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Department of the Senate—Report for 2020-21


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2020-21 Annual Report

© Commonwealth of Australia 2021

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International Licence.

The details of this licence are available on the Creative Commons website: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

ISSN: 0812-1427

Digital version of this report: www.aph.gov.au/senate/dept/annreps/2021

Department of the Senate website: www.aph.gov.au/senate

Prepared and printed by the Department of the Senate

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The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are detailed on the Prime Minister and Cabinet website: www.pmc.gov.au/government/commonwealth-coat-arms

Contact officer

For further information about the content of this report, please contact the annual report coordinator:

Chief Finance Officer Department of the Senate Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600 Phone: 02 6277 3897 Email: fms.sen@aph.gov.au

Letter of transmittal

iv DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

About this report This annual report of the Department of the Senate documents the department’s performance for the financial year ending 30 June 2021.

The report is presented in six parts.

Overviews

Commentary by the Clerk on performance and significant matters that affected the department, and a description of the role, aims, structure and functions

Report on performance A summary of overall performance, the department’s annual performance statement, and a description of each office’s contribution to the department’s outcome

Management and accountability

A report on corporate governance and the management of resources

Financial statements The auditor’s report and audited financial statements

Appendices

1. Resources 2. Staffing 3. Contact details

References

Tools to assist the reader:

• a glossary and abbreviations list • an index showing how the report complies with annual reporting requirements • an alphabetical index

The report is presented for tabling in the Senate pursuant to section 65 of the Parliamentary Service Act 1999. It is also produced to meet the information needs of interested people, including:

• senators and their staff

• the Australian community

• staff of the Department of the Senate and other parliamentary departments

• staff of other legislatures

• staff of executive government departments and agencies, and

• the media.

The report is available on the department’s website: www.aph.gov.au/senate/dept/annreps/2021

v ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Contents Letter of transmittal iii

About this report iv

Overviews 1

Clerk’s review 3

Departmental overview 9

Report on performance 13

Annual performance statements 15

Clerk’s Office 29

Table Office 35

Senate Public Information Office 41

Procedure Office 45

Parliamentary Education Office 53

Committee Office 57

Black Rod’s Office 65

Management and accountability 71

Corporate governance 73

External scrutiny 78

Management of human resources 79

Management of financial resources 82

Report on financial performance 84

Financial statements 89

Appendices 119

Appendix 1 - Resources 121

Appendix 2 - Staffing 123

Appendix 3 - Contact details 125

References 127

Glossary and abbreviations list 129

List of requirements 131

Alphabetical index 135

X Clerk’s review 3

X Departmental overview 9

Overviews

2 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

3 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Clerk’s review We have asked a lot of our staff this year.

I routinely note that the department is nothing without its people: their knowledge, their skills, their dedication. But their efforts this year have been nothing short of extraordinary.

The year was dominated by the need for the Senate, like other institutions, to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic, and for the department to devise new ways of working. Procedural, practical and logistical changes were needed to enable the Senate and parliamentary committees to maintain their essential operations, and the changes have themselves been dynamic; shifting and evolving along with public health advice.

Some of these were described in last year’s review: physical and procedural changes on the floor of the Senate to accommodate social distancing requirements; videoconferences and hybrid hearings as the predominant means for committees to take evidence; rapid adjustment to staff working from home, requiring new approaches to connecting and collaborating on our work; a reconfiguration of our education programs to reach dispersed classes online.

Our operations this year required frequent communication between the Presiding Officers, parliamentary staff and health officials to develop and implement COVID-safe arrangements. The Black Rod’s Office assumed a new function of managing arrangements recommended in public health advice, although implementation was shared by staff across the department. At its simplest that advice came down to two things: reduce the risk that someone might bring the virus into the building and reduce the risk of transmission in case it did get in. Between travel restrictions, borders closures and quarantine and testing regimes, however, the settings for each sitting fortnight were different. These factors also constrained committee travel, so that the inquiry plans had to be made and remade as physical, then hybrid, then virtual hearings; shifting rapidly on occasion as ‘snap’ lockdowns affected every state and territory.

To give some examples, the degree of difficulty for our largest logistical exercise - the delayed Budget estimates round held in October 2020 - was amplified by the need to run four simultaneous videoconferences for senators and witnesses in parallel with each day’s ‘physical’ proceedings. Planning involved the development of detailed COVID-safe protocols for the senators, staff and witnesses attending in person, together with resources to manage hundreds of virtual witnesses each day. Despite these complications, the fortnight proceeded with barely a hitch.

As another example, the possibility of introducing a remote element to Senate proceedings was first mooted in the early days of the pandemic, and implemented in August 2020 and as needed since. There were few glitches, demonstrating perhaps how familiar senators and their staff were with the system, given its intensive use for committees. In the background, however, new arrangements were needed to support senators using the facility and to ensure they had access to the documents that underpin the Senate’s work, and to advice and support on procedural and legislative matters.

4 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Our capacity to support these and other changes has once again demonstrated the resilience and flexibility of the department and its people. This has particularly been the case while physical access to Parliament House was limited to essential staff, complicating the ordinary business of communicating and collaborating that sits at the heart of much of our work.

As I write this, public health orders continue to require staff to work at home where practical, but the promise of a gradual return to ‘the office’ is on the horizon. The most recent sittings were held under lockdown, with a fraction of our staff in the building, and with everyone leaning heavily on the lessons of the past year. Despite the challenges, our support for the Senate and its committees, and for senators involved in their proceedings, has been virtually seamless.

I remain incredibly grateful to our staff for achieving this outcome, and also acknowledge that their capacity to work in this manner is not endless. It will be a relief for many to return to business as usual, whatever that may look like in the near future, and to reconnect with their colleagues and teams.

Employment and workplace arrangements Like so many others, our staff found media reports of a sexual assault in Parliament House in 2019 particularly confronting. When the allegations were reported in February this year we made sure staff were aware of the support available to them, including confidential support and counselling through our employee assistance program.

Quite apart from the harrowing nature of the allegations, the reports raised concerns about the employment arrangements for staff in political offices, sparking two reviews into parliament as a workplace.

The employment arrangements and workplace policies that apply in the Senate department are very different. The legal framework is described in our  Workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination policy, which spells out the department’s commitment to providing a safe work environment, free of bullying, harassment and discrimination. We had revised that policy in October 2020; the result of extensive consultation with staff at all levels across the department, flowing from the development of the Health and Well-being Strategy discussed in this review two years ago. Without for a moment equating the behaviours dealt with in that policy with the allegations, the work by our Workplace Consultative Committee, Human Resources team and program managers to update that policy established a stronger shared understanding of how the department would support staff and supervisors to deal with situations when they arise.

The policy commits the department to dealing with allegations of improper behaviour, no matter the source, including where it involves parliamentarians or their staff. The policy also provides a framework to support staff and supervisors dealing with situations in which bullying, harassment or discrimination might arise, by setting behavioural and process expectations.

5 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

The first of the reviews sparked by the allegations, conducted by a Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, recommended interim arrangements for an independent complaints mechanism for serious incidents involving parliamentarians and their staff, as well as an education and awareness program. Those recommendations are currently being implemented.

The second review, being undertaken by Commissioner Kate Jenkins under the auspices of the Human Rights Commission, is due to report in November 2021.

That review is considering drivers in parliamentary workplaces that may increase the risk of workplace bullying, sexual harassment and sexual assault, and barriers to reporting and responding to such conduct. Again, it has a clear focus on parliamentarians and their staff, and on perceived inadequacies in the employment and workplace arrangements for staff employed by parliamentarians. While our employment and workplace arrangements are very different, no doubt the review’s findings will indicate ways we can further strengthen our policies and procedures for preventing and addressing workplace bullying and harassment.

The department has contributed to the review in a number of ways, including by encouraging our staff to make submissions or attend interviews, and facilitating their participation in surveys and focus groups. We responded to a series of requests for information, focusing on the demographics of our workforce, our - thankfully limited - experience with complaints of inappropriate conduct, and the training available to support staff to operate in our unique environment. With the other parliamentary departments we made a submission about the employment and workplace arrangements that apply across the Parliamentary Service, while I made a submission on behalf of the department highlighting our sustained engagement with staff about navigating the parliamentary environment.

In October and November of 2020 staff participated in the annual Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) census, the results of which were published in March this year. It was gratifying that the results were overwhelmingly positive and compared favourably to the APS overall, at the same time providing something of a counter to the narrative of a singular ‘toxic culture’ at Parliament House. Moreover, they paint the picture of an engaged and motivated workforce, with a strong connection to the department and our purpose. Specific strengths noted include:

• Overall job satisfaction received a positive response score of 91%—16% higher than the APS overall and an improvement of 4% compared to 2019;

• Recommending the department as a good place to work received 92% positive response—23% higher than the APS average and 2% higher than 2019.

• Workgroup skill, knowledge and the capability to perform well received a positive response score of 98%—17% higher than the APS overall and an improvement of 14% compared to 2019;

• Effective communication from your SES received a positive response score of 84%—16% higher than the APS overall and a 4% improvement on 2019.

6 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Overall the results were very positive, but we also recognised areas for improvement, including the need for further refinement and communication of our policies around inappropriate behaviour. In providing the results to staff I noted that this would remain an important focus for the department, particularly against the backdrop of the Jenkins review.

Annual performance The headline for our performance report this year records that the department successfully achieved its purpose of facilitating and supporting all meetings required under decisions of the Senate and its committees, including managing the continuing disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. In doing so, we provided comprehensive, timely and high-quality support to senators, the Senate and committees, as well as prompt and accurate procedural advice and legislative support.

There were slightly fewer sittings than expected - 48 sitting days - reflecting the decision to set aside the first fortnight scheduled for August 2020 on public health advice. However, indicators of procedural and legislative activity were generally consistent with or above those seen in recent years. For instance, the Parliament passed 157 bills, compared with 153 and 148 in the previous two years. Staff in the Table Office and Procedure Office produced more than 1,800 procedural scripts for senators to use in the chamber - around 38 per day, again comparable with recent years, while 740 legislative amendments were drafted by the Procedure Office and circulated in the Senate, somewhat more than the 608 reported last year.

By contrast, many indicators of committee activity were well up on the previous reporting period. In particular, secretariat staff processed around 10,500 submissions, 3,000 more than last year and nearly twice as many as in 2018-19. Committees heard from 7,500 witnesses in the course of an astonishing 395 hearings; a record, dwarfing the 225 and 290 hearings secretariats organised in the past two years. Partly this reflected the deferral of the 2020-21 Budget estimates round until October 2020, which fed into a record 95 estimates hearings held during the year. I note again the significant logistical challenges involved in arranging so many hearings, particularly in virtual and hybrid modes, and ensuring they run smoothly.

These and other indicators demonstrate that the elevated levels of committee activity seen in recent years continued, as did the practice of establishing and maintaining more select committees, with the department supporting 11 Senate select committees and two joint select committees during the year.

Despite the considerable workload, direct feedback from senators continued to indicate high levels of satisfaction, including via a survey of satisfaction with services to committees undertaken through the Chairs’ Committee, and another on senators services provided through the Black Rod’s Office. These are detailed in the annual performance statements, beginning on p. 15, and in the subsequent parts of the performance report, detailing the activities and achievements of each office.

7 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Looking ahead Our Corporate Plan charts our expectations for the year ahead. The final year of the 46th Parliament should see a lull in legislative and committee activity over the election period before ramping up again with the start of a new parliament. The department uses these periods to place particular focus upon staff learning and development and to update the manuals which capture the institutional practice and knowledge which guide our work. The opening of a new parliament places high demands on several areas of the department in relation to the induction of new senators and support to senators who are taking on new roles as well as the significant logistical undertaking associated with the opening of a new Parliament.

Our work to refocus our parliamentary education programs to include more web resources for teachers and virtual outreach to students was accelerated by the pandemic. While the number of onsite programs for visiting students has rebounded during this year - albeit sporadically due to changeable travel restrictions - we will continue to develop additional online resources and programs; accessible to all students and teachers.

As I noted last year, the effective response to the pandemic required close collaboration with our parliamentary colleagues, particularly the ICT and broadcasting teams in the Department of Parliamentary Services. We aim to capitalise on these closer working relationships to deliver improvements to the technological support provided to the Senate and committees. A shared challenge that has emerged in recent years involves incorporating burgeoning cyber security requirements into the planning and delivery of ICT projects, including projects to upgrade the applications that support the core work of the department. This has particularly affected some of our legacy systems, including those used to compile and publish committee reports. There has been welcome momentum in resolving these issues - despite the market-wide difficulty in recruiting and retaining the necessary staff - and we look forward to their resolution over the coming reporting period.

My thanks, as always, to colleagues across the Parliamentary Service. The Clerk of the House of Representatives, Claressa Surtees, has been instrumental in ensuring we share our respective pandemic experiences with our counterparts in state and territory parliaments. There have been numerous challenges for Rob Stefanic and his team, particularly in leading critical elements of the response to the pandemic by the parliamentary service. More broadly, I appreciate his commitment to embedding genuine collaboration between the parliamentary departments in undertaking our work. We also welcomed a new Parliamentary Budget Officer this year, in Stein Helgeby, who has engaged with us in good humour.

As I have often noted, the specialist advice and support the department provides relies most fundamentally on our capacity to recruit well and support the development and well-being of our staff. The structural changes we have implemented over the last five years aimed to refocus the department on its core functions of supporting the meetings of the Senate and parliamentary committees. Those efforts are producing a larger pool

8 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

of officers developing the specialist secretariat and advisory skills the department will require in the future. Looking beyond the next twelve months, this investment in the future capability of the department remains my key priority.

Circling back to where I started, I note the President’s remarks to the Finance and Public Administration estimates hearing in October 2020, noting that our work supporting the Senate and committees has required ‘flexibility; ingenuity; determination, in some cases; and cooperation across departments and agencies in an often rapidly evolving and unpredictable environment.’

What a privilege it is to lead such a flexible, ingenious and determined team.

Richard Pye Clerk of the Senate

9 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Departmental overview The Senate secretariat The Senate department provides secretariat support for the Senate and its committees, and advice and support to enable senators and others to participate in their meetings. Its work is substantially driven by the requirements of the Senate and senators.

The department provides services and undertakes activities in the following areas:

• advice about Senate and committee proceedings

• secretariat support for the Senate

• secretariat support for committees

• administrative advice and support for senators

• public information and parliamentary education

• capability, governance and accountability.

In undertaking its functions the department is responsible not to the government of the day but to the Senate and all senators, maintaining complete impartiality in serving equally senators from all political parties and independent senators.

Before turning to the department’s performance during 2020-21, this overview sets out the department’s organisational structure, program structure and objectives.

10 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Organisational structure The department is responsible to the Senate through the President of the Senate, Senator the Honourable Scott Ryan, who was elected to that position on 13 November 2017. The accountable authority for the department is the Clerk of the Senate, Mr Richard Pye, who was appointed to a 10 year term on 9 March 2017. Figure 1 shows the structure, roles and responsibilities of each office, and the department’s senior managers at the time of publication.

Figure 1 - Organisational structure

Jackie Morris DEPUTY CLERK OF THE SENATE

Richard Pye CLERK OF THE SENATE

PROCEDURE OFFICE Procedural support, legislative scrutiny and parliamentary information resources

EXECUTIVE

| CLERK’S OFFICE

Procedural advice and strategic direction

Rachel Callinan CLERK ASSISTANT (PROCEDURE)

TABLE OFFICE Procedural and secretariat support for the Senate

Tim Bryant CLERK ASSISTANT (TABLE)

COMMITTEE OFFICE Secretariat support for committees

SENATE PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE Information management, resource production and ICT liaison

PARLIAMENTARY EDUCATION OFFICE Parliamentary education resources and programs for teachers and students

Toni Matulick CLERK ASSISTANT (COMMITTEES)

BLACK ROD’S OFFICE Corporate support for the department and administrative advice for senators

John Begley USHER OF THE BLACK ROD / CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

11 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Outcome and program structure The department is one of four departments of the Australian Parliamentary Service established under the Parliamentary Services Act 1999. We work collaboratively with our colleagues in the parliamentary service to support the parliament. To achieve this, the department adheres to the guiding objectives of the Strategic Plan for Parliamentary Administration, namely:

• providing services and support to enable the Houses and their committees to function effectively

• ensuring parliamentarians are supported in their work today and we are responsive to the future

• enhancing engagement in the work of the Parliament

• ensuring Australian Parliament House operates as a safe and accessible workplace and national institution, and

• enhancing our capability as an independent, non-partisan and professional parliamentary service.

In order to coordinate common and joint activities with the other parliamentary departments, the department participates on a range of interdepartmental committees. Chief among these are: regular meetings of department heads; the Parliamentary Administration Advisory Group; the Security Management Board; the Parliamentary ICT Advisory Board (and its subordinate ICT committees); and numerous bodies managing joint projects and endeavours such as the implementation of the Parliament’s Reconciliation Action Plan.

Within the broader role of the parliamentary service, the department’s planned outcome is to provide advisory and administrative support services to enable the Senate and senators to fulfil their representative duties and exercise the legislative power of the Commonwealth. The department delivers its outcome through a single program, which is described in the next chapter.

Reporting on performance The next chapter contains the annual performance statements for 2020-21. It also contains a performance report for the seven offices of the department, each of which commences with a table reporting results against the criteria contained in the department’s portfolio budget statements and in office work plans.

A report on the department’s financial performance is included in the ‘ Management and accountability’ chapter.

X Annual performance statements 15

X Clerk’s Office 29

X Table Office 35

X Senate Public Information Office 41

X Procedure Office 45

X Parliamentary Education Office 53

X Committee Office 57

X Black Rod’s Office 65

Report on performance

14 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

15 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Annual performance statements As the accountable authority of the Department of the Senate, I present the department’s annual performance statements for 2020-21, as required by subsection 39(1) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. In my view, these statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the department’s performance and comply with subsection 39(2) of that Act.

(Richard Pye) Clerk of the Senate 29 September 2021

Performance reporting framework

Overview In 2020-21, the department successfully achieved its purpose of facilitating and supporting all meetings required under decisions of the Senate and its committees, including managing the continuing disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. In doing so, the department provided comprehensive, timely and high-quality support to senators, the Senate and committees, as well as prompt and accurate procedural advice and legislative support.

Throughout the year the department also:

• published a range of materials on the role and work of the Senate and the Parliament, and delivered effective education and information programs

• managed its staff in accordance with its enterprise agreement, provided learning and development opportunities, and managed the department’s response to the pandemic to maintain the department’s capabilities, and

• delivered its services in a cost-effective manner and in accordance with accountability requirements.

The department continued to provide advice and assist the Senate with practical and procedural adjustments required by the pandemic.

The department worked closely with the other parliamentary departments to deliver its services, to improve support for the Parliament and the work of its members and to enhance the strategic direction of the parliamentary service. Other collaborative work during this reporting period included a number of joint ICT projects such as implementation of a digital division recording system and transitioning finance and human resource management systems to cloud-based products.

16 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

The department’s financial result for the year was a surplus of $1.798m (excluding asset related adjustments). This result reflects some lag in recruiting additional staff as a result of the delayed timing of the 2020 budget and the continuing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, including a reduction in large expenditure items such as staff travel to support committees. Nevertheless, without the supplementary funding received in the October 2020 budget, the department would have been significantly overspent against current resourcing levels. A return to typical levels of travel and the trend of increasing demand on the Committee Office will necessitate additional resources to sustain the department’s services and activities. In this regard, the department welcomes the funding supplementation it received in the 2020 and 2021 budgets.

An analysis of the department’s financial performance and the financial statements commence at page 89.

These annual performance statements record the department’s results against the planned performance table in figure 2 (below), which is derived from its Corporate Plan 2020-21 and Portfolio Budget Statements 2020-21. They are based on records of services provided by the department, feedback recorded by departmental staff and comments made by relevant groups and committees.

In summary, this data shows both a high level of demand for the department’s services and advice, and very high levels of satisfaction with what is provided. The Senate’s requirements at the mid-point of the 46th Parliament continued to be driven by the large crossbench and sustained high levels of committee and legislative activity. Factors influencing demand are analysed further below.

Before addressing the department’s performance in detail, this year’s report once again includes a case study, this time examining the progress of a single bill (see figure 3 below). The case study is intended to illustrate the kinds of support the department provides to the Senate, its committees and senators.

17 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Advice and support - Secretariat support for the Senate and its committees, and advice and support to enable senators and others to participate in their meetings.

