e gi c Pl an 1 9 9 5 - 2 0 0 0

R&D PROGRAM

Strategic Goal Areas The objects of the Corporation are met through the following:

• Market focus To assist industry to identify and meet the needs of consumers for a range of fresh and processed horticultural products particularly the markets of the Asia Pacific region and to improve linkages between all

industry sectors in order to add value to horticultural products.

• Sustainable production To establish environmentally sustainable management practices that make efficient use of the natural resource base and reduce industry reliance on chemical inputs.

• Industry leadership To improve the leadership skills and resources of horticultural industries in order to bring about greater understanding of the benefits of R&D thereby increasing the competitiveness, profitability and sustainability of Australian horticulture.

• R&D management To ensure that the R&D program is well coordinated, industry responsive and effectively managed to the highest professional standards.

• Corporation management To ensure the Corporation is well managed.

In recognition of the Government's strategic priorities, the appointment of a new

Board and the dynamics of the horticultural industries, the Corporation has commenced a review of its strategic plan and will formulate a revised plan to lead the Corporation into the new millennium by June 1998/99.

This plan is currently being reviewed and a new plan will go to the Minister for approval in June 1999.

In terms of the specific objects of the Corporation, the Corporation, in partnership with industry, Government and research providers:

• Identified the priority areas of horticultural R&D - see Industry Leadership and Partnership Strategic Goal in this section for specific strategic planning activities and the section titled Partners in R&D under Government for the review of the Corporation's strategic

plan. (Refer also to the index under Strategic Plan) • Improved the efficiency and effectiveness of horticultural R&D - see the section titled Partners in R&D for examples of efficiency and

effectiveness demonstrated by collaboration across the R&D program. (Refer also to the index under Collaboration) • Made more effective use of the skills available in the community, particularly the scientific community for horticultural R&D

- see the section titled Partners in R&D for examples of effectiveness demonstrated by collaboration across the R&D program and the Introduction to this report under Year in Review for the specific dimensions of the involvement of the research provider community in

the R&D program. (Refer also to the index under Research providers.) • Furthered the sustainable management and use of natural resources - see the section titled Partners in R&D under Government for the adoption of Government policy directives under Environmentally

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 51

R&D PROGRAMS S t r a t e g i c Plan 1 9 9 5 - 2 0 0 0

Sustainable Development and in this section the Sustainable Production Strategic Goal Areas (Refer also to the index under Environmentally Sustainable Development and Sustainable Production) • Increased the economic, environmental and social benefits to industry and the community by improving production, processing, storage, transport and marketing of horticultural products - see each of the following strategic goal areas including specific column stories and the sections on Public Benefits and Key Achievements.

(Refer also to the index under Public Benefit) • Ensured sound accountability for expenditure on horticultural R&D - see each of the following specific strategic goal areas: R&D Management and Corporation Management; and also the sections titled

Corporate Governance and Corporation Management. (Refer also to the index under Corporate ...)

52 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r at e gi c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

R&D PROGRAM

PROGRAM: MARKET REQUIREMENTS AND ECONOMIC STUDIES

Objective To assist producers to better match their product to consumer requirements.

Strategies • Encourage industry and the Australian Horticultural Corporation (AHC) to collate available commodity statistics.

• Identify market research opportunities and initiate appropriate studies.

• Assist industry to develop R&D plans based on customer/consumer needs, especially in Asian Pacific markets.

• Assist industry to develop appropriate strategies for import replacement.

Public Benefits • Horticultural products which match consumer needs.

• Development of new export markets.

• Improved return on R&D investment through matching research to critical cost factors.

• Efficiency gains through identifying best practice.

Performance Indicators • Establishment of clear market criteria for developing crop improvement goals.

• Identification of critical cost factors for production to be incorporated into the R&D planning process.

• Completion of market development studies for specific industries.

Key Achievements 1997/98 • ABS collection and collation of nursery industry data completed.

• 1998 Market Outlook Report for the Australian Processing Tomato industry completed.

• Artichoke feasibility study in the USA completed; economic analysis concluded and potential export markets identified.

• Market research for the chestnut industry commissioned and completed defining the nature of the industry and the profile of current and potential customers. • Identification of export markets for vegetable production in South

Australia in progress. • Preliminary market research audit for the banana industry conducted.

• Identification of current export knowledge for the citrus industry in progress.

Product Description Language for Apples and Pears ensures consistent quality

Product description languages (PDLs) have recently been developed and implemented in the apple and pear industries. The PDLs use a set of photographs and definitions to describe apple and pear quality, focussing on characteristics and describing them in a way that can be easily

measured. These product specifications form the heart of packer quality assurance programs. These PDLs have been

adopted in most major packing sheds in Australia as a training tool for staff to ensure

consistent packing of fruit, and as a negotiating tool for trading with retailers.

The PDLs put greater emphasis on product quality rather than just price and can be used as tools to assist in exporting.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 53

R&D PROGRAM S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

Disinfestation boosts Australia's economy

Australia's relatively small population limits growth of many horticultural industries.

Producers increasingly look to develop export markets to expand production and

income. Bigger production can also bring greater economies of scale

and improved profitability. However, access to many lucrative export markets is banned due

to quarantine barriers, which can only be lifted by developing commodity treatments

that ensure insect pests will not be introduced into the countries of potential

trading partners. While growers and exporters are primary beneficiaries of

increased access to export markets, many other allied commercial sectors

also derive benefits.

PROGRAM: DISINFESTATION/MARKET ACCESS

Objective To assist producers to access export and interstate markets restricted by quarantine barriers.

Strategies • Develop and implement a R&D program based on Market Access Committee priorities and coordinated by the Market Access Program Manager.

• Develop disinfestation technologies based on physical treatments to replace chemical treatments.

• Assist industries to develop strategic market access plans.

• Investigate prospects for pest free area status and a 'systems approach' as a means of quarantine security.

• Assist industries to develop contingency plans for managing possible incursions of exotic insect pests.

Public Benefits • Development of new export markets.

• Improved sustainability of existing export markets.

• Nil chemical treatment on disinfested horticultural products.

Performance Indicators • Development of Market Access Research Plans for specific incursions and/or industries.

• Completion of verification trials for specific industries and markets.

Key Achievements 1997/98 • Cold disinfestation treatment for three kinds of easy peel citrus for Japanese market verified.

• Cold disinfestation treatment for oranges and lemons for Korean market verified.

• Contingency plan for incursions of melon fly developed.

• Contributed to scoping study on incursion management planning for the Australian plant industries.

• National disinfestation research program developed.

• Substantial program funding negotiated with the Citrus Market Development Group and Australian Horticultural Exporters Association.

54 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

R&D PROGRAM

PROGRAM: QUALITY MANAGEMENT

Objective To assist industry to better match product to consumer requirements.

Strategies • Develop awareness and adoption of industry Quality Management Systems (QMS) across horticulture in conjunction with the Australian Horticultural Corporation (AHC).

• Continue to support QMS development.

Public Benefits • Increased consumer confidence at all levels of product consumption.

• Export and domestic markets developed and/or maintained.

Performance Indicators • Revised QMS strategy in place.

• QM technology transfer publication available to growers.

• Identification of benefit cost of QMS in specific industries.

• Implementation of QMS in specific industries.

Key Achievements 1997/98 • Revised HRDC funding policy for QMS projects established and outlined in 1998/99 application requirements.

• Quality Management technology transfer document "The Competitive Edge: How to make quality systems work for you" completed and 30,000 copies distributed through national publications and industry bodies.

• Export palm industry accredited to ISO 9002.

• First two of a series of ten Quality Management training workshops conducted throughout Queensland for the mango, melon, fresh stonefruit and vegetable industries.

• 140 nurseries accredited under the Nursery Industry Accreditation Scheme of Australia (NIASA).

Quality: The Competitive Edge

Consistency of product quality and food safety are recognised by the Corporation as two of the most significant

issues facing horticulture in this and the next decade. Adoption of Quality Management systems will assist industry in assuring the quality and safety of horticultural products for consumers.

Some of the experiences gained through HRDC projects have been captured in

the publication, The Competitive Edge:

How to make Quality Systems Work for You. This publication will benefit all horticultural

industries and their Australian consumers. It aims to increase awareness and

adoption of Quality Management in horticulture and draws together experiences of

horticultural producers who have Quality Systems in place.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 55

R&D PROGRAM S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

Fine tuning tests for avocado maturity

Marketing of under and over mature fruit not only results in poor product quality to

the consumer, but also decreases returns to growers. Fruit picked when immature can

have unacceptable eating quality, shrivel while softening or soften unevenly. A

commonly used method to determine the correct picking time is by measuring the moisture content of

avocado flesh.

However, this provides no guarantee of acceptable maturity standards. Researchers

have investigated how fruit sampling procedures could affect the method's accuracy and found that the procedure for

sampling fruit and handling it before testing can affect the accuracy of the

maturity test. With a clearer understanding of these factors, growers are now in a

better position to harvest fruit at optimal maturity and provide a better quality product

to consumers.

PROGRAM: POSTHARVEST

Objective To assist producers and handlers provide quality fresh product to consumers.

Strategies • Develop and implement appropriate postharvest protocols based on market requirements for each industry.

• Develop integrated product handling systems aimed at minimising product wastage.

Public Benefits • Quality horticultural products which meet consumer expectations.

• New export markets developed through improved storage life.

• Improved economies through reduced postharvest waste.

• Improved product freshness through better management of postharvest diseases and disorders.

Performance Indicators • Identification of critical control points in postharvest handling chain.

• Development of citrus postharvest research plan.

• Development of citrus postharvest handling guide.

Key Achievements 1997/98 • Postharvest manual for citrus industry in production.

• Citrus postharvest meeting held to coordinate program and identify future R&D needs.

• Cool chain management for fresh stonefruit and vegetables being extended to industry.

• Fruit dipping trials and residue analysis for dimethoate insecticide for peaches completed.

• Chestnut market research identified specific postharvest quality issues.

• Apple scald forecasting model for Granny Smith and Delicious varieties developed.

56 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

R&D PROGRAM

PROGRAM: TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION

Objective To ensure R&D outcomes are available to horticultural industries to facilitate technology adoption.

Developing quality- assured production and marketing for fresh potatoes

Strategies • Develop integrated technology adoption strategies for all R&D projects.

• Encourage industries to employ Industry Development Officers (IDOs).

• Develop appropriate extension strategies for each industry.

• Encourage industry partnerships for projects aimed at developing commercial products.

Public Benefits • R&D funding is returned to the community via a more competitive, sustainable and market focussed industry.

• Performance Indicators • Inclusion of a technology transfer strategy in all projects/programs.

• Identification of commercial partners for each project/program where appropriate.

• Revision of technology transfer strategy.

Performance Indicators • Development of guidelines for employment of IDMs, IDOs and Project Officers, including role statements and performance measures.

• Development of an HRDC Internet Site following market research of key stakeholders.

• Programs include technology adoption strategies consistent with industry plans/best practice.

• Development of guidelines for industry conferences and meetings.

Key Achievements 1997/98 • R&D outcomes from programs/projects communicated and adopted effectively.

• Review of the role and effectiveness of IDOs with recommendations to improve industry development and technology adoption completed.

• High quality reports on R&D projects and quality management systems published.

• Coordination and adoption of strategic approach within and between teams of IDOs improved in the nursery, citrus and fresh stonefruit industries.

• High quality book and field guide on citrus pests published and distributed.

• "The Competitive Edge: How to make quality systems work for you": a booklet providing a single, concise source of information on quality management systems published and distributed.

This project focuses on growers applying the principles of Quality

Assurance (QA) to give them greater awareness of the need to be involved in the whole value-adding chain.

Recent HRDC- commissioned research found 50% of consumers occasionally get annoyed about the

quality of fresh potatoes, with 20% unhappy with the quality of potatoes they buy.

Enthusiastic potato producers made a commitment to market their produce through a pre-determined

marketing chain which applies the principles of QA. Large retail chains are involved and complete the

marketing chain from grower to consumer.

As a result of the project, market access has been improved, with growers consulting marketers and consumers to better understand what is needed.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 57

R&D PROGRAM S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

Delivering fruit with guaranteed sweetness

A project using near infrared spectroscopy has established that sugar levels in melons

can be determined without cutting open the fruit by using a beam of light and measuring reflectance.

The next stage is to test the equipment in packhouses so that it can be used in practice

to sort the fruit by flavour. The research team is collaborating with a leading

Australian

manufacturer of fruit sorting equipment in order to achieve this. The industry expects a number of benefits to

flow from this

technology, including reduced wastage from the current practice of destructive sampling,

as well as rewarding those growers who produce high-quality fruit.

For the consumer, the benefits of enjoying fresh natural fruit at its peak will certainly add

value.

PRO G RAM : NEW A N D VALUE A D D E D PRO DUCTS

O b jective

To maximise marketing opportunities by developing new and value added products.

Strategies

• Increase processing capacity and commercialise processing technologies.

• Encourage producers to realise opportunities for value adding as identified by industry and HRDC.

• Initiate R&D in conjunction with commercial partners.

• Undertake market and feasibility studies with appropriate partners.

Public Benefits

• Improved export potential for table grapes.

• Improved fruit quality through non-destructive testing systems.

P erform ance Indicators

• Completion of field trials for producing table grape presentation package.

• Feasibility of using petroleum oils as mould preventers in grapes.

• Completed calibrations for using Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIR) in testing melon quality.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 97/98

• Calibration for Near Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy in melons completed.

• Carton liner for table grapes developed and initial field trials successfully completed.

• Essential oils capable of controlling rots in stored table grapes identified.

58 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : M a r k e t Focus

R&D PROGRAM

PROGRAM: G ENETIC IM P R O V E M E N T

O bjective

To ensure coordinated research programs have clear, market focussed goals.

Pomefruit industry provides a model o f varietal evaluation

Strategies

• Develop coordinated genetic improvement programs to satisfy market requirements.

• Establish industry-based management committees for each improvement program.

Public Benefits

• Availability of horticultural products which meet consumer needs.

• New naturally resistant varieties that require less pesticide use.

• Improved efficiency through productive plant varieties.

Perform ance Indicators

• Development of framework for delivering information on new citrus cultivars.

• Development of a plan for future banana improvement.

• Release of stonefruit varietal database on CD-ROM.

• Establishment of State Evaluation Committees for Australian Pome Fruit Improvement Program • Completion and extension to other tropical crops of pilot study on conservation of tomato germplasm.

• Publication of an asparagus varieties handbook.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 9 7 /9 8

• Pilot study on conservation of tomato germplasm completed.

• Planning session for banana plant improvement resulting in single improvement program held.

• Stonefruit varietal database on CD-ROM published and available at AFSFCA conference August 1998.

• State evaluation committees for the Australia Pome Fruit Evaluation program established.

• Asparagus varieties handbook in preparation.

A number of horticultural commodity groups are moving towards nationally coordinated varietal evaluation and

propagation schemes for the introduction and evaluation of new varieties and

rootstocks. Ongoing introduction of new cultivars and rootstocks ensures that Australia's

horticultural industries can meet domestic and export requirements.

To avoid duplication of effort, restricted access to new material and inadequate testing of

cultivars and rootstocks, these programs use national evaluation models. One such model is the Australian Pome Fruit

Improvement Program (APFIP), which consists of a management committee, a full time coordinator, multiplication blocks, state evaluation committees and a number of associated technical committees.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 59

R&D PROGRAM

Innovative alternatives to pesticide use in fresh stonefruit orchards

Despite the ravages of pests and diseases, growers strive to provide produce that is free of blemishes and pesticide residues, or at least with residues that are within stringent food safety

limits.

The stonefruit industry in the Cobram area in Victoria has adopted an innovative approach to reducing pesticide use.

Participating orchards are no longer sprayed with insecticides for the key insect pest, Oriental fruit moth,

but rely on disrupting the mating of moths using biochemical pheromones. As a

result, fresh and canning peaches and apricots have no pesticide residues that pose a risk to consumers' health.

The broader community also benefits because this ecologcally-friendly approach lowers the chance of

environmental pollution from chemical pesticides.

S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a :

S u s t a i n a b l e P r o d u c t i o n

PRO G RAM : PEST A N D DISEASE M A N A G E M E N T

O b je c tiv e

To achieve pest and disease management which minimises environmental impact and meets market requirements.

Strategies

• Develop a coordinated program of research and training which implements Integrated Crop Management practices.

• Identify achievable targets to reduce pesticide use.

Public Benefits

• Provision of horticultural products that meet consumer requirements for reduced pesticide use and minimum residue levels.

• Improved access to export markets through compliance with international residue standards.

• Enhanced maintenance of the ecosystem.

P erform ance Indicators

• Establishment of contingency plan for at least three species of fruit fly.

• Completion of residue pilot program for apples and pears.

• Completion of laboratory screening of alternative controls for fruit spotting bug.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 9 7 /9 8

• Improved pesticide control through introduction of new products especially for vegetable and nursery crops, softer pesticides for fruit crops and advancements in spray applications achieved.

• Biological control alternatives to chemical pesticides using beneficial insects and biological pesticides in fruit and vegetables introduced.

• Cultural practice alternatives for soil borne plant pathogens in fruit and vegetables developed.

• Pesticide resistance management strategies instituted for brassicas, tomatoes and sweet corn.

• National communication and R&D management plans established for newly introduced exotic pests, western flower thrip and silverleaf whitefly and their associated plant diseases.

• National contingency plans developed for future incursions of melon fly and Dutch elm disease.

• Review and preparation of strategic plan for R&D aimed at fruit fly control in the field completed.

• Alternatives to methyl bromide generated for soil fumigation in flowers, strawberries and vegetables and disseminated information through national communication strategies.

• Improved methods of implementing I PM through training programs in processing tomatoes introduced and adoption rates measured using

60 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r at egi c G o a l A r e a :

S u s t a i n a b l e P r o d u c t i o n

grower surveys in pome fruit and fresh stonefruit.

• Programs, linked to the National Residue Survey, established for testing chemical residues in Australian pome fruit and processing tomatoes.

R&D PROGRAM

HRDC A nn ua l Report 1997-98 61

R&D PROGRAM S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : S u s t a i n a b l e P r o du ct i o n

Setting guidelines for sustainable production

Guidelines for sustainable fruit and vegetable production have been developed

by the Queensland Fruit and Vegetable Growers (QFVG).

They are a compilation of existing technology and recommended or 'better' farm management practices and have been developed in close consultation with growers and research and extension officers from Government and

private agencies.

The Guidelines will advise growers on appropriate practices to meet legislative requirements and achieve long-term sustainability. It is expected that the guidelines will increasingly become a self regulatory tool.

For example, they could be used as industry standards in the development of district water

allocation and management plans.

PRO G R AM : CULTURAlVHARVESTING PRACTICES

O b je c tiv e • To manage commercial horticultural production in a way that maintains and protects natural resources and ensures economic growth.

Strategies • Develop training packages aimed at implementing world best practice in sustainable horticultural management.

• Assist in developing a continuous supply of improved products through R&D investment directed toward risk management and production

continuity.

Public Benefits • Efficiency gains through best practice management of horticultural production units.

• Minimisation of off-farm pollution.

• Industry consolidation and economic development through the adoption of sustainable farming practices.

P erform ance Indicators • Reduction of nitrate/nitrogen leaching by 50-80 kg/ha in the Goulbourn

Valley.

• Development of guidelines for the use of recycled sewage sludge on a range of soil and crop types. • Efficient water use and reduction of nutrient leaching in New South Wales nurseries.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 9 7 /9 8

• Sustainable fruit & vegetable production guidelines in Queensland produced and promoted.

• Permanent bed production systems for vegetables developed.

• Understanding of mechanisms by which potatoes accumulate cadmium increased.

• Loss of soil and nutrients from intensively farmed vegetables quantified.

• Grower group to test alternatives to black plastic mulch established.

• Successful workshops on nursery water use in NSW held; workshops to be adopted as national model.

• Irrigation practices for better soil and water management in Goulburn Valley Orchards established.

62 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Strategi c G o a l A r e a : S u s t a i n a b l e P r o d u c t i o n

R&D PROGRAMS

PROGRAM: TOTAL WASTE MANAGEMENT

Objective To make better use of waste materials and minimise the environmental impact of horticultural production.

Strategies • Undertake a waste management audit for appropriate industries.

, · Develop R&D programs to target areas of greatest return.

• Identify potential partners to ensure integration of programs.

Public Benefits • Development of biodegradable plastic mulch to overcome disposal problems of existing mulches.

• Recycling of sewage and reclaimed effluent water onto cropping lands.

Performance Indicators • Alternative biodegradable materials for plastic mulch, • Reduced environmental contamination from production process.

Key Achievements 1997/98 • Biodegradable plastic mulch available for grower field trials.

• Best practice guidelines for sustainable production that minimise off * farm waste published.

>

i

I

1

Sustaining the vegetable industry with recycled water

One of the major limitations to horticultural production in South Australia is the limited availability of

water. Current groundwater aquifers are over used and are degrading due to excess drawdown and increasing salinity. A

pipeline will reclaim sewage effluent from Adelaide's Bolivar

Sewage treatment works for use as horticultural irrigation wate to overcome

declining water supplies and allow sustainable expansion of the area for horticultural

purposes. However, recent studies involving the application of reclaimed water have

shown a decline in soil fertility related to degradation of soil structure and increasing

salinity and sodicity. Other issues identified include increasing soil boron levels, contamination of ground waters, bacterial and pathogenic

contamination of produce and clogging of irrigation equipment.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 63

R&D PROGRAM S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : I n d u s t r y L e a d e r s h i p a n d P a r t n e r s h i p

Whole of industry approach to R&D

The HRDC involves many horticultural industries faced with both industry specific

and common issues that need to be addressed through an R&D program.

To facilitate the decision making and funding of a collective approach to common

issues, the HRDC, in consultation with peak industry associations, formed the Horticultural Reference

Group. This group will develop a strategic framework for addressing multi

industry R&D.

O b je c tiv e To improve the leadership skills and resources of horticultural industries in order to bring about greater understanding of the benefits of R&D thereby increasing the competitiveness, profitability and sustainability of Australian

horticulture

Strategies

• Support industry strategic plans with R&D plans. • Encourage representatives from the production and marketing chains to become R&D committee members.

• Support R&D Committee Chairpersons in travelling to production regions for close consultation.

• Support Rural Leadership program.

• Support R&D study tours by industry organisation executives.

• Support market intelligence studies. • Encourage industry to adopt a 'whole of Government' approach to regional problems. • Undertake regular communication with industry executive officers in

order to maintain focus on innovation.

• Provide innovation themes at industry R&D meetings and conferences.

• Coordinate multi-industry R&D programs.

• Ensure R&D Committees are proactive and represent the national industry. • Support industry R&D Committee involvement in the R&D Program.

P erform ance Indicators

• Levy paying industries to have strategic R&D plans.

• R&D study tours undertaken to benchmark Australian industry.

• Market research to support market access.

• Training to improve horticultural skill base.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 9 7 /9 8

• Review of R&D Committee role, effectiveness and composition completed and revised policy developed and agreed.

• Two R&D Agency forums held to agree on revised application process duly 1997) and the new Research and Development Heads of Agreement (May 1998).

• R&D Committee Chairpersons meeting held in February 1998 covering:

- Strategic planning - Commissioning of R&D - HRDC R&D Committee review - Implications of the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies

Act for HRDC and R&D Committees, and training in the areas of:

64 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : I n d u s t r y L e a d e r s h i p a n d P a r t n e r s h i p

- Economic evaluation of R&D, and - Management of multi-industry projects.

• Peak Industry Leader meetings held in July 1997 and February 1998; Presidents' Council meeting held in March 1998 to discuss industry issues and impact on the R&D Program. Agreed to form Horticultural Industry Alliance to take progressive steps to achieving a single entity addressing both R&D and Marketing by the year 2000.

• Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee formed and membership agreed with industry to address multi industry R&D issues.

• Key priority areas for 1999/2000 application call identified by industry.

• Pyrethrum R&D Plan developed and available.

• Revised potato strategic plan drafted; to be circulated to industry for comment by October 1998.

• Workshop held in December 1997 to develop revised Macadamia R&D plan; draft R&D plan in circulation for industry comment.

• Audit and review of progress against avocado strategic plan held in March 1998; revised R&D plan completed.

• Citrus regional forums to review progress against strategic plan held in May 1998.

• Cherry industry workshop completed in August 1997; revised R&D plan available.

• Chestnut review of strategic plan completed in November 1997; addendum to plan available.

• New nashi plan finalised.

• Apple and Pear industry strategic plan available.

• Nursery plan reviewed and priorities confirmed in February 1998.

• "Industry Update" introduced by the Corporation to inform horticultural industry of Corporation and R&D issues (5 issues produced).

• Executive Director involved in Missed Opportunities project for DPIE and planning for National Conference on Women in Agricultural Resource Management (Washington, DC) and promoted role of women in horticultural decision making process.

• Industry/HRDC Partnership Agreement drafted for pilot industries (apple and pear, macadamia, nursery and fresh stonefruit).

• Nursery overseas study tour delayed to coincide with technology transfer conference in USA in July 1998.

• Horticultural industries to form the focus of the 1998/99 Australian Rural Leadership Program; participants from citrus and papaw industries

confirmed. • Revised policy for R&D consultation costs approved by Board.

• Banana R&D Plan developed and available.

R&D PROGRAM

HRDC A nn ua l Report 1997-98 65

R&D PROGRAM

HRDC moves to ensuring a better targetted program

In 1997/98, the HRDC undertook a process of consultation and review to examine its

application process. To better meet its planning and management obligations to both

industry and

government, the HRDC immediately moved to a two-stage application process

with the support of both industry and research agencies for the 1998/99

application call. The process involves a brief concept development proposal

due at the end of August in 1998/99 and a full application for selected projects by

the end of December.

S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : R& D M a n a g e m e n t

O b je c tiv e

To ensure that the R&D program is well coordinated, industry responsive and effectively managed to the highest professional standards

Strategies

• Develop industry awareness and understanding of the importance of R&D investment for horticulture.

• Encourage additional industries to adopt R&D levies.

• Contribute to maintaining the research skill base.

• Establish links with other Government agencies and programs.

• Support corporate strategic R&D funding for horticulture.

• Ensure clearly defined industry and public benefit priorities are accounted for when selecting and developing R&D programs.

• Ensure R&D programs are based on appropriate market intelligence.

• Review the current communication strategy and implement specific elements for key industry R&D partners.

• Review the R&D application process to ensure it is effective and efficient.

• Ensure R&D providers are accountable for delivering services to the Corporation and industry.

• Develop and use benefit/cost analyses to evaluate key R&D programs.

• Maintain the Corporation as part of a strong international R&D network with closer links established for collaborative research.

• Ensure intellectual property and marketing rights benefit the Australian horticultural industry.

P erform ance Indicators

• Adoption of R&D levy mechanism.

• Improved coordination of R&D resources.

• Established links with other R&D agencies and Government bodies.

• R&D application process meets needs of all partners.

• Benefit/cost of R&D program identified.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 9 7 /9 8

• Phase 1 of Communications Review completed.

• Strategy for HRDC Internet site developed.

• RIRDC participated in HRDC's speciality mushroom search conference; HRDC involved in RIRDC's advisory panel for Asian food program.

• Links established with Californian, South African and New Zealand avocado research program to investigate potential collaborative arrangements.

• New citrus albedo program to be carried out in conjunction with related work in California and South Africa.

• Almond levy implemented in January 1998.

• Table grape levy returned to industry for further consultation.

• Onion levy submission in development.

66 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : R&D M a n a g e m e n t

• Custard apple levy increase implemented in January 1998.

• Avocado levy increase approved for implementation (July 1998).

• South Australian Research and Development Institute review planned for completion July 1998.

• Review of olive program completed and recommendations implemented.

• Western flower thrip and Fruitfly reviews completed.

• Review of Citrus postharvest and integrated pest management programs completed.

• Industry Development Officer review completed.

• R&D Committee policy review completed.

• Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee, to review and recommend multi-industry research program, established.

• Two phase application process introduced for 1998/99 application year with the support of industry and research partners.

• "Women in Horticulture" television special produced and screened nationwide on 16 and 17 May, 1998.

• Inter-agency collaboration with AHC, DPIE, RIRDC, ACIAR, L&WR&DC and CROC improved. • SCARM green and white papers on national approach to disinfestation developed.

• Final report policy evaluated and revised policy to resolve overdue report issue implemented.

• Review of Intellectual Property (IP) and commercialisation issues conducted for 1997/98 program and policy to resolve future issues implemented.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

R&D PROGRAM S t r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : C o r p o r a t e M a n a g e m e n t

IP and

commercialisation under the spotlight

To assess its risk management in the area of Intellectual Property and Commercialisation, the

HRDC undertook a review of projects involving product outcomes in 1997/98.

As a result of this review, the

Corporation will move to ownership of a minimum 1% security interest in all funded

programs. To support this ownership, the Corporation will redirect resources to

provide dedicated commercialisation support to the program.

O b je c tiv e

To ensure the Corporation is well managed.

Strategies

• Deliver services in an efficient manner consistent with industry best practice.

• Encourage Industry Development Officers, Research Agency Administration Managers and R&D Committees to be an integrated part of the Corporation.

• Maintain a skills audit of all staff to establish competencies and plan future staff development.

• Maintain a safe and harmonious working environment.

• Define responsibilities and grievance procedures in the Corporation's policy manual.

• Ensure quarterly financial reviews are provided to the Board.

• Performance Indicators • Corporation resourced appropriately to perform its management role.

• Consultation with industry partners in management of R&D program.

• Provision of a safe and harmonious working environment.

Key A chievem ents 1 9 9 7 /9 8

• Comprehensive handover strategy to new Board completed August 1997 ensuring new Board operational within minimal timeframe.

• All staff role statements reviewed, performance measures identified, positions evaluated and remuneration reviewed.

• Program Management base expanded to address issues related to strategic access and customer base of the Corporation, including five program managers located across four other states.

• New chart of accounts adopted and preliminary investigation of cost management financial framework completed.

• Phase 1 of Communication Review completed.

• Review of several core business activities conducted in context of best practice:

- R&D Committee policy; - Industry Development Officer policy; - Funding of Industry Consultation costs; - Human Resources policy manual.

• Records Management audit completed and implementation commenced.

• Recommendations of OH&S audit implemented.

• Risk Management and Audit Committee maintained with appropriate Terms of Reference and regular meetings.

• "Board Snaps" introduced internally to keep Board informed of Corporation, industry and R&D issues (seven issues published).

• Six monthly progress report against the Business Plan prepared.

• Participated in ANAO preliminary performance audit.

68 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

St r a t e g i c G o a l A r e a : C o r p o r a t e M a n a g e m e n t

• Revised Board Committee structures introduced to reduce risk and focus on industry sectors.

• Professional development conducted in:

- Myers-Briggs development program - information management and program management database - computer skills - commissioning process

- partnership agreements.

• Code of conduct drafted.

• Integrated information management strategy including review of reporting requirements underway.

• Year 2000 Compliance team formed and audit commenced.

R&D PROGRAM

HRDC A nn ua l Report 1997-98 69

70 H R D C A n n u a l R e p o rt 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o r p o r a t e M a n a g e m e n t

Funding Base 72

Funding Base 72

Statutory Levies 72

Voluntary Levies 75

Voluntary Contributions 75

Management Fee for R&D Programs/Projects 75

New Business Development Strategy 76 Significant Events 77

Significant Events 77

Joint Ventures 77

Intellectual Property 77

Communication 78

Communication 78

Communication Review 78

Benefit/Cost 79

Final Reports 80

Reporting Requirements 80

Information Management Review 80 Year 2000 Compliance 81

Freedom of Information 81

Corporate Issues 82

Professional Development 82

Equal Employment Opportunity 82 Occupational Health & Safety 82

Energy Efficiency 82

Accommodation 82

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT F u n d i n g Base

Funding Base

Funding of research and development managed and co-ordinated by the Corporation is on the basis of equal cost sharing between industry and the Commonwealth Government. The Commonwealth Government matches expenditure on a dollar for dollar basis up to the level of 0.5% of the gross value of horticultural production (GVP).

Industry funds are sourced in three ways:

• statutory levies • voluntary levies • voluntary contributions.

S tatutory Levies

A statutory levy can be established to provide funding to meet an industry's R&D needs where market failure is demonstrated. Extensive industry consultation must result in a clear mandate from industry to establish such a levy.

The Minister's requirements for establishing a new levy or varying an existing levy are attached as Appendix B.

The Corporation has achieved significant growth over its ten year history in the number of statutory levy paying industries and in the level of investment in R&D by those industries. The Corporation continues to encourage and assist other non levy industries to establish a long term commitment to R&D. Statutory levy receipts increased by 13% in 1997/98.

During 1997/98, the following statutory levy for R&D related activities occurred:

• The alm o n d industry submission to the Minister requesting introduction of a statutory levy of:

- 1.0 cent/kg (almond in shell except non-pareil almond) - 1.5 cents/kg (non-pareil almond in shell) and - 2.0 cents/kg (shelled almonds) was approved and implemented on 1 January, 1998.

• An avocado levy increase from 6 cents/tray ($5.00/tonne) to 8 cents/tray ($13.33/tonne) was approved and implemented on 1 July 1998.

• The chestnut industry varied their split of industry levies between marketing and R&D from 25:75 respectively to 50:50 effective 1 April 1998.

• An increase from 14 cents/tray to 20 cents/box in the statutory levy rate for the custard a p p le industry to overcome funding deficiencies in the research and development program to date was approved and implemented on 1 January, 1998.

• The garlic industry sought to implement a levy based on garlic sold in Australia. As greater than 80% of garlic sold in Australia is imported and cannot be levied, the Corporation rejected the proposal as inappropriate to raise the level of funds required to fund the required

R&D program. The Corporation continues to work with the garlic

72 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

F u n d i n g Base

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

industry to develop a more appropriate proposal.

• The m ango and m elo n industries continue to express strong interest in implementation of statutory levies.

• The onion industry submitted an application for implementation of a limited levy in February 1998. The submission was not accepted in its current form and the onion industry was advised. Further discussion of an appropriate levy has continued.

• The sto n efru it industry sought industry support for a levy increase as follows:

4 cents/tray; 8 cents/half carton; or $8.00/tonne.

Further consultation with some regions is now required by the Honourable Senator Troeth, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy.

• The ta b leg rap e industry sought the assistance of the Corporation to undertake a process of consultation with industry to gain support for the implementation of a statutory levy. Support was not demonstrated by the majority of growers and the submission was rejected. The table grape levy was returned to industry for further consultation. The

industry have since gained industry wide acceptance and support of a breeding program.

• The p assionfruit industry continues to express strong interest in establishing a research levy and is undertaking a process of consultation with all growers.

• The veg etab le levy was amended to include vertically integrated businesses acting as grower/processors in the cover of the levy.

Industries with statutory levies and their respective levy rates in 1997/98 were:

shell except non-pareil almond) 1.5 cents/kg (non-pareil almond in shell)

2.0 cents/kg (shelled almonds) (implemented 1 January 1998)

Industry 1 9 9 7 /9 8 R & D

______________ Levy Rate

1 9 9 8 /9 9 R &D

Levy Rate

Almond 1.0 cent/kg (almond in As for 1997/98

Apple 6.5 cents/box (fresh)

65 cents/tonne (for juicing) $1.30/tonne (for processing)

As for 1997/98

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 73

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT F u n d i n g Base

Pear 6 cents/box (fresh)

60 cents/tonne (for juicing) $1.20/tonne (for processing)

Avocado 6 cents/tray $5.00/tonne

Cherry 1 cent/kg

Chestnut 7.5 cents/kg

Citrus 3.0 cents/box

$1.50/tonne (increase effective 1 July, 1997)

Custard Apple 20 cents /1 0 kg box $20.00/tonne (implemented 1 January 1998)

Macadamia 3.3 cents/kg

Nashi 10 cents/4 kg box

$1.80/tonne (for juicing) $3.60/tonne (for processing)

Nursery 1.6% wholesale container price

Potato 50 cents/tonne (fresh & seed) $1.00/tonne (processed)

Fresh 2 cents/tray

Stonefruit 4 cents/box

Strawberry $8.00/1000 runners or part thereof

Vegetable 0.5% of first point of sale 0.5% 'free on board' value

As for 1997/98

8 cents/tray $13.33/tonne (effective 1 July 1998)

As for 1997/98

5.0 cents/kg (effective 1 April 1998)

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98 but seeking an increase to: 4 cents/tray; 8 cents/half carton; or $8.00/tonne in late 1998/99.

As for 1997/98

As for 1997/98

74 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

F u n d i n g Base

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT II

Voluntary Levies

A number of industries have chosen not to establish a statutory levy as they are well positioned with limited entry or exit points to enable successful collection of a voluntary levy from all growers.

For example:

• The m ushroom industry has a voluntary levy of $1.99/kg collected at the point of sale of spore.

• The processing to m a to industry has a voluntary levy of 50c/tonne for produce accepted at the processing gate which is matched by the processors before submission to HRDC. The levy collected in 1997/98 represented a substantial increase over 1996/97 due to favourable weather conditions, increased use of drip irrigation (as a result of the

HRDC training/study tour project) and increased grower skills as a result of the Industry Development Officer role in supporting changed management practices in the grower base.

• The p yreth ru m industry has a voluntary levy of 5% of gross income from harvested pyrethrum as it enters the refining process, matched by the industry processor, Botanical Resources Australia who also contribute additional funds to complete the program.

• The canning fr u it industry has a voluntary levy of 80c/tonne collected on fruit as it enters the processing plant and utilised in the canning fruit R&D program focussing on production issues. Further funds are supplied by the canning fruit processors to fund the processing based component of the research program.

V oluntary C on trib utio n s

A voluntary contribution from individuals, companies or groups interested in horticultural R&D may be accepted where the primary beneficiary of the research and development outcome is:

• a non levied sector of an industry with a statutory levy in place; • a non-statutory levied industry; or • an industry with a statutory levy in place where the project is:

- short term - regionally focussed and/or - an emergency.

In the absence of a formal industry strategic plan, projects for which funding is sought must demonstrate industry benefit, alignment with the Corporation's strategic plan and consistency with the priorities of Government.

M a n a g e m e n t Fee for R & D Program s/Projects

A management fee of 10%, established as a percentage of total project cost, is charged against the project to meet the program management and administration costs of the Corporation.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 75

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT F u n d i n g Base

N e w Business D e v e lo p m e n t Strategy

A workshop with the Directors of the Corporation was conducted by Paul Izbicki of Total Interaction in March 1998 on new business development strategy and planning. The workshop was designed as a risk management approach to forward planning by the Corporation. Objectives of the meeting included:

• clarification of risks • opportunities for a new combined body for Horticulture • opportunities for new activities (R&D and related) • HRDC funding opportunities • HRDC image and positioning • international linkages and spinoff opportunities • how to capture income potential from innovation and the application of

new technologies • strategy for change and • strategies to capitalise on skills and networks.

Further development of this strategy was undertaken at the Board meeting in July 1998.

76 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S i g n i f i c a n t Events

Significant Events

In accordance with section 15, sub-section 1 of the CAC Act, 1997 the Corporation has not, in this reporting period of 1997/98:

• formed a company or participated in the formation of a company; • participated in a significant partnership, trust, unincorporated joint venture or similar arrangement; • acquired or disposed of a significant shareholding in a company; • acquired or disposed of a significant business;

• commenced or ceased a significant business activity; or • made a significant change in the nature or extent of its interest in a significant partnership, trust, unincorporated join t venture or similar arrangement.

Joint Ventures

CRC for International Food Manufacture and Packaging Science The Corporation is a member of the CRC for International Food Manufacture and Packaging Science. Since January 1996, the Corporation has received 11 applications from the CRC of which seven were approved.

In November 1997, the Corporation resolved not to seek or take up or continue to hold positions on the Board of the CRC or any other organisation in order to maintain HRDC's focus on its core business and to prevent the Board of HRDC from being placed in a potential position of compromise in a funding relationship. This remains the position of the

Corporation. At this time, HRDC has no intention of withdrawing from the CRC for International Food Manufacture and Packaging Science.

Unebam Ltd The Corporation is a shareholder in Unebam Ltd, a company formed to sell the intellectual property rights to a related research program outcome involving the use of a horticultural product as a potential therapeutic

treatment. No further funding was undertaken in this period.

In te lle c tu a l P roperty

The Corporation has signed 30 Royalty Participation Agreements for an equity share in the royalties generated by research program outcomes. While most of these are signed in anticipation of income to be earnt, the Corporation received only $280 in royalties in 1997/98.

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

HRDC A nnual Report 1997-98 77

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT C o m m u n i c a t i o n

C o m m u n icatio n

Over and above the technology transfer component of the R&D program ($4.6 million) the Corporation spent a further $385K from its Corporate account, funded by receipts from the Corporation's management fee, on

direct costs of specific communication initiatives including:

• production and distribution to industry and research partners of the Corporations' newsletter "HRDC Update" • the Corporation's Research Report 1996/97 containing a special feature on plant improvement for our future (70,400 copies distributed

nationally through insertion in key journals, industry publications and direct mail out from the Corporation to research providers, educational institutions, libraries, horticultural support industries and growers) • the Corporation's Annual Report (500 copies distributed including the

Commonwealth Government requirement) • introduction of the Corporation's summary annual report "HRDC In Focus" used to provide an overview of the Corporation and its program at first point of contact (5,000 distributed nationally through industry

conferences and direct mail to growers, industry associations, research providers, educational institutions, libraries, horticultural support industries, retailers and government agencies and representatives • publication and distribution of final reports (850 sold; 126 new titles

published and 130 titles republished) • the publication "The Competitive Edge: how to make quality systems work for you" (40,000 copies distributed nationally through publication insertion and direct mail to industry associations, growers, research

providers, horticultural support industries, retailers, government agencies and representatives; libraries, educational institutions and training providers) and • research for the development of the HRDC web site.

C o m m u n icatio n Review

The Corporation completed phase one of a communication review which found that:

• HRDC is well recognised as a critical link in the development of the industry; • HRDC has a highly professional but somewhat bureaucratic image; and • Face-to-face communication was seen as the most critical

communication channel.

The objectives of the review were to:

• understand the current corporate "positioning" of HRDC in the minds of key stakeholders and influences; • identify "corporate" communication needs for HRDC key audiences / main influences; • identify key elements of corporate information and establish

communication channels and priorities among HRDC stakeholders; and

78 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o m m u n i c a t i o n

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

• establish a corporate communications benchmark against which future progress can be tracked.

Future directions for the Corporation established by the review include:

• an overarching vision of leadership which is appealing to all stakeholders (from growers to Ministers); • a strategy with measurable objectives; • a focus on developing face-to-face communication opportunities; • priorities and highlights of successes and star projects of the HRDC

identified in the mainstream media; • existing communication mediums refined to deliver relevant and timely information through the appropriate channels.

It is proposed that the second stage of the review will provide detailed quantitative analysis of our target audiences' needs, document appropriate strategies, identify resources required to satisfy those needs and provide input to the new HRDC Strategic Plan. This input w ill include attitudes towards, expectations of and satisfaction with the current R&D program. This stage of the review will be commissioned by way of advertisement and

be conducted in the 1998/99 financial year.

B enefit Cost

The Corporation undertook an independent evaluation of the benefit/cost of a selected number of completed programs in 1996/97. The results of this review and a further investigation of the adoption of quality management systems in horticulture were published as " The Competitive Edge: How to

make quality management systems work for you" in 1997/98.

This review identified that implementation of a quality management system will provide the following benefits:

• Better control of the business • Product identification/traceability • Improved market returns • Consistent product quality

• Building better relationships with customers and suppliers • Improved customer interface • Improved staff communication/ performance/ job satisfaction • Improved delegation of responsibility

• Reduced corporate/directors' liability • Removed dependence on a single employee • Better definition of work roles/responsibilities • Better record keeping skills

• Improved objectivity • New marketing opportunities • Retention of existing markets and customers • Continuity from one season to the next

• Easier induction of new workers

A quality management system will provide the following benefits:

• Better control of the business • Product identifi­ cation/traceability

• Improved market returns • Consistent product quality • Building better

relationships with customers and suppliers • Improved customer

interface • Improved staff communication/ performance/ job

satisfaction • Improved delegation of responsibility • Reduced corpo­

rate/directors' liability • Removed dependence on a single employee • Better definition of

work roles/resp­ onsibilities • Better record keeping skills • Improved objectivity • New marketing

opportunities • Retention of existing markets and customers • Continuity from one

season to the next • Easier induction of new workers • Increased efficiency of

production.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 79

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT C o m m u n i c a t i o n

• Increased efficiency of production operations - less waste and down time and fewer rejects • Helpful in planning ahead.

Final Reports

Final Reports of R&D undertaken through the Corporation and published by the Corporation are available for purchase from the Corporation. A published list of available Final Reports was included in the Corporations

Research Report 1996/97.

Each Final Report contains an industry summary and a technical summary of the research conducted targeting the industry and researcher audiences respectively.

Copies of all published Final Reports are made available to the relevant industry association and Industry Development Officer(s) (where they exist). Access to published Final Reports is also provided through the National Library of Australia and the State Library of NSW as required under

Copyright legislation.

The Corporation is currently investigating the opportunities for its own web site and summaries of Final Reports are currently publicly available through the Elders web site at www.elders.com.au Purchase of final reports may be undertaken through the Corporation.

R eporting R equirem ents

The 1997/98 annual program of the Corporation was submitted as a Business Plan to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy, Minister Anderson, by May 31 prior to commencement of the financial year of operation. Ministerial approval of the proposed program was granted on 30 June 1997.

The HRDC submitted its Business Plan for 1998/99 to the Honourable Senator Judith Troeth, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy and received approval on June 26, 1998.

The Corporation also reports annually to the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy, Senator Troeth as well as annually to each eligible horticultural industry body usually at their annual conference or annual general meeting.

In fo rm a tio n M a n a g e m e n t R eview

An information management review team was formed in early 1998 to review the reporting roles and responsibilities assigned to Corporation staff and to develop a register of reporting needs for key users. The team met three times in 1997/98 and developed documentation supporting the roles and responsibilities of the Information Management Officers in support of

Program Managers and the application cycle.

The Corporation conducted a records management audit in July 1997 to improve efficiency and retrieval of information. As an outcome of this audit and government recommendations in this area, the Corporation is

FIRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o m m u n i c a t i o n

implementing the TRIM records management system utilising a centralised filing system and a controlled system of file titling and structure.

The Corporation is also negotiating an archives and disposal schedule with the Australian National Archives.

Year 2 0 0 0 C o m p lian ce

To provide a mechanism for identifying the implications for and exposure of the HRDC to "the millenium bug" and to ensure compliance of computer systems with the year 2000, the Corporation formed a project

team in February 1998. The team has made contact with hardware suppliers for the Corporation's computer systems and office equipment and software suppliers. As a result a number of software applications have been updated or are in the process of update and a system of testing is being

implemented for hardware items.

