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Australian National Maritime Museum—Report for 2020-21


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Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2020-21

Australian National Maritime Museum - Annual Report 2020-21

Contents

Publication information

2

Chairman’s letter of transmittal

5

Director’s statement

7

Our vision, mission and priorities

8

Year in review

9

Highlights

9

Grants and awards received

9

Director’s report

11

Director’s highlight

16

Annual Perf

ormance Statement

18

Introductory statement

18

Purpose of the museum

18

Location of major activities and facilities

18

Results for 2020

-

21

19

Delivery of the museum’s Statement of Intent for 2020

-

21

41

Exhibitions and attractions

44

Touring exhibitions

48

Interactives and multimedia

51

Governance and accountability

52

Corporate governance

52

Roles and functions of the museum

52

Legislation

55

Outcome and programme structure

55

Australian National Maritime Museum Council

55

Legal and compliance

64

Peop

le and culture

66

Grant programs

 

77

Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation

85

Financial statements 2020

-

21

90

Appendixes

12

2

Index

15

8

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Publication information

2

Pu

blica

tion information

Copyright

Aust

ralian National Maritime Museum

Annual Report 2020

-

21

© Commonwealth of Australia 2021

ISSN 1039

-

4036 (print)

ISSN 2204

-

678X (online)

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the

Copyright Act 1968

, no part may be

reproduced by any process without prior permission from the Australian National Maritime

Museum.

Australian Nat

ional Maritime Museum

The Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) at Darling Harbour, Sydney, opens

9.30 am

-

5 pm every day (9.30 am

-

6 pm in January).

During COVID

-

19 restriction periods in Sydney, the museum operates at reduced hours, from

10.30am

to 4pm every day.

The museum is also closed to staff and visitors when required by

New South Wales Public Health Orders.

Closed 25 December.

Entry at 30 June 2021

All Exhibition Ticket (July 2020

-

December 2020)

Includes: Top deck of HMAS

Vampire

& HMB

Endeavour

; all exhibitions; permanent galleries

Adults: $25

Children (under 15): $15

Concession: $20

Family (2 adults and up to 3 Children): $60

ERTH Ticket (December

school

holidays)

Includes: Access to ERTH’s Prehistoric Aquarium

Adults: $20

Children (un

der 15): $20

Concession: $20

Family (2 adults and up to 3 Children): $50

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Publication information

3

See it All (December 2020

-

March 2021)

Includes: Top deck of HMAS

Vampire

, HMB

Endeavour

and

Duyfken

(From January 2021); all

exhibitions; permanent galleries

Adults: $27

Children

(under 15): $17

Concession: $22

Family (2 adults and up to 3 Children): $65

See it All (March 2021

-

June 2021)

Includes: Top deck of HMAS

Vampire

, HMB

Endeavour

and

Duyfken

;

James Craig

; all exhibitions;

permanent galleries

Adults: $25

Children (under 15

): $15

Concession: $20

Family (2 adults and up to 3 Children): $65

Mini Mariners Ticket

Adults: $8

Children (under 15): $12

Children (under 4): free

Members: free

Group bookings: 20% discount on ticket prices for groups of 10 or more

Galleries Ticket

Free

admission to permanent galleries

Members/Australian pensioners/child under 4

Free

Mailing address

Wharf 7, 58 Pirrama Road, Pyrmont NSW 2009 Australia

Ph (02) 9298 3777

Fax (02) 9298 3780

Website (including this annual report) www.sea.museum

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Publication information

4

Contact off

icer

For enquiries about

this report please contact the Head of Knowledge

,

Dr Peter Hobbins

Ph (02) 9298 3777

Email publications@sea.museum

Editor

Dr Peter Hobbins

Assistant editor

s

Inger Sheil and Mona Hussain

Staff photographer

Elizabeth Maloney

C

over

Ha

rbour Garden, ANMM/Cassandra Hannagan

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Chairman’s letter of transmittal

5

C

hairman’s letter of transmittal

Hon Paul Fletcher MP

Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts

Parliament House

Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

On behalf of the Council of the Aus

tralian National Maritime Museum, I am pleased to present the

museum’s annual report for the financial year ended 30 June 2021.

This report has been prepared and is submitted to you in accordance with all applicable obligations

of the

Public Governance, P

erformance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act), including section 46,

which requires that you table the report in the Parliament. The report includes the Museum’s

audited financial statements and the annual performance statement as required by the PGPA

Act.

This report was considered by the Council on

1 October 2021

. The members of Council accept the

report as a fair and accurate representation of the Museum’s performance during the 2020

-

21

financial year.

As required by section 10 of the

Public Govern

ance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

, I

certify that:



the Museum has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans



the Museum has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and

reporting mechanisms that meet its s

pecific needs



the Council has taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating

to the Museum.

This report showcases the results achieved by the Museum’s Director and staff in the 2020

-

21

financial year amidst the most trying of cir

cumstances.

As with all aspects of business in 202

0

-

21, the management of the COVID

-

19 pandemic was at the

forefront of deliberations by the Museum’s Council and Executive. As you would expect, we

prioritised the safety of staff and the general public and

moved quickly to provide Australians with

‘COVID

-

19 safe’ museum

-

quality experiences onsite, offsite and online.

Minister, the additional financial support provided by the Commonwealth to assist with COVID

-

19 in

2020

-

21 was vital. In 2020

-

21, total expens

es were $23.4M (excluding depreciation) and total

revenue was $37M, of which $9M was self

-

generated, excluding non

-

cash income related to the

donation of the

Duyfken

replica of $3.5M and

National Collecting Institutions (NCI) Cultural Grant

income of $2M.