The department’s outcome is delivered under a single program, comprising services and activities in the following areas:

• Advice about Senate and committee proceedings

• Secretariat support for the Senate

• Secretariat support for committees

• Administrative advice and support for senators

• Public information and parliamentary education, and

• Capability, governance and accountability.

Senators (and others) have the advice and support they require to participate in meetings of the Senate and its committees.

The department’s activities enable the Senate and its committees to meet in accordance with their decisions.

Senators are satisfied with the administrative advice and support they receive from the department.

Public information about the work and role of the Senate and its committees and parliamentary education programs are current and accessible to all.

PROGRAM 1

DELIVERY ASSESSMENT

Figure 2 - Planned performance The department is responsible, not to the government of the day, but to the Senate and all senators. In planning terms, the department’s purpose is expressed as a single outcome - provide advisory and administrative support services to enable the Senate and senators to fulfil their representative duties and exercise the legislative power of the Commonwealth.

These services are delivered through a single program.

18 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Figure 3 - Case study infographic

CASE STUDY

Higher Education Support Amendment (Job-Ready Graduates and Supporting Regional and Remote Students) Bill 2020

Considered whether to refer the bill to a committee 2 proposed changes to the Selection of Bills Committee report drafted

280 submissions 45 form letters 583 emails 2 public hearings 1 report drafted 3 dissenting reports edited

1 SEPTEMBER

PASSED BY THE HOUSE

8 OCTOBER

PASSED BY THE SENATE

2 SEPTEMBER

INTRODUCED TO THE SENATE

2 SEPTEMBER

SELECTION OF BILLS COMMITTEE

3 SEPTEMBER

REFERRED TO SENATE COMMITTEE

3-25 SEPTEMBER COMMITTEE INQUIRY

Motion drafted to have the bill withdrawn Drafting and circulation of proposed non-government amendments Programming support

Circulated government amendments and requests Running sheet prepared Motion drafted to change the routine of business and limit the time for consideration of the bill Script drafted to assist the chair to conclude consideration of the bill

Government amendments and request agreed to Message drafted requesting the House amend the bill

Message received from the House 2 procedural scripts produced

Drafted 317 sheets of amendments during the year of which 245 sheets were circulated

The Senate passed 156 bills during the year, 29 with amendments

The bill was one of 77 bills referred to committees during the year

8 OCTOBER

HOUSE AGREES TO AMENDMENT REQUEST

25 SEPTEMBER

COMMITTEE REPORT TABLED

1-3 OCTOBER

SITTINGS PREPARATION

6 TO 8 OCTOBER

DEBATED IN THE SENATE

19 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Case study narrative - Senate consideration of a bill These case studies are intended to illustrate the kinds of support the department provides to the Senate, its committees and senators. The case study included in last year’s annual performance statements looked at a cross-section of the support provided during a single sitting week. This case study has examined the support provided, over a number of months, in relation to a specific bill: the Higher Education Support Amendment (Job-Ready Graduates and Supporting Regional and Remote Students) Bill 2020 (the bill). This bill was chosen as a case study for these performance statements in September 2020 because it relates to an area of contested policy (many bills are not controversial and therefore would not illustrate the full range of support provided by the department).

The bill was agreed by the House of Representatives on 1 September and introduced in the Senate on 2 September.

The Table Office provides secretariat support to the Selection of Bills Committee which considers proposals to refer bills to a Senate committee for inquiry. The Selection of Bills Committee met on the evening of 2 September but was unable to reach agreement about whether the bill should be referred. In such cases, the Senate resolves the issue when it considers whether to accept the recommendations of the report of the Selection of Bills Committee. The Procedure Office provides assistance to non-government senators who wish to propose changes to the committee references recommended by Selection of Bills, for example by proposing that a bill should be referred for inquiry or by suggesting a longer reporting date for an inquiry. The office prepared two proposed changes to this report in relation to the bill. The Clerk’s Office and the Procedure Office also prepared other procedural material during that week to support senators who either opposed the bill or wished to see it referred to a committee for inquiry. Often when senators are still crystallising their views on a bill, they will seek advice on procedural options though many of these may not be pursued.

Ultimately, the Senate referred the bill to the Education and Employment Legislation Committee on 3 September 2020 for inquiry and report by 25 September 2020. The committee secretariat identified organisations and individuals likely to have a view on the bill, advised them of the inquiry and invited them to make a submission. Secretariats have extensive contact lists based upon organisations and individuals who have provided evidence to previous committee inquiries relating to the same area of policy. However, they also conduct additional research to identify other potential submitters, particularly if an inquiry relates to a new or unusual topic. Secretariats operate as the primary point of contact to provide information about the inquiry, the process by which individuals and organisations are able to make submissions, and more general information about the Senate and its committees.

During the short inquiry the secretariat processed 280 submissions as well as 45 form letters and 583 emails arising from a campaign by the National Tertiary Education Union. This involved:

• administrative tasks related to preparing submissions received by the committee for publication on the web;

20 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

• research support to distil the key issues identified in the submissions and potential witnesses; and

• procedural advice to the committee about its options for receiving and publishing material submitted to the committee.

The secretariat supported the committee to hold public hearings on 15 and 17 September. As COVID-19 restrictions prevented committees travelling, these hearings were hosted from Canberra with both witnesses and senators (including the chair of the committee) appearing via videoconference. Staff in the Department of Parliamentary Services support committee hearings by managing videoconferences, broadcasting the hearings and preparing hearing transcripts. Practical arrangements for hearings are also supported by staff in the Usher of the Black Rod’s office who manage the booking and set-up of hearing rooms.

The secretariat drafted a report for the committee (initially on the instructions of the chair) and edited three dissenting reports. Secretariats do sometimes also assist with the drafting of dissenting reports but only where resources permit. The bill was one of the 77 bills referred to committees during the year.

The bill was debated across three sitting days from 6 to 8 October. The Table Office provides procedural and administrative support to the government in relation to the programming of its legislation. This includes, for example, advising the government about when bills can be brought on for debate under the Senate standing orders. In this case, the bill could not have been debated before the date the Senate required the Legislation Committee to report on the bill.

The Procedure Office assisted a crossbench senator to prepare an (ultimately unsuccessful) motion seeking to have the bill withdrawn. The office also assisted with the drafting and circulation of proposed amendments to the bill. In addition to the technical complexities of drafting changes to legislation, this is often an iterative process of seeking to match the proposed amendments to the policy position of the senators seeking the amendments. As an indication of this, the office drafted 317 sheets of amendments during the year of which 245 sheets were circulated (a sheet of amendments may have a single proposed change to a bill or many amendments proposing various changes).

On 8 October, Table Office staff circulated government amendments and requests for amendments to the bill, and prepared a running sheet. A running sheet is a suggested order for the consideration of amendments by the Senate. It identifies amendments which are identical, or of similar effect, or which could not coherently sit together (for example a proposal to delete a provision and a proposal to amend it). It also guides the chair and other senators in relation to how particular questions should be framed in order to meet the requirements of the Constitution and the standing orders.

The government successfully proposed a motion on 8 October to change the routine of business (the Senate’s schedule for the sitting day) and limit the time for further consideration of the bill (colloquially known as “the guillotine”). Table Office staff provide advice to government ministers about procedural options in these circumstances and also assist with the drafting of the motion. Often several drafts of such a motion are required to reflect the evolution of negotiations between the government and other parties.

21 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Once the motion was agreed Table Office staff prepared a script to assist the chair of the Senate to put the questions required to conclude the proceedings on the bill. These scripts have to be tailored, sometimes at very short notice, to the stage the bill has reached and the particular amendments proposed.

In this case, one of the government amendments agreed by the Senate was framed as a request. Under the Constitution, the Senate is constrained from directly making amendments which have particular financial consequences. However, the Senate can request that the House make such changes to the bill. Departmental staff drafted a message seeking this amendment which the Usher of the Black Rod’s office had signed by the President and physically took to the House.

When the House returned a message, indicating it had made the amendment to the bill, Senate staff quickly produced scripts for the chair and the minister for the final steps required to conclude consideration of the bill.

The Senate passed 156 government bills during the year, 29 with amendments. This was consistent with the numbers of government bills passed and amended over the past three financial years.

The next part of the annual performance statements analyses the department’s performance in each of its key areas of service delivery and activity.

Results Advice about the operations of the Senate and its committees

ASSESSMENT Senators (and others) have the advice and support they require to participate in meetings of the Senate and its committees

One of the key outputs of the department is advice about the operations of the Senate and its committees. Much of this advice is given verbally and instantaneously by the Clerk and other senior officers in the Senate, and by committee secretaries and their staff during committee meetings. These officers also provide procedural advice to senators and their staff at other times, both verbally and in writing. Committee secretaries are supported in providing advice by the Clerk Assistant (Committees) and Senior Clerk of Committees, ensuring advice to committees is consistent and accurate.

Senators and other recipients of written advice continued to acknowledge its value, and advice was provided within agreed timeframes to meet the purposes for which it was sought. On occasion during the year, recipients of advice published it as a contribution to public debate, at the same time subjecting it to public scrutiny. When committees seek the Clerk’s advice it is almost always for the purpose of publishing it, to show the basis on which committees may have taken particular decisions or reached particular conclusions. No committee expressed dissatisfaction with advice received.

Advice about the programming of business in the Senate is the responsibility of the Clerk Assistant (Table), as is the provision of advice and support to government Senate office holders. Procedural advice and support for non-government senators is a particular

22 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

responsibility of the Deputy Clerk and the Clerk Assistant (Procedure). Senators continued to acknowledge the value of their advice. The Procedure Office drafted large numbers of procedural scripts, legislative amendments and private senators’ bills, helping senators participate in legislative proceedings. Amendments and bills accurately reflected the drafting instructions and were prepared within required timeframes and to the satisfaction of senators.

Advice provided by the department was also tested during estimates hearings and in other Senate proceedings and senators relied on such advice throughout the year. In addition to comments made by senators recorded in Hansard, feedback from senators provided directly to the Table Office and the Procedure Office indicated high levels of satisfaction with both advice and the levels of administrative support provided.

Procedural briefings among senior officers and the publication and dissemination of procedural resources assisted in maintaining the department’s institutional knowledge and the capacity of officers to provide advice and support.

Secretariat support for the Senate and its committees

ASSESSMENT The department’s activities enable the Senate and its committees to meet in accordance with their decisions

This outcome has been met during 2020-21 through two program components.

1. Secretariat support for the Senate

The department provided secretariat support for the Senate on each of its 48 sitting days.1

During the sittings the Clerk, the Deputy Clerk and senior officers provided advice in the Senate to the President, Deputy President and other occupants of the chair, as well as to other senators and their staff. The Table Office and the Procedure Office provided procedural scripts and advice to assist senators participating in proceedings. Feedback from senators and their staff acknowledged the value and accuracy of this advice and support.

The Black Rod’s Office provided formal and ceremonial support for sittings, including the swearing in of two new senators who filled casual vacancies during the year.

The Table Office and Senate Public Information Office (SPIO) published the Senate’s formal records and informal guides to its work. These resources were accurate and timely, and produced to meet the needs of senators and Senate deadlines. Documents supporting the Senate’s legislative work were also uniformly accurate and timely.

Documents received for tabling were processed, recorded in procedural documents and archived. Increasingly, documents and business information are published online, enhancing the ability of senators and others to follow and participate in Senate proceedings, and further improvements to digital publishing processes and online measures were implemented during the reporting period.

1 Including 8 October where the Senate suspended and resumed the following day.

23 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

2. Secretariat support for committees

The department provided secretariat support for all committee meetings required under decisions of the Senate and of committees themselves, including those joint committees to which the department provides support. This support was primarily provided by the Committee Office, although other offices also supported a number of standing committees.

Secretariat support for committees encompasses:

• procedural advice for the chair and other members, including advice and support to new senators

• logistical support for meetings (including interstate hearings) and site visits

• preparation of meeting documents, including minutes and agenda

• managing and publishing submissions, and organising witnesses

• research, analysis of evidence and briefings to members, and

• preparation of draft reports, and their finalisation for tabling.

The Committee Office experienced another sustained period of high workload. The office supported 16 legislation and references committees, 11 Senate select committees, two joint select committees and five other joint committees, undertaking between them, at one point, 69 separate inquiries. Secretariat staff in the Committee Office processed more than 10,800 submissions, arranged 395 public hearings (which heard from over 7,500 witnesses) and 563 private meetings. The Senate made 94 references during the year and the office assisted in drafting 175 reports.

Advice, documentation and draft reports were consistently provided to committees in accordance with their requirements. Reports were drafted and presented to the Senate in accordance with the timeframes set by committees and by the Senate.

Secretariat staff work closely with senators to support committees and, in particular, work closely with the chair to prepare draft reports. This provides an ongoing opportunity for direct feedback about senators’ satisfaction. Despite the considerable workload, this direct feedback continued to indicate high levels of satisfaction.

Senators referring to committee reports during debates in the Senate also indicated their high levels of satisfaction with the support provided by secretariat staff.

A survey of satisfaction of Chairs was undertaken through the Chairs’ Committee, providing another avenue of direct feedback about services provided to senators and committees. This feedback indicated very high levels of satisfaction with the services provided and offered suggestions on additional services that could be offered to better support Chairs and committees in the future.

24 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Administrative advice and support for senators

ASSESSMENT Senators are satisfied with the administrative advice and support they receive from the department

The department, principally through the Black Rod’s Office, provides support services to the Senate, to Senate committees and to senators at Parliament House. These services include preparing and supporting the Senate chamber for each sitting day, general office support, asset management, maintenance of equipment and furniture, and stationery services. The office also paid senators’ salaries and allowances as required, organised office accommodation within the Senate wing and provided other services such as arranging transport and delivery services.

The Usher of the Black Rod provided security advice and support to the President, committees, senators and the department. The Usher of the Black Rod and Deputy Usher of the Black Rod also worked with colleagues in the Department of Parliamentary Services (DPS) Security Branch and the Serjeant-at-Arms’ Office, and with the Australian Federal Police, providing the Senate’s perspective on security matters.

A significant focus of the office during 2020-21 was the COVID-19 pandemic. This required measures to be put in place to reduce the risk of transmission while enabling the essential work of the Senate to proceed. The configuration of the Senate chamber was adjusted according to changing health advice to allow for appropriate social distancing and the delivery of services to senators in the chamber was adapted to reduce the risk of transmission. The office also made arrangements for the entry of senators into the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) for parliamentary sittings in consultation with Commonwealth and ACT health officials. The department’s response to the pandemic required significant coordination between the parliamentary departments and health officials.

Services were delivered within established timeframes and met relevant legislative requirements. This aspect of the department’s work involves regular and direct contact with Senate office holders, senators and their staff, and other stakeholders, all of whom provided regular informal feedback which was very positive. Positive comments were also recorded in Hansard about the quality of the support for senators provided by the office and the department. The office conducted a survey of senators during the week of 21 June 2021, 27 responses were received and on average (across all questions) 77 percent rated the services provided as ‘excellent’ and the remaining as ‘good’ or not applicable. No respondents rated any of the services as ‘poor’. Formal surveys regarding other services provided by the department are scheduled for future financial years.

25 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Public information and parliamentary education

ASSESSMENT Public information about the work and role of the Senate and its committees and parliamentary education programs are current and accessible to all

The department continued its public information programs this reporting period including delivering 13 seminars, 14 training programs for senators and their staff, and three public lectures, as well as publishing material on the role of the Senate and its committees. The formal and informal feedback regarding these services indicated that the programs effectively met their objectives. These programs were reduced in the first two quarters of 2020-21 due to restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through the Parliamentary Education Office (PEO), the department also delivered a comprehensive education program to students able to visit Parliament House. Approximately 450 Australian schools visited, and outreach programs were also delivered to students in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. Feedback collected from these sessions indicated high levels of satisfaction with these services. The number of users of the PEO website remains steady and feedback indicates high levels of satisfaction with educational information and resources provided online. In response to the restrictions imposed due to the pandemic, PEO continued its scaled up delivery of programs via videoconference, delivering sessions to over 8,400 students in this reporting period. This figure represents a 280 per cent increase on 2019-20 participation rates for programs delivered by videoconference.

The Senate Public Information Office (SPIO) develops and publishes a range of public information resources to support the operation of the Senate, including on sitting days the Dynamic Red and Senate Daily Summary and, during estimates hearings, Estimates Live, and manages the department’s web presence including accounts on YouTube (AuSenate) and Twitter(@AuSenate). The office also collates statistics on Senate activity and in this reporting period completed enhancements to the Senate’s online statistical collection, StatsNet. These resources were provided on all sitting days, and accurate, reader-friendly public information resources were delivered within established timeframes.

Capability, governance and accountability

ASSESSMENT All identified accountability obligations to the Senate are met

Senate committees provide opportunities for senators and others to monitor the department’s performance. The department met its accountability obligations to the Senate during the year, particularly through its appearance before estimates hearings. The Clerk and other officers appeared at estimates hearings of the Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee during each round of Senate estimates and also provided responses to 91 estimates questions on notice, which were published on that committee’s web page. These activities provide an important accountability mechanism by which senators may test advice provided by departmental officers and evaluate the

26 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

department’s performance in a public forum. The Appropriations, Staffing and Security Committee also has a specific role in relation to the department’s appropriations as well as matters concerning the department’s structure, staffing and ICT and security arrangements. Reports on the department’s financial performance were provided to the President of the Senate and the Appropriations, Staffing and Security Committee, as was the annual report of the department’s Audit Committee. Regular reports on other departmental matters are also provided to the President.

The department again participated in the Australian Public Service Commission APS Employee Census. The department scored highly in all categories and compared favourably to the APS across the survey with improvement in most metrics over the department’s 2019 survey results.

Analysis The department reports against the performance indicators contained in its portfolio budget statements, tabled in the Senate in October 2020, and those in its Corporate Plan for 2020-21. Those indicators have two dimensions, comprising an assessment of the demand for the department’s services and an evaluation of the department’s performance in delivering those services.

Factors influencing demand A constant in the department’s planning and reporting has been the recognition that much of the demand for its services shifts in line with levels of Senate legislative and committee activity. Demand is overwhelmingly driven by the requirements of senators, and the decisions and activities of the Senate and its committees. Each year, significant factors include:

• the political dynamics of the Senate

• the number of days and hours, and distribution, of its sittings

• the legislative workload of the Senate

• the number of committees on which senators serve, and

• the number and complexity of committee inquiries.

Each of these is in turn affected by the electoral cycle. 2020-21 was the second year of the 46th Parliament and the Senate’s large and diverse crossbench continued to affect the level of demand for advice, and the character of advice and support required.

Significant factors during this reporting period included the continuing need to comply with the health and safety constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to scheduled sitting days and committee hearings.

The Senate sat on 48 days after a sitting fortnight was set aside by agreement between the government and opposition, on public health advice. High levels of committee activity continued, with 11 Senate select and two joint select committees supported during the year. This additional activity was funded from one-off supplementation to the department’s appropriation included in the October 2020 budget.

27 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Performance in delivering services Evaluation of the department’s performance is based upon the degree to which its services meet the requirements of the Senate and its committees, and senators, principally measured against criteria centred on:

accuracy—frequently assessed by considering whether advice or documents were demonstrated to be inaccurate

timeliness—particularly whether advice, documents or services were provided in time to meet the purpose for which they were sought

satisfaction of senators (including committees of senators) with the advice, documents or other services provided—the assessment of which is considered further below.

The particular criteria which apply are described in the department’s portfolio budget statements and in the performance summary tables for each office contained in this chapter.

Monitoring and assessing satisfaction Much of the department’s work involves contact with senators and their staff, presenting the most direct means of eliciting (often informal) feedback about services and performance, and an avenue for addressing concerns as they are raised. During 2020-21, direct feedback was very positive across all service areas, particularly in relation to core advisory, drafting and secretariat support roles. Senators’ comments about the department and its staff, placed on the public record during Senate and committee proceedings, constitute another valuable source of performance information. These comments continued to be resoundingly positive during 2020-21. The department also monitors its performance through formal and informal channels, including letters, emails, phone calls, seminar evaluation forms and outputs from management information systems. Again, these sources were positive. The direct accountability of the department to the Senate through its committees was noted above at page 22.

The department’s program managers have adopted a formal process for recording and providing feedback to the Clerk to provide assurance for his certification of the annual performance statements. These measures have been provided to the department’s Audit Committee, which has provided advice that the measures and these annual performance statements are appropriate.

The subsequent parts of this chapter report on the activities and performance of the department against the criteria contained in the departmental work plans.