Freedom of In fo rm a tio n

General inquiries re access to documents or other matters relating to FOI are directed in the first instance to the FOI Contact Officer as follows:

The Business Manager Horticultural Research & Development Corporation Level 6 7-9 Merriwa Street GORDON NSW 2072 AUSTRALIA Tel: (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352

This annual report contains a list of all programs/projects, including recipients, funded by the Corporation in 1997/98 (see Appendix D).

Facilities for access to documents are available at the Corporation's office. Access to documents incurs a fee as prescribed under the Act.

During the year to 30 June 1998, the Corporation received nil inquiries pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

Categories o f D ocu m en ts - FO I

Category________________

Annual Report Application Requirements Applications Business Plan

Research Report Strategic Plan Administration Operational

Personnel

N atu re____________

Files, Publication Manuals, Pamphlets Files Files, Publication

Files, Publication Files, Publication Files Files

Files

Note: All current documents are located at the Corporation's office in Gordon and

copied to interstate offices if required.

CORPORATE M A N A G E M E N T

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 81

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT C o r p o r a t e Issues

Professional D e v e lo p m e n t

The Corporation invested approximately 60 staff days and $28K in direct costs in staff training in 1997/98. This training was undertaken to facilitate staff professional development focussing on the program management database application, specific computer applications and skills, the commissioning process, intellectual property principles and negotiation, development of a partnership approach with industry and research providers and teamworking.

Equal E m plo ym en t O p p o rtu n ity (EEO)

The Corporation supported equal opportunity of employment principles.

All recruitment and promotion opportunities were assessed on the basis of merit.

O ccu p atio n al H ealth & Safety

The Corporation is committed to providing a safe and healthy working environment for its staff and has maintained a total ban on smoking in the workplace.

The Corporation implemented the recommendations of the OH&S audit conducted in 1996/97 including the update of training of the First Aid Officer and review of fire prevention procedures and training. The Corporation achieved a nil workplace accident record in 1997/98.

Energy Efficiency

The HRDC leases floor space in a multi-tenanted building in the Sydney suburb of Gordon. Under the existing leasing arrangements, the Corporation is not able to determine the extent of reduced energy use but encourages its staff to reduce energy consumption, to purchase energy efficient equipment and vehicles and utilise energy efficient practices.

The Corporation's offices are located close to major road and rail transport routes so that use of alternative transport means is available to Corporation staff.

It is the policy of the Corporation to recycle wherever possible. Clean, used paper is collected on a regular basis by an external company for recycling. Re-use of office paper and double sided printing are also undertaken.

A ccom m odation

Through the joint steering committee with AHC, HRDC made a commitment to seek co-location with AHC. The Corporation met with AHC in January about this issue and the HRDC Board at its February meeting, agreed in principle to relocate and to examine the associated options and implications.

HRDC investigated the cost of relocation and the Board further considered the matter at its meeting in May 1998 and agreed to seek an interim extension of our lease for six to twelve months. However, the

82 FIRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o r p o r a t e Issues

owners of the property would not consider a lease of any less duration than 3 years as stipulated in the current lease. Prior to knowing the level of industry support for the HIA process, the Corporation took up the option

on its existing lease. The Corporation is still actively seeking relocation opportunities with AHC and at the appropriate time will seek to have the lease reassigned.

1 '

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 83

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o rt 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

Independent Audit Report 86

Statement by Directors 87

Statement of Revenues and Expenses 88 Balance Sheet as at 30 June 1998 89

Statement of Cash Flows 90

Schedule of Commitments 91

Notes 92

Supplementary Financial Statements 108 Statements of Revenue and Expenses 108

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT

To the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy

Scope I have audited the financial statements of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation for the year ended June 1998. The financial statements comprise: • Statement by Directors; • Statement of Revenues and Expenses; • Balance Sheet • Statement of Cash Flows; • Schedule of Commitments; • Schedule of Contingencies; and • Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements.

The members of the Board of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation are responsible for the preparat and presentation of the financial statements and the information they contain. I have conducted an independent audit of the financial statements in order to express an opinion on them to you, the Minister for Primary Industries and Energy

The audit has been conducted in accordance with Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorpon the Australian Auditing Standards, to provide reasonable assurance as to whether the financial statements are free of mi rial misstatement. Audit procedures included examination, on a test basis, of evidence supporting the amounts and otha disclosures in the financial statements, and the evaluation of accounting policies and significant accounting estimates. These procedures have been undertaken to form an opinion as to whether, in all material respects, the financial statemei

are presented fairly in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, other mandatory professional reporting requin ments (Urgent Issues Group Consensus Views) and statutory requirements so as to present a view of the entity which is consistent with my understanding of its financial position, the results of its operations and its cash flows.

The audit opinion expressed in this report has been formed on the above basis.

Audit Opinion In my opinion, (i) the financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Commonwealth Authorities

(ii) the financial statements give a true and fair view, in accordance with applicable Accounting Standards, other mand tory professional reporting requirements and the Guidelines for Financial Statements of Commonwealth Authoritie of the financial position of the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation as at 30 June 1998 and the results its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended.

Australian National Audit Office

Russ Chantler Executive Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Sydney 31 August 1998

PO Box A456 Sydney South NSW 1235 130 Elizabeth Street SYDNEY NSW Phone (02) 9367 7100 Fax (02) 9367 7102

86 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S t a t e m e n t by D i r e c t o r s

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Partnership in horticulture

In our opinion, the attached financial statements show fairly the information required by the Minister for Finance and Administration's Guidelines for Financial Statements of Commonwealth Authorities.

At the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Corporation will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

Lindy Hyam Executive Director Horticultural Research & Development Corporation 37 August 7998

James McCeoch Chairman Horticultural Research & Development Corporation 37 August 7998

Level 6, 7 Merriwa Street, Gordon NSW 2072 Australia Tel. +61 2 9418 2200 Fax. +61 2 9418 1352

E-mail: hrdc@hrdc.gov.au

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 87

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

HO RTICULTURAL RESEARCH A N D DEVELOPM ENT C O R P O R A TIO N

S ta te m e n t o f Revenues and Expenses

For the year ending 30 June 1998

Notes

19 9 8

$

1997 $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 2 8 ,6 7 3 ,1 5 8 7,697,866

Proceeds from export charges 2 4 4 3 ,0 0 3 380,131

Revenues from Government 3 1 3 ,8 9 9 ,7 5 8 11,867,720

Voluntary contributions 4 7 ,2 4 9 ,9 6 0 7,418,950

Interest income 7 5 8 ,0 1 8 709,017

Other income 5c 1 2 3 ,2 2 5 322,053

Total o p eratin g revenues 5 3 1 ,1 4 7 ,1 2 2 28,395,737

OPERATING EXPENSES

Employees 6a 1 ,2 9 3 ,1 1 6 984,365

Suppliers 6b 2 ,0 5 6 ,1 4 4 1,787,306

Depreciation 6c 151,981 137,287

Research and development grants 6d 2 5 ,2 8 1 ,6 8 0 21,364,080

Total o peratin g expenses 2 8,782,921 24,273,038

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 2,364,201 4,122,699

E Q U ITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 1 0 ,7 6 0 ,5 9 9 6,637,900

A ccum ulated surplus a t en d o f re p o rtin g p e rio d * 1 3 ,1 2 4 ,8 0 0 10,760,599

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements.

* See Schedule of Commitments

88 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH A N D D EVELO PM ENT C O R P O R A T IO N

Balance Sheet As at 30 June 1998

1 9 9 8 1997

Notes $ $

CURRENT ASSETS Cash 10 3 2 1 ,9 2 5 755,215

Receivables 12 4 ,3 6 7 ,8 3 2 1,572,867

Investments 11 1 4 ,5 4 0 ,0 1 0 10,790,010

Others 13 5 8 ,5 3 5 18,899

Total C u rre n t Assets 1 9 ,2 8 8 ,3 0 2 13,136,991

N O N -C U R R E N T ASSETS

Plant and equipment 14 1 6 1 ,6 4 6 202,126

Total n o n -cu rren t assets 1 6 1 ,6 4 6 202,126

Total Assets 1 9 ,4 4 9 ,9 4 8 13,339,117

CURRENT LIABILITIES Provisions and payables 16 6 ,2 7 3 ,8 4 5 2,545,087

Total Current Liabilities 6 ,2 7 3 ,8 4 5 2,545,087

N O N -C U R R E N T LIABILITIES Provisions and payables 16 5 1 ,3 0 3 33,431

Total n o n -cu rren t lia b ilitie s 5 1 ,3 0 3 33,431

Total lia b ilitie s 16 6 ,3 2 5 ,1 4 8 2,578,518

N et Assets 1 3 ,1 2 4 ,8 0 0 10,760,599

EQUITY Accumulated surpluses* 1 3 ,1 2 4 ,8 0 0 10,760,599

Total eq uity 1 3 ,1 2 4 ,8 0 0 10,760,599

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements.

* See Schedule of Commitments

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 89

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Statement of Cash Flows

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

For the year ending 30 June 1998

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations Interest received

Other

Total cash received

Cash used Grants Employees Suppliers

Net cash from operating activities

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment

Net cash from investing activities

Net increase in cash held

add Cash at 1 July 1997

Cash at 30 June 1998

The accompanying notes form part of the financial statements.

1998 1997

Notes $ $

11,417,142 10,960,142 781,097 708,625

16,063,568 15,416,867

28,261,807 27,085,634

21,514,472 20,639,190 1,238,982 978,779

2,080,141 1,463,457

24,833,595 23,081,426

17b 3,428,212 4,004,208

111,502 106,096

(111,502) (106,096)

3,316,710 3,898,112

11,545,225 7,647,113

17a 14,861,935 11,545,225

90 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Schedule of Commitments As at 30 June 1998

1998 1997

Notes $ $

BY TYPE CAPITAL COMMITMENTS - -

OTHER COMMITMENTS Operating leases 1 648,701 203,163

Other commitments 2 12,647,446 133,785

13,296,147 336,948

BY MATURITY One year or less 12,837,310 281,540

From one to two years 379,727 55,402

From two to five years 79,110 -

Net commitments 13,296,147 336,942

1. Operating leases are exclusively in relation to office accommodation. 2. Other commitments comprises mainly of Research & Development

grants to be funded 50% by levy-paying industries and 50% by Commonwealth matching grants in 1998/99: Apple & Pear 1,807,168

Avocado 313,730

Strawberry 85,836

Chestnut 34,772

Citrus 1,626,694

Custard Apple 75,750

Cherry 53,366

Macadamia 1,180,500

Nashi 20,072

Nursery 873,448

Potato 1,972,290

Stonefruit 498,094

Vegetables 4,105,726

12,647,446

Schedule of Contingencies For the year ending 30 June 1998 CONTINGENT LOSSES - -

CONTINGENT GAINS - -

Net contingencies

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

F I N A NCI AL MANAGEMENT

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements

For the year ended 30 June 1998

1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

1.1 Basis of Accounting The financial statements are a general purpose financial report.

They have been prepared in accordance with:

- Guidelines titled Financial Statements of Commonwealth Authorities issued by the Minister for Finance and Administration in July 1997 which require that the financial statements are prepared

- in compliance with Australian Accounting Standards and Accounting Guidance Releases issued by the Australian Accounting Research Foundation, and

- having regard to Statements of Accounting Concepts, and

- the Consensus Views of the Urgent Issues Group.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets which, as noted, are at valuation.

1.2 Taxation The Corporation is exempt from all forms of taxation except fringe benefits tax and sales tax.

1.3. Property, Plant and Equipment All assets with a cost of less than $1,000 are expensed in the year of acquisition, except where they form a group of similar items which is significant in total.

Assets are reported at cost in the Balance Sheet.

All depreciable non-current assets are written off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Corporation using the straight line method of depreciation.

Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

From 1996-97 onwards, the Guidelines require that property, plant and equipment be progressively revalued in accordance with the 'deprival' method of valuation (as set out in the Guidelines on Accounting Policy for Valuation of Assets of Government Trading Enterprises) by 1 July 1999 and thereafter

be revalued progressively on that basis every three years.

Plant and equipment will be initially revalued in 1998-99, and

92 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 —98

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

thereafter over successive three-year periods. (Previous policy was to carry these assets on the basis of the value recognised on acquisition).

1.4. Provision for Employee Entitlements The liability for employee entitlements encompasses provisions for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the

average sick leave taken by employees is less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The provision for annual leave reflects the value of total annual leave entitlements of all employees at 30 June 1998 and is recognised at its nominal value.

The liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 1998. In determining the present value of the liability, attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account.

1.5. Insurance The Corporation has a policy of maintaining adequate insurance cover against insurable risks for its assets, employees and directors.

1.6. Cash For the purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows, cash includes deposits held at call with a bank and investments in money market instruments.

1.7. Financial Reporting by Segments The Corporation operates predominantly in one industry and in one geographical area, Australia. The principal activities of the Corporation are the co-ordination and funding of research and

development in the horticultural industry.

1.8. Comparative Figures Where necessary, comparative figures have been reclassified to conform with changes in presentation in these financial statements.

1.9. Changes in Accounting Policies Changes in accounting policy have been identified in this note under their appropriate headings.

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 93

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

2. PROCEEDS FROM LEVIES & EXPORT CHARGES

Proceeds from levies

1998 1997

$ $

Levies Apple & Pear 1,021,627 903,898

Avocado 209,642 212,264

Strawberry 320,349 119,076

Chestnut 36,372 47,917

Citrus 937,334 823,739

Custard Apple 46,832 36,513

Cherry 63,310 48,617

Macadamia 678,733 570,256

Nash! 91,680 85,222

Nursery 422,492 493,019

Potato 986,919 956,768

Fresh Stonefruit 321,648 313,230

Vegetable 3,533,850 3,087,347

Almond* 2,370 -

* Almond levy introduced 1 January 1998.

8,673,158 7,697,866

Export charges Apple & Pear 165,091 128,869

Avocado 960 4,438

Chestnut 23 390

Citrus 139,790 113,680

Custard Apple 703 895

Cherry 3,000 3,217

Macadamia 15,915 35,371

Nashi 1,094 4,151

Nursery 21,531 329

Potato 2,724 2,363

Fresh Stonefruit 21,513 13,664

Vegetable 67,087 72,764

Almond 3,572 -

443,003 380,131

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

$ $

REVENUES FROM GOVERNMENT Commonwealth Government matching grants for research & development projects were received for the following product groups.

Those with voluntary contributions:

Cutflower 12,415 43,662

Fruit 1,932,600 2,192,504

Nuts 194,790 175,058

Sportsturf 152,332 191,591

Other vegetables 384,700 950,843

Horticulture - General & Others 2,049,674 2,415,531

4,726,511 5,969,189

Commonwealth Government matching grants for research & development projects were received for those industries with statutory levies and

voluntary contributions:

Apple & Pear 1,441,254 1,262,370

Avocado 202,937 124,277

Strawberry 260,604 10,824

Chestnut 39,376 34,731

Citrus 1,248,792 1,268,301

Custard Apple 4,321 41,274

Cherry 70,592 30,823

Macadamia 569,423 401,585

Nashi 27,075 15,855

Nursery 904,799 753,028

Potato 974,066 1,013,003

Fresh Stonefruit 375,784 197,417

Vegetable 2,914,478 647,083

Almond 540 -

9,034,041 5,800,571

13,760,552 11,769,760

Strategic research 139,206 97,960

13,899,758 11,867,720

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 95

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 $

1997 $

REVENUE - VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS The Corporation received voluntary contributions from various industry donors towards research & development projects for the following product groups:

Apple & Pear 162,227 199,755

Avocado 8,663 6,050

Strawberry 90,201 -

Chestnut 1,233 1,500

Citrus 167,246 347,286

Cherry 7,049 2,750

Nursery 410,293 339,404

Potato 93,456 119,951

Fresh Stonefruit 77,815 4,650

Vegetable 888,803 -

Cutflower 12,415 43,570

Fruit 1,968,265 2,222,842

Nuts 194,791 175,057

Sportsturf 152,333 191,591

Other Vegetable 378,206 951,404

Florticulture - General & Others 2,064,381 2,416,842

Strategic research 572,583 396,298

7,249,960 7,418,950

OPERATING REVENUES (by economic type) Interest Income - Deposits 758,018 709,017

Revenues from Government 13,899,758 11,867,720

Other Revenues Industry contributions 16,366,121 15,496,947

Other 123,225 322,053

Total Operating Revenues

16,489,346 15,819,000

31,147,122 28,395,737

96 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

________ $__________ $

6. GOODS AND SERVICES EXPENSES 6.a Employee Expenses

Basic remuneration for services provided 1,293,116 984,365

Staff Superannuation

The Corporation is an approved employer for the purposes of the Public Sector Superannuation (PSS) Scheme.

The Public Sector Superannuation scheme is an employer-subsidised superannuation scheme for employees of the Australian Public

Service and other participating Commonwealth Agencies. The scheme is managed by the Commonwealth Superannuation

Board of Trustees No. 1 (The Trustees) under a Trust Deed and Rules. The contributions excluding the contributions for the Directors detailed in Note 7

for the financial year amounted to $99,280 (1997 - $71,837).

6.b.Suppliers

Supply of goods and services Operating lease rentals 1,859,003 1,597,364 197,141 189,942

2,056,144 1,787,306

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 97

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

$ $

6.c. Depreciation

Depreciation of plant and equipment 151,981 137,287

6.d. GRANTS EXPENSE Payments made for: Levy-paying projects: Apple & Pear 2,636,989 2,385,538

Avocado 365,656 207,917

Strawberry 446,518 -

Chestnut 71,844 60,393

Citrus 2,271,232 2,302,903

Custard Apple - 75,747

Cherry 127,629 53,058

Macadamia 1,012,391 692,324

Nashi 37,240 15,460

Nursery 1,642,940 1,342,092

Potato 1,751,148 1,829,709

Fresh Stonefruit 674,688 310,389

Vegetable 5,024,175 661,404

Other non-levy paying industries 8,573,684 10,883,512 Strategic research 645,546 449,500

Corporate funded projects - 94,134

25,281,680 21,364,080

The Corporation paid R&D grants to the following groups:

Non-profit entities 23,006,329

Overseas entities -

Others 2,275,351

25,281,680

Above grant payments include $144,761 consulting costs paid to the Apple & Pear ($51,250) Nursery ($9,696), Potato ($3,669),

Fresh Stonefruit ($18,400), Vegetables ($58,800) and Strawberry ($2,946) industries.

98 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1998 1997

_______ $__________ $

7. REMUNERATION OF DIRECTORS The part-time directors and the Chairman of the Board receive such fees and allowances as are

determined by the Remuneration Tribunal.

The Executive Director is the only full- time member of the Board and receives such salary and allowances as are approved by the Minister.

Remuneration Remuneration received or due and receivable directly or indirectly by directors

Superannuation Annual contributions to superannuation funds for Directors and the Executive Director as

detailed below.

The number of Directors (including directors who retired on 15th August 1997) included in these figures are shown in their relevant income band:

Number Numberer

0 - $9,999 7 1

$10,000 - $19,999 6 6

$20,000 - $29,999 1 -

$30,000 - $39,999 - 1

$ 70,000 - $ 79,999 - 1

$150,000 - $159,999 - 1

$200,000 - $209,999 1 -

279,130 327,069

51,040_______ 28,742

330,170 355,811

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 99

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

Bl

T

RELATED PARTY INFORMATION Directors

The names of Directors who have held office during the financial year are:

M r James McGeoch

M r David Minnis

Ms Lindy Hyam

M r Tony Biggs

M r Andrew Combe

M r James Croll

Ms Ann Hamblin

M r Michael Keenan

M r Malcolm Kentish

M r Mike Macnamara

Dr Don Plowman

M r Dennis Richards

M r Peter Walker

Dr Rip Van Velsen

M r Paul Ziebarth

Chairman (from 16 August 1997)

Chairman (up to 15 August 1997)

Executive Director

Deputy Chairman

Government Member (up to 31 March 1998)

Director (from 16 August 1997)

Director (from 16 August 1997)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Government Member (from 1 April 1998)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Director (up to 15 August 1997)

Research & Development grant payments totalling $9,019,571.00 have been paid to CRC Soil and Land Management, Queensland Fruit and Vegetable Growers/Queensland Horticulture Institute and Dept of Natural Resources and Environment of which Ms Ann Hamblin, M r Paul Ziebarth and M r Dennis Richards are employed as Directors, respectively.

The grant payments were made on normal commercial terms and conditions.

100 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

$ $

9. REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS Remuneration to Australian National Audit Office for auditing the financial statements for the

reporting period 21,000 20,000

No other services were provided by the Auditor-General during the reporting period.

10. CASH Interest bearing cheque & savings accounts Short-Term Bank Deposits &

(1,653,496) (551,083)

11 AM accounts 592,582 1,092,908

Money market deposits at call 1,382,539 213,090

Petty cash 300 300

321,925 755,215

11. INVESTMENTS Current Assets Short-Term Commercial Bills 14,540,010 10,790,010

14,540,010 10,790,010

12. RECEIVABLES Other debtors Amounts due from the Commonwealth for:

241,266 1,700

Levies 69,313 8,868

Commonwealth matching grants 4,057,253 1,562,299

4,367,832 1,572,867

Receivables includes receivables overdue by: - more than 60 days . 1,700

1,700

13. CURRENT ASSETS - OTHER Prepayments & others 52,388 12,004

Interest accrued 6,147 6,895

58,535 18,899

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

HRDC Annual Report 1997-98 101

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

$ $

PLANT & EQUIPMENT Computer equipment - at cost 442,454 359,693

Less accumulated depreciation 321,149 249,466

121,305 110,227

Furniture, fixtures & fittings - at cost 422,168 416,456

Less accumulated depreciation 397,570 329,881

24,598 86,575

Office equipment - at cost 88,589 65,560

Less accumulated depreciation 72,846 60,236

15,743 5,324

Total Property, Plant & Equipment 161,646 202,126

ANALYSIS OF PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT

Plant &

Equipment

Movement summary 1997/98 for all assets irrespective of valuation basis

Gross value as at 1 July 1997 841,709

Additions 111,502

Gross value as at 30 June 1998 953,211

Accumulated Depreciation as at 1 July 1997 639,583

Depreciation charge for assets held 1 July 1997 120,710

Depreciation charge for additions 31,272

791,565

Net book value as at 30 June 1998 161,646

Net book value as at 30 June 1997 202,126

102 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

$ $

16. PROVISIONS & PAYABLES

16.a Liabilities to Employees Salaries 12,675 5,060

Annual Leave 71,350 42,703

Long Service Leave 51,303 33,431

Separation • 2,799

Aggregate employee entitlement liability 135,328 83,993

16.b Suppliers Trade creditors 279,861 248,109

16.c Grants Research & development grants 5,211,490 1,444,282

16.d Other Prepayments received 405,838 634,537

Other creditors 292,631 167,597

698,469 802,134

Total liabilities 6,325,148 2,578,518

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

HRDC Annual Report 1997-98 103

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

1998 1997

$ $

17. NOTES TO THE STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

(a) Reconciliation of Cash Cash at Bank 321,925 755,215

Investments 14,540,010 10,790,010

14,861,935 11,545,225

(b) Reconciliation of net cash flows from operating activities to operating surplus Operating Surplus 2,364,201 4,122,699

Depreciation 151,982 137,287

Provision for annual leave 28,647 (9,901)

Provision for long service leave Changes in assets and liabilities 17,872 (23,420)

(Increase) in receivables (Increase) Decrease in prepayments & (2,794,965) (712,774) other assets (39,636) 8,817

Increase in creditors 3,700,111 481,500

Net cash provided by operating activities 3,428,212 4,004,208

18. ECONOMIC DEPENDENCY The Corporation is economically dependent on levies and voluntary contributions received from Industries and Commonwealth Government contributions.