Overall, the museum made a profit of

$

2.9M (including the

Duyfken

donation, NCI

grant and COVID

-

19

assistance), however when the financial impact of the

Duyfken

donation and

NCI grant are excluded, the museum made an underlying loss of $(2.535)M. This amou

nt was $465K

better than the museum’s budgeted loss of $(3.0)M and was fully supported by the COVID

-

19

assistance provided.

I am pleased to report that there were a total of 4.33M engagements with the Museum (onsite,

offsite and online) in 2020

-

21. The re

sults for education, for growing and providing access to the

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Chairman’s letter of transmittal

6

National Maritime Collection, and for supporting Indigenous maritime heritage are also very

pleasing. Also, progress was made on each of the strategic priorities in our corporate plan and

securin

g the donation of the

Duyfken

replica, with your approval, is a most notable achievement.

Minister, the results and activities described in this report are a testament to the management, staff

and volunteers of the museum who have weathered and continue to

weather the COVID

-

19 storm.

The Council thanks them for their passion and commitment.

I also acknowledge the contribution of my fellow Councillors and thank them for their diligence

throughout this trying year. I especially thank the Hon Margaret White AO

and VADM Jonathan

Mead AO who completed their terms on this Council this year. I am pleased to formally welcome

and acknowledge the contribution of the Councillors appointed this year

-

RADM Mark Hammond

AM, Nyunggai Warren Mundine AO and Judy Potter.

As

I foreshadowed in my report last year, the pandemic has reduced our self

-

generated revenue and

this is a particularly bitter pill after so many years of hard work to forge a strong financial future.

Minister, the Council appreciates your desire to deeply u

nderstand our operating environment and

your championship of additional financial support for the Museum. We understand there are many

calls on

the

public purse at this time and the additional funding provided by Government has been

vital for the Museum.

W

e are really hopeful that you will be able to extend a similar level of support

to us in the year ahead. This would be deeply appreciated.

John P Mullen AM

Chairman

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Director’s statement

7

Director’s statement

The Australian National Maritime Museum is a statutory authori

ty established by the

Australian

National Maritime Museum Act 1990

and responsible to the

Hon Paul Fletcher MP,

Minister for

Communications,

Urban Infrastructure, Cities

and the Arts.

This annual report

covers

operations for the first financial year of th

e Australian National Maritime

Museum’s Corporate Plan 2020

-

2024. It has been made in accordance with a resolution of the

councillors of the Australian National Maritime Museum, those councillors being responsible under

Section 9 of the

Public Governance,

Performance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act) for the

preparation and content of the report. The report was prepared in accordance with the relevant

statutory and government requirements.

Kevin Sumption PSM

Director and CEO

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Our vision, mission and priorities

8

Our vision, mission

and priorities

Our vision

‘More than a museum’:

we create encounters and experiences that change peoples’ understanding

of Australia

Our mission

Our mission is to lead the promotion and conservation of Australia’s maritime heritage and culture

through:



de

veloping and sharing our collections, knowledge and expertise



motivating learning through research, educational programs and products



supporting community participation to retain our maritime heritage; and



exploring contemporary issues

.

Our priorities

Sin

ce its establishment in 1991, the museum has been a leader in the preservation, promotion and

sharing of Australia’s maritime heritage. The museum has set six priorities in

the

2020

-

24

Corporate

Plan

to build upon this proud history and to guide the museum

’s path and programs towards a

longer

-

term future:

Priority 1

Sharing the national maritime story

Priority 2

Compelling experiences

Priority 3

Supporting reconciliation

Priority 4

A trusted voice and custodian

Priority 5

A strong financial future

Priority

6

People first

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

9

Year in review

Highlights

The museum enjoyed the following achievements over 2020

-

21

:



Total visitor engagement of 4,332,274, equalling 94% of the planned target



On

-

site visitation was 407,924, including highest February visitation on r

ecord



Visitor satisfaction rating of 91%



Student participation in museum and partner websites

reached

459,933 visits, nearly twice

the target



Toured 7 exhibitions at 15 international venues in the United States, Denmark and

Singapore, plus 11 exhibitions t

hat visited 46 venues throughout Australia



Arrival of newest addition to our fleet, the replica 1606 vessel

Duyfken

, gifted to the

museum by the Duyfken 1606 Foundation



Former Welcome Wall elevated to formal status as Australia’s National Monument to

Migra

tion



Opened the Ben Lexcen Terrace and Sydney Harbour Gallery



Enhanced integration into the museum’s wider precinct via incorporation into the

Sydney

Festival

2021



Exceeded 150,000 objects in the National Maritime Collection



Philanthropic donations of cash

, in

-

kind and objects valued at a total of $4.7M



Awarded grants totalling more than $2.2M to support the museum’s collections and

programs



Won two categories at the Museums & Galleries National Awards 2021, for

Mariw Minaral

(

Spiritual Patterns

) and

Cook's

Voyages

-

the View from the Shore

.

Grants and awards received

The following grants were awarded

to

the museum during the reporting period.



National Cultural Heritage Account to acquire a collection of significant objects associated

with Lieutenant Huber

t Edward ‘Ted’ Carse and Operation Jaywick, an Allied commando raid

against Japanese shipping in Singapore Harbour in September 1943: $43,359.



City of Sydney’s CBD Activation Grant 2020

-

21 (

COVID

-

19 Round 2) to support the

development and performances of O

cean Spirit Rising, a spectacular live show combining

water, light, music and dance: $40,000.



Destination NSW to support the presentation of Harbour Garden, a vibrant, giant inflatable

installation as part of Sydney Solstice: $95,000.