28 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

29 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Clerk’s Office Outputs

Advice on, and support for, proceedings of the Senate and its committees.

Leadership and strategic direction for the department.

Secretariat and advisory support to the Procedure and Privileges Committees.

Procedural information and related resources for senators and the department.

Performance information Performance results

Advice and support are sound and timely, and provided to the satisfaction of the President, other officeholders, Senate committees and senators so that they are able to fulfil their roles.

Senators and other recipients of advice on powers, privileges and proceedings continued to acknowledge its accuracy and value.

Advice and support was invariably provided in time to meet procedural and operational requirements.

The capacity of the department and its employees to provide advice and support meets operational requirements.

Activities under the learning and development framework underpinned the department’s advisory and support capacities.

Governance structures advance the department’s accountability and the achievement of its outcome.

Governance forums achieved all significant targets for the year, including managing budgeting and staffing targets.

Contributions to interdepartmental forums advanced the strategic aims of parliamentary administration.

Advice, documentation, publications and draft reports are accurate, of a high standard and produced to meet the required timeframes.

All advice, documents and draft reports produced in support of committees supported by the office were of a high standard and met required timeframes; none were shown to be inaccurate.

Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice is updated to reflect significant changes in the Senate.

The Procedural Information Bulletin is produced after each sitting period and other procedural resources are updated and augmented as required.

The Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice, Second supplement to the 14th edition - Updates to 31 July 2020, was published (tabled 24 August 2020).

The Procedural Information Bulletin was produced promptly after sitting periods and estimates hearings.

Procedural and administrative information for senators was published to intranet site, Senate Connect.

30 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Overview The Clerk of the Senate, Richard Pye, manages the department in accordance with the Parliamentary Service Act. The Clerk is also the principal adviser to the President of the Senate and senators on proceedings in the Senate, parliamentary privilege, and committee proceedings and their outcomes in the Senate. The Deputy Clerk of the Senate supports the Clerk in these roles and, with the Clerk Assistant (Procedure), provides procedural and legislative advice and support to non-executive senators. The Deputy Clerk also has particular corporate governance roles, including as the department’s senior representative on the Audit Committee and as chair of the Program Managers’ Group. The cost of the office for 2020-21 was $0.9m ($1.0m in 2019-20).

Advice and information The provision of advice, particularly to the President, senators and parliamentary committees, is a core function of the department and a priority for the Clerk’s Office. Much advice is provided orally and instantaneously, particularly in the Senate chamber, in private meetings of committees, and to senators who seek advice in person. Such advice is impossible to quantify in any meaningful way, but the number and kinds of written advices provide some indication of work undertaken.

Written advice The number of requests for written advice was very similar to the previous financial year. There were more requests related to committee matters than in the previous year including requests related to the powers of committees, the rules governing questions at estimates hearings and claims of public interest immunity by the executive. Advice was also provided on various aspects of Senate procedure, most significantly, on options for adapting the procedures of the Senate to allow for remote participation in its proceedings. Figure 4 shows the number of written advices provided by topic, while figure 5 shows demand over recent years. The Clerk’s Office maintained the approach of providing succinct, less formal advice that was closely targeted at the needs of the senator requesting the advice.

Figure 4 - Types of written advice provided by the Clerk, 2020-21

PROCEDURE

PRIVILEGE

CONSTITUTIONAL MATTERS

COMMITTEE MATTERS

LEGISLATION

17

52

31

0

1

Topic

31 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 5 - Number of advices provided by the Clerk’s Office, 2017-18 to 2020-21

Performance indicators for provision of advice focus on timeliness and accuracy. Senators and other recipients of advice continued to acknowledge its accuracy and its value. All advice was provided in time to meet the purposes for which it was sought. Most advice is provided on a confidential basis and it is for the recipient to decide whether to release it, and if so, on what basis. On several occasions during the year, recipients of advice published it as a contribution to public debate, at the same time subjecting it to public scrutiny. As this advice can inform the actions of senators, the Senate and its committees, as well as public debate, all advice is prepared to the highest standards and on the soundest possible basis.

Procedural information The Clerk produced issues of the Procedural Information Bulletin after each sitting period and the three rounds of estimates hearings, covering all the major procedural developments and matters of procedural interest which arose. Updates on procedural and administrative matters affecting senators were also published to an intranet site for senators and their staff, Senate Connect.

The second supplement to the 14th edition of Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice was published in August 2020. Most notably, this updated supplement recorded the procedural changes adopted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Clerk and Deputy Clerk prepared and presented sessions in the department’s learning and development program, and in other forums for parliamentary staff. They also provided seven introductory briefing sessions to senators whose terms commenced during the year and nine training sessions to senators who took on the role of Chair of the Senate.

2020-21 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

99

88

116

101

32 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Committees The office provided secretariat support to two Senate standing committees. Advice and support was acknowledged as meeting the needs and timeframes of the committees and their members.

Procedure Committee The Clerk served as secretary to the Procedure Committee, which responds to references from the Senate or the President by evaluating, and recommending improvements to, Senate procedure.

During the year the committee met eight times and presented four reports. Three of these reports (tabled in August 2020, October 2020 and May 2021) addressed practical and procedural matters connected to ensuring scheduled sittings of the Senate and estimates hearings proceeded safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. The three reports introduced and refined the rules allowing senators to participate in Senate proceedings by video link. The Senate adopted the rules proposed by the committee at the beginning of several sitting periods between August 2020 and May 2021.

The other report (tabled in June 2021) recommended extending the operation of temporary orders limiting opportunities for senators to propose formal motions while alternatives were developed. However, on 24 June the Senate adopted new temporary orders further limiting formal business and introducing additional opportunities for senators to put their views on the record through short statements.

Committee of Privileges The Deputy Clerk served as secretary to the Committee of Privileges, which met nine times in 2020-21 (17 in 2019-20) and presented one report. The committee protects the integrity of Senate and committee proceedings by inquiring into matters which may amount to contempt of the Senate. Those matters, which arise from concerns raised by other committees or individual senators, are referred to the committee by the Senate.

One matter was referred to the committee relating to allegations of improper interference with the Economics References Committee inquiry into Australia’s naval shipbuilding capability. The Committee of Privileges inquiry into these allegations was ongoing at the end of the reporting period.

The committee also administers the right-of-reply mechanism for people seeking to respond to adverse comment made about them in the Senate. One request was received and reported on during the year in the 180th report. The Senate adopted the recommendation of the report that the reply be incorporated in Hansard.

33 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Strategic direction and governance A key responsibility of the office and the department’s senior executive is to set the strategic direction of the department. During the year, this included a necessary focus on the immediate issues related to the pandemic, supporting staff in the aftermath of allegations of a sexual assault in Parliament House and the department’s engagement with the Foster and Jenkins reviews regarding parliamentary workplaces. However, the department’s senior managers also ensured that longer term priorities related to workforce capability and the adoption of enhanced ICT capabilities were pursued.

In close consultation with departmental staff, the department updated its policy to prevent and address workplace bullying, harassment and discrimination, and delivered training to support awareness and implementation of that policy. In light of experience during the pandemic, the department also updated its working from home policy to provide more flexibility for staff to work from home both on an ad hoc or occasional basis, or to seek approval of an ongoing arrangement.

The Deputy Clerk was the department’s senior representative on its Audit Committee and chaired the Program Managers’ Group. A key area of work for Program Managers was ensuring the department operated consistently with the health and safety requirements necessitated by the pandemic while maintaining its support to the Senate and its committees. The group also refreshed the department’s learning and development framework in order to consolidate the department’s focus on the knowledge, skills and attributes staff require to perform their advisory, secretariat and support roles, and the most effective means of building those capabilities among staff.

During the financial year, the Clerk attended five meetings of the Heads of the Parliamentary Departments. This group provides a forum to support coordination across the parliamentary service on administrative matters and to set the strategic direction of the service.

More broadly, the Clerk and other senior officers collaborated with their counterparts in the other parliamentary departments on matters connected to parliamentary administration.

More information on governance is in the ‘Management and accountability’ chapter.

Performance outlook It is clear that the next reporting period, the final year in an electoral cycle, will continue to be affected by the uncertainties introduced by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is nevertheless likely to see an increase in committee and legislative activity in the period leading into the election. The number of requests for advice should be consistent with 2020-21.

The office will publish a third supplement to the 14 th edition of Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice. The supplement will document the procedural changes and temporary orders agreed by the Senate in relation to formal motions and its routine of business, and the evolution of procedures allowing for remote participation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

34 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Once that supplement is complete, work will commence on the 15th edition, which will mainly be progressed during the election period. That work is likely to include the development of a privilege manual for the Senate.

Induction and training for newly elected senators, and those undertaking new roles, will be the highest priority of the office towards the end of the next reporting period.

The department will continue to refine its corporate governance processes and systems, placing particular focus on implementing and reporting on improvements to the efficiency of its operations. In many cases, these efficiencies are achieved through improved integration of information technology systems into the processes of the Senate and its committees, and will therefore require close collaboration with our ICT colleagues in the Department of Parliamentary Services.

35 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Table Office Outputs

Programming and procedural support to the Senate and the legislative process.

Publication of formal and informal records of Senate business.

Receipt, dissemination and storage of documents.

Inquiries service.

Secretariat support for the Publications; Selection of Bills; and Senators’ Interests committees.

Performance information Performance results

Procedural advice and legislative documents are accurate and timely. Advice was given as required. Legislative documents were accurate and produced within required timeframes.

Order of Business, Notice Paper and Journals of the Senate are accurate and published within required timeframes.

Other publications are accurate and timely.

All information resources were accurate and published according to required timeframes.

Tabled documents are processed and stored, and available online wherever possible.

Senate records were accurately recorded and safely stored and documents were distributed in a timely manner.

Inquiries assistance is effective and supported by online information services.

Inquiries were responded to immediately, or within reasonable or agreed timeframes for more complex queries.

Committees are supported; advice, documentation, publications and draft reports are accurate and timely.

Committee meetings were held, documents provided and reports prepared within agreed timeframes.

36 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Overview The Table Office is led by the Clerk Assistant (Table) and has three functional areas, as shown in figure 6.

Figure 6 - Elements and responsibilities of the Table Office

Executive and programming

Tim Bryant, Clerk Assistant Procedural advice to government senators, programming support and production of the Order of Business.

Secretary to the Selection of Bills and Senators’ Interests committees, and Registrar of Senators’ Interests.

Legislation and Documents Journals and Notice Paper

Ivan Powell, Director

Processing legislation Processing and custody of documents Inquiries services Secretary to the Publications Committee

Production of the Notice Paper and Journals of the Senate Processing questions on notice, orders for the production of documents and petitions

The Table Office provided support for the Senate on each of its 48 sitting days in this reporting period, with one sitting fortnight cancelled on public health advice. All performance results, as outlined in the above table, were achieved within established time frames. Project work was completed or has continued, as forecast.

Much of the work of the Table Office involves direct contact with senators and their staff, as well as other clients. This presents an ongoing opportunity to receive and respond to feedback about the services provided by the office. General feedback was almost invariably positive. The next formal survey of satisfaction levels is proposed for 2022-23.

Staff numbers remained steady during the reporting period, with an average full-time equivalent level of 13.4. The cost of the office was $2.1m ($2.1m in 2019-20).

Programming and procedural support The Table Office supported the operation of the Senate by providing programming support, preparing procedural scripts for use in the chamber (1,172 in 2020-21, averaging 24 per sitting day) and providing a broadcast captioning service of Senate proceedings. The Order of Business (the program for each day’s sitting) was prepared in draft form to assist senators (especially the whips) and published as a final edition prior to each sitting. The Clerk Assistant (Table) and other staff of the office provided procedural advice to government office holders in relation to programming and the management of government business in the Senate, and also worked closely with the Parliamentary Liaison Officer (Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet) to facilitate government business in the Senate.

37 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Formal records The Notice Paper is the formal agenda of the Senate. The Notice Paper was produced and published by the Table Office in advance of each sitting day. The Journals of the Senate is the official record of decisions made by the Senate. Proof Journals were published online shortly after the end of each sitting day, and printed versions distributed the next morning. Final Journals were subsequently produced following thorough checking of source materials.

Legislation The office facilitated the legislative work of the Parliament by processing all bills considered in the Senate, preparing legislative documents including third reading and assent prints of bills passed, and processing assent messages.

The office also prepared the formal messages by which the two Houses communicate on legislative and other activity. In 2020-21, 194 messages were prepared, of which 165 related to the passage of bills (the remaining related to matters such as committee memberships). These figures compare to 212 messages, of which 168 related to the passage of bills, in 2019-20. Figure 7 reflects the level of legislative activity in recent years.

Figure 7 - Senate legislative activity, 2017-18 to 2020-21

Number of bills which passed both Houses

Number of bills to which amendments were moved

Number of bills to which amendments were agreed

2017-18 57 sitting days

157

56

128

29

46

29

148

52

36

2018-19 37 sitting days (election)

2019-20 58 sitting days

2020-21 48 sitting days

153

55

30

38 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Questions on notice, notices of motion and petitions Senators continued to use the questions on notice process - written questions to ministers on the administration of public policy - as an important accountability mechanism. Throughout the reporting period, 2,019 questions were asked on notice. These were processed and published to a searchable database on the Parliament’s website within established timeframes.

In 2020-21, the office processed all notices of motion received for inclusion in the Notice Paper - 646 for this reporting period compared to 878 in the previous period. These notices signal senators’ intentions to move particular motions on specified days. The office also processed 12 petitions (with 78,165 signatories) which senators had lodged for presentation to the Senate (compared to 12 petitions with 45,747 signatures in 2019-20).

Another frequently used means of obtaining information about matters of concern to the Senate are orders for documents. During 2020-21, the office processed the 37 orders for documents made by the Senate, some of which were then the subject of follow-up orders, and one of which was a continuing order.

Documents The office received and processed all of the 4,099 documents provided for tabling in the Senate in this reporting period, recorded their details in the Journals and Index to the Papers Presented to Parliament, and archived them. This figure is comparable to the 4,576 documents tabled in the previous period. Figure 8 shows the number of documents tabled in the Senate in recent years.

Documents from the President, ministers, the Auditor-General and committees may also be presented when the Senate is not sitting. The office administers this procedure, which facilitates the timely publication of material of interest to, or required by, the Parliament. In 2020-21, a total of 831 documents (or approximately 20 per cent of all documents tabled in the Senate) were presented using this procedure. This compares with 506 documents (or 11 per cent of all documents tabled) during the previous year.

All documents presented to the Senate in the reporting period were digitised and made publicly available on the Parliament’s website, except for those documents already made available on the Federal Register of Legislation by the Office of Parliamentary Counsel.

Significant work was also undertaken in the reporting period to organise and rationalise the office’s holdings of hardcopy materials. This work will continue in the next reporting period to ensure the preservation of historically important material and the efficient use of the office’s document storage areas.

39 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 8 - Documents tabled in the Senate, 2017-18 to 2020-21

Inquiries Hard copies of all documents presented to the Senate are made available on request through the inquiries and distribution services provided by the office. The inquiries service also fields a range of queries about Senate proceedings from senators and their staff, government agencies and others. In 2020-21, 2,345 inquiries were received (approximately 27 per cent from senators or their staff). This compares to 3,021 inquiries in the previous reporting year. The majority of inquiries - which are communicated face to face, by telephone or email - were responded to immediately, with other more complex inquiries responded to within timeframes agreed with the requester. While these figures are drawn from formal statistics kept for performance reporting purposes, the staff of the office also respond to considerably more requests for information from senators and their staff as they go about their duties on sitting days (as do other staff of the department).

Support for committees During the year, the office provided secretariat support to three committees. All committee meetings were convened, papers prepared (including draft reports as required) and other administrative support provided within the timeframes required by the committees.

The Clerk Assistant (Table) is secretary to the Selection of Bills Committee which meets and reports each sitting week on recommendations to refer bills to the legislation committees for inquiry. He is also secretary to the Senators’ Interests Committee and the Registrar of Senators’ Interests, with responsibility for administering the Register of Senators’ Interests, which is published online.

In addition, the Director of the Table Office provided secretariat support to the Senate Publications Committee.

5,515

4,126

4,576

2017-18 57 sitting days

4,099

2020-21 48 sitting days

2018-19 37 sitting days (election)

2019-20 58 sitting days

40 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Performance outlook In 2021-22, the Table Office will continue to serve as the secretariat to the Senate, and to certain committees.

The existing timeframes set for the provision of various services remain appropriate, with a few minor adjustments reflected in the office’s 2021-22 work plan. The office will continue to monitor its performance through the collation of a range of statistics and feedback and exception based reporting of non-compliance.

The key procedural publications - Order of Business, Notice Paper and Journals - produced by the office will continue to be refreshed to reflect the evolving style of Senate and departmental documents, and a continued emphasis on publishing procedural material in digital formats to support accessibility and efficiency and to reduce printing costs.

The office will also continue to support various ICT related activities, including contributing to the ongoing maintenance, enhancement and testing of existing systems that support the work of the office and the Senate, as well as involvement in projects such as the development of a new system to facilitate the receipt and publication of tabled documents in digital format. This was originally intended to be implemented in the current reporting period, but was delayed by the extra demands placed on ICT resources by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The key staffing focus for the next reporting period remains the sharing of skills and knowledge to ensure sufficient back-up is available to fill in for staff who may not be able to come in to the office, as well as bringing in staff from other areas of the department from time-to-time, to ensure that expertise in relation to specific tasks is not unduly concentrated.

41 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Senate Public Information Office Outputs

Produce, publish and manage information resources about the activities of the Senate and its committees.

Liaise with the Department of Parliamentary Services (DPS) and others in relation to the ICT systems and resources that underpin the support provided to the Senate, including system enhancement and development.

Performance information Performance results

Manage the production of: Dynamic Red (ParlWork); Senate Daily Summary; The Week Ahead; StatsNet; and Senate Discovery.

All publications were published within agreed timeframes set out in the 2020-21 office work plan.

Coordinate the Senate’s public information resources and produce and publish material for the department in multiple formats.

Current, accurate and relevant information was available about the role and work of the Senate and its committees as required.

Ongoing improvements were made to the availability and accessibility of information resources.

Develop, manage and participate in projects to improve information dissemination.

A number of projects to streamline work practices and to improve the delivery of information were successfully implemented.

Liaise with DPS and the other parliamentary departments on ICT matters.

The requirements of the Senate and the department were effectively represented in the ICT priorities of the Parliament.

Manage the Senate’s Twitter account. Through @AuSenate, the department engaged with and informed followers about the work of the Senate.

42 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Overview The Senate Public Information Office (SPIO) is led by the Clerk Assistant (Table) and the Director, SPIO, Matt Keele. The Director and the SPIO team work closely together to deliver services to the Senate, the public and the department. The Clerk Assistant (Table) is also responsible for strategic leadership in relation to the department’s ICT dependencies, including liaison with the Department of Parliamentary Service’s Information Services Division.

SPIO produces and publishes an array of information resources so that people can understand and engage in the work of the Senate and its committees. This work is undertaken against the strategic goal of improving the department’s approach to publishing and sharing information and being responsive to the evolving ways in which senators and the public expect to find and consume information.

SPIO also coordinates the department’s involvement in forums and projects affecting the production and dissemination of Senate and departmental information resources.

Throughout the reporting period, SPIO continued to work closely with colleagues from DPS Information Services Division to support remote working arrangements due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The disruption caused by the pandemic has resulted in revised timelines for many projects that had completion dates on or before 30 June 2021. New timelines for completion of these will need to be renegotiated in 2021-22.

The cost of the office for 2020-21 was $1.4m ($1.4m in 2019-20), with staffing levels maintained at an average of 10 full-time equivalent.

Information resources SPIO supported each of the 48 sitting days in this reporting period by producing and publishing the following information resources relevant to the meetings of the Senate, and meeting corresponding performance results:

• The Week Ahead - 13 editions

• Dynamic Red (and ParlWork web-application) - 48 editions with an average of 116 updates per day

• Senate Daily Summary - 48 editions

• Senate Discovery - 9 episodes, and

• compilation and publication of statistics about the work of the Senate: StatsNet and Statistical Summary.

In this reporting period, the office’s work to develop and publish information resources also included:

• StatsNet - back capture to 2012 of statistical information and further enhancements to the website user interface

• continuing to assist with the development of a website launched to commemorate the 50th year of the operation of the modern Senate committee system

43 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

• producing video, print and web resources for the Parliamentary Education Office (PEO), notably the Pass the bill game (interactive learning content), and resources to enhance the delivery of virtual classrooms

• establishing the Senate YouTube channel

• producing the department’s corporate reporting and planning documents, and

• ongoing development of Senate Connect (senators’ intranet) and SENNET (departmental intranet).