104 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Not es to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

F i na n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s — i

19. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS a. Terms, conditions and accounting policies

Financial Notes Accounting Policies and Methods

(including recognition critera and mesurement basis)

Nature of underlying instrument (including significant terms & conditions affecting the amount, timing and certainty of cash flows)

Financial assets Deposits 10

Receivables 12

Term deposits 10

Deposits are recognised at their nominal Temporarily surplus funds, mainly amounts. Interest is credited to revenue from monthly receipts of levies, as it accrues. voluntary contributions and Commonwealth

matching funds are placed on deposit at call with the Corporation's banker. Interest is earned on the daily balance at the prevailing daily rate for money on call and is paid at month end.

These receivables are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any provision for bad and doubtful debts. Provisions are made when collection of the debt is judged to

be less rather than more likely.

The deposit is recognised at cost. The deposit is w ith the Corporation's bank, Interest is accrued as it is earned. maturing in 1998/1999, and earns an effective rate of interest of 5.0% pa payable every month.

Financial liabilities Trade 16b

creditors

Grants 16c

Settlement is usually made net 30 days.

Creditors and accruals are recognised at nominal amounts, being the amounts at which the liabilities w ill be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent

that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

The Corporation recognises a liability on the signing of the grant agreements. The amount of the liability is for the total of all payments under the agreement which are no longer

at the Corporation's discretion. The part o f the liability recognised in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities comprises payments which are

more rather than less likely to be made and would except in exceptional circumstances include

payments which are subject to future appropriation by the Parliament. Payments agreed which fail this recognition criterion are disclosed as contingent liabilities.

Any payments stated to be at the Corporation's discretion are not recognised as liabilities and are expensed only when paid.

The Corporation approves research grants for whole of life of project. Grant payments are made in installments according to the grantee meeting agreed milestones and subject

to funds being appropriated annually by the Parliament. The Corporation does not necessarily appropriate the benefits of the research to itself and any benefit it receives w ill only coincidentally approximate in value the grant made.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 105

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT N o t e s to a n d f o r m i n g p a rt of the

F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

19. Financial Intruments (cont.) b. Interest Rate Risk

Financial Notes Floating Interest Fixed Interest Non- Total W eighted

Instrum ent Rate Rate

1 year or less

Interest Bearing Average

Effective

97/98 96/97 97/98 96/97 97/98 96/97 97/98 96/97 97/98 96/97

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 % %

Financial Assets

(Recognised)

Deposits at call 10 1,382 213 - - - - 1,382 213 4.5 5.0

Receivables 12 - - - - 4,368 1,573 4,368 1,573 n/a n/a

O ther Debtors 13 - - - - 58 19 58 19 n/a n/a

Term deposits 10 - - 13,480 11,332 - - 13,480 11,332 5.0 5.5

Total Financial

Assets

(Recognised) 1,382 213 13,480 11,332 4,426 1,592 19,288 13,137

Total Assets 19,450 13,339

Financial

Instrum ent

Financial Liabil­

ities (Recognised)

Trade creditors

Grants liabilities

Notes Floating Interest

Rate

Fixed Interest

Rate

1 year or less

N on­

Interest Bearing

Total W eighted

Average

Effective

97/98 96/97

$'000 $'000

97/98 96/97

$'000 $'000

97/98 96/97

$'000 $'000

97/98 96/97

$'000 $'000

97/98 96/97

% %

- - - - 280

5,211

248

1,444

280

5,211

248

1,444

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total Financial

Liabilities

(Recognised) 5,491 1,692 5,491 1,692

Total Liabilities 6,325 2,578

Total Financial

Liabilities

(Unrecognised)

19.c Net Fair Values of Financial Assets and Liabilities

Financial Assets

The net fair values of cash, deposits on call and non-interest bearing monetary financial assets approximate their carrying amounts.

Financial Liabilities The net fair values for trade creditors and grant liabilities, all of which are short-term in nature, are approximated by their carrying amounts.

106 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Notes to a n d f o r m i n g p a r t of t he

Fi nan ci al S t a t e m e n t s

FINANCIAL M A N A G E M E N T

19. d Credit Risk Exposures The economic entity's maximum exposures to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the carrying amount of those assets as indicated in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

The economic entity has no significant exposures to any concentration of credit risk.

20. SUPPLEMENTARY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF INDUSTRY PARTICIPANTS A Statement of Revenues and Expenses and Statement of Financial Position has been prepared for each industry participant in the

Corporation which contributes a statutory levy.

i I

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 107

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

ALMOND

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

OPERATING REVENUES * Proceeds from levies and export changes Commonwealth contributions

Total operating revenues

OPERATING EXPENSES Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution)

Total operating expenses

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of report

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period

* Introduced 1 January 1988.

ALMOND

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash Receivables Investments

Total Assets

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables

Total liabilities

Net Assets

EQUITY Accumulated surplus

Total equity

1998 $

5,942 540

6,482

1,080

1,080

5.402

____0

5.402

942 540

3,920

5,402

5.402

5.402

5.402

108 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

APPLE & PEAR

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies Proceeds from export charges Commonwealth contributions Voluntary contributions

Interest income Other income

Total operating revenues

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants Levy collection costs Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) Operations and administration

Bank charges

Total operating expenses

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period

APPLE & PEAR

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash Receivables Investments

Total Assets

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables

Total liabilities

Net Assets

EQUITY Accumulated surplus

Total equity

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects

(See Schedule of Commitments)

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98

1998 $

1997 $

1,021,627 165,091 1,441,254 162,227

60,575 6,814

903,898 128,869 1,262,370 199,755

80,718 601

2,857,588 2,576,211

2,636,989 31,398

2,385,538 27,130

245,243 224,076

275 421

2,913,905 2,637,165

(56,317) (60,954)

1,296,047 1,357,001

1,239,730 1,296,047

(73,238) 475,145 1,399,529

(93,022) 195,419 1,338,348

1,801,436 1,440,745

561,704 144,698

561,704 144,698

1,239,732 1,296,047

1,239,730 1,296,047

1,239,730 1,296,047

903,584

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

AVOCADO

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies Proceeds from export charges Commonwealth contributions Voluntary contributions

Interest income Other income

Total operating revenues

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants Levy collection costs Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) Operations and administration

Bank charges

Total operating expenses

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 274,936 174,134

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 291,548 274,936

AVOCADO

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash 5,648 (40,654)

Receivables 43,733 24,869

Investments 324,279 294,649

Total Assets 373,660 278,864

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 82,112 3,928

Total liabilities 82,112 3,928

Net Assets 291,548 274,936

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 291,548 274,936

Total equity 291,548 274,936

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 156,865 (See Schedule of Commitments)

1998 1997

$ $

209,642 212,264

960 4,438

202,937 124,277

8,663 6,050

8,361 10,923

- 464

430,563 358,416

365,657 207,917

8,078 9,060

39,862 40,496

354 141

413,951 257,614

16,612 100,802

n o HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

CHERRY

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES ror me year ending j u june i yyo

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 63,310 48,617

Proceeds from export charges 3,000 3,217

Commonwealth contributions 70,592 30,823

Voluntary contributions 7,049 2,750

Interest income 1,098 1,710

Other income 978 -

Total operating revenues 146,027 87,117

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 127,628 53,058

Levy collection costs 5,000 5,000

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 13,336 8,371

Operations and administration Bank charges 219 219

Total operating expenses 146,183 66,648

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses (156) 20,469

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of report 58,899 38,430

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 58,743 58,899

CHERRY

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (10,684) 1,250

Receivables 25,103 14,501

Investments 80,415 56,691

Total Assets 94,834 72,442

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 36,091 13,543

Total liabilities 36,091 13,543

Net Assets 58,743 58,899

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 58,743 58,899

Total equity 58,743 58,899

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 26,683

(See Schedule of Commitments)

F I N A N C I A L M A N A G E M E N T

HRDC A nnual Report 1997-98

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

CHESTNUT

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies and export charges 36,395 48,307

Commonwealth contributions 39,376 34,731

Voluntary contributions 1,233 1,500

Interest income 1,602 2,495

Other income - 860

Total operating revenues 78,606 87,893

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 71,845 60,393

Levy collection costs 3,173 3,180

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 6,840 9,055

Operations and administration Bank charges 69 12 '

Total operating expenses 81,927 72,640

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses (3,321) 15,253

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 74,176 58,923

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 70,855 74,176

CHESTNUT

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash 3,916 (14,505)

Receivables 13,629 10,865

Investments 82,024 81,958

Total Assets 99,569 78,318

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 28,714 4,142

Total liabilities 28,714 4,142

Net Assets 70,855 74,176

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 70,855 74,176

Total equity 70,855 74,176

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 17,386

(See Schedule of Commitments)

112 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

CITRUS

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES t-or me ye a r e n d in g j u June iy y o

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 937,334 823,739

Proceeds from export charges 139,790 113,680

Commonwealth contributions 1,248,792 1,268,301

Voluntary contributions 167,246 347,286

Interest Income 57,387 70,130

Other income 30,778 17,529

Total operating revenues 2,581,327 2,640,665

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 2,271,232 2,302,903 Levy collection costs 38,164 27,320

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 226,228 233,566

Operations and administration Bank charges 99 133

Total operating expenses 2,535,723 2,563,922

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 45,604 76,743

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting year 1,200,710 1,123,967

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 1,246,314 1,200,710

CITRUS

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (51,858) 7,614

Receivables 246,455 172,858

Investments 1,381,715 1,235,147

Total Assets 1,576,312 1,415,619

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 329,998 214,909

Total liabilities 329,998 214,909

Net Assets 1,246,314 1,200,710

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 1,246,314 1,200,710

Total equity 1,246,31 1,200,710

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 813,347

FINANCI AL MANAGEMENT

HRDC A nnual Report 1997-98 113

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

CUSTARD APPLE

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 46,832 36,513

Proceeds from export charges 703 895

Commonwealth contributions 4,321 41,274

Interest income 400 470

Total operating revenues 52,256 79,152

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants - 75,747

Levy collection costs Corporate cost recovery (Industry & 1,480 1,770

Commonwealth contribution) 8,642 6,801

Total operating expenses 10,122 84,318

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 42,134 (5,166)

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of report 1,447 6,613

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 43,581 1,447

CUSTARD APPLE

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash 4,885 (42,755)

Receivables 588 38,298

Investments 41,770 35,275

Total Assets 47,243 30,818

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 3,662 29,371

Total liabilities 3,662 29,371

Net Assets 43,581 1,447

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 43,581 1,447

Total equity 43,581 1,447

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects (See Schedule of Commitments) 37,875

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o rt 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT I

MACADAM IA

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 678,733 570,256

Proceeds from export charges 15,915 35,371

Commonwealth contributions 569,423 401,585

Interest income 30,666 31,587

Other income - 21,247

Total operating revenues 1,294,737 1,060,046

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 1,012,391 692,324

Levy collection costs 1,723 2,110

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 126,287 110,103

Operations and administration Bank charges 167 744

Total operating expenses 1,140,568 805,281

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 154,169 254,765

EQUITY INTEREST Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 677,786 423,021

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 831,955 677,786

MACADAMIA

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (79,373) (10,839)

Receivables 181,437 7,986

Investments 937,463 682,182

Total Assets 1,039,527 679,329

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 207,572 1,543

Total liabilities 207,572 1,543

Net Assets 831,955 677,786

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 831,955 677,786

Total equity 831,955 677,786

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 590,250

(See Schedule of Commitments)

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 115

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

NASH I

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

1998 1997

________ $_ ________$

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 91,680 85,222

Proceeds from export charges 1,095 4,151

Commonwealth contributions 27,075 15,855

Interest income 8,805 9,262

Total operating revenues 128,655 114,490

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 37,240 15,460

Levy collection costs 2,720 9,820

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 16,866 16,248

Operations and administration Bank charges _________ 44_ _________ 2

Total operating expenses 56,870 41,530

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 71,785 72,960

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 203,796 130,836

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period ___275^58^ ^^203^796^

NASHI

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash 2,801 (5,822)

Receivables 2,413 5,042

Investments 274,874 206,413

Total Assets 280,088 205,633

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 4,507 1,837

Total liabilities 4,507 1,837

Net Assets 275,581 203,796

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 275,581 203,796

Total equity 275,581 203,796

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects ____ 10,036

(See Schedule of Commitments)

116 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

NURSERY

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES tor me year ending ju June i yyo

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies & export charges 444,023 493,348 Commonwealth contributions 904,799 753,028

Voluntary contributions 410,293 339,404

Interest income 38,973 40,792

Other income 330 663

Total operating revenues 1,798,418 1,627,235

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 1,642,940 1,342,092 Levy collection costs 18,005 26,307

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 155,322 151,400

Operations and administration Bank charges 234 230

Total operating expenses 1,816,501 1,520,029

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses (18,083) 107,206

EQUITY INTEREST Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 649,236 542,030

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 631,153 649,236

NURSERY

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (156,594) 449

Receivables 368,981 112,302

Investments 848,982 628,599

Total Assets 1,061,369 741,350

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 430,216 92,114

Total liabilities 430,216 92,114

Net Assets 631,153 649,236

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 631,153 649,236

Total equity 631,153 649,236

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 436,724

(See Schedule of Commitments)

F I N A N C I A L M A N A G E M E N T

HRDC A nn ua l Report 1997-98 117

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

POTATO

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES r u r u it? yt?dr e n u m g j u ju rit? i

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 986,919 956,768

Proceeds from export charges 2,724 2,363

Commonwealth contributions 974,066 1,013,003

Voluntary contributions 93,456 119,951

Interest income 70,595 79,652

Other income 15,991 6,668

Total operating revenues 2,143,751 2,178,405

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 1,751,148 1,829,709 Levy collection costs 32,175 40,070

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 196,910 196,179

Operations and administration Bank charges 73 118

Total operating expenses 1,980,306 2,066,076

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 163,445 112,329

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 1,169,474 1,057,145

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 1,332,919 1,169,474

POTATO

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (268,179) (34,320)

Receivables 441,160 119,409

Investments 1,668,489 1,250,459

Total Assets 1,841,470 1,335,548

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 508,551 166,074

Total liabilities 508,551 166,074

Net Assets 1,332,919 1,169,474

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 1,332,919 1,169,474

Total equity 1,332,919 1,169,474

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 986,145 (See Schedule of Commitments)

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT I

FRESH STONE FRUIT

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES For the year ending 30 June 1998

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 321,648 313,230

Proceeds from export charges 21,513 13,664

Commonwealth contributions 375,784 197,417

Voluntary contributions 77,815 4,650

Interest income 14,960 14,338

Total operating revenues 811,720 543,299

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 674,689 310,389

Levy collection costs 13,072 8,500

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 76,535 60,274

Operations and administration Industry meeting - 23,992

Bank charges 345 179

Total operating expenses 764,641 403,334

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 47,079 139,965

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 362,115 222,150

Accumulated surplus at end of reporing period 409,194 362,115

FRESH STONE FRUIT

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (18,972) 7,894

Receivables 120,949 6,875

Investments 467,609 357,830

Total Assets 569,586 372,599

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 160,392 10,484

Total liabilities 160,392 10,484

Net Assets 409,194 362,115

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 409,194 362,115

Total equity 409,194 362,115

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 249,047

(See Schedule of Commitments)

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o rt 1997-98

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

STRAWBERRY

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES ror me year ending j u June i yyo

1998 1997

$ $

(3 months)

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 320,349 119,076

Commonwealth contributions 260,604 10,824

Voluntary contributions 90,201 -

Interest income 5,708 265

Total operating revenues 676,862 130,165

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 446,518 -

Levy collection costs 3,000 -

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 74,639 21,648

Bank charges 50 -

Total operating expenses 524,207 21,648

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 152,655 108,517

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 108,517 -

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 261,172 108,517

STRAWBERRY

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (45,028) 4,106

Receivables 169,427 11,152

Investments 327,139 115,000

Other - 1,892

Total Assets 451,538 132,150

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 190,366 23,633

Total liabilities 190,366 23,633

Net Assets 261,172 108,517

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 261,172 108,517

Total equity 261,172 108,517

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 42,918

(See Schedule of Commitments)

120 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

S u p p l e m e n t a r y F i n a n c i a l S t a t e m e n t s

VEGETABLE

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENSES

1998 1997

$ $

OPERATING REVENUES Proceeds from levies 3,533,850 3,087,347

Proceeds from and export charges 67,087 72,764

Commonwealth contributions 2,914,478 647,083

Voluntary contributions 888,803 -

Interest income 172,116 85,840

Other income 514 -

Total operating revenues 7,576,848 3,893,034

OPERATING EXPENSES Research and development grants 5,024,176 661,404

Levy collection costs 112,864 142,181

Corporate cost recovery (Industry & Commonwealth contribution) 814,433 574,508

Operations and administration Industry meeting - 58,003

Bank charges 346 250

Total operating expenses 5,951,819 1,436,346

Surplus of operating revenues over expenses 1,625,029 2,456,688

EQUITY INTERESTS Accumulated surplus at beginning of reporting period 2,546,050 89,362

Accumulated surplus at end of reporting period 4,171,079 2,546,050

VEGETABLE

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION As at 30 June 1998

CURRENT ASSETS Cash (472,919) 37,508

Receivables 954,852 47,130

Investments 4,882,693 2,521,571

Total Assets 5,364,626 2,606,209

CURRENT LIABILITIES Payables 1,193,547 60,159

Total liabilities 1,193,547 60,159

Net Assets 4,171,079 2,546,050

EQUITY Accumulated surplus 4,171,079 2,546,050

Total equity 4,171,079 2,546,050

Industry funds committed for 1998/99 R&D projects 2,052,863

(See Schedule of Commitments)

F I N A N C I A L M A N A G E M E N T

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 121

122 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Glossa ry Frequently used terms in this report

Organisations referred to frequently in this report

124

125

G L O S S A R Y F r e q u e n t l y u s e d t e r m s i n t h i s r e p o r t

BUSINESS PLAN The annual program of the Corporation detailing the priorities and resources required to address both strategic and operational issues.

CAC Act Commonwealth Authorities and Corporations Act, 1997.

EEO Equal Employment Opportunity.

FOI Freedom of information.

GVP Gross value of production.

IDM Industry Development Manager, responsible for national coordination and facilitation of an industry program.

IDO Industry Development Officer, responsible for a State or regional industry development program.

IP Intellectual property.

IPM Integrated pest management.

MISSION This is a key statement which explains why the business exists and what it aims to achieve.

NIR Near infra-red spectroscopy.

OH&S Occupational Health and Safety.

MRL Maximum residue lim it for chemicals and pesticides.

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Measures of effectiveness and efficiency.

124 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Fr eq uen t l y used t e r m s in t hi s r e p o r t

G L O S S A R Y

PM Program Manager.

QA Quality assurance.

QMS Quality management systems.

STRATEGIC PLAN This is the plan which identifies strategic issues beyond the current year and contains strategies to address these issues.

VC Voluntary contribution.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 125

G L O S S A R Y O r g a n i s a t i o n s r e f e r r e d t o f r e q u e n t l y in

t h i s r e p o r t

ACIAR Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research

AHC Australian Horticultural Corporation

AHEA Australian Horticultural Exporters Association

AHIR&DC Australian Horticultural Industry Research and Development Committee

AQIS Australian Quarantine Information Service

CRC Cooperative Research Centre

CROC Cotton Research and Development Corporation

CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

DPIE Department of Primary Industries and Energy

HIA Horticultural Industry Alliance Steering Committee

L&WRRDC Land & Water Resources Research & Development Corporation

QFVG Queensland Fruit and Vegetable Growers

RDC Research and Development Corporation

RIRDC Rural Industries Research & Development Corporation

SMA Statutory Marketing Authority

126 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

A p p e n d i c e s

Appendix A -S t a t u t o r y Levy l e g i s l a t i o n / r e g u l a t i o n s 128

Appendix B -Pr i nc i pl es f o r t he d e t e r m i n a t i o n

o f P r i ma r y I n d u s t r y levies 129

Appendix C -Ret i r i n g B o a r d M e m b e r s of t he C o r p o r a t i o n 130

Appendix D -Proj ect s Fuded by t he C o r p o r a t i o n 132

Appendix E -P u b l i c a t i o n s of the C o r p o r a t i o n 158

Appendix F -C o n t a c t D e t a i l s 164

Appendix G -I n d u s t r y o r g a n i s a t i o n s an d a g e n c i e s c o n s u l t e d in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8 166

APPENDIX A S t a t u t o r y Levy l e g i s l a t i o n / r e g u l a t i o n s

Statutory levy funds are collected under the following pieces of legislation:

Horticultural Levy Act 1987 Horticultural Export Charge Act 1987 Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection Act 1991

evy funds are contributed under the following Regulations:

Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Almond) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Apple and Pear) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Avocado) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Cherry) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Chestnut)

Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Citrus) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Custard Apple) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Macadamia) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Nashi) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Nursery) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Potato) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Stone fruit) Regulations Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Strawberry) Regulations • Primary Industries Levies and Charges Collection (Vegetable)

Regulations

128 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

APPENDIX B Principles f o r the d e t e r m i n a t i o n Primary I n d u s t r y levies

The following principles have been developed by the Department of Primary Industries and Energy and are reproduced here for your information.

(i) The proposed levy must relate to a function for which there is a significant market failure.

(ii) A request for a levy must be supported by industry bodies representing, wherever possible, all levy payers, or by levy payers directly. Otherwise a levy may be initiated by the government in the public interest in consultation with the industries involved.

(iii) The initiator of the levy shall provide an assessment of the extent, the nature and source of any opposition to the levy, and shall provide an analysis of the opposing arguments and reasons why the levy should be imposed despite the arguments raised against the levy. The

initiator shall also demonstrate that all reasonable attempts have been made to inform levy payers of the proposal and that they have had the opportunity to comment on the proposed levy.

(iv) The initiator shall provide an estimate of the amount of levy to be raised to fulfil the function to be paid for by the levy, a clear plan of how the levy w ill be utilised, including how the plan will benefit levy payers in an equitable manner, and demonstrated acceptance of the

plan by levy payers in a manner consistent with principle (ii).

(v) The initiator must be able to demonstrate that there is agreement by a significant majority on the levy imposition/collection mechanism, or that, despite objections, the proposed mechanism is equitable in the circumstances.

(vi) The levy imposition must be equitable between levy payers.

(vii) The imposition of the levy must be related to the inputs, outputs or units of production of the industry or some other equitable arrangement linked to the function causing the market failure.

(viii) The levy collection system must be efficient and practical, and must impose the lowest possible 'red tape' impact on business, subject to transparency and accountability requirements.

(ix) Unless new structures are proposed, the organisation or organisations which will manage expenditure of levy monies must be consulted prior to introduction of the levy.

(x) The body managing expenditure of levy monies must be accountable to levy payers and to the Commonwealth.

(xi) Levies must be reviewed against these principles following a specified period and in a manner determined by the Government in consultation with industry at the time of imposition of the levy.

(xii) Changes to existing levies. The proposed change must be supported by industry bodies or by levy payers, or by the Government in the public interest. The initiator of the change must establish the case for change and, where an increase is involved, estimate the additional amount which would be raised, indicate how the increase would be spent and demonstrate how this expenditure would benefit levy

payers.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 129

APPENDIX C Re t i ri n g B oa rd M e m b e r s of the C o r p o r a t i o n ____________________

Mr David Minnis (Chairman) Managing Director, Minnis Horticultural Services Pty Ltd Melbourne, Vic.

Tel: (03) 9380 5369 Fax: (03) 9387 4537 M r Minnis is a member of the Australian Horticultural Exporters' Association and is actively involved in the export of fresh fruit and vegetables to Asia. M r Minnis served as Chairman on the Board of the

Corporation from 1992 to 1997.