Sydney Festival to su

pport a range of events and exhibitions as part of Sydney Festival 2021:

$20,000.



Capital funding of $2M 202

0

-

2

1

NCI

Phase 2 Capital Works Budget $2,000,000

Measure

-

2nd instalment (an additional $2M will be received in FY22)

.



$12,865 Norwegian Embassy G

rant for Ocean Symposium

.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

10

Teams across the museum earned the following awards during the reporting period.

Museums & Galleries National Awards 2021

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns)

Winner, Indigenous Projects

Cook's Voyages

-

the

View from the Shore

Winn

er, Interpretation, Learning and Audience Engagement

Museums Australasia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards 2021

What's On at the Australian National Maritime Museum

Winner, Information Brochure

Beach Couture

Winner, Poster

Art Directors Club für Deut

schland 2021

PS

Herald

VR Experience

-

PS

Herald

Virtueller Tauchgang

(with Hochschuler Kaiserslautern)

‘Golden Nail’ Winner, Term Paper

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

11

Director’s

report

It is with great pride that I introduce my final annual report for the Australian National Maritim

e

Museum.

It is a bittersweet moment as I reflect on all that the museum has achieved throughout my tenure,

particularly an extraordinary performance in this most unusual year.

In a year that saw great disruption from the COVID

-

19 pandemic, the museum’s re

silience has been

strongly tested. The commitment of staff and volunteers during this time has been a testament to

their strength and passion. I would like to start this report by thanking them from the bottom of my

heart.

The pandemic has seen projects ca

ncelled, delayed and postponed. Even when able to go ahead, our

initiatives were subject to constantly changing rules on numbers, distancing and the many other

factors of operating in a COVID

-

safe environment. It has meant a disrupted year both physically

and

mentally for the entire organisation.

Even with all this uncertainty and change, the museum has enjoyed a successful year.

Results

Even with the disruption brought about by the pandemic, approximately 4.3 million people engaged

with the museum onsite,

offsite or online. The key contributors to this strong result in extraordinary

circumstances were strong touring exhibitions, a varied and engaging online offer in collaboration

with our partners, and some special initiatives at the museum including our Fr

ee February offer.

The key results for the year were:



Total visitor engagement of 4,332,274, equalling 94% of the planned target



Total visitation of 1,145,715 which includes

o

407,924 visitors on site

o

737,791 visitors off site



91% visitor satisfaction



1,651,

580 visits to the website and 598,525 engagements with social media



772,089 Encounters 2020 engagements



459,933 students participating in public programs.

The museum piloted Free February to entice people back in to the museum. This proved to be a

record

-

b

reaking initiative. We experienced the highest February visitation on record with 20,248

visitors on site. We are pleased with the record results, had positive feedback from visitors and have

commissioned follow

-

up research to better understand the audienc

e we attracted.

Financial position

As mentioned by the Chairman, total expenses last year were $23.5M (excluding depreciation),

which were 27% lower than budget. Total revenue was $37M, of which $9M was self

-

generated,

excluding

a

NCI

capital works grant o

f $2M and

replica

Duyfken

donation valued at $3.5M. A ‘profit’

of $2.9M was obtained (including the

Duyfken

, the NCI grant and COVID

-

19

assistance) but when

one

-

offs are excluded it results in an underlying ‘loss’ of $(2.535)M. This figure is $465K better

than

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

12

the museum’s budgeted loss of $(3.0)M and was supported by the COVID

-

19 assistance provided by

the Australian Government.

This was a successful year for the museum’s philanthropy program with generous donations to the

museum and to the Australian Nat

ional Maritime Museum Foundation. These donations enhanced

the National Maritime Collection and supported the delivery of a range of important museum

programs. This year cash donations totalled $587K, while 28 objects valued at $3.83M were donated

and a fu

rther $310K was raised in cash or in

-

kind support for Migration Heritage Fund projects. I

particularly acknowledge major donations from Christine Sadler, Valerie Taylor AM, David and Jennie

Sutherland, the Carse family and the Duyfken 1606 Foundation. The

ANMM Foundation disbursed

over $200K to the museum this year.

National Maritime Collection

We are pleased to be able to announce that the National Maritime Collection has hit a milestone of

exceeding 150,000 objects. This is of course a result of excelle

nt and diligent work by many people

and departments over the past 30 years. This year we accessioned 833 objects, across all areas of

Australian maritime history, to the National Maritime Collection. My personal highlights were the

high

-

profile

Duyfken

rep

lica, several artefacts related to the MV

Krait

, a collection of over 9000

photographs representing the life’s work of Ron and Valerie Taylor AM, and the Westpac Little

Ripper drone.

Duyfken

This year we saw the gifting of the replica

Duyfken

to the muse

um by the Duyfken 1606 Foundation

in Western Australia. An event to formally acknowledge the donation and transfer the vessel to the

museum originally planned for December 2020 was held on 29 March 2021. It was attended by Vikki

Baldwin (Foundation Chair),

Peter Bowman (Foundation CEO), the Ambassador, Consul General and

Deputy Consul of the Netherlands, plus representatives of sponsors Smit Lamnalco and Tyrell’s

Wines. Reflecting the pivotal role of the late Michael Kailis in the

Duyfken

project, it was ve

ry fitting

that George Kailis and Amanda Kailis from MG Kailis Group could also attend.

The

Duyfken

is continuing to attract significant visitor interest and the inaugural sailing season has

been well booked. We look forward to continuing to sail this won

derful vessel on the harbour

throughout the year. We are investigating ocean touring possibilities for the future.