SPIO also managed the Senate’s Twitter account, @AuSenate, providing regular and frequent updates about the work of the Senate and its committees. Through Twitter, the department is able to increase its outreach, engage with citizens and others and respond quickly to requests for information.

Projects and support During the reporting period, SPIO continued to collaborate with DPS and the Department of the House of Representatives (DHR) on a number of ICT projects to enhance the systems that underpin our work and to create new resources. During this period six projects were completed:

• enhancements to the SCID-report builder systems, tools used by the Committee Office to manage inquiry data and to draft and publish reports - completed August 2020

• development of a YouTube channel to promote awareness of the work of the Senate - completed September 2020

• enhancements to the Senate’s online statistical collection, StatsNet - completed February 2021

• implementation of the Senate Division Recording System - February 2021

• migration of the department’s financial management system from on-premise infrastructure to TechOne cloud - completed April 2021

• migration of the Senate digitised historical records collection, in collaboration with the Parliamentary Library, to make digital copies of Senate tabled papers more accessible - completed May 2021

SPIO provided extensive support to the department by coordinating, with DPS, the rollout of the Windows 10 operating system and Microsoft 365 applications, as well as a laptop rollout project - completed February 2021 and June 2021 respectively.

Other significant work during 2020-21 which is expected to be completed in the next reporting period includes:

• Passage of Legislation - an online interactive flowchart illustrating the parliamentary processes relating to bills, and

• Online Tabled Documents project (with DPS, DHR and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet), a system to receive and publish digital copies of tabled documents.

44 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Performance outlook In 2021-22, SPIO will continue its information resource production, projects and support programs and ICT liaison, in line with the department’s strategic aims and to achieve its service delivery to senators and the public.

The office will continue to work with DPS and others to progress various ICT projects designed to strengthen and streamline the systems and resources that enable the department’s work.

With the implementation of Windows 10 and Microsoft 365, new opportunities are available to modernise systems which produce and publish information. SPIO will develop an information portal to increase digital literacy within the department and will work with business areas to identify and implement efficiencies through the use of off-the-shelf Microsoft products such as Teams and OneDrive. Other projects that will benefit from the introduction of these platforms include the redevelopment of the committee report builder system and the streamlining of production practices for updates to Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice.

Lessons learned throughout the COVID-19 pandemic continue to emphasise the need for ICT systems that provide mobility and seamless user experience between office and remote working arrangements, for senators and staff alike. Working with DPS, SPIO will continue to bed down new ICT capabilities to support the remote participation of senators and members in parliamentary proceedings.

SPIO’s work will continue to focus on capacity building throughout the department to support digital innovation to mitigate the department’s strategic risks in relation to ICT systems and resources and workforce capability.

45 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Procedure Office Outputs

Legislative drafting and procedural support to non-executive senators.

Secretariat support for legislative scrutiny committees.

Procedural research services.

Parliamentary information for public servants and the community.

Support and funding for inter-parliamentary relations.

Performance information Performance results

Procedural advice and support is sound and timely, enabling the instructing senator to fulfil their role.

Senators and their staff continued to acknowledge the accuracy and value of procedural advice though feedback.

Legislative amendments and private senators’ bills are legally sound and meet the requirements of instructing senators.

Legislative amendments and bills were accurate, and were prepared within required timeframes and to the satisfaction of senators.

Secretariat support to the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation Committee, the Scrutiny of Bills Committee and the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights is accurate, of a high standard and timely.

Advice and documents prepared for the legislative scrutiny committees were accurate, of a high standard and provided within the timeframes set by the Senate and the committees, and to the satisfaction of the committees.

Parliamentary research information is accurate, timely and comprehensive.

Seminars, lectures and other parliamentary information projects are provided to increase the awareness of the work and role of the Parliament.

Inter-parliamentary functions are supported to the satisfaction of participants.

Accurate and comprehensive parliamentary research was provided within required timeframes.

Seminars and lectures were held in accordance with the programmed schedule (with some interruption due to the pandemic), and public information projects were delivered in accordance with the required timeframes. Training was provided to the satisfaction of participants, demonstrated by positive feedback obtained through evaluation processes.

Inter-parliamentary functions were carried out to the satisfaction of participants.

46 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Overview The Procedure Office is led by the Clerk Assistant (Procedure) and has three functional areas, as shown in figure 9.

Figure 9 - Elements and responsibilities of the Procedure Office

Executive, legislative drafting and procedural advice

Rachel Callinan, Clerk Assistant

Procedural advice, support and training.

Drafting of legislative amendments and private senators’ bills.

Procedural support and public information

Legislative scrutiny

Jane Thomson, Director, Procedure and Research Legislative drafting and procedural advice Publications, seminars, public lectures and exhibitions Parliamentary liaison and research on parliamentary matters

Anita Coles, Secretary, Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights

Glenn Ryall, Secretary, Scrutiny of Bills Committee and Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation Committee Secretariat, advisory and administrative support to the committees

The office provides a range of advisory, research and public information services to support the work of senators and the Senate, including legislative drafting services and support for the Parliament’s legislative scrutiny committees.

The demand for procedural and legislative advice and support is driven by the requirements of senators and the Senate. The work of the secretariats of the legislative scrutiny committees is similarly driven by the volume of legislation coming before the Senate and additional inquiries undertaken by the committees.

The Procedure Office monitors levels of satisfaction with its performance through formal and informal channels such as seminar evaluation forms, surveys and direct feedback from senators and their staff, and members of the public.

The full-time equivalent staffing level for the Procedure Office in 2020-21 was 25.4 (20.5 in 2019-20). The cost of providing the services of the Procedure Office in 2020-21 was $4.0m ($4.0m in 2019-20).

Procedural support In 2020-21, the office assisted non-executive senators and their staff by providing advice relating to the role and work of the Senate and its committees. As usual, there was strong demand for such advice, particularly during sitting periods. Advice was provided on many procedural issues, including the constitutional powers of the Senate, the legislative process, the process for disallowance of delegated legislation, reference of

47 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

matters to committees, orders for production of documents and opportunities for debate. The office also provided research support to the Clerk and Deputy Clerk and others on procedural matters.

Staff ensured the accuracy of advice by researching appropriate precedents and consulting other departmental officers, particularly the Clerk Assistant (Procedure), the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk. Advice was non-partisan, consistent, and provided to senators and their staff in a timely fashion often within very short time frames.

In 2020-21, the office prepared an average of 14 procedural scripts per sitting day for use by senators in the chamber with a total of 677 scripts for the year. This was similar to the previous year’s average of 17. These scripts assist senators to pursue matters of concern to them through, for example, orders for the production of documents, committee references and the introduction of bills.

The office also checked material, particularly draft motions, for procedural accuracy on request from senators and their staff. The advice provided was accurate and provided in time to enable senators to use this material in the Senate and elsewhere.

Legislative drafting In 2020-21, the office provided legislative support to senators by drafting amendments and private senators’ bills, primarily for non-government senators.

The office prepared and circulated 59 second reading amendments (an increase on the previous year, when 52 such amendments were circulated). The office also drafted and circulated 245 sets of committee of the whole amendments, comprising 740 individual amendments (compared to 608 amendments circulated on 170 sheets in the previous year). While the preparation of second reading amendments is usually straightforward, committee of the whole amendments, which propose amendments to bills, can range from simple to quite complex and resource intensive.

A further 72 sets of amendments were requested and drafted, but not circulated. The decision to circulate amendments is purely a matter for senators. Reasons that amendment sheets may not be circulated include the sponsoring senator deciding not to proceed with the amendments, or amendments being drafted to inform negotiations between parties or as an alternative position to circulated amendments.

In accordance with section 53 of the Constitution, 6 sets of amendments were framed as requests to the House of Representatives. For these requests, the office produced statements of reasons to explain why the amendments were framed as requests, as required by the Senate’s procedures. The majority of the requests that were drafted related to the government’s coronavirus response package.

Senators continued to use private senators’ bills as a means of furthering debate on policy issues and, in some cases, influencing the government to pursue legislative action. In 2020-21, the office received requests for 47 private senators’ bills, all of which were progressed in accordance with senators’ instructions, and 18 private senators’ bills were

48 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

introduced. This demand was similar to the previous reporting period and reflects a strong interest among non-government senators for a legislative response to policy matters of concern to them.

Figure 10 summarises legislative drafting and procedural services provided to senators over the past four years.

Figure 10 - Legislative drafting and procedural advice services provided to senators

Service 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

Committee of the whole amendments circulated 1011 473 608 740

Second reading amendments circulated 30 26 52 59

Private senators’ bills introduced 31 39 32 18

Procedural scripts prepared 727 689 977 677

The results of a formal survey of senators and staff, as well as informal feedback, confirmed the quality of the procedural advice and legislative drafting service provided by the office including where support was provided within the tight time constraints common in sitting weeks.

Support for legislative scrutiny committees During the reporting period, the Legislative Scrutiny Unit provided secretariat, research and administrative support to the following committees:

• Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights

• Senate Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Bills, and

• Senate Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation (formerly the Regulations and Ordinances Committee).

The committees examine bills and legislative instruments according to their terms of reference. The committees generally report each sitting week on the bills and legislative instruments scrutinised, and annually outline their work and the significant matters they have pursued during the year. In response to the impact of pandemic restrictions, the committees varied their usual practices to regularly meet and report outside of sitting weeks to ensure their scrutiny reports were available in a timely way.

In preparing the reports tabled during this period, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights secretariat examined 199 bills (278 in 2019-20) and drafted 16 reports containing comments on 36 bills (76 in 2019-20) raising matters relating to the committee’s terms of reference set out in the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011). The secretariat also examined 1,826 disallowable and exempt legislative instruments (2,272 in 2019-20) and drafted comments on 48 instruments (33 in 2019-20).

49 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

In this reporting period, the Scrutiny of Bills Committee secretariat examined 273 bills (296 in 2019-20) and drafted 19 reports, containing comments on 103 bills (129 in 2019-20) raising matters relating to the committee’s terms of reference under Senate standing order 24.

The Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation Committee secretariat examined 1,316 disallowable legislative instruments (1,695 in 2019-20) against its terms of reference set out in Senate standing order 23. The secretariat prepared 15 reports, containing comments on 194 instruments (290 in 2019-20) and identifying 150 instruments for the attention of the Senate. The committee also tabled two reports relating to its broad-ranging inquiry into the exemption of delegated legislation from parliamentary oversight. On 16 June 2021, the Senate adopted three recommendations of the final report, including amendments to standing order 23 to allow the committee to scrutinise instruments that are exempt from disallowance.

The work of the three committees in scrutinising bills and legislative instruments supports parliamentary consideration of legislation in a number of important ways, including influencing the drafting of bills and legislative instruments, informing debate in the Senate and the House of Representatives, and resulting in amendments to bills and legislative instruments and associated explanatory materials.

Continuing on from the previous reporting period, the three committees have examined and reported on a significant volume of delegated and primary legislation made in response to the pandemic, with the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights and the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation Committee publishing lists of COVID-19 related legislation relevant to their terms of reference on their websites to promote public scrutiny of these laws. During the reporting period, 14 COVID-19 related bills had been introduced into the Parliament and 301 COVID-19 related legislative instruments were registered on the Federal Register of Legislation. Committee secretariats supported the committees in this work in addition to the usual support provided to the committees. This work will continue into the next reporting period.

Parliamentary information and training The Procedure and Research Section helps to increase knowledge of the role and work of the Senate by coordinating a range of lectures, seminars and public information activities and by producing parliamentary resources.

Training and resources In response to the ongoing impacts of the pandemic, the section focused on the provision of training and seminars presented under a hybrid model (in person and via videoconference) as well as wholly via videoconference. As the section continues to develop its remote delivery capacity, modifications to presentation material, resources and methods will continue to be made.

In addition to providing ad hoc one-on-one training sessions for senators by senior officers, the section provided a comprehensive program of training for senators’ staff. In a move away from providing the training during sitting periods and in person, in

50 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

this reporting period the training was provided in non-sitting periods and presented via videoconference to enable staff to participate regardless of their location. Material available on the Procedural Hub, a resource located on the senators’ intranet (Senate Connect), was used as the primary resource for the training to assist staff to learn about procedural mechanisms as well as to understand the information, templates and forms provided on the site to assist senators.

As can be seen in figure 11, the number of seminars provided to public service agencies reduced due to factors brought about by the pandemic including uncertainty which was reflected in demand. The provision of modified training delivered under a hybrid model has provided flexibility for agencies and particularly for employees working from home. The section will continue to develop its remote delivery capacity in 2021-22 as well as corresponding guidance material and online resources for public service agencies.

The Senate Occasional Lecture Series was similarly affected by the pandemic with the number of lectures significantly reduced in this reporting period. As the lectures were already streamed live, the lectures remained accessible to those who could not attend in person. In this reporting period Auslan interpretation of lectures was introduced.

A program of specialised procedural training sessions was launched for Senate departmental staff with duties directly related to the chamber. Presented by the Clerk and senior managers, the program seeks to build the technical knowledge and procedural capacity of staff who support sittings of the Senate.

50 years of the modern committee system On 2 December 2020 the President of the Senate launched Navigate Senate Committees, a website launched to celebrate 50 years of the modern committee system. The website locates committees in their historical context and provides a record of committee work represented by reports, photographs and oral history recordings. As committees inquire into matters of national significance, the timeline of inquiries serves as a historical record of the social, economic and technological evolution of the nation.

Figure 11 - Seminars, training programs and lectures, 2017-18 to 2020-21

Service 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

Senators’ orientation sessions 1 2 2 2

Senators’ staff training sessions 12 6 11 14

Seminars for public service officers • number of seminars • number of attendees

21 519

28 573

25 573

13 331

Public lectures • number of lectures • number of attendees • live online views

10

1077 236

7

631 379

7

648 376

3

188 228

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Inter-parliamentary relations and capacity building The Australian Parliament’s international program focuses on strengthening engagement and cooperation between parliaments internationally, with an emphasis on parliamentary relations with countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

The program’s activities and projects in 2020-21 were coordinated by the International and Parliamentary Relations Office (IPRO) and the Parliamentary Skills Centre (PSC), with input from all four parliamentary departments. IPRO manages incoming and outgoing delegation programs, membership of inter-parliamentary organisations, and the international interests and travel of senators and members. The PSC is responsible for all parliamentary strengthening and capacity building programs of the Australian Parliament, including study programs for visiting parliamentarians and staff of other parliaments.

IPRO and PSC are offices administered by the Department of the House of Representatives, and IPRO is funded jointly by the Department of the Senate and the Department of the House of Representatives. The Department of the Senate continued to provide secretariat support to the Australian Delegation to the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), including during the 142nd IPU Assembly held remotely, and also responded to various requests for information and research. A detailed description of the work of IPRO and PSC is provided in the annual report of the Department of the House of Representatives.

Performance outlook A key focus for the Procedure Office for 2021-22 will be to ensure that we continue our high level of service provision within the ongoing constraints of the pandemic. While many of our services, including legislative drafting and procedural advice, can continue largely unaffected, the pandemic prompted a revision of others with a number of initiatives implemented in this reporting period and others to be further explored in the next. The office will also continue its work to provide procedural development resources for departmental staff in order to contribute to knowledge sharing and succession planning across the department.

The Legislative Scrutiny Unit will continue to support the work of the three parliamentary scrutiny committees, including the work being undertaken by the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation Committee and the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights to scrutinise the delegated legislation related to the government’s COVID-19 response.

In terms of public information, regular publication of news and events about the Senate will provide a means of informing the public about important developments in the Senate. It is anticipated that this information will be informed by, and complementary to, other activities managed by the office including the lecture series.

52 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

53 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Parliamentary Education Office Outputs

Parliamentary education resources and programs.

Performance information Performance results

Curriculum-aligned programs for students and teachers are delivered at Parliament House, in classrooms though the outreach program and digitally to encourage ongoing engagement with Australia’s parliament.

Feedback from teachers using Parliamentary Education Office services shows very high levels of satisfaction with the education program.

Teaching programs were consistently conducted in accordance with the booking schedule.

Relevant and accurate print and digital resources are produced that explore the role and value of the Australian Parliament and illuminate the aims and achievement standards of the Australian Curriculum.

Parliamentary Education Office websites and publications are updated and refreshed regularly to ensure accuracy.

Provision of a range of resources and services that facilitate parliamentarian engagement with the community in order to increase citizen understanding of and engagement with Parliament.

Senators and members are satisfied with the provision of services and support.

Overview Jointly funded by the Department of the Senate and the Department of the House of Representatives, the Parliamentary Education Office (PEO) delivers parliamentary education services on behalf of the Australian Parliament to students, teachers, and others across Australia. To date, more than 2.3 million students have expanded their knowledge of the Australian Parliament through participating in a PEO program.

In addition to operational management by the Department of the Senate, the PEO is guided by the PEO Advisory Committee. The committee is comprised of interested members and senators, meets twice a year and reports to the Presiding Officers.

The full-time equivalent staffing level for the PEO in 2020-21 was 11.1 (in 2019-20 the FTE staffing level was 11.4.) The cost of providing the service of the PEO in 2020 - 21 was $1.5m (compared to $1.6m in 2019-20).

54 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Education programs: onsite, digital and outreach The PEO is a leader in civics and citizenship education in Australia and delivers education programs for teachers and students onsite at Parliament House, in classrooms across Australia and digitally through videoconferencing.

School visits to Parliament House continue to be significantly impacted in this reporting period by travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. For schools able to visit Parliament House, all programs were conducted in a COVID-Safe manner, and for schools unable to complete their visit, a videoconferencing program was offered. In 2020-21, 28, 742 students from 444 schools across Australia participated in onsite PEO programs. These figures represent a 69 per cent decrease on pre- pandemic 2018-19 student participation numbers, and a 53 per cent decrease on 2019-20 participation numbers.

In 2020-21, the PEO conducted outreach within a 250km radius of Canberra. This allowed the program to be delivered amidst changing travel restrictions and also provided opportunities for schools who, despite geographical proximity, have not previously connected with the PEO. During this period the PEO delivered outreach to 483 participants from 13 schools in the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales (electorates of Hume, Eden-Monaro, Bean and Canberra).

The number of students and teachers who took part in a videoconferencing program continued to increase, with 9,075 participants in this reporting period. This is an increase of over 298 per cent on 2019-20 participation rates and an increase of 700 per cent on 2018-19 participation rates. This increase is partly attributable to the restrictions imposed due to the pandemic, and partly attributable to the PEO continuing to establish a brand and presence as a quality provider of digital education. In this reporting period, the PEO also upgraded the existing videoconferencing studio and established a second studio, paving the way for the PEO to enhance its provision of digital education programs about the Australian Parliament.

Content: online and print PEO websites provide information about parliament and curriculum-aligned teaching resources for all Australian teachers and students. In 2020-21 a total of 1.06 million users (representing 2.38 million unique page views) were recorded.

The PEO also produced and distributed a range of publications during the reporting period, including a new teaching booklet for teachers of Politics and Legal Studies and new classroom posters illustrating key aspects of our system of government such as the Australian Constitution.

55 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Services for members and senators The PEO provides dedicated support to encourage and assist senators and members to engage with schools and students. Senators and members are offered a complimentary annual allocation of education and information materials for students, teachers, and others in their communities. Senators and members can also request a tailored brochure, Representing You, to assist them when explaining their work as an elected representative. In 2020-21, 126 parliamentarians requested their allocation (this compares with 150 in the previous reporting period). The unusual circumstances of lockdown and the reduced ability to visit schools may explain the slightly lower take up than in previous years.

Performance outlook Over the next reporting period, the PEO will continue to follow all relevant health and other advice to safely deliver education programs for Australian teachers and students. An important part of this work will be to continue to enhance and promote videoconferencing programs and other services as a method to engage students and teachers who are unable to visit Canberra.

Through the ongoing provision of high calibre digital and print content for parliamentarians, teachers, and students, the PEO will continue to provide quality parliamentary education services for citizens across the country.

56 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

57 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Committee Office Outputs

Secretariat support and procedural advice to the legislative and general purpose standing committees, select committees, and certain joint committees.

Performance information Performance results

The degree of satisfaction of the chairs of committees, committee members and other senators with the quality and timeliness of advice and support.