Mr Andrew Combe (Government Member) Director Horticultural Commodities Section Dept of Primary Industries and Energy Canberra, ACT Tel: (06) 272 5493 Fax: (06) 272 5672 M r Combe served as the Government Member on the Board of the

Corporation from 1989 - 1998. In his role as Director of Horticultural Commodities, he provides policy advice to the Government in the areas of meat, wool, sugar, grape and wine as well as horticultural produce.

Mr Michael Keenan Manager, Tamlaght Dareton, NSW Tel: (03) 5027 4702 Fax: (03) 5027 4561 M r Keenan manages his own farm producing citrus, avocados and cut flowers for export markets. He has participated in the Citrus R&D Committee and the Australian Citrus Improvement Program since 1991; the Citrus Market Development Group and Riverlink Policy Advisory Group since 1995 and has been a Director of Western Murray Irrigation since 1995. M r Keenan served on the Board of the Corporation from 1991 - 1997.

Mr Malcolm Kentish Chairman, Kentish & Sons Pty Ltd M t Gambier, SA Tel: (08) 8739 8230 Fax: (08) 8723 0088 M r Kentish is actively involved in the potato industry serving on the Australian Potato Industry Council from 1989 to 1993 and is presently a

member of the Horticultural Task Force, a committee formed to research and advise the government on horticultural development in South Australia. Mr Kentish served on the Board of the Corporation from 1994 - 1997.

130 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Retiring B o a r d M e m b e r s of t h e

C o r p o r a t i o n

Dr Donald Plowman Director of R&D, SA Research & Development Institute Adelaide, SA Tel: (08) 8226 1881 Fax: (08) 8303 9403 Dr Plowman was a member of the management team involved in the development of the SA Research & Development Institute and manages the R&D program including external funding for the Corporation. Dr Plowman served on the Board of the Corporation from 1994 - 1997.

Dr Rip van Velsen Horticulturist Adelaide, SA Tel: (08) 8344 1565 Fax: (08) 8344 1565 Dr van Velsen retired in 1993 as Chief of the Plant Health and Regulatory Branch of the SA Department of Agriculture. He has served as a committee member for the Australian Society of Horticultural Science and the SA Rural Industry Horticultural Training Committee. He is currently Chairman of the South Australian Citrus Board. Dr van Velsen served on the Board of the HRDC since its inception in 1988 to 1997.

APPENDI X C

HRDC A nnual Report 1997-98 131

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98

MARKET FOCUS

Lead Agency

AP95019 Crop forecasting in apple and pear (cont'd AP519)

$32,985 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

AP97013 Australian National Apple Breeding Program

$90,014 Agriculture Western Australia

AP97042 Best practice group - reference group $2,000 HRDC

CH97004 Market Research for the Chestnut Industry - Reference Group $4,500 HRDC

CH97005 Chestnut market research $20,000 Frank Small and Associates

CY97008 Market research audit and development of a market research plan for the Cherry Industry

$10,000 Richard Strategic Services

CY97010 Industry development plan for the South Australian cherry industry $6,000 SA Farmers Federation

FR96040 Growing better Australian banana businesses (cont'd FR640) $113,200 Australian Banana Growers' Council Inc

HG97028 USA & UK Food Trends - study tour

$13,151 Meyers Strategy Croup FYy Ltd

HG97031 User needs analysis and design for a horticultural Intranet $175,136 Melbourne Market Authority MC97015 Funding the commissioning

of macadamia projects in 1997/98 $7,000 HRDC

MC97016 A review of the export marketing structure of the Australian macadamia industry

$57,500 PacAlliance (Australia) Pty Ltd

NA97003 Review of the Australian a Nashi Growers Strategic Plan $9,875 HRDC

NY97012 Nursery industry statistical collection

$78,000 Australian Bureau of Statistics

NY97014 Financial performance benchmarking for retail and wholesale nurseries throughout Australia

$87,211 FMRC Pty Limited

NY97030 Nursery Industry market research audit $12,500 Richard Strategic Services NY97047 Nursery Industry Supply Chain Analysis $14,686 Retailworks Pty Ltd TM97008 "Market Outlook Report" and "Benchmarking Update - Processing Sector"

$16,331 APTRC Inc

VG95010 Carrot export development (cont'd VG510) $108,946 Agriculture Western Australia

VC97011 Remote sensing as an aid to horticultural crop recording and husbandry $76,181 University of

Tasmania

VG97012 Large seeded broad beans for the Japanese market $5,642 University of

Tasmania

VC97028 Economic sustainability of vegetable farms $10,000 Davey & Maynard VG97042 Developing new export vegetables with $79,936 emphasis on burdock, daikon and globe artichoke Agriculture Western Australia

132 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t he C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

VG97064 Assessment of tomato, capsicum and eggplant cultivars production techniques for export to Japan and Taiwan and demonstration of I PM of Botrytis cinerea for local and export crops

$36,727 TAS Department of Primary Industry & Fisheries

VC97104 Investigation and development of selected $19,484 Asian markets for fresh and processed vegetables Cowra Vegetables to Asia Group

VG97111 Vegetable market research audit and development of a market research plan

SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION

$17,000 Richard Strategic Services

AP94043 Reducing risk and chemical usage while improving efficiency and predicability of thinning practices (cont'd AP443)

$4,972 University of Tasmania

AP95011 Dormancy release and chemical thinning of Pink Lady and Sundowner apples (cont'd AP511)

$26,188 Agriculture Western Australia

AP95018 Improving replant strategies for apples (cont'd APS 18) $2,966 New South Wales

Department of Agriculture

AP95024 Nitrogen fertiliser management for yield and fruit quality cont'd AP524) $32,706 Department of Natural Resources (& Environment)

AP96006 Optimising nitrogen rates and application methods to enhance red skin colour development in red Fuji (cont'd AP606)

$44,750 University of Tasmania

AP96014 Maximising apple orchard productivity under hail netting (cont'd AP614) $20,852 Queensland Horticulture Institute

AP96034 MothWatch: A community approach to monitoring and reducing codling moth populations (cont'd AP634)

$49,500 Orchard Services

AP96043 Development of a thinning program for European pears (cont'd AP643) $49,386 University of Tasmania

AP96053 Productivity and profitability of growing packham pears $12,294 Northern Victoria Fruit Growers Association Ltd

AP97002 Development of crop regulation strategies for new and problem apple cultivars - Gala $20,000 University of Tasmania

AP97005 A study of apple replant syndrome $32,054 University of Tasmania

AP97010 Increasing the yield and fruit quality of Australian apple orchards $39,310 Queensland Horticulture Institute

AP97012 Establishment of Australian Apple & Pear Thinning Group $10,000 University of Tasmania

AP97014 The relationship of cultural practices to water core in Sundowner apples $13,600 Agriculture Western Australia

AP97017 Concentrate spraying in pome fruit: preserving the beneficials $50,874 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 133

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

AP97027 Crop forecasting of Packham pears in the Goulburn Valley $14,826 AAPGA Inc

BS97003 Sustainable strawberry production (Better Berries Program - Western Australia) $30,721 Agriculture Western Australia

CT95004 Biofumigation of citrus replant soils using $66,546 SA Research & brassica cover crops (cont'd CT504) Development Institute

CT95031 Improving Imperial mandarin fruit quality $51,717 New South Wales and marketability (cont'd CT531) Department of Agriculture

FR95013 Banana nutrition in North $62,645 Queensland Horticulture

Queensland (cont'd FR513) Institute

FR95031 Improved Fruit Handling $59,813 Queensland Horticulture

Systems in Bananas Institute

FR96001 Development of a chemical thinning program $19,554 Agrisearch for canning apricots and peaches (FR601) Services Pty Ltd

FR96010 Develop orchard fertiliser strategies using $42,806 Department of Natural successive annual leaf analyses and focus groups (cont'd FR610) Resources & Environment

FR96015 Subsoil acidity under bananas - innovative $39,995 Queensland Department of amelioration practices (cont'd FR615) Natural Resources

FR96050 Evaluation of plant back periods for methyl $24,500 Department of bromide and alternative fumigants used Natural Resources

for soil disinfestation in the strawberry industry (cont'd FR650)

& Environment

FR97009 Nutritional management of $14,408 Queensland Horticulture

non-astringent persimmon Institute

FR97029 New methods of soil/irrigation management $75,636 Department of in orchards for higher yields through Natural Resources

improved soil structure, soil quality and increased water use efficiency

& Environment

FR97031 Queensland Papaya Industry Research, $106,682 Queensland Horticulture Development & Extension - Phase 1 Institute

FR97032 Improved soil management for $31,000 Ardmona Foods

deciduous orchards Limited

FR97048 Improving the root health of $9,090 New South Wales

subtropical bananas Agriculture Department of

HC95042 Development of good farm management guidelines for sustainable fruit and $145,544 QFVG vegetable production (Cont'd HG542) HG96005 Improving soil structural quality $54,522 CRC for Soil & Land

to increase productivity in orchards (cont'd HG605)

Management

HC96027 Improvement and transfer of irrigation technology to Western Australian $37,568 Irrigation Association of Aust Ltd - WA Region

horticultural industries (cont'd HG627) HC97022 Virginia Horticulture Centre Project $109,091 Virginia Horticulture Centre Inc

134 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t he C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

MC95008 Canopy management for consistent yield in macadamia (cont'd MC508) $111,293 CSIRO Plant Industry

MC95013 Evaluation of groundcover species for macadamia orchards (cont'd MC513) $10,827 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

MC97005 Control of nut abscission in macadamia $74,467 The University of Queensland

MU94008 Optimisation of an innovative method for cultivating exotic mushrooms particularly shittake

$12,727 RIRDC

NA96001 Development of chemical fruit thinning in nashi (cont'd NA601) $13,990 Agrisearch Services Pty Ltd

NT95003 Irrigation, nutrition and disease management strategies to maximise yield and quality of walnuts (cont'd NT503)

$17,425 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

NY95016 A non-vented culture system to reduce orchid production costs (cont'd NY516) $53,860 JODI Enterprises Pty Ltd

NY95025 Commercial adoption of efficient irrigation & fertiliser strategies for containerised nursery plants (cont'd NY525)

$52,000 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

NY97004 Nursery environmental self audit $35,268 Fluvial F’ty Ltd

NY97023 Evaluate and extend nursery irrigation, drainage and recycling practices as set out in WATERWORKS program

$11,804 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

NY97040 Evaluation of irrigation sprinklers for the Nursery Industry $15,600 Australian Irrigation Technology Centre

OT97003 Agronomic improvements of direct seeded pyrethrum in Tasmania $81,273 Botanical Resources Australia Pty Ltd

OT97007 Evaluation and development of py rethrum harvesting options $199,000 Botanical Resources Australia Pty Ltd

OT97009 Preliminary py rethrum crop production evaluation studies in Victoria, NSW, South Australia and Queensland

$5,900 Botanical Resources Australia Pty Ltd

PT94023 A national strategy to reduce cadmium accumulation in potato crops (cont'd PT423) $93,277 CSIRO Land and Water

PT96020 Mechanisms of cadmium accumulation by potato tubers (cont'd PT620) $31,068 CSIRO Land and Water

PT97003 More economic and environmentally responsible use of phosphorus fertiliser in potato cropping on krasnozem soils in Australia

$30,050 University of Tasmania

PT97010 Sustainable potato production in highland NSW - Stage III $68,960 Lanz Agricultural Consultii

PT97026 Developing soil and water management systems for potato production on sandy soils in Australia

$44,136 SA Research & Development Institute

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 135

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

SF96002 New harvest maturity indices for $46,186 University of Western Sydney,

stonefruit (cont'd SF602) Hawkesbury

SF97007 Crop regulation and blossom thinning to $31,053 New South Wales increase fruit size and market returns of Department of

low and medium chill stonefruit Agriculture

TM97009 Benchmarking soils for processing $40,714 Department of Natural tomato production Resources & Environment

TU95001 Ecological restoration of roadside $14,358 University of Western Sydney, corridors (cont'd TU501) Hawkesbury

TU96001 Preliminary survey of water quality in water bodies on NSW golf courses (cont'd TU601) $56,000 Turfgrass Technology Pty Ltd TU96002 Reducing water use by turf grasses in a $73,589 University of

Mediterranean environment: evaluation of diverse species (cont'd TU602)

Western Australia

TU96007 Low input fairway grass trials (cont'd TU607) $17,892 Victorian Golf Association

VC95036 Phenological development and quality of $26,620 The University of broccoli in south-east Queensland (cont'd VG536) Queensland VC97019 Factors influencing carrot size and shape $50,212 University of Tasmania VG97020 Sustainable vegetable production $83,206 New South Wales

systems Department of Agriculture

VG97021 Investigation of plastic mulch alternatives $30,800 Queensland Horticulture for intensive vegetable production Institute

VG97027 Development of a sustainable integrated permanent bed system for vegetable crop production

$95,390 Applied Horticultural Research Pty Ltd

VG97065 Investigation of current irrigation practices and research into water requirements of onions

$25,421 Field Fresh Tasmania

VG97073 Integrated weed management, cover crop, $54,967 Queensland Horticulture mulch and rotation management in vegetable production systems Institute VG97079 Soil amendments to improve vegetable

production systems on sandy soils $95,172 Agriculture Western Australia

VG97083 Improving lettuce quality through adoption of sustainable production practices $75,503 Agriculture Western Australia

GENETIC IMPROVEMENT AP96008 Development of a national apple rootstock $45,150 SA Pome Fruit Improvement source area - Stage 3 (cont'd AP608) Committee

AP96012 Field assessment of tissue cultured $2,194 Queensland Horticulture Red Gala clones (cont'd AP612) Institute

AP96019 Breeding of woolly aphid resistant $13,320 New South Wales

dwarfing apple rootstocks (cont'd AP619) Department of Agriculture

136 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t he C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

AP96028 National pear rootstock breeding and $32,600 Department of Natural development (cont'd AP628) Resources & Environment

AP96032 National pear breeding and cultivar $87,400 Department of Natural improvement program (cont'd AP632) Resources & Environment

AP96035 Australian Pome Fruit Improvement Program (cont'd AP635) $302,615 APFIP Ltd

AP97009 Selection of high quality disease resistant $23,214 Queensland Horticulture apples for the Australian industry. Institute

AP97016 Apple and pear cultivars with functional $52,760 Department of Natural insect pest resistance genes Resources & Environment

BS97001 Improvement of strawberry quality and $89,600 Department of Natural yield by production of new varieties (cont'd from FR525) Resources & Environment

BS97002 Cultivar and management improvement $156,500 Queensland Horticulture for the sub tropical/tropical strawberry industry (cont'd FR511) Institute

BS97007 Strawberry runner production for the $47,700 Queensland Horticulture sub-tropics Institute

CT95002 A national program for the evaluation of $82,402 SA Research & Development navel orange cultivars (cont'd CT502) Institute

CT95015 National mandarin cultivar evaluation $38,186 Queensland Horticulture program (cont'd CT515) Institute

CT95043 New Valencia clones common orange $67,181 New South Wales varieties and rootstocks for improved Department of

fresh juice production (cont'd CT543) Agriculture

CT95047 National assessment of recently released $13,383 SA Research & Development grapefruit cultivars (cont'd CT547) Institute

CT96009 Evaluation of new citrus rootstocks $22,243 New South Wales

(cont'd CT609) Department of Agriculture

CT96014 Australian citrus scion breeding program $200,615 CSIRO Plant (cont'd CT614) Industry

CT97002 Australian Citrus Improvement Program $47,441 Australian Citrus Improvement Association Inc

CT97005 Production of quality lemons for the $12,218 New South Wales

premium local and overseas market (phase 2) Department of Agriculture

CU97001 Genetic Improvement in Custard Apple $14,545 Queensland Horticulture for Domestic and Export Markets Institute

CY95006 Smaller cherry trees for profitable $16,832 New South Wales

intensive orchards - National evaluation Department of

of dwarfing rootstocks (cont'd CY506) Agriculture

CY97002 Breeding high quality, Australian, sweet $42,487 SA Research & cherries to meet demand from overseas and domestic markets Development Institute

CY97011 Attendance at the 25th International $8,643 SA Research &

Horticultural Congress, Brussels, Development

August 1998 Institute

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8 137

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

FR94008 Evaluation of rootstocks for tablegrape production in subtropical areas (cont'd FR408).

$20,080 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR95001 Benefits to be obtained from the use of virus-tested stonefruit propagation schemes (continued - final year of FR501)

$16,564 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

FR95012 Stonefruit cultivar database update (cont'd FR512) $13,502 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR95017 Cold tolerance in banana (cont'd FR517) $33,500 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR95019 Development of transgenic papaws resistant to papaya ringspot virus, type P: Phase II (cont'd FR519)

$71,600 Queensland University of Technology

FR96009 National raspberry breeding and cultivar improvement program (cont'd FR609) & Environment

$15,794 Department of

Natural Resources

FR96012 Selection of superior smooth cayenne pineapple clones (cont'd FR612) $3,351 Queensland

Horticulture Institute

FR96013 Banana tissue culture for clean, sustainable production (cont'd FR613)

$58,436 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR96018 Banana plant improvement (cont'd FR618) $32,455 Queensland Horticulture Institute FR96027 Variety improvement program for yellow

fleshed canning peaches (cont'd FR627) & Environment

$106,814 Department of Natural Resources

FR96030 Further improvement in passionfruit through field evaluation of cross pollinated hybrids (cont'd FR630)

$10,821 Australian Passionfruit Industry Association

FR97003 Transgenic bananas with resistance to banana bunchy top virus $96,596 Queensland University of Technology FR97004 Mapping disease resistance genes in

banana (Stage 2)

$20,000 The University of Queensland

FR97012 Development of a pineapple plant not prone to natural flowering using gene $37,195 Queensland Horticulture Institute FR97015 Identifying and Developing Market

Acceptable Varieties for the Queensland Tablegrape Industry

$26,405 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR97025 Assessment of olive yield and oil quality and cultivar identification $9,091 RIRDC

FR97028 Workshop on disease testing and rapid release of new apple and stone fruit cultivars $12,880 TAS Department of Primary Industry & Fisheries FR97046 Development of tetraploid hop varieties

for use in hop breeding

$30,610 Australian Hop Marketers

FR97047 Table Crapes for the New Millennium $8,405 CSIRO Plant Industry

138 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D J

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

HC96018 Production of transgenic plants by electromechanical fusion of single plant cells (cont'd HG618)

$230,800 University of NSW

MC96002 Macadamia improvement by breeding (cont'd MC602) $207,874 CSIRO Plant Industry

MC96006 New macadamia cultivars to 2010 and beyond (cont'd MC606) $20,248 Queensland Horticulture Institute

MC97003 Conservation of macadamia germplasm resources $48,490 The University of Queensland

NT96001 Improved almond varieties (cont'd NT601) $1,800 Riverland Horticultural Council Inc

NT96003 Improved almond planting material (cont'd NT603) $27,274 University of

Adelaide

NT96009 Comparative Evaluation of Almond Rootstocks & Varietal Clones (cont'd NT609)

$3,050 Australian Almond Growers Association

PT96004 Evaluation and development of new potato genotypes - South Australia (cont'd PT604)

$27,000 SA Research & Development Institute

PT96005 Potato cultivar accession and testing in Tasmania (cont'd PT605) $27,000 University of

Tasmania

PT96015 Selection and evaluation of potato cultivars in Queensland (cont'd PT615) $27,000 Queensland Horticulture Institute

PT96017 Potato breeding & cultivar evaluation - Western Australia (cont'd PT617) $27,000 Agriculture

Western Australia

PT96027 Potato cultivar evaluation in Victoria and New South Wales (cont'd PT627) $54,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

PT96034 Breeding fresh market potato varieties - Stage 2 (cont'd PT634) $77,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

PT96037 Breeding French fry potato varieties - Stage 2 (cont'd PT637) $103,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

PT96038 Breeding crisp potato varieties - Stage 2 (cont'd PT638) $31,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

PT97011 DNA fingerprints and cryopreservation of $62,654 Department of Natural potato cultivars for improved quality assurance Resources & Environment

PT97013 Production and assessment of virus resistant potato cultivars $50,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

SF97005 National Plum Breeding Program $40,000 Queensland Horticulture

Institute

TM95002 Introduction and screening of improved cultivars to increase processing tomato productivity (cont'd TM502)

$60,709 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

TU97005 Australian Turf Seed Evaluation Program (AUSTEP) - Ryegrass $36,700 Turfgrass Technology Pty Ltd

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 139

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

VG94047 Introduction and selection of onion $54,550 Henderson Seed

germplasm for adaptation to the Australian environment (cont'd VG447)

Group F*ty Ltd

VG95018 Development of the asparagus industry $11,430 New South Wales in Australia - cultivar assessment for fresh Department of

and processing markets (cont'd VG518) Agriculture

VG95026 Varietal improvement of kailaan and $45,700 Henderson Seed production of a kailaan broccoli hybrid (cont'd VG526) Group Pty Ltd

VG95030 Onion production and varietal $36,000 Queensland

improvement studies to meet domestic Horticulture Institute

and export market requirements (cont'd VG530)

VG96005 Breeding fresh market tomatoes for $52,200 Queensland

machine harvest (cont'd VG605) Horticulture Institute

VG96006 Breeding for sweetness and tenderness $112,001 Queensland in tropical and subtropical sweetcorn (cont'd VG606) Horticulture Institute

VG96007 Genetic transformation of lettuce for $42,063 Queensland resistance to viruses (cont'd VG607) Horticulture Institute

VG96010 Pumpkin varietal improvement $52,150 Queensland

(incorp VG610 & VG517) Horticulture Institute

VG96030 DNA finger printing technology for purity $10,000 Henderson Seed analysis of hybrid seed in Brassica crops Group Pty Ltd

VG97023 Sweet potato variety improvement $30,700 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VG97025 Queensland fresh market tomato $88,622 Queensland Horticulture breeding Institute

VG97034 Vegetable export opportunities and $21,000 Queensland Horticulture germplasm availability in Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Korea and Japan Institute

VG97039 Onion cultivar trials $10,318 Agronico Pty Ltd

VG97085 Breeding and agronomic evaluation of $57,196 Department of tomato cultivars for fresh market Natural Resources

production in northern Victoria & Environment

VG97093 Flavour improvement in tomatoes: genetic manipulation and breeding for improved flavour

$78,475 CSIRO Plant Industry

POSTHARVEST

AP95003 Control of russet in Red Fuji (cont'd AP503) $59,532 University of Tasmania AP97008 A pilot apple and pear chemical

residue monitoring program

$255,425 AAPGA Inc

AP97032 Prevention of weight loss of pome fruit $36,346 CA Refrigeration Pty Ltd during CA and conventional storage

140 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

CT97006 Implementation of new strategies to combat oleocellosis $48,203 CSIRO Plant Industry

CT97012 Postharvest oil disinfestation and mould wastage control program for export Navel oranges

$105,130 SA Research & Development Institute

FR95022 Postharvest evaluation of new disease resistant banana varieties (cont'd FR522) $3,200 New South Wales

Department of Agriculture

FR96028 Delayed ripening of bananas through ethylene control (cont'd FR628) $18,182 University of

Newcastle

FR97006 Maturity standards for Lady's Finger bananas $3,200 New South Wales

Department of Agriculture

FR97017 Fungicide replacement for mango stem-end rot $35,701 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR97018 Control of internal disorders in mango $40,756 Queensland Horticulture Institute

HG96024 Hazard analysis of the export cool-chain (cont'd HG624) $32,500 University of

Newcastle

HC97034 Pesticide bioremediation technologies for Australian horticulture $54,545 CSIRO

Entomology

MC96007 Storage of macadamia nut-in-shell (continued) $23,320 The University of Queensland

MC97009 Treatment of macadamia kernels to reduce microbial contamination levels $51,511 Queensland Horticulture Institute

MC97011 Macadamia nut-in-shell (NIS) drying - factory and farm $54,817 The University of Queensland

MC97012 The effect of water flotation on moisture uptake and quality of macadamia kernels $2,408 The University of

Queensland

NA97001 Extending the storage life of nashi fruit $17,872 University of NSW

NT97007 Pecan maturity investigations $15,244 The University of Queensland

PT96052 Sprout suppression for the French fry potato industry (cont'd PT652) $41,610 Sunrise Agriculture Pty Ltd

PT97031 Innovative transport and disease control systems: potato exports to Asia $90,718 CSIRO Food Science & Technology

SF97010 Cool chain handling $55,034 SA Research & Development

Institute

VG94043 Export cauliflower quality improvement (cont'd VG443) $62,040 Agriculture

Western Australia

VG9601 7 Onion storage (cont'd VG617) $22,727 University of Tasmania

VG97016 Vegetable cool chain management $83,448 SA Research & Development Institute

VG97044 Improving the safety of minimally processed vegetables by implementing rapid testing for Listeria

$24,400 CRC for International Food Manufacture & Packaging Science

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 141

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

VC97045 New washing treatments for minimally $26,100 CRC for International Food processed vegetables Manufacture & Packaging

Science

VG97046 Microbiological survey of minimally $27,065 CRC for International Food processed and packaged vegetables Manufacture & Packaging

Science

VG97056 Optimising fresh bean quality through $82,320 Piccone the production, distribution and Horticultural

marketing chain (as a model for other Consultancy

vegetable products) Pty Ltd

VC97112 Food safety and quality assurance workshop for the Vegetable Industry $48,600 HRDC

DISINFESTATION

AP95020 Pre-storage treatment for non-chemical $166,408 Department of disinfestation of pears and apples Natural Resources

(cont'd AP520) & Environment

CT96020 Cold disinfestation of citrus using $160,445 Queensland

different time x temp combinations Horticulture

(cont'd CT620) Institute

CT96025 Verification trial for cold disinfestation $306,760 Agriculture of citrus (easy peels) for export to Japan (continued CT625) Western Australia

CT97015 Evaluation of phosphine as a replacement for $45,622 Department of Natural methyl bromide for disinfestation of citrus Resources & Environment CT97037 Joint experiment - Australian citrus to $81,990 New South Wales Korea Department of Agriculture

CT97039 Post harvest disinfestation of citrus with a $11,847 Queensland Horticulture dimethoate dip prior to the packing-line Institute

CT97046 Korean Visit $52,804 HRDC

CY95004 Disinfestation of export cherries (cont'd CY504) $42,772 CSIRO Plant Industry FR96032 Disinfestation of additional mango $54,545 Queensland Horticulture

varieties for export to Japan (cont'd FR632)

Institute

HG96019 Determination of heat tolerance in $83,200 Queensland Horticulture immature stages of fruit fly pest species (cont'd HG619) Institute HG97019 Preliminary investigation of simplified $100,000 Queensland Horticulture

heat treatment systems for disinfestation of vegetables for New Zealand

Institute

HG97020 Visit to research institutions in USA $3,850 TAS Department

conducting research on quarantine of Primary

treatments to replace methyl bromide fumigation.