Ben Lexcen Terrace and Sydney Harbour Gallery

The Minister for Communications, Cyber

Safety

and the Arts officially opened the Ben Lexcen

Ter

race and Sydney Harbour Gallery on 4 November 2020.

The new

Sydney Harbour Gallery

now occupies the former South Gallery. It is a major step forward

in the overall gallery redevelopment plan and will be one of a series of new long

-

term galleries. We

have l

ong wanted to improve the overall ambience in the building by opening up this space to light

and views of the harbour, thus creating a brighter, more welcoming museum experience. The

exhibits displayed in the space have been designed to be robust enough to

withstand higher light

levels and to operate as an evening function space with direct access to the Ben Lexcen Terrace. A

feature of the new gallery is the Little Ripper un

crew

ed aerial vehicle, a new Australian

-

designed

lifesaving system.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

13

The gallery was

sponsored by the Port Authority

of

NSW

and delivered in collaboration with the

Sydney Institute of Marine Science, Reef Design Lab and The Little Ripper Group. It interprets the

changing face of Sydney Harbour, exploring both the biodiversity and health o

f the harbour and its

history as a working port. The effect of opening the space up to the outside views is transformative

for the museum and we are delighted with the effect of this work and the associated Ben Lexcen

Terrace upgrade.

National Monument to

Migration

On 22 March 2021

the Governor

-

General, His Excellency General the Honourable David Hurley AC

DSC (Retd), was the guest of honour at the Welcome Wall unveiling. His Excellency announced the

elevation of the wall to Australia’s National Monument t

o Migration. This was wonderful recognition

of the work that the museum has put into our migration program over many years.

On this occasion, 850 names from 400 registrations were added to National Monument. These

additions, which included migrants from 54

different countries, enhance the 30,000 names already

inscribed on the wall. In addition to several Councillors and Foundation Board Directors, 13 staff had

their names added to the National Monument to Migration.

Sydney Festival

2021

and Other Public Ev

ents

The museum achieved a long

-

standing transformational opportunity when several of our activities

were included in the Sydney Festival

2021

. To have

A Mile in My Shoes

and the Alick Tipoti exhibition

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns)

incorporated into

the program enabled the museum to reach a

much wider audience. We are working closely with Sydney Festival

-

as well as with

City of Sydney,

Sydney Solstice and VIVID

-

to enable the museum to attract new audiences under a broader

umbrella. Initiatives suc

h as

Sunday Stir

,

Ocean Spirit Rising

and

Harbour Garden

have formed part of

this planning.

In conjunction with the London

-

based Empathy Museum, the museum staged

A Mile in My Shoes

-

an immersive exhibition focused on the migrant experience and representi

ng 35 countries of origin.

The exhibition has garnered support from a diverse range of supporters, including: the City of

Sydney, SBS, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the Kytherian Association of Australia, Assyrian

Australian National Federation, Australi

an Arab Chamber of Commerce, Chinese Australian Historical

Society, Diversity Council Australia, Federation of Australian Indian Associations, Fraternal Society of

Tripoli and Mena, Greek Orthodox Community of NSW, Indonesian Association of NSW, the NSW

Je

wish Board of Deputies, Organisation of African Communities, Quebec Club, Slovakian Embassy

and the Union of French Abroad.

Krait

Flag, Lt Carse medals and

k

nife

The museum was successful in acquiring at auction a collection of objects, including medals a

warded

to Lieutenant Hubert Edward ‘Ted’ Carse, plus a knife and a faux

-

Japanese ensign relating to the

World War II raid ‘Operation Jaywick’.

Ted Carse was the master of MV

Krait

during Operation Jaywick, an association which would in itself

make the col

lection nationally significant. However, while the medals and the knife are very

important additions to our collection of

Krait

-

related material, the flag is arguably the most

significant of the items.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

14

The MV

Krait

has been loaned to the museum by the Aus

tralian War Memorial since 1988 and was

recently restored to its 1943 configuration. These newly acquired objects will be an invaluable part

of interpreting the vessel.

We could not have funded this acquisition without the National Cultural Heritage Accoun

t, and we

are deeply appreciative that it is available to keep important cultural heritage objects such as these

in Australia. We are also extremely grateful to the family of Ted Carse’s brothers for their gift of

$45K towards the acquisition. Daina Fletch

er, Head of Acquisitions Development, liaised with the

family regarding this extremely generous donation.

Capital grant for pontoons

The museum was pleased to enter into a memorandum of understanding with the Department of

Infrastructure, Transport, Regio

nal Development and Communications for additional funding of $4M

($2M in 2020

-

21 and $2M in 2021

-

22) for the replacement of pontoons and associated safety

compliance works. We continue to develop plans for this exciting and significant upgrade to the

museu

m facilities.

Encounters 2020

Due to the ongoing disruption cause

d

by the pandemic, the

Encounters 2020

touring exhibition and

circumnavigation by the museum’s

Endeavour

replica could not proceed. This was of course a great

disappointment as a great deal

of work has taken place in the organisation of the program. All

voyaging patrons were refunded. The ‘view from the shore’ documentary

Looky Looky Here Comes

Cooky

produced for NITV

,

with principal funding from the museum

,

was very successful and won

Best D

ocumentary at the Australian International Documentary Conference. It was also nominated

for Best Documentary at the annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts

Awards.

Brand Award

The museum and Frost*collective received the gold award in the

‘best brand evolution’ category at

Transform

magazine’s Australia and New Zealand awards. The award recognises ‘the brand that best

moves its identity into the future while maintaining links with the past and evolving in a clear and

creative way’.