Formal and informal feedback, including reference to committee reports during debates in the Senate, shows that senators consider the support provided by the Committee Office to be effective.

Draft reports, reports and other documents are timely, accurate and of a high standard. Tabling deadlines are met.

Accurate advice, documentation, and draft reports were provided to committees in accordance with their requirements.

Reports were drafted and presented to the Senate in accordance with the timeframes agreed by committees and deadlines set by the Senate.

Inquiry information, evidence and reports are published promptly upon authorisation.

Information was updated promptly and accurately on committee web pages. Submissions, other documents and reports were published consistent with the decisions of committees.

Inquiries from the public regarding committees are handled promptly and professionally.

Telephone and email queries from the public were responded to promptly and accurately.

Members of the public had access to up to date, accurate and relevant material regarding committee activities and procedures.

Overview Committee Office secretariats supported 16 legislation and references standing committees, eleven Senate select committees, two joint select committees and five other joint committees (see figure 12). As in the previous year, secretariats experienced a demanding workload, with large numbers of inquiries and hearings taking place. The cost of the office in 2020-21 was $10.4m ($9.6m in 2019-20), with staff salaries comprising approximately 92 per cent of the office’s total expenses.

The remaining costs were administrative (for example, printing, venue hire and transport and accommodation for secretariat staff attending hearings). These administrative costs were reduced across the financial year due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, largely as a result of a reduced number of interstate hearings.

Committee secretariats provided administrative support to committees, including processing submissions, publishing a range of material to committee websites, arranging private meetings and briefings, liaising with witnesses and stakeholders, and arranging

58 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

public hearings and site inspections around Australia and by video and teleconference. Staff analysed and collated the evidence committees received, drafted briefing material and reports, arranged for the tabling and publication of reports, and assisted witnesses and others to participate in inquiries. In addition, secretariats provided procedural advice to chairs, committee members and other stakeholders, and responded to requests for information from members of the public about the operation of committees.

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic reduced the number of interstate hearings held throughout the year, and placed limits on the number of hearings that could be held in-person. However, the Committee Office workload was sustained, with committees making use of the ability to hold hearings via video and teleconference. This ensured that committees received the evidence they required from a wide range of witnesses in order to meet their reporting responsibilities to the Senate.

Feedback from members of committees when reports are tabled or debated in the Senate, and in the House of Representatives in relation to certain joint committees, and provided informally during the course of the year, indicates a high level of satisfaction with the quality of the advice and support. Feedback received by way of a survey of committee chairs and conducted through the Chairs’ Committee (which is chaired by the Deputy President of the Senate) showed that committee chairs were also very satisfied with the services provided by secretariats. While results were positive, the survey responses included some suggestions for improvement and future development. These suggestions focused on providing visual broadcast of public hearings held outside of Parliament House, and more opportunities for senators to undertake training on the role of the committee chair. The department will work with the Department of Parliamentary Services to investigate how an expanded broadcasting service can be provided and will offer additional training and support for committee chairs.

Activity levels and workload The Committee Office workload is determined by decisions of the Senate and of the committees themselves. During this reporting period, the Committee Office continued to deliver secretariat and drafting services to committees to enable them to conduct inquiries and table reports consistent with the time frames set by the Senate. The highest number of inquiries managed at one time was 69.

Submissions, public hearings and witnesses The high volume of work undertaken by committee secretariats during 2020-21 is demonstrated by the high level of administrative support provided to committees. This included processing over 10,800 submissions, an increase of more than 3,500 submissions when compared with the previous reporting period. In addition, secretariats arranged 395 public hearings (including 95 estimates hearings) at which over 7,500 witnesses appeared. Secretariats supported committees by arranging 563 private meetings and eight site inspections.

59 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 12 - Elements and responsibilities of the Committee Office

Executive

Toni Matulick, Clerk Assistant David Sullivan, Senior Clerk of Committees

Procedural advice and training. Planning and coordination. Secretariat staffing and resources.

Statistics and records.

Legislative and general purpose standing committee secretariats

Joint committee secretariats

Senate select committee secretariats

Community Affairs Jeanette Radcliffe (to 12 July 2020) Apolline Kohen (from 13 July 2020 to 11 June 2021) Pothida Youhorn (from 12 June 2021)

Economics Mark Fitt

Education and Employment Alan Raine

Environment and Communications Stephen Palethorpe

Finance and Public Administration Ann Palmer (to 9 August 2020) Sarah Redden (from 10 August 2020)

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Lyn Beverley

Legal and Constitutional Affairs Sophie Dunstone

Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Gerry McInally

Additional Support Unit Lee Katauskas

Joint statutory Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity Sean Turner

Corporations and Financial Services Patrick Hodder

Law Enforcement Sean Turner

Joint standing National Broadband Network Lee Katauskas

National Disability Insurance Scheme Bonnie Allan

Joint select Australia’s Family Law System Ann Palmer (to 28 July 2020) Tas Larnach (from 29 July 2020)

Road Safety Gerry McInally

Effectiveness of the Australian Government’s Northern Australia agenda Lee Katauskas

Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan Sean Turner

Financial Technology and Regulatory Technology Lyn Beverley

Autism Alan Raine

Foreign Interference through Social Media Lee Katauskas

Temporary Migration Lee Katauskas

Administration of Sports Grants Jeanette Radcliffe (to 12 July 2020) Apolline Kohen (from 13 July 2020 to 18 March 2021)

COVID-19 Jane Thomson (to 12 July 2020) Jeanette Radcliffe (from 13 July 2020)

Aboriginal Flag Sophie Dunstone

Tobacco Harm Reduction Patrick Hodder

Job Security Tas Larnach

60 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Figure 13 - Number of committee hearings, 2017-18 to 2020-21

To manage this volume of work, the office continued to operate flexibly with staff regularly working across secretariats, supporting different committees, and joining staff in other programs within the department on cross-program project teams when their workload permitted. Demonstrating professional flexibility is a key capability of Committee Office staff, and supports the department’s ability to deliver high quality services to committees.

Estimates hearings The 2020 budget estimates hearings, initially scheduled to take place in May 2020, were delayed to October 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional estimates followed in March 2021, and the 2021 budget estimates occurred in May and June 2021. As shown in figure 13, there were 95 estimates hearings, up from 43 hearings in the previous period. During these estimates hearings, just over 3,500 witnesses appeared. The elevated number of estimates hearings during 2020-21 occurred as a result of delays to estimates hearings in the previous financial year.

Significant planning was undertaken and protocols developed to ensure that estimates hearings took place under COVID-safe conditions. Committees were able to make use of expanded access to videoconference facilities, implementing a hybrid system where senators and witnesses were able to participate remotely and in-person. This maintained committees’ entitlement to examine and scrutinise the expenditure of the executive, and meet their obligations to report to the Senate, despite the uncertainty caused by the pandemic.

References and reports In addition to a high number of legislation inquiries, committees inquired into and reported on diverse topics including the Australian Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, autism, the administration of Australia Post, and financial and regulatory technology.

Other hearings Estimates hearings

273

83

225

61

2017-18 2020-21

300

95

2018-19 2019-20

182

43

61 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 14 - Number of references to committees, 2017-18 to 2020-212

The office supported committees to table a total of 175 reports. Figure 15 indicates how the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in fewer reports tabled during the 2019-20 year. Committees quickly adapted their work practices to enable more reports to be tabled during the 2020-21 year, despite the ongoing impact of the pandemic.

Figure 15 - Reports presented by all committees supported by the Committee Office 2017-18 to 2020-21

Each committee report, while initially drafted by Committee Office staff is, in the end, a committee document which reflects the views of members of the committee undertaking the inquiry. Feedback indicates that despite the pressure created by the high number of inquiries, and sometimes short time frames, the standard of committee reports has been maintained. This has been achieved through the dedication and skill of secretariat staff, with support from staff of other areas of the department when required.

2 These figures refer to packages of bills referred to committees not to the number of individual bills referred.

2017-18

(27%)

59

46

74 (30%) 79

19

(27%) 51

Bills referred (% of all bills) Other references

2020-21

66 (32%)

28

2018-19 2019-20

2017-18

172 175

206

2020-21 2018-19 2019-20

106

62 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Public information Providing accurate, accessible and relevant public information about the work of Senate committees is an area of ongoing focus.

The office continued to work with the Senate Public Information Office and the Department of Parliamentary Services on projects to improve systems and tools for drafting and publishing reports, and to manage the high volume of submissions and answers to questions on notice provided to committees during estimates and other hearings. Tools, systems and processes that enable prompt, accessible publication of committee evidence and reports are an essential part of the Committee Office’s responsibility to ensure committee information is processed, analysed, and published in a timely way. They also ensure that information is relevant and accessible, that senators are satisfied with services provided, and that efficiencies can be realised.

To further develop these systems and processes, additional staff were allocated to the Office of the Senior Clerk, providing a dedicated project team to offer committee office-specific ICT and web publishing support and training, and to progress ICT projects in collaboration with the Senate Public Information Office and the Department of Parliamentary Services.

The Committee Office Executive, comprising the Office of the Senior Clerk and the Office of the Clerk Assistant (Committees) continued the significant focus on collecting, analysing and publishing statistics and data generated by the Committee Office, including the twice-yearly publication Work of Committees and ensuring that information about committee membership and hearings was up to date and publicly accessible via the Senate website.

Committee Office staff supported the department’s seminar program by delivering training sessions to public servants and other members of the public about the operation of Senate committees, as well as delivering training offered by the Parliamentary Library for parliamentary staff.

International engagement The usual demand for Committee Office staff to present information to international delegations visiting Australia, and for certain committee secretaries to support outgoing parliamentary delegations was suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, during April 2021 Committee Office staff provided support to committees of the Parliament of Tonga by way of a virtual mission.

Management and leadership Under standing order 25(10) a Chairs’ Committee comprising the chairs of standing committees and Senate select committees may be convened by the Deputy President to discuss any matter relating to the operations of those committees. The Clerk Assistant (Committees) is the secretary. During 2020-21, this committee met to consider issues including levels of committee activity, the application of the privilege resolutions, and satisfaction of senators with committee office services.

63 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Committee secretaries met regularly throughout the year to discuss corporate and administrative issues, staff development and organisational capability, and procedural matters. Supporting staff well-being was also a focus during these meetings.

Staffing levels in the committee office were increased to meet the sustained demand of committees, contributing to staff well-being by ensuring there were sufficient resources and staff are able to take regular leave.

Performance outlook The 2020-21 reporting period saw the Committee Office support a sustained number of inquiries. Despite the reduction in committee travel and uncertainty caused by the ongoing pandemic, the office continued to deliver high levels of support to committees including the tabling of 175 reports, and the processing of almost 11,000 submissions. Reduced activity in terms of inquiries is expected in 2021-22 as a result of an anticipated election. Despite the reduced activity in committee inquiries that is expected, recruiting, training and retaining a dedicated, professional and committed staff will remain a priority of the Committee Office. Staffing levels are expected to be maintained to ensure that the Department can meet the future demands of the Senate and its committees. The office will support staff development through a range of strategies including peer and on-the-job learning, at-level forums, cross-program projects, formal training such as tertiary study, and enhanced procedural training.

The Committee Office will continue its focus on staff well-being by offering a rewarding work environment that values collaboration, and where managers demonstrate a commitment to health and well-being, and to developing the capability of their teams.

The Committee Office plans to build on strong relationships across the parliamentary service. Opportunities to work on mutually beneficial projects with colleagues in the Department of Parliamentary Services, the House of Representatives’ Committee Office and the Parliamentary Budget Office offer staff the chance to develop relevant skills and knowledge, and enhance our ability to offer high quality services to the Senate and its committees. Similar shared projects, such as a mentoring trial that was initiated in 2020-21 between the research branch of the Parliamentary Library and the Committee Offices of the Departments of the House of Representatives and the Senate, will be pursued.

Feedback about enhanced services, including the ability for committees meeting interstate to have their hearings broadcast visually, and increased opportunities for chairs to participate in training were received during the 2021 survey of committee chairs. The department will offer additional training for committee chairs in the coming year, and while broadcasting of committee hearings is the responsibility of the Department of Parliamentary Services, the committee office welcomes the opportunity to work across the parliamentary service to consider ways in which this service can be delivered.

Collaboration with the Department of Parliamentary Services ICT team is expected to result in an enhanced program for drafting and publishing committee reports in the 2021-22 year which will contribute to efficiency and productivity. An additional project between the Senate Table Office and the Senate Public Information Office is expected to allow for electronic tabling of certain published documents, creating efficiencies across the department.

64 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

65 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Black Rod’s Office Outputs

Chamber, committee room, office and printing support, ceremonial services, and security advice.

Corporate services, including payroll services for senators and human resources strategies and services for departmental staff, and support to the Clerk in meeting public governance, performance and accountability and certain record keeping requirements.

Support services, in conjunction with the Department of the House of Representatives, to the Association of Former Members of the Parliament of Australia (AFMPA).

Financial management and human resource corporate services to the Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO).

Performance information Performance results

Services are provided to the satisfaction of the President, office holders, Senate committees and senators so that they are able to fulfil their roles.

Services were delivered within timeframes and legislative requirements. Consistently positive feedback from senators, including office holders, and their staff was received throughout the reporting period.

Provision of corporate services facilitates the operations of the Senate and meets accountability obligations under the law and to the Senate.

Services were delivered within timeframes. Services supported the Clerk as the accountable authority to meet legislative obligations and the requirements of the Senate.

Services to the AFMPA are of a high standard, are provided promptly and are accurate.

Support was provided to the AFMPA as required and to a high standard.

Provisions of services to the PBO is of a high standard and is in accordance with the memorandum of understanding which includes a service level agreement.

Services were delivered to the satisfaction of the PBO.

Overview The primary functions of the Black Rod’s Office are to provide support services to the Senate, including to Senate committees and to senators at Parliament House, and to deliver certain corporate services to the department. The office is led by the Usher of the Black Rod and has three operational areas, as shown in figure 16.

The Usher of the Black Rod undertakes duties in the Senate chamber, including clerking and ceremonial roles, assisted by three senior staff and the chamber attendant team, among others. A major focus for the Black Rod’s Office during this reporting period was supporting the Senate and the department with advice and modifications to continue

66 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

operations through the COVID-19 pandemic. The office worked closely with Health Officials at both the Commonwealth and ACT Government levels to facilitate Senators’ travel to parliamentary sitting periods through multiple State COVID-19 travel restrictions.

The Usher of the Black Rod represented the department at cross-parliamentary forums including the Parliamentary Administration Advisory Group and the Security Management Board. The Usher of the Black Rod also administered the Presiding Officers’ Rules for Media Related Activity in Parliament House and its Precincts as the President’s delegate.

The Black Rod’s Office maintained its high level of service and support to the Senate, the President, senators and committees during this reporting period.

The regular work of the Black Rod’s Office involves frequent and direct contact with Senate office holders, senators and their staff, and other stakeholders, all of whom provide regular informal feedback which is generally positive. The work of the office was also subject to scrutiny by the Appropriations, Staffing and Security Committee, and by the Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee in estimates hearings.

The average full-time equivalent staffing level for the Black Rod’s Office for 2020-21 was 33.9 (33.6 in 2019-20), and the cost of running the office was $4.6m ($4.5m in 2019-20).

Senators’ services The Usher of the Black Rod and the Senators’ Services Section assist the President and Clerk on ceremonial and other occasions, and also provide chamber, committee room and message delivery services. Officers from other sections of the department continued to assist with chamber attendant duties to provide additional support as required.

During the reporting period the section also provided certain office support services to senators, their staff and departmental staff.

The printing and delivery services unit continued printing the Notice Paper and Journals of the Senate. Over the period, service turnaround times were met consistently, ensuring that documents, including committee reports, were available when required. The section also provided a high standard of delivery services to senators, their staff and departmental staff.

The section facilitated 8 suite moves for senators in the Senate wing of Parliament House as a result of vacancies, and ministry and shadow ministry changes.

The section also represented the interests of senators and the department in relation to building projects that continued throughout the reporting period, approving over 1,048 individual maintenance and building access requests.

67 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 16 - Responsibilities of the Black Rod’s Office

Executive

John Begley, Usher of the Black Rod

Procedural, protocol, ceremonial and security advice.

Advice on corporate and certain parliamentary administrative matters.

Membership of the Security Management Board.

Secretariat support to the Senate Standing Committee on Appropriations, Staffing and Security.

Secretariat support to the House Committee.

Secretariat support to various departmental committees including the Audit Committee and Workplace Consultative Committee.

Senators’ Services Human Resource Management Financial Management

John Baczynski, Deputy Usher of the Black Rod and Director, Senators’ Services Agency security advice and support Information technology security advice Accommodation Equipment management Chamber and committee room support Comcar shuttle liaison and coordination Delivery services Fleet management Office equipment Printing Project board membership

Olivia Rankin, Director, Human Resource Management Recruitment and staffing Pay and conditions Learning and development Work health and safety Rehabilitation coordination Industrial relations Performance management Services to the PBO

Fiona O’Loughlin, Chief Finance Officer Financial management and advice Financial reporting and systems management Asset management Accounts processing Strategic procurement advice Support for senior management decision-making Services to the PBO Corporate governance support and advice Compliance assurance Risk and fraud framework management

Security advice The Usher of the Black Rod and the Deputy Usher of the Black Rod provided security advice and support to the President, Senate committees, other senators and the department.

In particular, they worked closely with colleagues in the Department of Parliamentary Services’ Security Branch, the Serjeant-at-Arms’ Office and the Australian Federal Police, providing input into security matters from a Senate perspective.

68 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Human resource management The Human Resource Management Section delivers people strategy and services across the employee life cycle for departmental staff, in addition to administering certain allowances paid to senators and providing payroll services to the Parliamentary Budget Office. During this period the section focused on initiatives to improve staff health and well-being, support to staff during the COVID-19 pandemic, updates to key policies and leadership development training for managers.

Financial management The Financial Management Section delivers financial management, accounting and budgeting services, and supports the Clerk in meeting his governance and accountability obligations. The section administers the department’s financial management information system and oversees the fraud control framework.

During the reporting period, the section continued to provide assurance to the Clerk and other senior officers that the department had complied with financial reporting responsibilities, including producing audited annual financial statements and in relation to procurement. It also supported the department’s budget process, including the preparation of the portfolio budget statements and internal budgets.

The section also manages the department’s key governance mechanisms including monitoring the department’s compliance with relevant legislation, oversight of the department’s risk framework and administration of the department’s audit committee.

Corporate services for the Parliamentary Budget Office The office also provides certain financial management and human resource corporate services to the PBO on a fee-for-service basis. This is done in accordance with a memorandum of understanding which includes a service level agreement. The PBO expressed satisfaction with the department’s delivery of the outsourced corporate services functions during the period. Services provided by the department included transactional human resource and financial management services.

Performance outlook Key priorities for 2021-22 are to support the Senate and the department to continue to operate effectively during the COVID-19 pandemic and preparations for the opening of the 47th Parliament following the next federal election.

69 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Management and accountability X Corporate governance 73

X External scrutiny 78

X Management of human resources 79

X Management of financial resources 82

X Report on financial performance 84

72 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

73 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Corporate governance The department’s operations for 2020-21 were governed by the Parliamentary Service Act 1999, the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, provisions of the Fair Work Act 2009 and other legislation.

Corporate plan The department’s Corporate Plan 2020-21 outlines our objectives, role and structure, the environment in which we operate, and our approach to maintaining the capabilities of our key resource - our staff. Work reports provided to the Clerk throughout the reporting period showed continued progress in key areas and work tasks. Planned outcomes are explained in the department’s portfolio budget statements and performance results, including our annual performance statements, and are included in this report.

Management and assurance The department’s corporate governance mechanisms include two senior committees, the Program Managers’ Group, chaired by the Deputy Clerk, and the Audit Committee, chaired by an independent member from outside the department. These committees provide advice, support and assurance to the Clerk to ensure that effective governance and statutory responsibilities for the management of the department are met. The role, membership and activities of these groups are described in figure 17. A copy of the Audit Committee Charter can be found on the Department of the Senate website - www.aph.gov.au/senate/dept.

The department also participates in a range of interdepartmental committees through which the parliamentary departments coordinate common and joint activities. Chief among these were meetings of the heads of the four parliamentary departments, the Parliamentary Administration Advisory Group, the Security Management Board, the Parliamentary ICT Advisory Board (and its subordinate ICT committees), and other bodies managing joint projects.