Industry & Fisheries

NY97032 Development of surface disinfection $17,372 Department of Natural protocols for the Australian nursery industry Resources & Environment

142 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t he C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

SF97016 Dimethoate residue management in peaches $18,030 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VC97035 Development of descriptive "Model Tomato" for exports to New Zealand $9,800 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VG97097 Postharvest residue trials in rockmelons

NEW & VALUE ADDED PRODUCTS

$10,000 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR95048 Development of non-invasive objective test to measure eating quality of fruit (cont'd FR548)

$45,215 University of Central Queensland

FR96003 Will hot water treatment eliminate plant pathogens and expedite availability of new fruit varieties? (cont'd FR603)

$63,227 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

MU96009 Genetic diversity of mushroom spawn and its association with yield decline (cont'd MU609)

$47,124 Macquarie

Research Limited

OT97008 Preliminary assessment on the effectiveness of liquid C02 for continuous aeration of silo stored pyrethrum pellets

$36,000 Botanical Resources Australia Pty Ltd

VG97109 Further development of NIRS to measure eating quality of melons

PEST & DISEASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

$73,001 Central Queensland University

AP94048 WWAPM - Integrated management of weevils, woolly aphid and powdery mildew (cont'd AP448)

$134,595 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

AP95013 Biology and control of White Root Rot (Dematophora necatrix) of apple trees (cont'd AP513)

$17,002 Queensland Horticulture Institute

AP95021 Disease monitoring and control of pear scab (cont'd AP521) $53,487 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

AP95026 Improved spray application in apples and pears (cont'd AP526) $51,190 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

AP95045 Management of the Mediterranean fruit fly in apple and pear orchards (cont'd AP545)

$49,876 Agriculture

Western Australia

AP96003 Low impact pest and disease control - pome fruit (cont'd AP603) $41,377 TAS Department of Primary Industry & Fisheries

AP96022 Codling moth resistance management (cont'd AP622) $22,960 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

AP97007 Non-fungicidal and biological control of core rots in pome fruit $47,226 University of

Tasmania

AP97011 Pomefruit pesticide reduction strategies for the 2000's $53,840 Queensland Horticulture Institute

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 143

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

AP97021 Investigating the cause of decline in $64,201 Department of Natural pears in the Coulburn Valley Resources & Environment

AP97043 Controlling apple diseases - 7th $7,706 New South Wales

International Congress of Plant Pathology Department of

Edinburgh August 1998 Agriculture

AV96004 Avocado canopy health and $91,270 Queensland Horticulture

management (cont'd AV604) Institute

AV97001 Field management of avocado $74,144 Queensland Horticulture

postharvest diseases Institute

CH95002 Control of Phytophthora with $24,241 Department of

phosphorous acid in chestnut Natural Resources

(cont'd CH502) & Environment

CT95018 Integrated control of red scale in citrus $43,443 Queensland Horticulture (cont'd CT518) Institute

CT95019 Introduction and assessment of overseas $52,996 Queensland beneficials for biocontrol of citrus Horticulture

soft scales (cont'd CT519) Institute

CT95027 Area control of Queensland fruit fly $133,278 New South Wales

based on the sterile insect technique, Department of

Part 2: field experiments (cont'd CT527) Agriculture

CT95032 Production quality assurance for the $73,616 New South Wales Tri-State sterile insect release program Department of

(cont'd CT532) Agriculture

CT96012 Integrated management of honeydew $172,500 Department of Natural insects and ants on citrus (cont'd CT612) Resources & Environment

CT96016 Integrated control of the citrus jassid $27,862 Queensland

Empoasca smithi (cont'd CT616) Horticulture Institute

CT97007 Development of an I PM system for $101,588 Department of Natural thrips in citrus Resources & Environment

CT97009 Mechanism of mild-strain cross-protection $32,659 New South Wales of citrus against tristeza stem-pitting Department of Agriculture

CT97010 Development of an alternative to $21,954 New South Wales

endosulfan in the I PM of spined citrus bug Department of Agriculture

CT97016 Improving I PM for citrophilous $64,871 SA Research & Development

mealybug (CM) in citrus Institute

CT97033 Literature review of weed management $4,850 Applied Horticultural in citrus Research Pty Ltd

CT97036 Evaluation of protein bait spraying and $47,833 Queensland Horticulture inspection on the packing line as Institute

quarantine treatments for fruit fly in citrus CT97038 Publication of citrus I PM field guide $42,836 HRDC

CT97042 Industry Reference Croup for fruit fly review $5,500 HRDC FR95007 Epidemiology of red root rot of hops $55,607 Department of Natural and strategies for control (cont'd FR507) Resources & Environment

FR95014 Crop management in papaws: ratoon & $25,215 Queensland Horticulture pest management (cont'd FR514) Institute

144 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

APPENDIX D

Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

FR95020 The development of a management program for nematodes in subtropical bananas(cont'd FR520)

$34,142 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

FR95060 Development of oils for the control of grape powdery mildew and other pests and diseases of grapes (cont'd FR560)

$52,789 SA Research & Development Institute

FR96008 Large area mating disruption of oriental fruit moth (cont'd FR608) $400,320 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

FR96016 Implementing strategic control of burrowing nematode on bananas $83,504 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR96017 Rapaw dieback characterisation & transmission investigations (cont'd FR617) $27,273 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR96022 Developing and implementing integrated pest management systems in the Queensland banana industry (cont'd FR622)

$54,545 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR96023 Biology studies and IPM control options for banana rust thrips (cont'd FR623) $16,500 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR96024 Banana streak virus in Australia (cont'd FR624) $54,727 Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR96025 Improved soil borne disease management practices in vine nurseries (cont'd FR625) $31,544 SA Research & Development Institute

FR96026 Banana plant health improvement (cont.) $620,884 Australian Banana Growers' Council Inc

FR96043 Nematode management in pineapple following the withdrawal of EDB (cont'd FR643)

$59,009 Biological Crop Protection Pty Ltd

FR96047 Development of sustainable crop protection $81,818 strategies in tropical/subtropical strawberries in the absence of methyl bromide (cont'd FR647)

Queensland Horticulture Institute

FR97014 Black Sigatoka surveillance $123,636 Queensland Horticulture

Institute

FR97020 Identification of the sex pheromone of banana scab moth $32,352 CSIRO

Entomology

FR97021 Control of clearwing moths in persimmons with pheromone - a feasibility study

$10,400 CSIRO

Entomology

FR97023 Population and pathogenicity studies of Mycosphaerella spp. : pathogenicity studies (continued)

$7,864 The University of

Queensland

FR97039 An evaluation of the relative importance of banana corm rot in North Queensland. $16,999 Queensland Horticulture Institute

HG94035 Use of variable DNA microsatellites to analyse population structure of Queensland fruit fly (cont'd HG435)

$234,821 University of Sydney

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 145

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

HC95015 Alternatives to soil fumigation with $174,545 Department of

methyl bromide in the strawberry and Natural Resources

ornamental industries (cont'd HG515) & Environment

HC96003 PCR based diagnostics for Phytophthora $93,360 The University of (cont'd HG603) Queensland

HG96011 Extending PSO based IPM for horticulture $373,836 University of Western (cont'd HG611) Sydney, Hawkesbury

HG96016 Pre-emptive research into the biology $146,914 CSIRO and biological control of silver leaf Entomology

whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B

HG96023 Evaluation of petroleum sprays: $23,361 New South Wales

technology transfer for pome fruit pests Department of

and diseases (cont'd HG623) Agriculture

HC97007 National strategy for the management of $298,327 Agriculture western flower thrips and tomato spotted Western Australia

wilt virus

HG97010 Ecology and behaviour of fruitspotting $105,000 Queensland Horticulture bugs Institute

HG97017 Development of a national IPM program $201,925 New South Wales in greenhouse/protected crops Department of

(cont'd NY513) Agriculture

HG97023 Maintenance of fruit fly marker stocks $50,000 University of Sydney HG97027 National contingency plan for incursions $21,500 Queensland Horticulture of melon fly and other exotic fruit flies Institute

MC95004 A management strategy for the control $57,552 Queensland of rodents in macadamia orchards University of

(cont'd MC504) Technology

MC96003 Development of a pheromone-based $45,719 CSIRO monitoring system for the macadamia Entomology

nut borer (cont'd MC603)

MC96011 Development of macadamia husk spot $87,270 Queensland control strategies to address potential Horticulture

fungicide resistance Institute

NT95001 Improvement of packout and quality of $40,836 Department of Australian pistachios (cont'd NT501) Natural Resources

& Environment

NT96002 Improving pest management in pecan $92,571 CSIRO orchards (cont'd NT602) Entomology

NT97002 Managing 'canker' and die back in $59,172 Department of Natural

pistachios. Resources & Environment

NY96015 Detection and characterisation of orchid $16,364 University of fleck virus (cont'd NY615) Tasmania

NY97011 Controlling downy mildew in nurseries $20,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

146 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

NY97020 Quality assurance technical support and $68,336 New South Wales technology transfer for improved crop Department of

health in the NSW nursery industry Agriculture

NY97024 Management of elm pests and diseases $103,158 Keith Turnbull in Australia Research Institute

NY97046 Plant-available silicon (Si) as a protectant $32,495 University of against fungal diseases in soil-less Western Sydney,

potting media Macarthur

OT96004 Epidemiology and sustainable management of poppy fire and other fungal pathogens in poppy crops (cont'd OT604)

$24,500 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

OT96004 Epidemiology and sustainable management of poppy fire and other fungal pathogens in poppy crops (cont'd OT604)

$25,450 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

OT97001 Weed management of pyrethrum $80,000 Agronico Pty Ltd

OT97005 Disease management of pyrethrum. $45,065 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

OT97010 Preliminary investigation of the incidence $11,500 Botanical Resources and control of nematodes in pyrethrum crops Australia

PT96010 Investigation on common scab disease of potatoes and development of control methods (cont'd PT610)

$63,000 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

PT96032 Influence of rotation and biofumigation $117,738 Department of on soil-borne diseases of potatoes Natural Resources

(cont'd PT632) & Environment

PT96032 Influence of rotation and biofumigation $121,156 Department of on soil-borne diseases of potatoes Natural Resources

(cont'd PT632) & Environment

PT96047 Control of black nightshade and other weeds in potatoes $40,000 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

PT96054 Aphid monitoring in the Scott River $20,824 Agriculture

potato seed growing area of south-west Western Australia (cont'd PT654)

Western Australia

PT97004 Potato pink rot control in field and storage $54,577 SA Research & Development Institute

PT97015 New chemical treatments for fungal $67,324 Department of Natural diseases of seed potatoes Resources & Environment

SF96013 Establishing a process for developing $52,012 Department of Natural integrated pest management programs in stone fruit orchards (cont'd SF613) Resources & Environment

SF97003 Integrated management of carpophilus $45,589 New South Wales beetles in stone fruit orchards Department of Agriculture

SF97006 Managing Silverleaf and Trametes in $58,224 Department of Natural stone and pome fruits Resources & Environment

TM95001 Advanced integrated pest management $59,499 Department of Natural in processing tomatoes (cont'd TM501) Resources & Environment

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 147

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

TM96002 Selection of trichogramma for control of heliothis in tomatoes (cont'd TM602) $11,120 La Trobe University

TM97001 Improved control of powdery mildew on processing tomatoes $27,000 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

TU96006 Nematode management in turf using chemical alternatives (cont'd TU606) $30,740 Turfgrass Technology Pty Ltd

TU97002 Optimising African black beetle control in turf $8,000 CSIRO

Entomology

VC94023 Developing a management strategy for white rot and botrytis in onions $139,363 University of Tasmania

VG95006 Monitoring, management and reduction $21,060 of tomato leafminer in Bowen (cont'd VG506) Bowen Crop Monitoring Services Pty Ltd

VG95009 Pest and beneficial ecology in tomatoes (cont'd VG509) $57,609 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VC96008 Eggfruit caterpillar - pheromone development and control methods (cont'd VG608)

$20,790 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VG96014 Management of pest constraints to quality and production of melons (cont'd VG614) $30,413 Queensland Horticulture Institute VG96015 An investigation of carrot diseases in

north-western Tasmania and their control (cont'd VG615)

$32,110 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

VG96033 Management of soil-borne pathogens in vegetable cropping systems at Bundaberg, Queensland (cont'd VG633)

$67,636 Biological Crop Protection Pty Ltd

VG97014 Advancing the integrated management of diamondback moth in Brassica vegetables

$201,967 SA Research & Development Institute

VG97024 Implementation of an onion downy mildew forecasting service in the Lockyer Valley

$34,300 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VG97031 Management of bacterial fruit blotch of watermelon $17,851 Queensland Horticulture Institute VG97036 Insect pest management in sweetcorn $342,242 Queensland Horticulture

Institute

VG97037 Silverleaf whitefly management $100,700 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VG97038 Weed management in onions $18,471 Agronico Pty Ltd

VG97040 Trichogramma wasps in IPM programs for vegetable crops $56,238 BioResources Pty Ltd VG97050 Biofumigation - bioactive Brassica

rotations for IPM of soil borne pests and diseases

$102,181 CSIRO Entomology

VG97054 Resistance of Brussels sprouts to root knot nematodes $8,050 SA Research &

Development Institute

VG97060 Weed management in peas $33,459 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

148 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

VG97062 Weed management in sweetcorn $24,716 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

VG97063 Weed management in pumpkins and other cucurbit crops $35,000 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

VC97076 National clubroot management strategies for production of quality export and domestic Brassicas

$165,643 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

VG97084 Integrated management of Sclerotinia disease in beans $47,082 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

VG97103 Management of celery mosaic virus $85,499 Department of Natural Resources & Environment

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

AP95050 Scholarships for the apple and pear industry (cont'd AP550) $16,000 AAPGA Inc

AP96041 Technology transfer on the industry magazine (cont'd AP641) $31,775 AAPGA Inc

AP96049 Pome Fruit Industry Development Officer (cont'd AP649) $86,400 AAPGA Inc

AP97031 Australian Apple & Pear Growers' Association National Conference, August 1997, Hobart

$21,246 Tasmanian Apple & Pear Growers Association Inc

AP97033 World Apple Conference and IDFTA Apple Study Tour of Japan, October 27 to November 8, 1997

$6,550 New South Wales

Department of Agriculture

AP97034 R&D consultation and implementation $51,250 AAPGA Inc

AP97035 World Apple Conference and marketing mission to Asia $6,500 NSW Farmers

AP97036 IDFTA apple study tour and World Apple Conference : Japan 1997 $7,182 SA Research &

Development Institute

AP97037 Apple & Pear R & D Committee meetings $7,056 HRDC

AP97038 Apple Scab Project Development Workshop $945 HRDC

AP97040 Production and marketing tour of Italy and UK $102,890 AAPGA Inc

AV95006 AVOMAN Stage 2 (cont'd AV506)) $64,220 Queensland Horticulture Institute

AV97002 Costs of second R&D committee meeting, 97/98 $5,000 HRDC

AV97003 Technology transfer through Talking Avocados $13,250 Australian Avocado Growers Federation

AV97004 Searching for quality through the application of current research: Conference 97

$15,750 Australian Avocado Growers Federation

AV97006 Avocado R&D audit meeting, 1998 $12,000 Australian Avocado Growers Federation

BS97004 Strawberry Technical Committee $5,547 HRDC

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 149

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No.

BS97005

BS97006

BS97009

CH96001

CH97002

CT95006

CT95025

CT95070

CT96024

CT97004

CT97014

CT97017

CT97018

CT97019

CT97021

CT97022

CT97023

CT97024

CT97029

CT97040

CT97041

Title

Communicating research and development to strawberry industry

Strawberry R&D Committee meeting, September 1997

Strawberry study tour to USA, February 1998

Chestnut industry best practice and market development program (cont'd CH601)

Review of Chestnut Industry Strategic Plan, 1996

Technology transfer through Australian Citrus News' (cont'd CT506)

National and regional Cittgroups coordinators (cont'd CT525)

Citrus industry development officer, Riverland South Australia (cont'd CT570)

A multimedia information system for Australian citrus growers (cont'd CT624)

Evaluation, updating and reprinting of the Citrus Crowing Manual and the Citrus Handling Guide

Delivery of information to the citrus industry - survey of options

Costs of second R&D committee meeting, 97/98

National Citrus Field Day, Sunraysia 1997

National Citrus Quality Group Meeting, 1997

Annual national citrus breeding and evaluation coordination meetings, 1997-1999

Increased awareness and utilisation of Riverlink Services by horticultural industries and natural resource agencies (cont'd CT638)

Citrus entomology research coordination meeting, 1997 and development of strategic plan for citrus entomology R&D

Review and management strategy for R&D on control of fruit fly in the field

Regional forums on citrus R&D issues

1998 Australian Citrus Growers Inc 50th Annual Conference

National Citrus Study Tour of Spain

Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

$10,000 Strawberries Australia Inc

$5,281 HRDC

$31,035 Queensland Horticulture Institute

$16,851 Department of

Natural Resources & Environment

$5,500 Chestnut Growers of Australia, Ltd

$27,000 Australian Citrus Growers Inc

$120,000 Australian Citrus Growers Inc

$61,529 Citrus Growers of South Australia

$68,000 Queensland Horticulture Institute

$31,514 SA Research & Development Institute

$45,000 Karingal

Consultants

$12,000 HRDC

$7,600 Murray Valley

Citrus Marketing Board

$4,026 Murray Valley

Citrus Marketing Board

$12,000 New South Wales Department of Agriculture

$5,000 Department of

Natural Resources & Environment

$12,000 University of

Western Sydney, Hawkesbury

$44,500 Macarthur

Consulting Pty Ltd

$10,000 HRDC

$18,810 Murray Valley Citrus Marketing Board

$5,000 Australian Citrus Growers Inc

150 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t he C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

CT97043 Murray Valley Citrus Study Tour of Spain $5,151 Murray Valley Citrus Marketing Board

CT97044 Trade Delegation to Food and $3,200 Citrus Board of

Hotel Asia 98 South Australia

CT97045 Delivery of information to the citrus $13,400 Karingal

industry, Stage 2: Survey of skilled intermediaries

Consultants

CY97001 Attendance at the International Cherry $4,962 SA Research & Symposium, July 1997 Development Institute

CY97004 Third International Cherry Symposium, $5,180 Tasmanian July 23-29, 1997, Norway-Denmark Stonefruit Association Inc

CY97005 Attendance at the Third International $4,962 New South Wales Cherry Symposium and rootstock Department of

study tour Agriculture

CY97006 Cherry Growers of Australia Conference, $7,636 Victorian Cherry August 1997, Lilydale Association

CY97007 Cherry Research & Development Strategic Planning Workshop $21,231 HRDC

CY97009 Attendance at Prunus Breeders Meeting, $3,600 SA Farmers Aguascalientes, Mexico Federation

FL96001 Industry Development Officer for the $22,572 West Australian Wildflower West Australian Wildflower Producers

Producers Association Association

FR95037 Industry Development Officer - Fresh $94,870 Riverland Horticultural Stone Fruit / Almonds (cont'd FR537) Council Inc

FR97005 Attend International Symposium on $6,000 New South Wales

Banana in the Subtropics in Tenerife, Department of

Canary Islands, Spain. Agriculture

FR97008 Improved Technology Transfer within $27,220 Queensland Horticulture the Mango Industry through Comparative analysis and improved information access Institute

FR97027 Goulburn Valley Fruit Symposium $19,000 Northern Victoria Fruit

Growers Association Ltd

FR97030 Australian Banana Growers' Council $55,934 Australian Banana Industry Development Officer Growers' Council Inc

FR97036 Technology transfer in the canning stone $77,000 Northern Victoria and pome fruits & fresh pear and stone Fruit Growers

fruit industries. Association Ltd

FR97041 Australian Passionfruit Industry R&D Levy $38,000 Australian Passionfruit Industry Association

FR97044 Canning Fruit Industry Study Tour $55,000 Northern Victoria

to South Africia Fruit Growers Association Ltd

FR97045 Development of a National R&D Plan $18,183 Australian Banana for the Australian Banana Industry Growers' Council Inc

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 151

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

HG96049 National communication of research $40,000 Department of and policy issues related to phase-out of Natural Resources

methyl bromide for soil disinfestation purposes (cont'd HG649)

& Environment

HG97011 Macadamia and Avocado Industry $50,228 Queensland Horticulture Spray Technology Workshops Institute

HG97016 AS PAG National Conference and $8,700 Australian Soil &

Workshops 1997 Plant Analysis Council Inc

HG97018 Peak industry bodies consultation meeting with HRDC $38,310 HRDC

HG97021 Australasian Postharvest $39,290 Hawkesbury

Horticulture Conference Technologies Ltd

HG97025 Brighton Crop Protection Conference, attendance and technology transfer. $5,818 Serve-Ag Pty Ltd

HG97026 Attendance "Knowledge Acceleration" $2,364 TAS Department of Primary International Conference Industry & Fisheries

HG97029 Industry Development Officer - NSW Deciduous Tree Fruits $47,875 NSW Farmers

HG97033 Training and Development Scholarships $75,000 Australian Rural on Course 5 of the Australian Rural Leadership

Leadership Program Foundation Ltd

HG97037 Illustration of key horticultural concepts $8,091 Macquarie in a new Australian textbook - Plants in Action University

HG97038 Attendance at the IMI Fungal $15,200 SA Research &

Identification Course, UK Development Institute

HG97039 Development of a national IPM program in greenhouse/protected crops - project and training meeting

$9,336 HRDC

HG97040 Attendance at the 25th International Horticultural Congress, Brussels, August 1998 $14,860 QFVG

HG97041 Attendance at the 25th International $6,716 Strawberry

Horticultural Congress, Brussels, August 1998

Wholesalers WA

HG97042 Attendance at the 25th International $9,363 Leppington

Horticultural Congress, Brussels, Speedy Seedlings & Supplies

August 1998 Pty Ltd

MC95011 Documenting the knowledge base $22,975 Australian Macadamia (cont'd MC511) Society Limited

MC96014 Macadamia Industry Development $80,255 Australian Macadamia Officer (cont'd MC614) Society Limited

MC97002 MACMAN : A Management Analysis $32,046 Queensland Horticulture System for Improved Productivity and Quality in Macadamia Institute

MC97006 Publishing research results $16,250 Australian Macadamia

Society Limited

152 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

MC97007 R&D Committee Meeting $1,130 HRDC

MC97008 Australian Macadamia Industry $4,820 Australian Macadamia

Strategic Plan Society Limited

MU97005 24th National Mushroom Industry $21,827 Australian Mushroom Conference, Sydney, October 1997 Growers Association

MU97006 Specialty Mushroom Search Conference $10,130 Australian Mushroom Growers Association

MU97007 Dissemination of retail training material $48,396 Australian Mushroom and assessment of program impact Growers Association

NT97003 Hazelnut growers manual $2,600 Hazelnut Growers

of Australia Ltd

NT97004 Attendance at Second International $3,603 University of

Symposium on Pistachios and Almonds, Adelaide

University of California, Davis.