Organis

ational realignment

Building on last year’s realignment of the Strategy and External Relations Division, changes to other

Executive responsibilities were made this year. One key change included combining corporate

services and the key revenue

-

generating s

ections (front of house, venues and retail) into a new

division named Commercial and Operation Services. We also transferred volunteer management to

the People and Culture Division. Teams within the Experience Division were also realigned to focus

on visit

or experience, developing new programs and exhibitions, and delivering excellent research

and curatorial outcomes.

In closing, I would like to acknowledge the many individuals and organisations I have worked with

during my tenure. I would also thank all m

y colleagues at the museum, including the Executive

Team. I am also very appreciative of the guidance and support of Peter Dexter AM and John Mullen

AM, the Chairs of Council throughout my appointment. I also appreciate the input of all of the men

and wome

n who have served on the Council, its Committees and the Foundation Board throughout

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

15

my time at the Australian National Maritime Museum. I must pay especial tribute to the museum’s

volunteers: their passion and enthusiasm for the museum provides all of us

with extra resolve to get

the job done. The museum couldn’t function without them. I would like to acknowledge my

colleagues in the arts and culture sector

-

both in Australia and around the world

-

who have

supported me over the past nine years.

Finally,

I must acknowledge with a deep appreciation the love and support of my wife, Anne

-

Maree,

and my children Alice and Harry.

Kevin Sumption PSM

Director

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

16

Director’s

h

ighlight

Museum Director & CEO Kevin Sumption PSM singles out the success of the online

educational

game,

Cook’s Voyages,

as his highlight for 2020

-

21.

Cook’s Voyages

, launched on the 250

th

anniversary of James Cook’s landing at Kamay Botany Bay,

has proven an enormous success during the uncertainties of the past year.

Central to the game’s

design was a key message from the anniversary program

-

that we recognise

both ‘the view from the ship’ and ‘the view from the shore’ in 1770. As a result, player choices in

Cook’s Voyages

highlight a First Nations perspective on that profound encounter.

The game entices students to take command of an 18th

-

century voyage into the Pacific Ocean,

which at that time was largely unmapped by Europeans.

For the first time, players can engage with

two perspectives. They can consider the British sailors who first

encountered Australia’s east coast

and its Indigenous peoples, as well as the First Nations peoples who observed this novel vessel

approaching their shores.

These dual visions ensure that

Cook’s Voyages

is a landmark game that responds to our dynamic

under

standing of the early interactions between British voyagers and Australia’s First Peoples. If

players choose to act responsibly, they can learn language from five different Indigenous nations as

they sail along the continent’s east coast. Echoing the scien

tific importance of the

Endeavour

voyage, players can also record the local plants and animals on Country at each location.

The museum worked closely with specialists Roar Educate to develop the game. In 2021 it was

awarded a Museums and Galleries Nationa

l Award (MAGNA) for Interpretation, Learning and

Audience Engagement.

The choice to focus on gamified learning experiences is a considered and important one for the

museum. This digital

-

first approach reflects the evolving nature of classroom learning in A

ustralia.

Having recently launched

Wreck Seeker

, the museum now offers three maritime

-

themed games

aligned with the national curriculum. This initiative positions us as a global leader in this field among

cultural institutions.

We know that well

-

designed g

ames play an important role in engaging players

-

not only with

content, but also in developing skills and empathy. Unique to digital games is the capacity to

transport players into powerful scenarios, while giving them agency to interact in these spaces.

In

these virtual environments they can learn to deal, in a realistic way, with the consequences of their

actions. Games also allow players to replay scenarios, refining their reactions and skills to reach a

desired outcome.

A side effect of the remote lear

ning practices forced upon us during the COVD

-

19 pandemic has

been a growing student and teacher comfort with digital learning technologies. At the museum, we

have seen this enthusiasm play out in the skyrocketing popularity of our suite of online games an

d

resources.

In its first year,

Cook’s Voyages

attracted 18,000 users over 30,000 sessions

-

an amazing result. This

achievement follows the success of our first digital game

-

The Voyage

-

which has registered over 1

million plays since we launched it in

2015.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Year in review

17

Investment in online games has allowed the museum to reach students across the country

-

and

around the world. This strategy has been a major contributor to the impressive growth of our annual

educational outreach, rising from 65,000 to over

45

0,000

interactions

over a four

-

year period.

Kevin Sumption PSM

Director

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

18

Annual

P

erformance

S

tatement

Introductory statement

The Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum, as the accountable authority of the

Australian National Maritime Museum, prese

nt the 2020

-

21 annual performance statements of the

Australian National Maritime Museum, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the

Public

Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act). In Council’s opinion, these annual

performance state

ments are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the

performance of the entity, and comply with section 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

John Mullen AM

Chairman, Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum

Purpose of the museum

The museu

m’s functions are set out on section 6 of the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act

1990

.

The museum is responsible for leading the promotion and conservation of Australia’s maritime

heritage and culture. This is achieved through developing and sharing

its collections, knowledge and

expertise; motivating learning through research, educational programs and products; supporting

community participation to retain Australia’s maritime heritage; and exploring contemporary issues

of public interest and maritime

relevance.

This purpose is elaborated in the mission in our 2020

-

24 Corporate Plan as follows:

Our purpose is increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime heritage

by managing the National Maritime Collection and staging prog

rams, exhibitions and events.

Location of major activities and facilities

The major facilities and activities of the museum are located at Darling Harbour, Sydney.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

19

Results for 2020

-

21

Analysis of results and overall performance against purpose

Implement

ation of the 2020

-

24 Corporate Plan directly contributed to the achievement of our

purpose and portfolio budget statement

Program 1.1

management of maritime heritage

and

Outcome 1:

Increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime her

itage by

managing the National Maritime Collection and staging programs, exhibitions and events.