74 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Figure 17 - Management and assurance, 2020-21

Program Managers’ Group

Role Coordinate corporate governance matters, including • human resource management • risk management and planning • performance reporting • financial planning, and • departmental service quality

Activities Five meetings Examined a range of issues in the following areas • budget • staffing (including learning and development) • health and well-being strategy (including work, health and safety) • ICT and associated risk strategies • compliance, auditing and reporting requirements • risk management (including risks related to the COVID-19 pandemic) • administrative arrangements, and • administration in common with other parliamentary departments.

Membership Deputy Clerk and program managers.

Chaired by the Deputy Clerk.

Audit Committee

Role Provide independent advice to the Clerk on the department’s financial and performance reporting responsibilities, risk oversight and management, and systems of internal controls.

Activities Five meetings Based on the committee’s charter, the committee undertook a progressive annual work plan against its four main areas of focus • financial reporting • performance reporting • risk oversight and management, and • systems of internal control.

An annual report of the committee’s activities is provided to the Clerk in December each year.

Membership Three independent members (of whom one is the Chair), the Deputy Clerk and one program manager. Further information on the members is outlined below (see figure 18).

Observers: Usher of the Black Rod (Secretary), Chief Finance Officer, representatives from the Australian National Audit Office and the department’s internal audit service provider.

75 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 18 - Audit Committee member information, 2020-21

Member name Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience Meetings attended1

Total annual remuneration2

E Montano Ms Montano holds the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws (UNSW) and is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

She has over twenty years’ experience as chair, deputy chair and member of boards and audit committees across a range of government and not for profit entities. She has broad ranging experience in governance and the machinery of government including in financial and performance reporting, risk, assurance and program and project management and oversight.

As a former Chief Executive Officer of AUSTRAC, she was the first woman to lead a Commonwealth law enforcement/regulatory agency. Prior to that appointment, she was a consultant and senior lawyer with King & Wood Mallesons.

5 (of 5) $13,473

S Murtagh Mr Murtagh holds a Certificate in Governance and Risk Management from the Governance Institute of Australia and is a member of the Risk Management Institute of Australia.

He has been a member of public sector audit committees for most of the past 13 years, informed by a career in the general government sector spanning more than 37 years, and in governance focused roles at branch head or equivalent levels for over 12 years.

5 (of 5) $10,528

G Knuckey Mr Knuckey holds a Bachelor of Economics (ANU), is a Fellow Chartered Accountant, Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a Registered Company Auditor.

He has extensive experience as an audit committee member or chair and is currently serving on audit committees for numerous government entities. He also has extensive experience as a director and serves on boards and audit committees of multiple private sector entities.

Mr Knuckey has been a full-time company director and audit committee member since 2009 following a 32 year career with Ernst & Young specialising in Audit and Assurance Services in both the public and private sectors across a range of industries.

5 (of 5) $8,250

76 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

J Morris Ms Morris holds degrees in Arts and Law from the University of Queensland.

She is currently Deputy Clerk of the Senate where she supports the Clerk in providing advice on Senate and committee proceedings and leading and managing the Senate department. She is secretary to the Senate Committee of Privileges and chairs the department’s Program Managers’ group.

Prior to her current role, she worked in several roles within the department, including Clerk Assistant (Procedure) and Senior Clerk of Committees. Before joining the department, she worked for the Indigenous Land Corporation in both policy and project roles.

5 (of 5) $0

T Bryant (to 1 Dec 2020)

Mr Bryant holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Fine Arts from the University of Sydney.

He is currently the Clerk Assistant (Table). His primary responsibilities include the leadership of the Table Office and the Senate Public Information Office, and the provision of procedural advice and programming services for the Senate. He is also the secretary to the Selection of Bills Committee and the Registrar of Senators’ Interests.

Prior to his current role, he worked in several roles within the department including Clerk Assistant (Committees), committee secretary and Director of Research. Prior to joining the department, he worked in the Department of Education.

1 (of 5)3 $0

T Matulick (from 1 Dec 2020)

Ms Matulick has an Arts degree from Flinders University, qualifications in law and education from the University of Adelaide, a Master of Laws from the Australian National University, is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a member of the Law Society of the ACT.

She is currently the Clerk Assistant (Committees). She manages the functions, resources and staffing of the Senate Committee Office, as well as providing procedural advice and training to senators and staff.

Prior to her current role, she worked in the Department of the Senate’s Procedure and Committee Offices, having joined the department in 2008. Prior to joining the department, she worked as a teacher and a lawyer and held a statutory position as a former Deputy Registrar of Aboriginal Corporations.

4 (of 5)3 $0

1 The comparison relates to the total number of meetings held in the reporting period, not the meetings attended during the member’s tenure. In addition to attending meetings, the committee members are required to consider material out-of-session including significant preparation for each meeting.

2 Total annual remuneration is GST inclusive.

3 Mr Bryant served on the committee until 1 December 2020 and was replaced by Ms Matulick.

77 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Fraud control and risk management Consistent with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act, the Clerk’s Instructions and associated financial management policies promote the proper use of the department’s resources. The Clerk’s Instructions are reviewed regularly to ensure their applicability and coverage.

The department has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting mechanisms that comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework. No incidents of fraud were detected in this reporting period.

During 2020-21, risk areas and associated controls and mitigation strategies were routinely considered by senior management and reported to the department’s Audit Committee. The framework for managing risk is revised regularly and made available to staff on the department’s intranet. Risk oversight and management is a standing agenda item for meetings of the program managers. The next review of the department’s risk management and fraud control frameworks will occur in 2021-22.

78 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

External scrutiny The Senate Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee and the Senate Standing Committee on Appropriations, Staffing and Security provide means by which senators and others may monitor the department’s performance. Matters relating to the structure and functions of the parliamentary departments may also be examined by the Appropriations, Staffing and Security Committee.

Estimates hearings are an important accountability mechanism in which senators may test advice provided by departmental officers and evaluate the department’s performance. The Clerk and officers of the department appeared before the Senate Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee on 19 October 2020, 22 March and 24 May 2021. Matters considered included committee workload and resourcing, office support to senators, and arrangements for security at Parliament House. The department also provided responses to 91 estimates questions on notice. These are published on the committee’s web pages.

The department’s activities were also scrutinised by both an internal audit service provider and the Australian National Audit Office, although that office did not conduct any performance audits covering the department’s activities during the reporting period.

The department was not subject to any judicial or administrative tribunal decisions which had, or may have, a significant impact on the department’s operations.

While not subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982, the department’s policy is to comply with the intent of the Act in relation to its administrative records to the extent practicable, having regard to the legal issues which may arise in the absence of the protections afforded by the Act. In this reporting period the department received two requests for information in relation to its administrative records which were complied with in full.

79 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Management of human resources Staffing The Clerk of the Senate is appointed by the President of the Senate under subsection 58(1) of the Parliamentary Service Act, after consulting senators. Staff are engaged under section 22 of that Act.

Additional support was provided to the department through secondment arrangements with other Commonwealth and state and territory government agencies, including the Office of Parliamentary Counsel and the Office of the Legislative Assembly (ACT), as well as by graduates participating in the Parliament of Australia Graduate Program.

Figure 19 shows that the average full-time equivalent staffing level for 2020-21 was 168, an increase from 156 in 2019-20. This reflects the department’s increased support of Senate and Joint Parliamentary Committees over the period.

Two employees identified as First Australians, the same number as in the previous reporting period.

Further staffing statistics are provided in Appendix 2.

Figure 19 - Full-time equivalent staff numbers, 2017-18 to 2020-21

The department’s learning and development framework supports staff to develop and maintain relevant skills and knowledge. Participation in learning activities is actively promoted and encouraged. In 2020-21, twenty-nine learning activities were offered.

The department offered four internal training sessions, with a focus on parliamentary skills and knowledge. Continued development of staff in the area of parliamentary procedure and practice remains a priority for the department, to support our core work providing accurate and timely procedural advice.

Twenty-five learning activities focused on skills for the workplace, leadership, health and well-being and role-specific learning (e.g. subject matter conferences).

146

2020-21 2017-18 2019-20

168 161 156 151

2018-19

80 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Financial assistance or paid leave (or both) is also available under the department’s Studybank scheme, to assist ongoing staff to undertake tertiary studies relevant to the department’s objectives. In 2020-21, 16 employees accessed Studybank.

The department participated in the 2020 Australian Public Service Employee Census, administered by the Australian Public Service Commission, in October 2020. The department’s results were posted publicly on the Australian Parliament House website.

Employment arrangements The remuneration of the Clerk of the Senate, who is the holder of a statutory office, is determined by the President of the Senate after consultation with the Remuneration Tribunal.

The department’s five Senior Executive Service (SES) employees are covered by determinations made under subsection 24(1) of the Parliamentary Service Act.

The department’s 186 non-SES employees (including casual or sessional employees and those on long-term leave) are covered by the Department of the Senate Enterprise Agreement 2017-2020.

On 15 May 2020, the Clerk made the Department of the Senate Non-SES Employees Remuneration Determination 2020, to supplement the Department of the Senate Enterprise Agreement 2017-2020 with salary increases commencing May 2021. This followed a 92 per cent ‘yes’ vote by eligible employees for this determination in lieu of bargaining for a new enterprise agreement.

Three employees had an Individual Flexibility Arrangement with the Clerk in accordance with clause 7 of the Enterprise Agreement.

Under these various workplace arrangements, staff have access to a range of entitlements, including leave, study assistance, a workplace support allowance, salary packaging, guaranteed minimum superannuation payments and other allowances. Employees can also use other services offered at Parliament House, including the sporting facilities and the Parliamentary Library. None of the department’s workplace arrangements provide for performance pay.

All employees work at Parliament House, Canberra.

In response to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Clerk made the Department of the Senate Non-SES Employees COVID-19 Determination 2021 and the Department of the Senate SES Employees COVID-19 Determination 2021. These determinations continue greater flexibility for staff accessing existing leave entitlements should they need additional leave as a result of the pandemic, and provide for paid discretionary leave for casual or sessional employees. These determinations reflect similar arrangements made in relation to the Australian Public Service.

On 18 June 2021, the department advised staff that they could access up to a total of two hours of paid discretionary leave to travel to and receive COVID-19 vaccinations. Staff who had already taken paid leave for this purpose are eligible to have up to two hours of that leave re-credited. 13 staff accessed this leave in 2020-21.

81 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Work health and safety The department promotes and protects the physical and mental health and well-being of its workers and others in the workplace by providing a safe, supportive and inclusive environment and meeting its duties and obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. The department’s Health and Safety Committee met four times during 2020-21.

The department notifies work health and safety incidents to Comcare as required by the Work Health and Safety Act. There were no notifiable incidents in 2020-21, nor was the department subject to any investigation or compliance or enforcement measure under that Act.

In response to ongoing COVID-19 pandemic restrictions and precautions, the department updated its work health and safety, well-being and working from home policies and advices to allow greater flexibility and assurance for staff to safely work from home. Specific COVID-Safe advice and support is also provided to staff who undertake official travel. The department, through the Usher of the Black Rod, worked closely with Health Officials to ensure the department continues to operate on a COVID-Safe footing, especially during estimates and sitting periods. Detailed COVID-Safe plans have been made for major undertakings and are updated as needed when conditions change.

82 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Management of financial resources Procurement The department applies the requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act and the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. During the reporting period, the procurement function was reviewed by an internal audit. No issues were identified with the department’s procurement practices and minor amendments to administrative practices were recommended. The department supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website. The department has adopted the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low-risk procurements valued under $200,000 and electronic systems and processes are used to facilitate on-time payment performance.

Consultancy and non-consultancy contracts Expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts The department engages consultants to provide specialist expertise when not available within the department, or where an independent assessment is desirable. The department uses various selection processes to engage consultants including open tender, selective tender, direct sourcing, a panel of recognised or pre-eminent experts, or consultants who have previously undertaken work for the department or are known to have the requisite skills.

Reportable consultancy contracts 2020-21 Number Expenditure1 $

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 1 12,100

Ongoing contracts entered into during the previous reporting period 4 101,838

Total 5 113,938

Organisations receiving a share of the reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 Expenditure1 $

KPMG 72,886

Elizabeth Montano 13,473

Pickles Valuation Services 12,100

Storm IT Pty Ltd 10,528

McBeath Pty Ltd 4,950

Total 113,938

1 Expenditure is calculated on a cash basis and includes GST where applicable.

83 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

During 2020-21, one new consultancy contract was entered into involving total actual expenditure of $0.01m. In addition, four ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $0.10m. This amount does not include $0.16m for the provision of independent legal advice supporting the work of the two legislative scrutiny committees and the Joint Parliamentary Committee on Human Rights.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts

Reportable non-consultancy contracts 2020-21 Number Expenditure1 $

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 9 522,519

Ongoing contracts entered into during the previous reporting period 11 263,598

Total 20 786,117

Organisations receiving a share of the reportable non-consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 Expenditure1 $

Encore IT Services 123,820

Dell Australia Pty Ltd 110,603

Aurion Corporation 107,447

Fuji Xerox Australia Pty Ltd 92,776

Fuji Xerox Business Force Pty Ltd 53,440

Technology One 42,726

Icelab 39,858

Total 570,671

1 Expenditure is calculated on a cash basis and includes GST where applicable.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Advertising and market research In 2020-21, the department did not conduct any advertising campaigns or market research.

84 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Report on financial performance Overview In 2020-21, the department was appropriated $25.810m by the Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Act (No.1) 2020-21. This revenue included one-off departmental supplementation of $2.241m to support the elevated levels of committee activity during the financial year.

The department ended the financial year with an operating surplus of $1.798m (excluding asset related adjustments). The delayed timing of the 2020 budget and the continuing impact of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in delays in recruiting additional staff and a reduction in large expenditure items such as staff travel to support committees. Without the supplementary funding received in the October 2020 budget, the department would have been overspent against current resourcing levels.

Net results The following table outlines a summary of financial results between 2019-20 and 2020-21:

Statement of comprehensive income 2020-21 ($’000) 2019-20 ($’000)

Variance ($’000) Variance %

Total own-source revenue 451 453 (2) 0.4%

Total revenue from government 25,810 23,452 2,358 10.1%

Total expenses 24,909 24,185 724 3.0%

Net surplus/(deficit)* 1,352 (280)

* including asset related adjustments

The department’s operating expenses for 2020-21 were $24.463m (excluding asset related adjustments). The majority of the expenditure is on employee benefits ($22.163m), with the remaining nine per cent on supplier related expenses. A further breakdown of the proportion of expenses is shown in the following figure:

85 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Figure 20 - Expense by type 2020-21

Other supplier expenses - $0.56m, 2%

Consultants and contractors - $0.41m, 2%

Employee benefits - $22.16m, 91%

Travel - $0.37m, 1%

Assets and ICT related - $0.34m, 1%

Subscriptions, media and publications - $0.62m, 3%

Financial position The following table outlines a summary of financial position between 2019-20 and 2020-21:

Statement of financial position 2020-21 ($’000) 2019-20 ($’000)

Variance ($’000) Variance %

Total assets 17,461 15,951 1,510 9.5%

Total liabilities 8,674 8,352 322 3.9%

Equity/Net assets 8,787 7,599 1,188 15.6%

As at 30 June 2021, the department’s net equity was $8.787m, representing $17.461m of assets offset by $8.674m of liabilities. Most of these assets and liabilities are of a financial nature, with the largest balance being appropriation and other receivables ($14.848m). The majority of the department’s liabilities relate to employee provisions ($7.778m) and the remainder to short term payable ($0.863m) for accrued salaries and trade payables.

Entity resource statement The entity resource statement provides additional information about the funding sources that the department had access to during the year. Appendix 1 details the resources available to the department during 2020-21 and sets out a summary of total expenses for Outcome 1.

86 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Sustainability The department’s financial performance for the last five years is demonstrated below:

Figure 21 - Financial performance 2016-17 to 2020-21

FINANCIAL YEAR

TOTAL ($’000)

INCOME EXPENSES

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

2017-18 2016-17 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

While the department received one-off supplementation in 2020-21 and 2021-22, the continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in department not spending the full allocation in 2020-21. If the number and duration of committees established by the Senate continues at this level in future parliaments, the cost of these services cannot be accommodated without further supplementation.

87 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Financial statements X Independent Auditor’s Report 91

X Certification 93

X Statement of comprehensive income 94

X Statement of financial position 95

X Statement of changes in equity 96

X Cash flow statement 97

X Notes to the financial statements 98

90 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

91 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Independent Auditor’s Report

92 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Independent Auditor’s Report (continued)

93 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Certification by the Clerk of the Senate and the Chief Finance Officer

94 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Original Budget $’000

EXPENSES

Employee benefits 1.1A 22,163 21,536 23,437

Suppliers 1.1B 4,362 4,641 5,006

Depreciation and amortisation 2.2 188 156 197

Assets transferred to related entities 2.2 235 - -

Loss on disposal of assets 2.2 23 69 -

Total expenses 26,971 26,402 28,640

LESS:

REVENUE

Other revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 1.2 451 453 450

Resources received free of charge 1.2 2,062 2,217 2,204

Total other revenue 2,513 2,670 2,654

NET COST OF SERVICES 24,458 23,732 25,986

Revenue from government 25,810 23,452 25,810

Surplus / (Deficit) 1,352 (280) (176)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation reserve 148 - -

Total other comprehensive income 148 - -

Total comprehensive income / (loss) 1,500 (280) (176)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Original budget figures are those published in the department’s 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

95 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Original Budget $’000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 2.1A 147 153 153

Trade and other receivables 2.1B 14,848 12,478 12,478

Total financial assets 14,995 12,631 12,631

Non-financial assets

Property, plant and equipment 2.2 1,897 2,049 2,213

Right of use 2.2 32 54 33

Intangibles 2.2 178 848 197

Inventories 121 130 130

Prepayments 238 239 239

Total non-financial assets 2,466 3,320 2,812

Total assets 17,461 15,951 15,443

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 2.3A 314 94 94

Other payables 2.3A 549 467 467

Total payables 863 561 561

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 2.3B 33 54 33

Total interest bearing liabilities 33 54 33

Provisions

Employee provisions 3A 7,778 7,737 7,737

Total provisions 7,778 7,737 7,737

Total liabilities 8,674 8,352 8,331

Net assets 8,787 7,599 7,112

EQUITY

Contributed equity 2,603 2,915 2,604

Reserves 11,495 11,347 11,347

Accumulated deficit (5,311) (6,663) (6,839)

Total equity 8,787 7,599 7,112

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Original budget figures are those published in the department’s 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

96 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Statement of changes in equity as at 30 June 2021

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Original Budget $’000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 2,915 2,514 2,915

Transactions with owners

Contribution by owners

Equity injections - appropriation 401 401 401

Non-reciprocal transfer - assets (713) - (712)

Total transactions with owners (312) 401 (311)

Closing balance as at 30 June 2,603 2,915 2,604

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period (6,663) (6,383) (6,663)

Comprehensive income

Surplus / (Deficit) for the period 1,352 (280) (176)

Total comprehensive income 1,352 (280) (176)

Closing balance as at 30 June (5,311) (6,663) (6,839)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 11,347 11,347 11,347

Comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income 148 - -

Total comprehensive income 148 - -

Closing balance as at 30 June 11,495 11,347 11,347

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 7,599 7,478 7,599

Comprehensive income

Surplus / (Deficit) for the period 1,352 (280) (176)

Other comprehensive income 148 - -

Total comprehensive income 1,500 (280) (176)

Transactions with owners

Contribution by owners

Equity injections - appropriation 401 401 401

Non-reciprocal transfer - assets (713) - (712)

Closing balance as at 30 June 8,787 7,599 7,112

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Original budget figures are those published in the department’s 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Amounts appropriated which are designated as equity injections for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCB) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

97 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Original Budget $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 24,502 23,327 25,810

Sale of goods and rendering of services 548 387 450

Net GST received 127 156 200

Total cash received 25,177 23,870 26,460

Cash used

Employees 22,097 20,566 23,437

Suppliers 2,153 2,649 3,002

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA 913 717 -

Total cash used 25,163 23,932 26,439

Net cash used by operating activities 14 (62) 21

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 88 135 289

Purchase of intangibles 80 830 112

Total cash used 168 965 401

Net cash used by investing activities (168) (965) (401)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contributed equity 170 967 401

Total cash received 170 967 401

Cash used

Principal payments of lease liabilities 21 11 21

Total cash used 21 11 21

Net cash from financing activities 149 956 380

Net decrease in cash held (6) (71) -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 153 224 153

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 147 153 153

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Original budget figures are those published in the department’s 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Section 74 receipts are not separately identified in the Portfolio Budget Statements.