NT97005 Australian Nut Industry Council Inc $14,465 Australian Nut

Conference Mildura 1997 Industry Council Inc

NT97008 Almond Industry Advisory Tour $7,625 Australian Almond Growers

Association

NT97009 Technology Transfer through Australian $22,000 Australian Nut Nut Industry Journal Industry Council Inc

NY95004 Implementation of a Nursery $28,300 SA Research &

Accreditation Scheme for the Development

South Australian nursery industry Institute

(cont'd NY504)

NY95005 Improved transfer and adoption of $78,056 Nursery Industry

technology for the Victorian Nursery Association of

Industry (cont'd NY505) Victoria

NY95018 Nursery Industry Development Officer $114,974 Nursery Industry at national level (cont'd NY518) Association of

Australia

NY95040 Improved transfer and adoption of $99,490 Nursery Industry

technology for the Western Australian Association of

nursery industry (cont'd NY540) WA Inc

NY96029 Transferring research into training $123,948 Nursery Industry Association of Australia

NY97002 Travel/accommodation costs for Nursery $23,783 HRDC R&D Committee and consultation between NIAA and HRDC

NY97009 Nursery Industry technology $4,608 Queensland Horticulture

transfer workshops Institute

NY97016 Queensland Nursery Industry $78,825 Queensland Nursery

Development Officer Industry Association

NY97018 Publication of "The Nursery Papers" $59,104 Nursery Industry in Australian Nursery Manager and Association of Australia

onto NIAA Web site

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 153

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

NY97034 Industry program management and $22,602 Nursery Industry project involvement Association of Australia

NY97036 Technology transfer in the Queensland $10,024 Queensland Nursery Industry Association State Nursery Industry

Conference Association

NY97041 Production of 2nd Edition of $11,200 HRDC

"Handbook of the major pests and diseases of Nursery plants"

NY97042 Technology transfer at Nursery Industry $31,545 Nursery Industry 1998 National Conference and meeting Association of

of Nursery IDOs at conference Australia

NY97045 Optimum work methods in nursery production workshop (NY98003) $9,500 HRDC

NY97049 NSW Nursery Industry State Conference $12,727 Nursery Industry Association of NSW

OT94007 Pyrethrum Technology Transfer $224,914 TAS Department of

(cont'd OT407) Primary Industry & Fisheries

PT94028 Information packages and decision $27,577 SA Research &

support software for improved nutrient Development

management of potato crops (cont'd PT428) Institute

PT95042 Technology transfer to improve $66,500 Victorian Crisping

productivity and quality of crisping Potato Research

potatoes in Victoria & Southern NSW (cont'd PT542)

Group Inc

PT96009 Coordinating technology transfer in $128,450 SA Farmers the Australian potato industry (cont'd PT609) Federation PT96031 Technology transfer of new potato $30,000 Department of

cultivars (cont'd PT631) & Environment

Natural Resources

PT97019 APIC R&D Committee meeting October 1997 $7,843 HRDC

PT97020 APIC Consultation costs for 1997/98 $3,669 HRDC

PT97022 APIC ACM and HRDC report/consultation

$3,243 HRDC

PT97024 Production and distribution of $25,000 Australian Potato

'Potato Australia' Industry Council Inc

PT97025 Investigating electronic information $13,600 SA Research & services used by the Potato Industry Development

in the USA and UK Institute

PT97028 Strategic R&D planning for the Potato Industry $59,906 HRDC

SF96017 Industry Development Officer for $30,190 Sun Centre Horticultural

north west Victoria Development Association

154 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

SF96018 National Fresh Stone Fruit Industry $98,250 Australian Fresh Development Officer Network Stone Fruit

Coordinator (cont'd SF618) Growers Association Inc

SF97013 National Fresh Stone Fruit Industry $31,900 Australian Fresh R&D Consultative Process Stone Fruit Growers

Association Inc

SF97014 Third National Fresh Stone Fruit $14,468 Australian Fresh

Industry Conference Stone Fruit Growers

Association Inc

SF97015 Stone Fruit R&D Committee Meeting, July 1997 $5,345 HRDC

SF97019 Industry Development Officer for $10,500 Tasmanian Stonefruit

Tasmania Association Inc

SF97020 Industry Development Officer - Western Australia - Stone Fruit $6,610 Summer Fruit Council

TM97002 Adoption of technology and improved business practices in the Australian processing tomato industry

$144,275 APTRC Inc

TM97004 I PM in tomatoes - from research to $23,653 Department of Natural

practice Resources & Environment

TU97001 Attendance at National Turfgrass $2,000 CSIRO

Seminar, July 1997 Entomology

TU97003 1998 ACCSA Roving Workshop $34,780 Australian Golf

Series - Workshop 1 Course Superintendents

Association

VC95028 Technology transfer through Onions $13,800 Australian Onion Australia' and newslettter Industry Association Inc

VG97066 National workshop on the registration $33,299 Department of of pesticides for use on vegetables and Natural Resources

other minor crops & Environment

VG97080 Vegetable Industry Technology $117,944 SA Farmers

Coordinator, South Australia Federation

VG97086 AUSVEG consultation costs $80,800 HRDC

VC97095 Alliums Australia 1997 - International $103,658 Australian Onion Conference Industry Association Inc

VG97096 Fourth Australian Melon Conference, $20,215 Australian Melon October 1997, Bundaberg Association

VG97099 Research and Development Planning $45,690 Vegetable Workshop for the Western Australian Growers Association of

Vegetable Industry WA Inc

VG97102 Travel/accommodation costs for Vegetable R&D Committee & Product Group meetings, October, December 1997

$40,546 HRDC

VG97105 Workshop on use of organic wastes including composts in horticulture $5,322 HRDC

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 155

APPENDIX D Projects F u n d e d by the C o r p o r a t i o n

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

VG97113 Formulation of development plan and strategies for the Australian Vegetable Industry

$91,000 HRDC

VG97115 Production and distribution of the Vegetable R&D newsletter, Autumn 1997 $31,161 HRDC

QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

AP97041 Establishment of pilot best practice $10,000 Resource

groups in the Australian Consulting

Apple & Pear Industry Services Pty Ltd

CT95001 Implementation of quality management $104,124 Riverina Citrus & training in Riverina orchards and packhouses (cont'd CT501) Marketing

FR94036 Implementation of quality assurance $19,020 Tumut River for stonefruit industry Orchard Management Ltd

FR97011 Mango quality management training $38,251 Queensland Horticulture Institute

HG96047 HACCP-based QA System to meet $12,000 RJ Cornish & Co

IS09002 requirements for temperate fruit & potatoes

F*ty Ltd

HG97012 Conduct of Quality Assurance Program for Market Wholesalers $103,636 Brismark MC97010 Oil content and other components as $16,943 The University of

indicators of quality and shelf-life of macadamia

Queensland

MU97002 Development of HACCP code of $61,900 Hawkesbury

practice for the mushroom industry Technologies Ltd

NT94001 Pecan quality investigations $25,546 The University of

(cont'd NT401) Queensland

NY96002 Nursery Industry Accreditation Scheme, $38,392 Nursery Industry Australia Annual Conferences Association of

(cont'd NY602) Australia

NY97044 Establishing a National Nursery Industry $26,500 Richard Strategic Retail Accreditation Scheme: The concept, scope, characteristics and management Services RT96014 Development of a quality assured $102,970 Queensland

production and marketing system for Horticulture

fresh potatoes (cont'd PT614) Institute

SF97004 Fresh Stonefruit Quality Management $22,882 Queensland Horticulture Training Institute

SF97017 Development and Implementation of a $24,510 SA Fresh Fruit SQF 2000 based QA system for the Growers

South Australian Stone Fruit Industry. Association Inc

VG97022 Vegetable quality management training $78,350 Queensland Horticulture Institute

156 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Projects F u n d e d by t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX D

Project No. Title Approved 97/98 Lead Agency

VC97032 Melon quality management training $20,000 Queensland Horticulture Institute

VC97106 Development of food safety training programs for the fresh cut industry $90,909 CRC for International Food Manufacture &

Packaging Science

WASTE MANAGEMENT

HC96004 The beneficial use of sewage sludge on agricultural land (cont'd HG604) $38,182 TAS Department of Primary Industry &

Fisheries

NY97050 Safety in the garden brochure $8,406 HRDC

VG97081 Sustainable use of reclaimed effluent $136,103 water for horticultural irrigation on the Northern Adelaide Plains, South Australia

University of Adelaide

II

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 157

APPENDIX E P u b l i c a t i o n s of the C o r p o r a t i o n

CORPORATE PUBLICATIONS HRDC Business Plan 1997/98: Partnership in horticulture HRDC Annual Report 1996/97 HRDC Research Report 1996/97 HRDC In Focus The Competitive Edge: how to make quality systems work for you

HRDC Proposal Requirements 1999/2000 HRDC Update

The Corporation also supported the R&D content in the following industry newsletters:

Pome Fruit Australia Talking Avocados Australian Citrus News Australian Macadamia Society News Bulletin Australian Melon Runner Australian Nursery Manager Australian Nut Industry Journal Australian Processing Tomato Grower Onions Australia

Potato Australia Strawberry Research Newsletter Tomato Topics Vegetable R&D Newsletter Western Australian Wildflower Producers Association Newsletter

The R&D program also supported the following electronic technology transfer publications:

AVOMAN Citrus multimedia information system MACMAN Macadamia industry bulletin board

and the following hardcopy publications:

Citrus growing manual Citrus handling guide Citrus pests: a field guide Citrus pests and their natural enemies: integrated pest management in Australia

Handbook of major pests and diseases (2nd ed.) NIASA best practice guidelines (2nd ed.) Plants in action Hazelnut growers manual.

R & D PROJECT FINAL REPORTS PUBLISHED IN 1997/98 - HORTICULTURE GENERAL HG403 Quality assurance procedures for Trichogramma spp & maintenance o f large colonies for field evaluation

HG413 Genetic strategies for control o f Queensland fruit fly

HG504 Development o f delivery systems for trichogramma

158 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Publications of t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX E

HG524 Postharvest technology o f fruit & vegetable training course

HG630 Attendance at the British Crop Protection Council's Brighton Conference, November 7 996 and study tour

HG97025 Brighton Crop Protection Conference, attendance and technology transfer.

HG97028 USA & UK Food Trends - study tour

TEMPERATE FRUIT FR509 Cool chain gains: Higher quality fresh fruits to the consumer by improved

FR524

temperature management

Further investigation into in vitro shoot tip grafting o f deciduous fruit trees for virus elimination

FR97028 Workshop on disease testing and rapid release of new apple and stone fruit cultivars HG97026 Attendance " Knowledge Acceleration" International Conference by P Gillard

Apple/Pear AP401

AP403

AP414

AP425

Apple orchard system design and productivity

Breeding high quality disease resistant apples for Australia

Evaluation of genetically engineered pest resistant apple and pear scion cultivars

Reduction in pesticide use in the apple industry through new spray application technology

AP440

AP551

AP618

AP630

AP97031

New approaches to the control o f postharvest rots and scald in pomefruits

Testing that apple fruit is labelled true to type using DNA methods

Video - Reducing bruising when harvesting apples

Improved fruit quality using new handling technology

Australian Apple & Pear Growers' Association National Conference, August Ί997, Hobart

Berryfruit FR225

FR637

Cause and control o f crown and fruit rot diseases in strawberries

Ninth National Berryfruits Conference (Berryfruits MMM!)

Canning Fruit FR411 Control of stem rot and tree dieback caused by silverleaf and trametes in peaches and apples

FR635

FR97027

FR97036

Australian Canned Fruit Industry Study Tour to Greece, Italy and France

Goulburn Valley Fruit Symposium

Technology transfer in the canning stone and pome fruits & fresh pear and stone fruit industries.

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 159

APPENDIX E P u b l i c a t i o n s of the C o r p o r a t i o n

Stonefruit CY97005 Attendance at the Third International Cherry Symposium and rootstock study tour

FR121

FR543

SF608

SF610

SF97014

Pest status and control of fruit sucking bugs on peaches and nectarines

ANFIC 97 - Stepping Into The Future

National fresh stonefruit breeding program

Chemically thinning low chill peaches and nectarines

Third National Fresh Stone Fruit Industry Conference

TROPICAL FRUIT Avocado AV300 Production of clonal Hass avocado trees on six clonal rootstocks and the commercial evaluation

AV400

AV502

Disinfestation o f avocados against Mediterranean fruit fly

Sampling procedures for avocado dry matter maturity test

Banana FR024

FR109

FR221

FR303

FR306

FR308

FR319

FR324

FR649

Control of black sigatoka disease in bananas

Plantation/postharvest factors affecting banana shelf life

Panama resistance and cold tolerance in Cavendish banana

Development of disease free and disease resistant bananas using tissue culture

Sustainable management o f burrowing nematode on bananas (continued)

Soil chemical aspects of banana root health

Detection and control of viruses o f banana

Commercialisation of nematodes for IPM in bananas

Second National Banana Industry Congress

Citrus CT122 Improving the application efficiency o f pesticides in citrus crops and reducing off- target losses

CT310

CT311

CT314

CT327

CT402

CT405

CT416

CT421

CT433

Cause and control of sudden death in citrus

Improved detection methods for citrus viroids

New mandarin varieties for citrus nurserymen and growers

Quality maintenance of cold disinfested citrus fruits

Australian Citrus Foundation Repository

Integrated control o f citrus leafeating weevil

Production of quality lemons for the premium local and overseas markets

Breeding of fruit fly parasitoids for inundative release

Evaluate NIRS for rapid determination of leaf nutrients in oranges for quality fruit production (cont'd CT94033)

160 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Publications of t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX E

CT522

CT563

CT622

CT627

CT629

CT631

CT634

CT636

CT637

CT95001

CT97014

CT97023

CT97024

Genetic improvement o f citrus scions by conventional breeding and molecular technology

Physiological prospects for hot air disinfestation o f citrus fruits

Extension and accreditation o f the citrus training modules

Disinfestation of citrus against Queensland fruit fly using insecticide in wax

Queensland Citrus Growers Research Forum

USA citrus study tour for growers

Queensland study tour for mandarin growers

Impact damage potential assessment in mandarin packing lines for Queensland growers

5th ISCN Congress Tour - Mediterranean Region - 7997

Implementation of quality management & training in Riverina orchards and packhouses (cont'd CT501)

Delivery o f information to the citrus industry - survey o f options

Citrus entomology research coordination meeting, 7997 and development o f strategic plan for citrus entomology R&D

Review and management strategy for R&D on control o f fruit fly in the field

Other Tropical Fruit FR409 Implementation of an extension program in the Queensland papaw industry

FR545 Export o f Kensington mango by sea

FR645 ISHS Symposium on Biotechnology o f Tropical and Subtropical Species

VEGETABLE VG319

VG405

VG406

VG419

VG431

VG511

VG519

VG540

VG97099

Sweetcorn breeding and development to meet the requirements of Australian and export markets

An IPM package for heliothis in vegetables

Integrated weed management in vegetable production

An investigation into improved methods o f weed control in kabocha & pumpkins

Integrated strategies to control and prevent the spread o f clubroot

Molecular identification of strains of sclerotinia species

The use of red mud/gypsum to reduce water pollution from sandy soils used for vegetable production

Towards 2000 Herb Industry Conference & Expo, Bairnsdale, July 7 996

Research and Development Planning Workshop for the Western Australian Vegetable Industry

Melon VG624 A market profile of the Japanese melon industry

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 161

APPENDIX E P u b l i c a t i o n s of the C o r p o r a t i o n

Mushroom MU107

MU501

MU606

Development o f in-casing supplementation to small scale commercial trial stage

Development o f market information network for the Australian Mushroom industry

Evaluation of spent mushroom and other composts to Standards Australia requirements

MU97006 Specialty Mushroom Search Conference

Potato PT004

PT341

PT405

PT412

PT436

PT603

PT656

Potato irrigation - development o f irrigation scheduling guidelines

Integrated management of early and late potato blights in Australia

Integrated control of silver scurf and black dot of potato tubers

Potato early dying in Australia

Characterisation and detection o f potato cyst nematode

Refining Potato Pest Management Practices in Australia - Sabbatical o f Dr Walt Stevenson, potato extension specialist

National IPM program for potato pests

Fresh and Processing Tomato VC326 Management to reduce postharvest losses in tomatoes

VG409

VG427

VG429

TM200

Queensland fresh market tomato breeding

Flavour improvement in tomatoes

Queensland tomato quality management

Control o f waterlogging in tomatoes with mole drains

NUTS Almond NT607 Almond disease conference

Macadamia MC302

MC312

MC615

MC617

Pollen parent effects on nut quality and yield in Macadamia

Yield, quality and shelf life of new macadamia cultivars

Efficient and safe pesticide use as part of IPM strategies for macadamia production.

Sampling for Salmonella in macadamia nuts

ORNAMENTALS Cutflower FL305

FL503

Development officer position for the wildflower industry

Breeding and improvement o f Fan flower Scaevola

162 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Publ i cat i ons of t h e C o r p o r a t i o n APPENDIX E

Nursery NY110

NY306

Insecticidal control of cane weevil in palms

Fungicide resistance in isolates of Botrytis from ornamentals and development of control strategies

NY406

NY413

NY414

Control o f downy mildews in nursery seedlings

Investigation of sand filtration for nursery recycling systems (revised)

Improving nursery irrigation, drainage and re-cycling practices with training workshops

NY506 The compatibility of timber based potting media with mycorrhizal activity in nursery plant

NY515

NY523

Monitoring and treatment o f recycled water for nursery and floriculture production

Varietal improvement o f indoor plants by selection to withstand stresses o f the indoor environment

NY539 Implementation of improved business practices for Proteaflora certification to AS/NZS IS09002

NY610 Attend International Organisation for Biological Control (IOBC) Conference, Montpellier

NY612

NY613

NY617

NY97030

NY97036

Disinfestation protocols for equipment used in the nursery industry

Publication o f R&D Findings and Results

Presentation of R&D outcomes at National Conference

Nursery Industry market research audit

Technology transfer in the Queensland Nursery Industry Association State Conference

Sports Turf TU110

TU203

TU209

National turfgrass evaluation trial

Sand amendments for turf construction

Investigation randomly orientated interlocking mesh elements/sand rootzone system for bowling greens

TU604 Improving the efficiency o f African black beetle control in turf - a preliminary evaluation.

TU97002 Optimising African black beetle control in turf

OTHER HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS OT303 Potential wild poppy control strategies in commercial poppy crops

OT604 Epidemiology and sustainable management of poppy fire and other fungal pathogens in poppy crops

L

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 163

APPENDIX F

1 C o n t a c t D e t a i l s

As at August 1998.