Overall performance against targets and related corporate plan priorities in 2020

-

21 aligned with

two key measures:

1.

Engage, educate and inspire

-

continue to i

ncrease engagement with national and international

visitors through innovative exhibitions and programs that are accessed in a variety of ways.

In 2020

-

21 the museum’s overall performance against this measure, related targets and corporate

plan priorities

included headline achievement of 4.33M total visitor engagements, just 6

%

under

target (4.6M).

On

-

site paid visitation recovery was slow during 2020, stalled with a Greater Sydney COVID

-

19

outbreak in Q2, then rebounded in Q3 with a record

-

breaking Free Fe

bruary initiative. Strong

visitation results were achieved in Q4 in paid ticketed visitation (47% of annual results), public

programs (33%), education programs (54%) and website visitation (42%). These achievements came

despite the museum and peer institut

ions closing in response to COVID

-

19 NSW Public Health Orders

issued on 25 June 2021. Above

-

target ratings were maintained for visitor satisfaction (91%) and

teacher satisfaction (96%).

The museum continued to share Australia’s maritime story and deliver c

ompelling experiences on

-

site, off

-

site and online with the following highlights:



A new

Sydney Harbour Gallery

was opened in November 2020 and six major indoor

exhibitions were delivered, including

Sea Monsters

,

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns)

,

Defying

Empire

,

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

(55 & 56) and

Map It!



Major activations included the Sunday Stir

(March 2021) and Ocean Spirit Rising (May 2021),

while free outdoor exhibition offers included

Ship and Shore

and

Fire on Water’s Edge.



Touring exh

ibitions including

Container

,

Submerged

and

Remarkable

reached 46 venues

across regional and metropolitan Australia.



A

new online game,

Wreck Seeker,

was launched for students in 2021. Our total student

engagement

-

including museum and ABC Education co

-

de

veloped content

-

reached nearly

460,000. This record figure was most welcome while on

-

site school student visits fell below

target.



Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky

, a multi award

-

winning documentary funded by the museum

as part of Encounters 2020, attracted

significant audience engagement.



James Cameron

and

Voyages to the Deep

were amongst six touring exhibitions reaching

audiences in the US, Singapore and Denmark.

COVID

-

19 was the most significant factor constraining performance throughout 2020

-

21. The

museu

m continuously adapted its operations in response to dynamic Public Health Orders. These

regulations affected visitation, indoor and outdoor exhibits, venue operations, and school and

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance

Statement

20

volunteer programs. Major public events including the unveiling of the N

ational Monument to

Migration, the Sunday Stir and exhibition openings were rescheduled as a result of COVID

-

19

outbreaks. Due to travel restrictions, there were almost no international visitors in 2020

-

21, in

contrast to a peak of 89,000 visitors in 2018

-

19.

2.

Collection share and digitise

-

continue to build and maintain a rich national collection for

current and future generations of Australians to enjoy and learn from.

The museum remains a trusted custodian of the National Maritime Collection which excee

ded a

milestone of 150,000 objects during 2020

-

21. This figure included 338 acquisitions and 833

accessions, both well above target levels.

Major acquisitions included a

collection of over 9,000

images donated by Valerie Taylor AM, an Honorary Fellow of th

e museum. Another key accession

was an important collection of objects related to MV

Krait

, including medals awarded to Lieutenant

Hubert Edward ‘Ted’ Carse, thanks to a generous donation by the Carse family and the National

Cultural Heritage Account.

The

percentage of the collection digitised (62%) and available to the public (71%) continued to grow

and exceed target

s

. Expenditure on Indigenous acquisitions was likewise above the museum’s

targets. The museum maintained a strong focus on delivery and review

of our Reconciliation Action

Plan.

Organisational performance

During 2020

-

21, the museum was focussed on its operational and financial recovery from the

ongoing impacts of COVID

-

19. The museum maintained a relatively high level of own

-

source revenue

of 2

7.7

%

(excluding one

-

offs). This figure was down from 42.8

%

in 2019

-

20, despite challenging

conditions. COVID

-

19 has stopped international tourism revenues and constrained commercial

venue hire. These factors prevented full realisation of the benefits from

a major upgrade to the Ben

Lexcen Terrace, which reopened in November 2020. The operating environment and ongoing

uncertainty have been challenging for museum staff, resulting in organisational realignment and

reduced levels of staff satisfaction as eviden

ced in the Australian Public Service Commission Census

results. Improving staff satisfaction and engagement is a continuing focus of the executive and

leadership teams.

The museum largely delivered on its Statement of Intent for the year. We contributed to

national

leadership and recovery of cultural institutions, fostering regional outreach and social cohesion by

showcasing Indigenous culture and ensuring financial sustainability.

The re

-

emergence of the COVID

-

19 pandemic and the resulting temporary closu

re of the museum

will ensure that 2021

-

22 is even more challenging. The museum is scenario planning our reopening,

maintaining a focus on core functions and ensuring that employees and volunteers are safe, engaged

and supported. We look forward to resuming

our recovery and reinvention, and to further

contributing to Australian’s knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of our maritime heritage.

Priority 1 Sharing

t

he National Maritime Story

We will continue to innovate to expand opportunities for communitie

s across the country and the

world to engage with Australia’s maritime story

-

past, present and future.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

21

As the custodian of the National Maritime Collection, we will continue to care for it, maintain its

relevance and use new methods to maximise access f

or audiences and researchers.

We will create an Encounters 2020 program that meaningfully reaches audiences whatever their

background and wherever they are located.