98 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Overview

Note 1: Financial performance

Note 2: Financial position

Note 3: People and relationships

Note 4: Appropriations

Note 5: Explanation of major budget variances

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

99 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Overview Objective of the Department of the Senate The Department of the Senate is a not-for-profit entity. Its activities are classified as departmental. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses controlled or incurred by the department in its own right within its one outcome. Further details are contained in the statement of comprehensive income and the statement of financial position, and in the resource statement on page 121.

Basis of preparation of the financial statements The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:

• the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting Rule) 2015 (FRR), and

• Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Significant accounting judgements and estimates In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the department has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

• leave provisions involve assumptions based on the expected tenure of existing staff, patterns of leave claims and payouts, future salary movements and future discount rates.

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

100 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

New accounting standards All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material impact on the department’s financial statements.

Future Australian Accounting Standard requirements No new or revised pronouncements were issued by the AASB prior to the finalisation of the financial statements which are expected to have a material impact on the department in future reporting periods.

Taxation The department is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Events after the reporting period No events have occurred after balance date that should be brought to account or noted in the 2020-21 financial statements.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

101 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Note 1: Financial performance

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 1.1: Expenses

Note 1.1A: Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 15,881 14,961

Superannuation

Defined benefit plans 1,203 1,277

Defined contribution plans 1,823 1,591

Leave and other entitlements 3,256 3,707

Total employee benefits 22,163 21,536

Prior year expenses have been reclassified to apply to the categories listed.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Accounting policy

Superannuation Employees of the department are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), Public Sector Superannuation accumulation plan (PSSap) or other elected defined contribution schemes.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Commonwealth. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported by the Department of Finance as an administered item.

The department makes employer contributions to the relevant employees’ defined benefit schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the government and accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

Leave and other entitlements Accounting policies for leave and other entitlements are contained at note 3A - Employee Provisions.

102 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 1.1B: Suppliers

Goods and services

Employee related supplier expenses 222 199

Consultants and contractors 412 461

Asset and ICT related 336 341

Travel 370 506

Hire charges and hospitality 80 124

Subscriptions, media and publications 619 564

General office expenses 201 152

Resources received free of charge

DPS - Accommodation at Parliament House 1,841 2,075

ANAO - 2020-21 audit fee 87 87

Secondments 134 55

Total goods and services 4,302 4,564

Other supplier expenses

Workers compensation 60 66

Short-term leases - 11

Total other supplier expenses 60 77

Total supplier expenses 4,362 4,641

Prior year expenses have been reclassified to apply to the categories listed.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Accounting policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets The department has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The department recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

103 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 1.2: Own-source income

Revenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods 11 24

Provision of services 440 429

Total revenue from contracts with customers 451 453

Resources received free of charge

DPS - Accommodation at Parliament House 1,841 2,075

ANAO auditor remuneration 87 87

Secondments 134 55

Total resources received free of charge 2,062 2,217

Total own-source income 2,513 2,670

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Major product / service type:

Provision of corporate services 90 107

Provision of parliamentary education services 350 322

Sale of goods 11 24

Total revenue from contracts with customers 451 453

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

104 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Accounting policy

Revenue The department receives revenue from appropriations, the rendering of services and the sale of goods.

Revenue from sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer. The department reviews contracts with customers to ascertain if the contract is in scope of AASB 15 and if the performance obligations are required by an enforceable contract and they are sufficiently specific to enable the department to determine when they have been satisfied.

The department had no remaining or unsatisfied performance obligations as at 30 June 2021.

The following is a description of the principal activities from which the department generates its revenue:

• provision of corporate services to other government entities via formal contract - revenue recognised over time as identified performance obligations are fulfilled, i.e. as services are rendered.

• provision of parliamentary education services via formal contract - revenue recognised over time as identified performance obligations are fulfilled, i.e. as services are rendered.

• sale of merchandise and educational materials based on customary business practices - revenue recognised at point of time when payment received and control passes to customer, i.e. upon shipment to customer.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the department expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Resources received free of charge Resources received free of charge are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income as revenue where the amounts can be reliably measured and the services would have been purchased if they had not been provided free of charge. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

The department’s resources received free of charge relate to audit services from the Australian National Audit Office, accommodation at Parliament House from the Department of Parliamentary Services and secondments to the department.

Revenue from government The departmental appropriation for the financial year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) is recognised as revenue from government when the department gains control of the appropriation. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

105 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Note 2: Financial position

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 2.1: Financial assets

Note 2.1A: Cash and cash equivalents

Cash at bank 147 153

Total cash and cash equivalents 147 153

Note 2.1B: Receivables

Appropriation receivable 14,805 12,354

Trade and other receivables 19 104

GST receivable (from ATO) 24 20

Total receivables 14,848 12,478

Accounting policy

Financial assets Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and deposits in bank accounts.

Receivables for goods and services are recognised at nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is continually reviewed. Allowances are made on an expected loss basis.

Trade receivables and other receivables are recorded at face value less any impairment.

Trade receivables are recognised when the department becomes party to a contract and has a legal right to receive cash. Loans and receivables are assessed for impairment on initial recognition. Impairment allowances are made on a lifetime expected loss basis. Trade receivables are derecognised on payment.

The fair values of the department’s financial assets and liabilities approximate their carrying amounts.

106 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

2021

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Note 2.2: Non-financial assets Reconciliation of opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment, right of use and intangibles

PP&E RoU Intangibles

Work in Progress-Intangibles Total

As at 1 July 2020

Gross book value 2,298 64 551 713 3,626

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (249) (10) (416) - (675)

Total as at 1 July 2020 2,049 54 135 713 2,951

Additions by purchase 88 - 80 - 168

Depreciation/amortisation expense (129) (22) (37) - (188)

Revaluations and impairments

Gross value (211) - - - (211)

Accumulated depreciation 358 - - - 358

Disposals

Gross value (33) - (30) - (63)

Accumulated depreciation 10 - 30 - 40

Other movements

Non-reciprocal transfers - - - (713) (713)

Transfers to related entities (235) - - - (235)

Total as at 30 June 2021 1,897 32 178 - 2,107

Total as at 30 June 2021 represented by:

Gross book value 1,907 64 601 - 2,572

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (10) (32) (423) - (465)

Total as at 30 June 2021 1,897 32 178 - 2,107

Right of use and intangible assets are measured and carried at cost. Property, plant and equipment assets are carried at fair value following initial recognition at cost.

All revaluations are conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated later in this note and a revaluation of the department’s property, plant and equipment assets was conducted by an independent valuer as at 31 May 2021.

A revaluation increment of $147,283 for the property, plant and equipment class was recorded against the asset revaluation reserve. This movement in reserves is also included in the equity section of the statement of financial position.

The department removed from its asset register a number of furniture assets that were identified as belonging to the Department of Parliamentary Services. These items are recorded as a transfer to a related entity in Note 2.2 and the Income Statement.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of plant, equipment and intangible assets The department has $101,548 of contractual commitments payable within 1 year, primarily for the acquisition of ICT equipment.

Amounts for capital commitments are GST inclusive.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

107 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Accounting policy

Acquisition of assets Purchases of non-financial assets are initially recognised at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at fair value.

Property, plant and equipment Revaluations Following initial recognition at cost, plant and equipment assets (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Carrying amounts are reviewed every year to determine if an independent valuation is required. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised through operating result. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Upon revaluation, any accumulated depreciation is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset. A revaluation of the department’s assets was undertaken at 31 May 2021.

Depreciation Depreciable plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the department, using in all cases the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date.

Depreciation and amortisation rates applying to each category of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset class 2021 2020

Plant and equipment 5 to 15 years 5 to 15 years

Furniture and fittings 5 to 100 years 5 to 100 years

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

108 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Impairment All assets were assessed for indications of impairment at 30 June 2021. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment loss recognised if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

Derecognition An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Gains or losses from disposal of plant and equipment are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received.

Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

Fair value measurement All property, plant and equipment is measured at fair value in the statement of financial position. When estimating fair value, market prices (with adjustments) are used where available. Where market prices are not available, depreciated replacement cost is used. A reconciliation of movements in property, plant and equipment is included above.

Intangibles The department’s intangible assets comprise of internally developed software and purchased software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful life of the department’s software is 3 to 7 years (2020: 3 to 7 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2021.

Inventories Inventories held for sale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

109 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 2.3: Payables

Note 2.3A: Supplier and other payables

Trade creditors and accruals 314 94

Salaries and wages 419 314

Superannuation 60 45

FBT payable (to ATO) 70 108

Total supplier and other payables 863 561

The department’s only financial liabilities are supplier payables.

Note 2.3B: Interest bearing liabilities

Lease liabilities 33 54

Total interest bearing liabilities 33 54

Lease liabilities analysis

The department’s lease liability maturity profile is as follows:

Within 1 year 23 22

Between 1 to 5 years 10 32

Total lease liabilities 33 54

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

110 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Accounting policy

Payables Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced). Supplier and other payables are derecognised on payment. Supplier payables are settled within 20 days.

The liabilities for salaries and superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2021 represents outstanding contributions for the final pay fortnight of the year.

For all new contracts entered into, the department considers whether the contract is, or contains a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate is readily determinable, or the department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased for interest. It is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease liability is remeasured, the corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right-of-use asset or profit and loss depending on the nature of the reassessment or modification.

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets The department had no quantifiable or unquantifiable contingent assets or liabilities as at 30 June 2021 (2020: nil).

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

111 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 2.4: Current / non-current distinction for assets and liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents 147 153

Trade and other receivables 14,849 12,478

Prepayments 237 239

Right of use 22 22

Inventories 121 130

Total no more than 12 months 15,376 13,022

More than 12 months

Property, plant and equipment 1,897 2,049

Right of use 10 32

Intangibles 178 848

Total more than 12 months 2,085 2,929

Total assets 17,461 15,951

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

Suppliers 314 94

Other payables 549 467

Leases 23 22

Employee provisions 1,550 1,412

Total no more than 12 months 2,436 1,995

More than 12 months

Leases 10 32

Employee provisions 6,228 6,325

Total more than 12 months 6,238 6,357

Total liabilities 8,674 8,352

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

112 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Note 3: People and relationships

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 3A: Employee provisions

Leave

Annual leave 2,162 1,974

Long service leave 5,616 5,763

Total employee provisions 7,778 7,737

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Accounting policy

Employee benefits Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for personal leave as all personal leave is non-vesting and the average personal leave taken in future years by employees of the department is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for personal leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will apply at the time the leave is taken, plus the department’s employer superannuation contribution rates, and applicable on-costs, to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to FRR 24.1(a) using the shorthand method as at 30 June 2021. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases though promotion and inflation.

113 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Note 3B: Key management personnel remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the department, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the department.1

The department has determined the key management personnel to be the Clerk, Deputy Clerk, Clerk Assistants and the Usher of the Black Rod. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below.

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Key management personnel remuneration

Short-term employee benefits 1,546 1,575

Post-employment benefits 229 230

Other long-term employee benefits 35 35

Total key management personnel remuneration 1,810 1,840

The total number of key management personnel included in the above table is six individuals (2020: seven).

1 The President of the Senate is not considered key management personnel. The powers of the President do not give rise to a capacity to plan, direct or control the activities of the department, or significantly influence the department in its financial or operating policy decisions.

Note 3C: Related party transactions Related parties to the department are defined as key management personnel and close family members of key management personnel. A related party transaction is a transfer of resources, services or obligations between the department and a related party, regardless of whether a price is charged.

During 2020-21, there were no related party transactions.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

114 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Note 3D: Executive remuneration disclosure - Key management personnel

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total

remuneration Name Position title Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances Superannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other

long-term benefits

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

R Pye Clerk of the Senate 404,456 - 1,559 58,575 9,896 - - 474,486

J Morris Deputy Clerk of the Senate 234,922 - 27,271 39,882 5,775 - - 307,850

T Bryant Clerk Assistant, Table 193,171 - 27,271 36,941 4,897 - - 262,280

R Callinan Clerk Assistant, Procedure 198,174 - 27,271 30,260 4,897 - - 260,602

J Begley Usher of the Black Rod 200,050 - 27,271 30,260 4,897 - - 262,478

T Matulick Clerk Assistant, Committees 178,111 - 26,265 33,364 4,475 - - 242,215

Total 1

1,408,884 - 136,908 229,282 34,837 - - 1,809,911

1 The total amounts outlined in the table above correspond with the disclosure at note 3B. Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

115 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Note 3E: Executive remuneration disclosure - Senior executives and other highly paid staff During the reporting period, all the department senior executives were included in the key management personnel disclosed above (2020: nil).

The department did not have any other highly paid staff that meet the reporting threshold (2020: nil).

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Accounting policy

Remuneration policies, practices and governance arrangements The Clerk of the Senate’s remuneration is determined by the President of the Senate, after consultation with the Remuneration Tribunal, under section 63 of the Parliamentary Service Act 1999. In practice, the advice of the tribunal and the determinations of the Presiding Officers fix the remuneration of the heads of the four parliamentary departments at the same level. All other Senior Executive Service (SES) staff are remunerated under determinations made by the Clerk of the Senate under subsection 24(1) of the Parliamentary Service Act 1999.

For many years the department’s policy has been that changes in SES terms and conditions reflect equivalent changes for non-SES employees in the department’s enterprise agreements. On 26 March 2020, the Government announced a stay on increases in remuneration, entitlements and allowances for all SES employees. On 25 June 2021, the Australian Public Service Commission advised that the stay on SES pay rises had ended and Agency Heads could adjust SES remuneration consistent with the requirements of relevant Government policies.

The department’s remuneration arrangements do not provide for performance pay for any staff. Staff can also use other services offered at Parliament House, including vehicle parking.

The department did not identify any non-SES staff in the period whose remuneration exceeded the threshold amount for reporting key management personnel.

116 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Note 4: Appropriations

2021 $’000

2020 $’000

Note 4A: Annual appropriations (recoverable GST exclusive) Annual appropriation 25,810 23,452

PGPA Act - section 74 receipts 913 717

Departmental capital budget (DCB) 1 401 401

Total appropriation 27,124 24,570

Appropriation applied (current and prior years) 24,672 24,295

Variance 2 2,452 275

1 The DCB is appropriated through the Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Act (No. 1). It is not separately identified in the Appropriation Act.

2 The variance in 2021 is primarily driven by delays in anticipated employee recruitment following the postponed 2021 Budget, in which the department received additional funding, and the continuing impact of the pandemic on the department’s expenditure.

Note 4B: Unspent annual appropriations (recoverable GST exclusive) Departmental

Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Act (No. 1) 2019-20 188 12,507 Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Act (No. 1) 2020-21 14,764 -Total 14,952 12,507

Note 4C: Special appropriations managed through third party arrangements (recoverable GST exclusive) Authority 3

Department of Finance - Parliamentary Superannuation Act 2004, s. 18 2,754 2,769

Department of Finance - Australian Constitution, s. 66 1,233 1,417

Department of Finance - Parliamentary Business Resources Act 2017, s. 59 20,657 21,312

Total 24,644 25,498

3 Arrangements have been entered into with the Department of Finance to allow the department to draw upon these appropriations.

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

117 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Note 5: Explanation of major budget variances

Explanation of major variance

Variance to budget $’000

Variance to budget %

Affected line items

Slower than anticipated recruitment activity as a result of the delayed timing of the 2020-21 budget and the continuing impact of the pandemic led to lower employee costs and a reduction in associated supplier expenses throughout the year

1,274 644

5% 15%

Statement of comprehensive income:

• Employee benefits • Suppliers

(2,370)

(1,528)

-16%

-29%

Statement of financial position:

• Trade and other receivables • Accumulated deficit

(1,528)

-113%

Statement of changes in equity:

• Surplus/deficit for the period

1,308

1,340 849

5%

6% 39%

Cash Flow Statement:

• Cash received - appropriations • Cash used - employees • Cash used - suppliers

Lower than anticipated demand for asset replacement during the year resulted in variances against the original budget.

316

17%

Statement of financial position:

• Non-financial assets

232

231

265%

136%

Cash Flow Statement:

• Cash used - investing activities • Cash received - contributed equity

A transfer of assets to the Department of Parliamentary Services occurred during the year that was not anticipated at the time of the original budget.

(235)

-100%

Statement of comprehensive income:

• Assets transferred to related entities

316

17%

Statement of financial position:

• Property, plant and equipment

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021

Appendices X 1—Resources 121

X 2—Staffing 123

X 3—Contact details 125

120 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

121 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Appendix 1 - Resources Pursuant to paragraph 17AF(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, the following table provides a summary of the department’s total resources and payments made during the reporting period and corresponds with the department’s portfolio budget statements for 2020-21.

Resource statement, 2020-21

 

Actual available

appropriations for 2020-21 $’000 (a)

Payments made in 2020-21 $’000

(b)

Balance remaining $’000 (a - b)

Appropriations Departmental appropriation Prior year departmental appropriations 12,507 12,319 188

Departmental appropriations 1 27,124 12,360 14,764

Total departmental annual appropriations 39,631 24,679 14,952

Total resourcing and payments 39,631 24,679 14,952

1 Includes an amount of $0.401m in 2020-21 for the departmental capital budget

122 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

123 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Appendix 2 - Staffing The figures in these tables include staff on long-term paid leave, but exclude staff on leave without pay or on temporary movements out of the department at 30 June 2021, as well as non-ongoing staff employed on an irregular or intermittent basis who did not work on 30 June 2021.

Staff numbers, by classification, salary range and gender, 30 June 2021

Salary ($) Gender Total

Classification Male Female

Clerk of the Senate 434,690* 1 - 1

Deputy Clerk of the Senate (SES Band 2) 229,715-241,805 - 1 1

Clerk Assistants and Usher of the Black Rod (SES Band 1) 189,542-199,068 2 2 4

Parliamentary Executive Level 2 (PEL 2) 143,910-153,874 12 11 23

Parliamentary Executive Level 1 (PEL 1) 115,685-129,584 11 23 34

Parliamentary Service Level 6 (APS 6) 95,721-105,001 14 33 47

Parliamentary Service Level 5 (APS 5) 84,980-90,246 2 4 6

Parliamentary Service Level 4 (APS 4) 76,067-81,705 8 19 27

Parliamentary Service Level 3 (APS 3) 67,824-73,270 9 18 27

Parliamentary Service Level 2 (APS 2) 59,684-66,456 3 2 5

Parliamentary Service Level 1 (APS 1) 53,091-58,964 2 1 3

Total 64 114 178

SES = Senior Executive Service, PEL = Parliamentary Executive Level, APS = Australian Parliamentary Service * Indicates total remuneration package

124 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

Employees by gender

2020-2021 2019-2020

Gender Ongoing Non-ongoing Ongoing Non-ongoing

Female 108 6 98 13

Male 58 6 52 5

Total 166 12 150 18

Full-time and part-time employees

2020-2021 2019-2020

Full-time or part-time Ongoing Non-ongoing Ongoing Non-ongoing

Full-time 144 8 129 14

Part-time 22 4 21 4

Total 166 12 150 18

Employees by classification

2020-2021 2019-2020

Classification Ongoing Non-ongoing Ongoing Non-ongoing

Clerk of the Senate - 1 - 1

SES2 1 - 2 -

SES1 4 - 4 -

PEL2 23 - 23 -

PEL1 32 2 27 3

APS6 44 3 41 7

APS5 6 - 5 -

APS4 26 1 25 2

APS3 23 4 16 5

APS2 5 - 5 -

APS1 2 1 2 -

Total 166 12 150 18

125 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Appendix 3 - Contact details This appendix lists contact details for all areas of the department.