HRDC CONTACT PROGRAM AREAS STRATEGIC AREA CONTACT DETAILS

LIN D T HYAM Corporate G o vernan ce Level 6

M anagem ent 7-9 M e rriw a Street

G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352

Email: hyam l@ hrdc.gov.au M obile. 0411 566 516

LIBBY ABRAHAM Nursery M a rk e t/E c e n e m lc Level 6

C utflow er Studies 7-9 M e rriw a Street

G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352

Email: abraham l@ hrdc.gov.au

A N N E B A N H A M Personal Assistant to the Level 6

Executive Director 7-9 M e rriw a Street

G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352

Email: banham a@ hrdc.gov.au

LES BAXTER Alm ond G en etic Im p ro ve m e n t PO Box 338

Apple/Pear Sandy Bay TAS 7066 A ustralia

C anning Fruit Tel. (03) 6224 4481

Chestnut Fax. (03) 6224 4468

Fresh stonefruit Mob. 0411 366 677

Hop Nashi O ther tem perate fru it O ther nuts

Email: baxterl@ ozem ail.com .au

O ther horticultural products Py rethrum

NEIL CUBITT Final Reports Level 6

New application kits 7-9 M e rriw a Street

G ordon NSW 2072 Australia Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Fax. (02) 9418 1352

Email: cubittn@ hrdc.gov.au

MATT DARCEY Banana Com m unications Level 6

Technology Tran sfe r 7-9 M e rriw a Street

G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia Fax: (02) 9418 1352 Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Email: darceym@ hrdc.gov.au

JONATHAN ECCLES Cherry P estharvest Level 6

Potato W aste M a n a g e m e n t 7-9 M e rriw a Street

M ushroom G ordon NSW 2072 Australia

Vegetable Tel. (02) 9418 2200

Fax: (02) 9418 1352 Email: ecclesj@hrdc.gov.au

164 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Contact D e t a i l s

APPENDIX F

KIM JAMES W A Program M anager Export M a rk e tin g PO Box 1100

Nedlands WA 6009 Australia Mob. 0412 096 900 Fax: (08) 9386 8289

Email: hrdcwa@ ozemail.com.au

JENNY LONGBOTTOM Business M anagem ent Level 6

7-9 M e rriw a Street G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352 Email: jennyl@ hrdc.gov.au

KYLII MARTIN In form a tion M anagem ent Level 6, 7-9 M e rriw a Street

(including application G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia

process) Tel. (02) 9418 2200

Fax: (02) 9418 1352 Email: m artink@ hrdc.gov.au

GERARD McEVILLY Avocado N e w * V alu e Level 6

Citrus A dd ed Products 7-9 M erriw a Street

Custard Apple G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia

M acadam ia Tel. (02) 9418 2200

O live Fax: (02) 9418 1352

H orticu lture General Email: mcevillyg@ hrdc.gov.au

ROBYN SMITH Inform a tion M anagem ent Level 6

(including application 7-9 M erriw a Street

process) G ordon NSW 2072 A ustralia

Tel. (02) 9418 2200 Fax: (02) 9418 1352 Email: sm ithr@ hrdc.gov.au

MARK SMITH Fresh Tomato D isin fes tatio n Private Bag 15

Pistachio Past A Disease South Eastern M ail Centre VIC 3176

Processing Tomato M a n a g e m e n t A ustralia

Table Grape Tel. (03) 9210 9320

Fax. (03) 9210 9321 M ob. 041 756 7597 Email: sm itham @ ozem ail.com .au

LEIGH SPARROW Sportsturf C u ltu ra l/H a rv e s tin g PO Box 46 Kings M eadow

Practices TAS 7249 Australia

Tel. (03) 6336 5379 Fax. (03) 6336 5230 Email: Leigh.Sparrow@dpif.tas.gov.ou

JOHN TYJLS Asparagus Q u a lity M a n a g e m e n t c/o Queensland H orticultural

M elon Institute

Pecan Ind ooroop illy Services Centre

Straw berry Entomology Building

O nion 80 Meiers Rood

O th er tropical fru it Ind ooroop illy OLD 4068 A ustralia

O th er berry fru it Tel. (07) 3217 8549

Fax. (07) 3217 8549 Mob. 0417 622 773 Email: tyasj@ ozem ail.com .au

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 165

APPENDIX G I n d u s t r y o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s c o n s u l t e d in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

ABARE Adams and Bailey Nursery Adland Horticultural P/L Advanced Envirosafe AgrEvo Pty Ltd Agrichem Manufacturing Industries Ltd Agricultural & Resource Management Services Agriculture Western Australia Agrisearch Services Pty Ltd AgroK Australia Pty Ltd Agrolive Pty Ltd Agronico Pty Ltd Aldengga Cardens Alfred E Chave Pty Ltd Allfresh Pty Ltd Alliums Australia Almond Growers Association Inc AlmondCo AMACS Pty Ltd AMPOL Rural Applied Horticultural Research Pty Ltd Ardmona Foods Limited Armstrong Bros Arthur Yates & Co Pty Ltd Asian Development Bank Australasian Biological Control Inc Australian Almond Growers Association Inc Australian Almond Improvement Committee Australian Apple & Pear Growers Association Inc. Australian Avocado Growers Federation Australian Banana Growers' Council Inc Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research Australian Citrus Growers Inc Australian Citrus Improvement Association Inc Australian Custard Apple Growers Association Australian Entomological Society Inc Australian Food Industry Science Centre Australian Fresh Stone Fruit Growers Association Inc Australian Golf Course Superintendents Association

Australian Hop Marketers Pty Ltd Australian Horticultural Corporation Australian Horticultural Exporters Association Inc.

Australian Irrigation Technology Centre Australian Macadamia Society Limited Australian Melon Association

16 6 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Industry o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s consulted in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8 APPENDIX G

Australian Mushroom Growers Association Ltd Australian Nashi Growers Association Australian Nut Industry Council Inc Australian Olive Association Inc Australian Onion Industry Association Inc Australian Onion Industry Association Inc Australian Orchid Foundation Australian Passionfruit Industry Association Australian Rome Fruit Improvement Program Ltd Australian Potato Industry Council Inc Australian Processing Tomato Industry Council Inc.

Australian Quarantine & Inspection Service Australian Rubus Growers Association Australian Rural Leadership Foundation Ltd Australian Society of Plant Physiologists Australian Soil & Plant Analysis Council Inc Australian Vegetable and Potato Growers Federation Inc.

Australian Walnut Industry Association Avro Park Orchard Balhill Water Gardens Pty Ltd Banana Industry Committee

Barmac Industries Pty Ltd Bayer Australia Ltd BG Brisbane Biocon, Division of Ricegrowers Co-operative Biocontrol Ltd Biological Crop Protection Pty Ltd Biological Services Bioprotection Pty Ltd

BioResources Pty Ltd BOC Gases Australia Ltd Boomaroo Nurseries Botanical Resources Australia Pty Ltd

Boulevard Nurseries Bowen Crop Monitoring Services Pty Ltd Brismark Brookes Horticultural Products

Buderim Ginger Ltd Bundaberg Fruit & Vegetable Growers Bureau of Resource Sciences CA Refrigeration Pty Ltd Caltex Australia Petroleum Pty Ltd Canning Fruit Industry Council of Australia Carnarvon Horticultural Development Council Castle Chemicals Pty Ltd

Central Coast Council

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 167

APPENDIX G I n d u s t r y o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s c o n s u l t e d in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

Central Coast Regional Development Corporation Central Queensland University Centre for Agribusiness Marketing (WA) Chalmers Nursery Charles Sturt University Cherry Growers of Australia Ltd Chestnut Growers of Australia Ltd Chisholm Manufacturing - a division of Woolworths Citrus Board of South Australia Citrus Growers of South Australia Citrus Market Development Group Clarence City Council Coilsfield Orchard Coles Supermarkets Colin Campbell Chemicals Pty Ltd Colour Vision Systems Ltd Continental Water Systems Co-ordinated Thermal Systems Pty Ltd Costa Orchards Cotton R&D Corporation Country Fresh Produce Cowra Community Development Trust Cowra Export Packers Cowra Vegetables to Asia Group Cox Inall Communications Crawford Fund for International Agricultural Research CRC For Food Innovation CRC for International Food Manufacture & Packaging CRC for Soil & Land Management CRC for Tropical Pest Management Crisping Group of South Australia Inc Crop Care Australasia Pty Ltd CSIRO Entomology CSIRO Food Science & Technology CSIRO Land and Water CSIRO Plant Industry Cunial Orchards Cyanamid Agriculture Pty Ltd

Cyber Ag Marketing Dairy R&D Corporation Davey & Maynard David Pullar & Associates Debco Pty Ltd Department of Natural Resources & Environment, Vic. Department of Primary Industries and Energy (C'th) Devon port City Council

168 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Industry o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s consulted in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8 APPENDIX G

I

Diamond Star Australia P/L DJ & P Morris Don Alroe & Sons Dorrigo District Potato Advancement & Landcare Association Dow-Elanco Australia Ltd Dried Fruits R&D Council Dynamic Lifter E E Muir and Sons Pty Ltd Elite Propagation Elm Pests and Diseases Task Force Eric Lacey Memorial Trust Fund Envirosell Evergreen Marketing International Pty Ltd Federal Agricultural Marketing Authority Ferticom Pty Ltd Field Fresh Tasmania Fisheries R&D Corporation Flemings Nurseries Floraco Pty Ltd Florigene Pty Ltd Flower Growers Association Australia Inc.

Flower Growers Association of NSW Flower Growers Council of WA Flower Industry Association of Tasmania Fluvial Pty Ltd FMC International AG FMRC Pty Limited Font/s Pool Farm Pty Ltd Foresrtry & Wood Products R&D Corporation Frank Small and Associates Franklin Bros Farm Produce Fresh Farm Produce (Queensland) Pty Ltd Fresh Produce Watch

Fry Orchard FuCell Pty Limited Gayndah District Fruitgrowers Association Glenavon Nurseries Glenorchy City Council Golden Circle Cannery Pty Ltd Good Fruit & Vegetables Grace WR Australia Ltd Grains R&D Corporation Grant Orchard Grape & Wine R&D Corporation

GreenGold Guyra Potato Growers

II

HRDC A n n ua l Report 1997-98 169

APPENDIX G I n d u s t r y o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s c o ns u l t e d in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

CV Crop Protection Hansen Nursery Harvest Fresh Cuts

Hastings Data Loggers Hawkesbury I PM Services Hawkesbury Technologies Ltd Hazelnut Growers of Australia Ltd Henchman Orchards Henderson Seed Group Pty Ltd Hilton Carter Hoechst Sobering AgrEvo Pty Ltd Hort Research (NZ) Horticultural Congress Trust Hunter & Hunter and Associates I K Caldwell Pty Ltd (WA) IHD Pty Ltd Impact Fertilisers Institute for Horticultural Development (Vic.) Integrated Pest Management Pty Ltd International Wool Secretariat I PM Technologies Pty Ltd Irrigation Association of Australia Ltd Irrigation Research & Extension Committee j Allen Pty Ltd Japan External Trade Organisation I Cilag JH Leavy & Co JM Paulik & Sons JODI Enterprises Pty Ltd Johima Books John Potter Pty Ltd

K & B Adams Pty Ltd Karingal Consultants Keith Lind Pty Ltd Keith Turnbull Research Institute Kemps Nursery Kentish and Sons Pty Ltd Kings Park and Botanic Garden Komar Pty Ltd KW Engineering Pty Ltd La Trobe University Land & Water R&D Corporation Lanmar Nursery Lanz Agricultural Consulting Launceston City Council Lefroy Valley

170 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 —98

Industry o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s consulted in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

Leppington Speedy Seedlings & Supplies Pty Ltd Lerdederg Park Orchard Living Shade Pty Ltd Μ & M Nardi & Sons M Wilksch Nursery Macarthur Consulting Pty Ltd Macquarie Research Limited Macquarie University Macro Agricultural Consultants Mareeba District Fruit & Vegetable Growers Association Mario's Packinghouse Market Supply Intelligence Matilda Fresh Foods Pty Ltd Meander Valley Council Meat & Livestock Corporation Melbourne Market Authority Meyers Strategy Group Pty Ltd MicroControl Engineering MN Whereat and Associates Rural Consultants Pty Ltd Monsanto MSD Agvet Australia Pty Ltd Mundubbera Fruit Growers Association Murray Valley Citrus Marketing Board Murray Valley Table Grape Growers Council Mushroom Biotech (Aust) Pty Limited Naimo & Sons National Marketplace News New South Wales Department of Agriculture New South Wales Women's Bowling Association Northern Midlands Council Northern Victoria Fruit Growers Association Ltd Northern Victorian Fresh Tomato Industry Development Committ Novartis Crop Proection Australasia Limited Novartis Seeds Pty Ltd

NSW Banana Industry Committee NSW Farmers Association NSW Golf Course Superintendents Association NSW Strawberry Growers Association

NT Horticultural Association Nugan Group Nursery and Landscape Industry Association SA Inc Nursery Industry Association of Australia Nursery Industry Association of NSW Nursery Industry Association of Victoria Nursery Industry Association of WA Inc Orchard Services

APPENDI X G

i

HRDC A nn ua l Report 1997-98 171

APPENDIX G I n d u s t r y o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s c o n s u l t e d in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

Ψ —

Organic 2000 Organic Crop Protectants Pty Ltd Orica Australia Pty Ltd Orlando Wyndham PacAlliance (Australia) Pty Ltd Pacific Fresh Pacific Seeds Pty Ltd Penrith Lakes Development Corporation Ltd Perfection Fresh Produce (Aust) Pty Ltd Peter Fairchild & Associates Piccone Horticultural Consultancy Pty Ltd Pig R&D Corporation Pilati & Staples Pty Ltd Pistachio Growers Association Inc Pivot Ltd Potato Growing Industry Trust Fund of Western Australia Powells Nursery Pyrethrum R&D Committee Queensland Banana Industry Protection Board Queensland Department of Natural Resources Queensland Department of Primary Industries Queensland Flower Growers Association Queensland Fruit & Vegetable Growers Queensland Horticulture Institute Queensland Nursery Industry Association Queensland University of Technology Queensland Vapourheat Pty Ltd Rabobank Group Rainbow Coast Horticultural Society Rendell McGuckian Agricultural & Management Consultants Resource Consulting Services Pty Ltd Retailworks Pty Ltd Rhone-Poulenc Rural Australia Pty Ltd Richard Strategic Services Ridley AgriProducts Riverina Citrus Marketing Board Riverland Horticultural Council Inc Riverland Nurseries Riverland Rootstocks Riverland Vine Improvement Committee RJ Cornish & Co Pty Ltd Roberts Ltd Robertson District Potato Advancement & Landcare Association Rohm & Haas Ross & Co Fruit and Vegetables Pty Ltd Rossi Orchards

172 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Industry o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s consulted in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8 APPENDIX G

Rotam Australasia Pty Ltd Royal New South Wales Bowling Association Rural Industries R&D Corporation S Smith & Sons (Yalumba) S&L Fruit and Vegetable Trading Co Pty Ltd S&W Carter and George Spencer Pty Ltd SA Farmers Federation SA Farmers Federation, Flower Growers SA Fresh Fruit Growers Association Inc SA Research & Development Institute SBS-IAMA Trading Pty Ltd Scholefiled Robinson Horticultural Services Pty Ltd Scotts Australia Pty Ltd Seed Industry Association of Australia Serve-Ag Pty Ltd Shamrock Marketing Silverwood Nursery Supplies So Crisp South Australian Horticultural Export Co.

South Australian Pome Fruit Improvement Committee Inc South Pacific Seeds Pty Ltd Southcorp Wines Southern Cross Produce Sydney Ltd SP Exports Pty Ltd SPC Ltd Specialist Agricultural Services Pty Ltd SportsTurf Council of Australia

Stahmann Farms Stanthorpe Shire Council Stephen Morris Horticultural Consulting Stratosphere Strawberries Australia Inc Strawberry Growers Association of WA Strawberry Wholesalers WA Sugar R&D Corporation Sugarbush Flowers

Sumich Group Ltd Summer Fruit Council Sun Centre Horticultural Development Association Inc Sunnycrest Orchard Sunraysia Citrus Growers Inc Sunraysia Nurseries Sunrise Agriculture Pty Ltd

Sunshine Coast Subtropical Fruits Association Inc Supermarket to Asia Ltd Sydney Market Authority

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1997-98 173

APPENDIX G

174

I n d u s t r y o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s

c o n s u l t e d i n 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

Sylvan Australia Pty Ltd TAS Department of Primary Industry & Fisheries Tasmanian Alkaloids Pty Ltd Tasmanian Apple & Pear Growers Association Inc Tasmanian Greenhouse Tomato & Vegetable Growers Association Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research Tasmanian Onion Industry Panel Tasmanian Stonefruit Association Inc The Baker Foundation The Scotts Company The University of Queensland Theo Yannakoudis Toolangi Certified Strawberry Runner Growers Co-operative Tree Crops Sub Committee/Yeppoon District Local Production Tri State Fruit Fly Committee Tumut River Orchard Management Limited Turfgrass Technology Pty Ltd

University of Adelaide University of Central Queensland University of Melbourne University of Newcastle University of NSW University of Sydney University of Tasmania University of Western Australia University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury University of Western Sydney, Macarthur Vegetable Growers Association of WA Inc Vertex Bianca Nominees Pty Ltd VFF Flower Growers Group Victorian Chamber of Fresh Produce Wholesalers Inc Victorian Cherry Association Victorian Crisping Potato Research Group Inc Victorian Golf Association

Victorian Grafting Nurseries Victorian Potato Crisping Research Group Viewtime Flowers Virginia Horticulture Centre Inc

Virginia Irrigation Association Vitor Pty Ltd WA Strawberry Growers Association WA Turf Growers Association Warren Cauliflower Planning Group Wayne Skinner Rural Supplies West Australian Wildflower Producers Association West Tamar Council

HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

Industry o r g a n i s a t i o n s a n d a g e n c i e s consulted in 1 9 9 7 / 9 8

Westgro Greenhouses Winnaleah Irrigators Group Wobelea Woolworths Ltd Wrightson Seeds Ltd Yates Vegetable Seed Co Pty Ltd Zeneca Plant Science

APPENDI X G

HRDC Ann ua l Report 1997-98 175

176 HRDC A n n u a l Report 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

I N D E X

Accommodation 82

Achievements 7, 53-60, 62-68

ACIAR 27,29, 66

Action Plan for Australian Agriculture 28

AHC 4, 17, 29, 31, 66

Almond Levy 14, 66, 72, 73, 108

ANAO 68, 86

Annual Report 80

Apple & Rear Levy 14, 73, 109

Application Process Review 19, 66

Application Status 11, 12

Audit Office Report 86

Australian Horticultural Industry R&D Committee 5, 17, 19, 65, 66

Avocado Levy 14, 66, 72, 74, 110

Benefit Cost Evaluation 79

Board Meetings 40

Board of Directors 37, 99, 100, 130

Board Performance 46

Business Plan 80

Canning Fruit Voluntary Levy 75

Chairman's and Executive Directors Report 4

Charter 3

Cherry Levy 14, 74, 111

Chestnut Levy 14, 72, 74, 112

Citrus Levy 14, 74, 113

Collaboration between Agencies 24, 25, 29

Collaboration between Industries 23

Collaboration with other R&D Corporations 27, 29

Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act, 1997 34

Communication 78

Communication Review 66, 78

Compliance Index 183

Consultation costs 21, 65

Contact Details 164

Contents i

Corporate Coal Areas 51

Corporate Governance 34

Corporate Management 68

178 HRDC A n n u a l Re p or t 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

I N D E X

Corporate Objectives

Corporate Performance

Corporate Strategies

Corporate Team

Cultural/Harvesting Practices

Custard Apple Levy

Directives - Ministerial

Disinfestation

Disinfestation Review

Enabling Legislation

Energy Efficiency

Environmentally Sustainable Development

Equal Employment Opportunity

Final Reports

Finance Committee

Financial Statements

Freedom of Information

Fruit Fly Review

Functions - HRDC

Fund Recipients

Funded Program

Funding Base

Garlic Industry Levy

Genetic Improvement

Glossary

Governing Legislation

Government Agencies

Government Priorities

Graham Gregory Awards

Harvesting Practices

Highlights - R&D Program

Horticultural Industry Alliance

Horticultural Reference Group

53-60, 62-64, 66, 68

46

53-60, 62-64, 66, 68

47

8, 12, 62

14, 66, 72, 74, 114

16, 21, 28, 75, 96

7, 12, 54

26

34

82

28

82

66, 80

42

85

81

26

35

11, 13, 16, 25

132

72

72

7, 12, 59

123

34

29

28

5

8, 12, 62

7

4, 17, 31

5, 19

Horticultural Research and Development Corporation Act, 1987 34

Industry Development Officer Review 5, 22, 66

Industry Leadership & Partnership 64

Industry R&D Program 11

Industry Relationship Committees 44

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 9 7 - 9 8 179

I N D E X

Information Management Review 80

Intellectual Property 24, 67, 77

Joint Sub-Committee with AHC 45

Joint Ventures 77

Legislative Framework 34

Letter of Transmittal ii

Levies - Legislation 128

Levies - Regulations 128

Levies - Statistics 11, 13, 14, 94

Levies - Statutory 16, 72

Levies - Voluntary 16, 75

Levy Principles 129

Macadam ia Levy 14, 115

Management Fee 75

Mango Industry Levy 73

Market Access 7, 12, 27, 54

Market Focus 53

Market Requirements & Economic Studies 7, 12, 53

Melon Industry Levy 73

Ministerial Powers & Directives 34

Mission 3

Mushroom Industry Voluntary Levy 75

Nashi Levy 14, 116

New & Value Added Products 7, 12, 58

New Business Development Strategy 76

Nursery Levy 14, 117

Objects - HRDC 3, 35, 51

Occupational Health & Safety 82

Onion Industry Levy 66, 73

Participation 11, 14, 166

Partners - Government 28

Partners - Industry 17

Partners - Research Providers 24, 25, 29

Partnership Agreements 21, 24, 65

Passionfruit Industry Levy 73

Peak Industry Leaders Meetings 17, 65

Performance Indicators 53-60, 62-64, 66, 68

180 H R D C A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

I N D E X

Pest & Disease Management 8, 12, 60

Planning Framework 50

Postharvest 8, 12, 56

Potato Levy 14, 118

Powers - HRDC 35

Presidents' Council Meetings 17

Processing Tomato Voluntary Levy 75

Professional Development 69, 82

Projects Funded 1997/98 132

Public Benefit 53-60, 62-63

Publications 158

Pyrethrum Industry Voluntary Levy 75

Quality Management 9, 12, 55

R&D Agreement 24

R&D Chairs' Meeting 19, 64

R&D Committee Review 18, 64, 66

R&D Management 66

Reporting Requirements 80

Research and Development Corporations 29

Research Provider Meetings 24, 64

Research Providers 11, 13, 16, 25

RIRDC 27,29, 66

Risk Management & Audit Committee 43

Role - HRDC 36

Selection Committee 45

Significant Events 77

Stonefruit Levy 14, 73, 74, 119

Strategic Coal Committees 43

Strategic Plan 4, 12, 28, 51, 76, 80

Strategic Plans - Industry 65

Strawberry Levy 14, 74, 120

Sub-Committees of the Board 41

Sustainable Production 60

Tablegrape Industry Levy 66, 73

Technology Adoption 9, 12, 57

Term of Appointment 37, 99

Total Waste Management 9, 12, 63

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 9 7- 9 8 181

I N D E X

Vegetable Levy

Vision

Voluntary Contributions

Year 2000 Compliance

14, 73, 74, 121

3

11, 13, 16, 75, 96

69, 81

182 H R D C A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 9 7 - 9 8

C o m p l i a n c e I n d e x

C O M P L I A N C E

I N D E X

Administrative Tribunals

Audit Committee

Auditor General's Certificate

Benefit Cost Evaluation

Board Meetings

Board Selection Committee

Business Plan

Chairman's and Executive Director's Report

Clients, customers, stakeholders

Collaboration

Commonwealth Ombudsman

Consultation Costs

Contents

Corporate Governance

Date Annual Report Transmitted to Minister

Directors

Discretionary Grant Recipient Information

Effectiveness of Operations

Efficiency of Operations

Enabling Legislation

Energy Efficiency

Environmentally Sustainable Development

Exercise of Powers

Financial Statements

Freedom of Information

Functions

Governing legislation

Government Priorities

Highlights

Index

Information Officer

Insurance

Intellectual Property

Interaction with other Agencies

Joint ventures

Levy industries

Listing of Senior Executives

Minister Responsible

43

86

79

40

45

80

4-6

16-32

4, 11, 16-32, 45, 50, 168-176

21, 65

34-48

37, 100, 130-131

11, 132-157

11-14, 23, 25-27, 29-30

11-14, 23, 25-27, 29-30

34

82

28

11, 75, 77

85-121

81

35

34

28

7-10

177

81

93

24, 67, 77

50

77

11,13, 14, 72-74, 94, 128

47, 164

34

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 9 7 - 9 8 184

C O M P L I A N C E

I N D E X

Ministerial Guidelines & Policies 21, 28, 65, 75, 96, 129

Ministerial Powers & Directives 34

Mission 3

Name of Authority 34

Objects 3, 35, 51

Operational Challenges 4, 82

Organisational Structure 47

Outcomes 51-69

Outputs 51-69

Parliamentary Committee Reports -

Performance Indicators 51-69

Powers 35

Principal Programs - Objectives 53-69

Principal Programs - Performance 7-10, 53-69

Professional Development 69, 82

Projects Funded 132-157

Public Benefits 53-60, 62-63

Publications 158-163

Role 36

Significant Events 77

Staff Numbers & Basis of Staffing 47, 164-165

Strategic Plan 4, 12, 28, 50-69, 76, 80

Sub-Committees of the Board 41-46

Subsidiaries 77

SWOT Analysis 4 - 6

Term of Employment 37, 99

Vision 3

Voluntary Contributions 11, 13, 16, 75, 96

Year 2000 Compliance 69, 81

H R D C A n n u a l R e p o r t 1 9 97 - 9 8 185

I

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