Performance criterion

The key performance measure of sharing the national maritime story

is:

Engagement



Total visitor engagement (on

-

site, including programs; travelling; online via website and

social media; education; Encounters 2020)



Total number of annual off

-

site visitors to the organisation



Total number of annual online visits (website

and social media)



Total number of students participating in educational programs (on

-

site, off

-

site and online).

Encounters 2020



Number of participants, visitors and viewers in the Encounters 2020 program.

Collection digitisation and online accessibility



P

ercentage of the total collection available to the public online by 2023



Percentage of the total collection digitised.

Criterion source

2020

-

21 Portfolio Budget Statements, p.223.

2020

-

24 Corporate Plan, p.7.

Engagement

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Ac

tual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Total visitation

926,386

1,145,715*

1,852,771

2,107,611

1,873,751

Student participation

(excluding via

museum website)

248,000

164,365

69,886

30,747

36,893

Online visitation

#

2,489,113

1,651,580

1,716,

504

1,146,980

1,163,352

Social media

578,665

598,525

487,157

NR

NR

Subtotal

4,242,164

3,560,185

4,126,318

3,286,598

3,067,850

Encounters 2020

357,836

772,089

3,439,730

N/A

N/A

Total visitor

engagement

4,600,000

4,332,274

7,556,048

3,286,598

3,067,850

* Includes estimate of number of unpaid on

-

site visitors.

#

Includes visits to museum website education resources.

NR = not reported.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

22

Total visitation

* Includes estimate of number of unpa

id on

-

site visitors

Student participation

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of students

participating on

-

site

19,660

6,467

14,083

20,039

29,505

Number of students

participating off

-

site

9,535

1,314

10,94

5

10,221

7,388

Number of students

participating online

(partner website)

218,805

156,584

44,858

NR

NR

Students participating

online (museum

website)

-

295,568

309,657

NR

NR

Total

248,000

459,933

379,543

30,747

36,893

Online participation

2020

-

21

Tar

get

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Visits to the website

(non

-

educational)

Not set

1,356,012

1,406,847

NR

NR

Education visits to the

website

Not set

295,568

309,657

NR

NR

Total visits to the

website

2,489,113

1,651,580

1,7

16,504

1,146,980

1,163,352

Social media

engagements

578,665

598,525

487,157

NR

NR

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of visitors to

th

e museum (off

-

site)

660,000

737,791

936,192

1,089,592

1,051,330

Number of visitors to

the museum (on

-

site)

266,386

407,924*

916,579

1,018,019

822,421

Total visitation

926,386

1,145,715*

1,852,771

2,107,611

1,873,751

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

23

Methodology

Total Engagement

Total visitor engagements is the aggregate of the key engagement elements of total visitation,

student participation (on

-

site, off

-

site and

online), online visitation, social media engagement and

engagement with the museum’s Encounters 2020 initiatives, including mainstream media reporting.

The method of calculation of each element is set out below.

Note that for the purpose of measuring tota

l engagement only, the student participation figure

excludes engagement with learning products on the museum’s website, including the

The Voyage

,

Cook’s Voyages

and

Wreck Seeker

games, and teacher resources. This is to ensure that these

elements are not do

uble

-

counted as they are included under online visitation.

Total visitation

Total visitation is calculated by aggregating on

-

site visitation to the museum and visitation to the

museum’s off

-

site exhibitions and programs, including voyaging. On

-

site and of

f

-

site visitation are

separately reported. The framework for on

-

site visitation is detailed at

Annex

A.

Off

-

site visitation

Off

-

site visitation is determined through aggregation of actual attendance data provided by various

borrowing institutions.

On

-

sit

e visitation

On

-

site visitation is determined by aggregating actual ticket sales and membership visitation

recorded at front of house. These data were collected through the AXPOS system and Vivaticket

(introduced in December 2020), a

ctual venue client data

collected in the

customer relationship

management (

CRM

)

system and

the Events Perfect catering system,

and unpaid on

-

site visitation. In

2020

-

21 a reasonable and representative estimate of on

-

site unpaid visitation to the museum’s free

outdoor offerings h

as been established. This figure was calculated by multiplying the actual number

of paid on

-

site visitors (104,091) by 3.41, an average multiplier derived from the ratio of paid:unpaid

visitor data reported in 2018

-

19 and 2019

-

20. The estimate has been red

uced by a discount factor

of 14.3

%

to ensure conservatism. A review identified outages and anomalies affecting on

-

site

counting cameras, which diminished the accuracy and reliability of data during significant periods of

2020

-

21. New visitor

-

counting techn

ologies and systems are being explored for implementation

during 2021

-

22.

Student participation

Total participation in organised school programs is the aggregate of on

-

site, off

-

site and online

participation by students and teachers. However, for the purpo

se of the calculation of total

engagement, online student participation includes partner websites but excludes education material

on the museum’s website (this is counted as online visitation).

On

-

site participation in school programs is determined by agg

regating data regarding actual

numbers, as collected by front

-

of

-

house staff from the museum’s educators. Off

-

site participation is

the sum of all who participate in museum education programs that are held beyond our site,

calculated by collating data from

delivery staff and school bookings

.

Total online participation in

school programs includes museum learning content on other websites (e.g. ABC Education) and user

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

24

sessions on the following pages of the museum’s website: all pages that include curriculum

-

l

inked

resources,

The Voyage

,

Cook’s Voyages

and

Virtual

Endeavour

. ABC Education provides data on

visitation to museum

-

developed content on its website.