Department of the Senate Parliament House, Canberra ACT 2600 Phone: 02 6277 7111 Website: www.aph.gov.au/senate/dept

Office holders and senior officers of the Senate

PRESIDENT’S OFFICE

President of the Senate Senator the Hon. Scott Ryan Email: senator.ryan@aph.gov.au

Parliament House Phone: 02 6277 3300

Electorate Office—East Melbourne, Victoria Phone: 03 9660 6410

Deputy President of the Senate Senator Sue Lines Email: senator.lines@aph.gov.au

Parliament House Phone: 02 6277 3804

Electorate Office—West Perth, Western Australia Phone: 08 9481 4844

CLERK’S OFFICE

Clerk of the Senate Richard Pye Email: clerk.sen@aph.gov.au Phone: 02 6277 3350

Deputy Clerk of the Senate Jackie Morris Email: depclerk.sen@aph.gov.au

Phone: 02 6277 3360

TABLE OFFICE, SPIO PROCEDURE OFFICE, PEO

Clerk Assistant (Table) Tim Bryant Email: ca.table.sen@aph.gov.au

Phone: 02 6277 3020

Clerk Assistant (Procedure) Rachel Callinan Email: ca.procedure.sen@aph.gov.au

Phone: 02 6277 3380

COMMITTEE OFFICE BLACK ROD’S OFFICE

Clerk Assistant (Committees) Toni Matulick Email: ca.committees.sen@aph.gov.au Phone: 02 6277 3371

Usher of the Black Rod / Chief Operating Officer John Begley Email: blackrod.sen@aph.gov.au Phone: 02 6277 3398

References X Glossary and abbreviations list 129

X List of requirements 131

X Alphabetical index 135

128 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

129 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Glossary and abbreviations list amendments and requests for amendments

Proposals to alter a bill, which may be moved by any senator or member. Any amendments made by one House must be agreed to by the other House before a bill can become law. The Senate may not amend bills imposing taxation or appropriating money for the Commonwealth’s ordinary annual services; nor may it amend a bill so as to increase a charge or burden on the people. The Senate may, however, ‘request’ the House of Representatives to make such amendments.

AFMPA Association of Former Members of the Parliament of Australia

AusTender Australian Government tender information system

bill A proposal for a law that is introduced into Parliament. Bills are considered consecutively by the House of Representatives and the Senate. The two Houses must agree to a bill in identical terms before it can be transmitted to the Governor-General for assent, which marks its passage into law.

committee of the whole A committee consisting of all the members of the Senate formed to consider a bill in detail.

COVID-19 Stands for novel coronavirus disease 2019, which is the illness caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2).

DPS Department of Parliamentary Services

estimates hearings The term commonly used to describe the consideration by Senate legislation committees of the annual and additional estimates of expenditure of government departments and agencies.

IPRO International and Parliamentary Relations Office

motions Proposals for the Senate to agree to something, which must be expressed in a way that conforms with the standing orders.

pandemic A worldwide spread of an infectious disease.

parliamentary privilege

Two significant aspects of the law relating to parliament: the privileges or immunities of the Houses of the Commonwealth Parliament; and the powers of the Houses to protect the integrity of their processes, particularly the power to punish contempts.

PBO Parliamentary Budget Office

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PEO Parliamentary Education Office

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

130 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

PSC Parliamentary Skills Centre

Presiding Officers The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives are the Presiding Officers. Each presides over the proceedings of his or her respective House. Administratively, each is responsible for his or her respective House department and together they are responsible for the Department of Parliamentary Services and the Parliamentary Budget Office.

procedural scripts Scripts containing both routine and complex wording to be used by senators to ensure compliance with standing orders when taking part in proceedings in the Senate.

questions on notice When referred to in the context of the Senate, these are written questions to ministers from other senators. Questions on notice in the context of estimates proceedings are written or oral questions from committee members to a minister and/or the minister’s departmental officers, which require written answers from the minister or the minister’s department.

second reading amendments Proposed resolutions which comment on or affect the passage of bills, but do not propose specific changes to the text of bills.

SES Senior Executive Service

SPIO Senate Public Information Office

Standing Orders Procedural rules that govern the conduct of proceedings in the Senate and its committees.

TOPS Table Offices Production System

131 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

List of requirements PGPA Rule reference Description Requirement Location

General

17AD(g) & 17AI Letter of transmittal Mandatory iii

17AJ(a) Table of contents Mandatory v

17AJ(b) Alphabetical index Mandatory 135

17AJ(c) Glossary and abbreviations list Mandatory 129

17AJ(d) List of requirements Mandatory 131

17AJ(e) Contact officer Mandatory ii, 125

17AJ(f) & (g) Web address and electronic address of report Mandatory iv

Clerk’s review

17AD(a) A review by the accountable authority Mandatory 3

Departmental overview

17AE(1)(a)(i) Role and functions Mandatory 9

17AE(1)(a)(ii) Organisational structure Mandatory 10

17AE(1)(a)(iii) Outcome and program structure Mandatory 11

17AE(1)(a)(iv) Purposes as included in corporate plan Mandatory 17

17AE(1)(aa) Information on the accountable authority Mandatory 10

17AE(1)(b) Portfolio structure Portfolio

departments - mandatory

N/A

17AE(2) Variations to outcomes and programs If applicable,

mandatory

N/A

Report on performance

Annual performance statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F Annual performance statements Mandatory 15-27

Report on financial performance

17AF(1)(a) Discussion and analysis of the department’s financial performance Mandatory 16,

84-86

17AF(1)(b) Table summarising the total resources and total payments of the department Mandatory 121

17AF(2) Significant changes in the financial results If applicable, mandatory N/A

132 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

PGPA Rule reference Description Requirement Location

Management and accountability

Corporate governance

17AG(2)(a) Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems) Mandatory 77

17AG(2)(b) Fraud control certification by the accountable authority Mandatory iii

17AG(2)(c) Corporate governance structure and processes Mandatory 73-77

17AG(2)(d)-(e) Reportable non-compliance with finance law If applicable, mandatory N/A

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) Charter of the Audit Committee (direct electronic address) Mandatory 73

17AG(2A) (b)-(e)

The name, qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member. Information about the attendance of each member at committee meetings and their remuneration.

Mandatory 75-76

External scrutiny

17AG(3) Developments in external scrutiny Mandatory 78

17AG(3)(a) Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on operations

If applicable, mandatory

N/A

17AG(3)(b) Reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a parliamentary committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman

If applicable, mandatory

N/A

17AG(3)(c) Capability reviews on the entity released during the period If applicable, mandatory

N/A

Management of human resources

17AG(4)(a) An assessment of the departments’ effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve department objectives

Mandatory 79-81

17AG(4)(aa) and (b) Statistics on the department’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis

Mandatory 79-81

123-124

17AG(4)(c) Employment arrangements Mandatory 80

17AG(4)(c)(i) Number of SES and non-SES employees covered by employment agreements Mandatory 80

133 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

PGPA Rule reference Description Requirement Location

17AG(4)(c)(ii) Salary ranges by classification level Mandatory 123

17AG(4)(c)(iii) A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees Mandatory 80

17AG(4)(d) Performance pay If applicable,

mandatory

N/A

Assets management

17AG(5) Effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the department’s activities

If applicable, mandatory

N/A

Purchasing

17AG(6) Department performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules Mandatory 82

Reportable consultancy contracts

17AG(7)(a) and (b)

Summary statement regarding the number of new and existing reportable consultancy contracts Mandatory 82

17AG(7)(c) A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged

Mandatory 82

17AG(7)(d) A statement that ‘Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.’

Mandatory 83

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AG(7A)(a) Summary statement regarding the number of new and existing reportable non-consultancy contracts Mandatory 83

17AG(7A)(b) A statement that ‘Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.’

Mandatory 83

Additional information

17AGA Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

Mandatory 82-83

134 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

PGPA Rule reference Description Requirement Location

Australian National Audit Office access clauses

17AG(8) Australian National Audit Office access clause If applicable, mandatory N/A

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) Contracts or standing offers with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which have been exempted from being published in AusTender

If applicable, mandatory

N/A

Small business

17AG(10)(a) Statement regarding support of small business participation Mandatory 82

17AG(10)(b) An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the department support small and medium enterprises

Mandatory 82

17AG(10)(c) Statement recognising the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time If applicable, mandatory

82

Financial statements

17AD(e) Financial statements Mandatory 89

Executive remuneration

17AD(da) Executive remuneration Mandatory 114-115

Other information

17AH(1)(a)(i) Statement regarding advertising campaigns If applicable, mandatory N/A

17AH(1)(a)(ii) If the department did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect If applicable, mandatory

83

17AH(1)(b) A statement that ‘Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website]’

If applicable, mandatory

N/A

17AH(1)(c) Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information

Mandatory N/A

17AH(1)(d) Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found

Mandatory N/A

17AH(1)(e) Correction of material errors in previous annual report If applicable, mandatory

N/A

17AH(2) Information required by other legislation Mandatory N/A

135 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

Alphabetical index A abbreviations and acronyms - 129-130 accommodation services - 24, 66 accountability and management - 73-85 advertising - 83 advice - 9, 15, 16, 17, 21, 22, 24, 26, 27, 29, 30-31, 33, 57, 67, 74, 76, 81, 83 See also Clerk of the Senate, advice; security advice; procedural advice

written - 21, 30 amendments to legislation See legislation, amendments annual performance statement - 15 asset management - 24, 67 AusTender - 83, 129 Australian Federal Police - 24, 67 Australian National Audit Office - 74, 78 Australian public sector

training programs for - 45, 50, 62 Australian Public Service Commission Employee Census - 5, 26, 80

B bills - 6, 19, 20, 21, 37, 39, 45, 46, 48, 49, 61, 129 See also legislation Black Rod’s Office - 3, 6, 22, 24, 65-69

contact details - 125 broadcast - 20, 58, 63 captioning - 36

C casual vacancies - 22 ceremonial support services - 22, 65, 66, 67 chamber support - 36, 65-68 Clerk Assistant (Committees) - 21, 59, 62, 76, 123

contact details - 125 Clerk Assistant (Procedure) - 22, 30, 46, 47, 76, 123

contact details - 125 Clerk Assistant (Table) - 21, 36, 39, 42, 76, 123 contact details - 125 Clerk of the Senate - 3-6, 10, 15, 21, 22, 25, 27, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 47, 50, 65, 66, 68, 73, 74, 76, 78, 79, 80, 93, 123, 124

contact details - 125 Clerk’s Instructions - 77 Clerk’s Office - 19, 29-34

contact details - 125

collective agreement See enterprise agreement Committee Office - 16, 23, 43, 57-63, 76 contact details - 125

committees See also Committees; workloads, Committee Office activity - 6, 7, 16, 23, 26, 58-61, 62 inquiries - 19, 23, 26, 32, 39, 46, 49, 50, 57,

58, 60, 61, 63 legislative scrutiny - 45, 46, 48-49, 51, 83 meetings - 21, 23, 30, 35, 39, 57, 58 public hearings - 3, 6, 20, 23, 26, 57, 58, 60, 62, 63 See also estimates hearings references to - 19, 20, 23, 32, 47, 60-61 reports - 7, 19, 20, 23, 26, 32, 35, 43, 44, 48, 49, 50, 57, 58, 60-61, 62, 63, 66 secretariat costs - 57 submissions - 6, 19, 20, 23, 57, 58, 62, 63 support for - 9, 19-20, 21, 23, 29, 32, 39, 43, 45, 48-49, 51, 57-63, 65, 67, 83 witnesses - 3, 6, 20, 23, 57, 58, 60 Committees

Appropriations, Staffing and Security - 26, 66, 67, 78 Audit - 26, 27, 30, 33, 67, 73, 74, 75, 77 Chairs’ - 6, 58 Economics - 32 Finance and Public Administration Legislation - 25, 66, 78 House - 67 Human Rights - 45, 46, 48, 49, 51 Privileges - 29, 32, 76 Procedure - 29, 32 Publications - 36, 39 Scrutiny of Bills - 45, 46, 48, 49 Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation - 45, 46, 48, 49, 51 Selection of Bills - 19, 35, 36, 39, 76 Senators’ Interests - 35, 36, 39, 76 Workplace Consultative - 67 Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework - 77 Commonwealth Procurement Rules - 82 Constitution, the Australian - 20, 21, 54

section 53 - 47 contracts - 82-83 corporate governance - 30, 34, 73-77 corporate plan - 7, 16, 26, 73 corporate support services - 65-68 costs of operations - 30, 36, 42, 46, 53, 57, 66 COVID-19 pandemic - 3, 6, 7, 15, 16, 20, 24, 25, 26, 31, 32, 33, 40, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 51, 54, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 66, 68, 74, 80, 81, 84, 129 crossbench - 16, 20, 26

136 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

D delegations - 51, 62 delivery services - 24, 66 departmental overview - 9-11 Department of Parliamentary Services (DPS) - 7, 20, 24, 34, 41, 42, 43, 44, 58, 62, 63, 67, 130 Department of the House of Representatives (DHR) - 7, 43, 51, 53, 63, 65 Deputy Clerk of the Senate - 22, 30, 31, 32, 33, 47, 73, 74, 76, 123

contact details - 125 Deputy President of the Senate - 22, 58, 62 contact details - 125 digital division recording system - 15, 43 document processing and management - 22, 29, 35, 37, 38, 40, 43, 63, 66 documents tabled or presented - 22, 32, 35, 38-39, 40, 43, 61 Dynamic Red - 25, 41, 42

E education (public awareness) See Parliamentary Education Office (PEO) education (staff) See learning and development employees See staff employment arrangements - 4-6 See also human resource management enterprise agreement - 15, 80 estimates hearings - 3, 6, 22, 25, 29, 30, 31, 32, 58, 60, 66, 78, 129 Estimates Live - 25

F Fair Work Act 2009 - 73 financial management - 67, 68 financial statements - 91-111 formal motions - 32, 33 fraud control - 68 Freedom of Information Act 1982 - 78

G glossary - 129-130 Governor-General - 129

H Hansard - 22, 24, 32 heads of the parliamentary departments - 11, 33, 73

health and well-being - 4, 26, 33, 55, 63, 68, 74, 79, 81 House of Representatives - 19, 21, 37, 47, 49, 58, 129 See also Department of the House of Representatives (DHR) human resource management - 4, 15, 67, 68, 74, 79-81 Human Rights Commission - 5

I Index to the Papers Presented to Parliament - 38 information and communications technology (ICT) - 7, 11, 15, 26, 33, 34, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 62, 63, 73, 74 internal audit - 74, 78, 82 inter-parliamentary relations - 45, 51

J Journals of the Senate - 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 66

L learning and development - 7, 15, 29, 31, 33, 40, 50, 63, 74, 79 for senators and their staff - 25, 31, 34,

49-50, 63 lectures - 25, 45, 46, 49, 50, 51 legislation - 20, 36, 37, 46, 49 See also bills

amendments - 6, 20, 21, 22, 37, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 82, 129 legislative activity - 6, 7, 16, 33, 37 legislative drafting services - 20, 22, 27, 45, 46, 47-48, 49, 51 legislative scrutiny committees See committees; legislative scrutiny

M management and accountability - 73-85 messages - 21, 37, 66

N Notice Paper - 35, 36, 37, 38, 40, 66 notices of motion - 38

O Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice - 29, 31, 33-34, 44 Order of Business - 35, 36, 40 See also Dynamic Red organisational structure - 10 outreach programs - 25, 53, 54

137 ANNUAL REPORT 2020-21

overviews Black Rod’s Office - 65-66 Clerk’s Office - 30 Committee Office - 57-58 departmental - 9-11 Parliamentary Education Office - 53 Procedure Office - 46 Senate Public Information Office - 42 Table Office - 36

P Parliamentary Administration Advisory Group - 11, 66, 73 Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) - 7, 63, 65, 68, 130 parliamentary delegations See delegations Parliamentary Education Office (PEO) - 25, 43, 53-55

Advisory Committee - 53 contact details - 125 education centre activities - 7, 25, 54 printed resources - 43, 54 videoconference - 25 videoconferencing - 7 website - 7, 25, 43, 54 Parliamentary ICT Advisory Board - 11, 73 parliamentary privilege - 29, 30, 129 See also Committees, Privileges parliamentary research - 45, 46, 47 Parliamentary Service Act 1999 - iv, 30, 73, 79, 80 Parliamentary Skills Centre (PSC) - 51 pay See remuneration payroll services - 24, 65, 68 PEO See Parliamentary Education Office (PEO) performance - 6

analysis - 26-27 annual statement - 15 assessment - 17, 21, 22, 24, 25 case study - 16, 18-21 delivery - 17 outlook

Black Rod’s Office - 68 Clerk’s Office - 33-34 Committee Office - 63 Parliamentary Education Office - 55 Procedure Office - 51 Senate Public Information Office - 44 Table Office - 40 overview - 15-16 planned - 17 petitions - 36 planning See corporate plan

portfolio budget statements - 11, 16, 26, 27, 68, 73, 121 presentation of documents See documents tabled or presented President of the Senate - 10, 21, 22, 24, 26, 29, 30, 32, 38, 50, 65, 66, 79, 80, 130

contact details - 125 Presiding Officers - 3, 53, 66, 130 printing services - 66 private senators’ bills - 22, 45, 46, 47, 48 See also bills; legislation procedural advice - 3, 15, 20, 21, 23, 30-31, 35, 36, 39, 45, 46, 48, 51, 57, 58, 76, 79 Procedural Hub - 50 Procedural Information Bulletin - 29, 31 procedural scripts - 6, 21, 22, 36, 47, 130 procedural support - 3, 36, 46-47 See also procedural advice Procedure Office - 6, 19, 20, 22, 45-51

contact details - 125 procurement - 68, 82 See also contracts productivity See workloads professional development See learning and development Program Managers’ Group - 30, 33, 73, 74 Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 - 15, 73, 77, 82 Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 - 121 public hearings See committees, public hearings; estimates hearings public information - 9, 25, 41, 42, 45, 46, 49, 51, 57, 62 See also Parliamentary Education Office (PEO); Senate Public Information Office (SPIO)

Q questions on notice - 25, 36, 38, 62, 78, 130

R Reconciliation Action Plan - 11 records of Senate business - 15, 22, 35, 37, 38, 43, 50 See also document processing and management remote working - 4, 42, 44 See also senators, remote participation remuneration - 80, 123 reports tabled See documents tabled or presented research services See parliamentary research risk management - 3, 74, 77

138 DEPARTMENT OF THE SENATE

S salary See remuneration schools, programs for See Parliamentary Education Office (PEO) scripts See procedural scripts second reading amendments - 47, 48, 130 security advice - 24, 65, 67 Security Management Board - 11, 66, 67, 73 seminars - 25, 45, 46, 49, 50, 62 Senate Daily Summary - 25, 41, 42 Senate Discovery - 41, 42 Senate Public Information Office (SPIO) - 22, 25, 41-44, 62, 63, 76

contact details - 125 senators education services - 53, 55

feedback from - 6, 16, 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 36, 40, 45, 46, 48, 57, 58, 61, 65, 66 induction for - 31, 34 induction fpr - 7 interests - 51, 66 remote participation - 3, 30, 32, 33, 44, 60 support for - 3, 6, 7, 9, 11, 15, 17, 19-20, 21-24, 29, 30, 36, 45, 46, 47, 48, 66 Senior Clerk of Committees - 21, 59, 62, 76 sitting days - 3, 6, 19, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26, 29, 31, 32, 36, 37, 39, 42, 46, 47, 48, 81 SPIO See Senate Public Information Office (SPIO) staff - 3-5, 123-124 See also human resource management; learning and development

full-time equivalent staffing levels - 36, 42, 46, 53, 66, 79, 124 gender - 123, 124 numbers and classification - 123-124 salary range - 123 superannuation - 80 staffing levels

Black Rod’s Office - 66 Parliamentary Education Office - 53 Procedure Office - 46 Senate Public Information Office - 42 Table Office - 36 standing orders - 20, 130

23 - 49 24 - 49 25(10) - 62 Statistical Summary - 42 StatsNet - 25, 41, 42, 43 structure See organisational structure

Studybank scheme - 80 support See senators, support for; committees, support for

T tabled papers See documents tabled or presented Table Office - 6, 19, 20, 21, 22, 35-40, 63, 76

contact details - 125 temporary orders - 32, 33 tenders See contracts The Week Ahead - 41, 42 training and development See learning and development; seminars; lectures Twitter - 25, 41, 43

U Usher of the Black Rod - 20, 21, 24, 65, 66, 67, 74, 81, 123 contact details - 125

V videoconferencing - 3, 20, 25, 49, 50, 54, 55, 58, 60

W websites See also Parliamentary Education Office (PEO), website

50 years of the modern committee system - 42, 50 Australia’s Parliament House - 38 ParlWork - 41, 42 Senate Connect - 29, 31, 43, 50 SENNET - 43 witnesses See committees, witnesses work, health and safety See health and well-being Work Health and Safety Act 2011 - 81 workloads - 6

Clerk’s Office - 30 Committee Office - 16, 23, 57, 58-61, 78 of the Senate - 26 workplace agreements See enterprise agreement

Y YouTube - 25, 43