Online visitation

Online visitation is the number of visits to the museum’s website (

www.sea.museum

)

, calculated by

using the sessions metric in Google Analytics. This is calculated retrospectively by reviewing the data

for the financial year for all digital properties, then adding the elements together. As the website

receives over 500,000 visits per fi

nancial year, the numbers are subject to Google Analytics data

sampling. In order to avoid double

-

counting for total engagement purposes, the museum tracks

participation in the following initiatives separately: online education programs, virtual excursions

,

The Voyage

,

Cook’s Voyages

and

Wreck Seeker

. These programs are included in total online

visitation. Online visitation does not include visitors to the museum’s social media pages or

downloads of the museum app.

Social media engagements are calculated b

y consolidating the data provided directly from Twitter,

Facebook and Instagram analytics. An engagement is counted when someone likes, comments,

shares or interacts with a post made on the museum’s social channels.

Encounters 2020

While an element of tota

l engagement, the methodology for calculation of participation in

Encounters 2020 is separately reported below.

Notes:

Note 1: The datasets in this Annual Performance Statement are compiled by the relevant business unit

applying the data definitions in th

e National Cultural Institutions Key Performance Indicator Framework, as

compiled by the Office for the Arts within the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development

and Communications. Refinements are applied where appropriate.

Note 2: Da

ta for performance in past years is sourced from the relevant Annual Report, incorporating any

adjustments.

Note 3: All supporting data for the analysis comprises actuals collected at the operational level.

Analysis

Total visitor engagement in 2020

-

21 w

as 4.33M or 94

%

of target (4.60M) indicating recovery from

the COVID

-

19 pandemic was broadly as anticipated. Stronger on

-

site visitation figures in the final

quarter

-

including school and public programs

-

uplifted full

-

year performance. Overall, website

visitation fell short of a highly ambitious leap target, and COVID

-

19 limited the number of schools

and students able to engage in on

-

site or off

-

site learning programs in 2020. However, online

learning content

-

including museum games, virtual tours and c

o

-

created ABC education content

-

attracted larger overall audiences in 2020

-

21.

Total visitation

Total visitation for the year was 1.15M, which was 24

%

above target (0.93M).

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

25

Recovery during late 2020 was impacted by a further Greater Sydney COVID

-

19 out

break in

December, which constrained peak summer school holiday visitation. A rebound in visitation was

prompted by an experiment

-

our Free February initiative resulted in a record

-

breaking 20,000

visitors. Final quarter visitation was strongly driven by

the NSW Government’s ‘Dine and Discover’

voucher program, part of its COVID

-

19 business support package. Adjusted museum ticket pricing

enabled NSW adult residents to use one of their $25 Discover vouchers to enter the museum

without a gap payment. Almost

half (47

%

) of paid ticketed visitation occurred between April and 25

June,

before

the museum and other cultural institutions

in Sydney

were closed in response to NSW

Public Health Orders.

The

contribution

of

off

-

site

visitation

is

analysed

below

and

on

-

sit

e

visitation

is

analysed

under

P

riority

2.

Off

-

site visitation

There

were

738K

off

-

site

visitors

this

year,

which

was

12

%

ahead

of

target.

This

achievement

can

be

attributed

to

a

final

-

quarter

uplift

in

visitation

to

domestic

and

international

touring

exhibitions.

Off

-

site

visitation

contributed

over

64

%

to

the

museum’s

total

visitation

this

year,

demonstrating

that

the

challenge

of

sharing

the

national

maritime

story

is

being

met.

0

500,000

1,000,000

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,500,000

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

1997-98

1998-99

1999-00

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

Total visitation to the museum since 1991

Visitors to museum

Off-site visitors

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

26

Touring exhibitions

In

2020

-

21

there

were

737,791

visitors

to

the

museum’s

travelling

exhibitions

in

Australia

(325,335)

and

overseas

(401,056).

These

numbers

were

down

on

2019

-

20

figures,

but

stronger

than

anticipated

despite

the

ongoing

disruption

caused

by

lockdowns,

travel

bans

and

freight

delays.

Final

-

quarter

off

-

s

ite

visitation

was

stronger

with

273,238

visitors,

representing

37

%

of

annual

off

-

site

visitation.

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of travelling

exhibitions

18

16

20

17

Number of exhibitions in

Australia

11

11

18

15

N

umber of venues in Australia

46

64

82

92

Number of exhibitions overseas

7

10

6

3

Number of venues overseas

15

17

12

10

Information

about

the

museum’s

touring

exhibitions

is

included

under

the

‘Exhibitions

and

attractions’

section

of

this

report.

This

y

ear

the

museum

toured

18

exhibitions

in

total,

including

7

displayed

at

15

international

venues

in

the

United

States,

Denmark

and

Singapore.

Another

11

exhibitions

were

displayed

at

46

venues

throughout

Australia,

with

distribution

set

out

in

the

following

table:

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

Percentage off

-

site visitation 2010

-

11 to 2020

-

21

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

27

T

ouring exhibitions in

2020

-

21

NSW

QLD

NT

WA

SA

VIC

TAS

ACT

Total

Total number of venues

(flat pack exhibitions)

8

9

0

8

11

4

0

0

40

Number of venues (other

touring exhibitions)

0

2

1

1

0

0

2

0

6

TOTAL

8

11

1

9

11

4

2

0

46

This year the m

useum’s Speakers Bureau delivered 17

4

talks to a total audience of 5,869. While

audience numbers were down marginally on last year, there was a shift back to ‘in person’ talks

during 2021.

Student participation

Almost 460K students participated in on

-

site,

off

-

site and online learning programs this year, up

from 380K in 2019

-

20. On

-

site and off

-

site student participation was lower than target due to

COVID

-

19 limiting school excursions, plus the cancellation of Science Week programming. However,

participatio

n rebounded in the final quarter, while online student participation via the museum

website and ABC Education partnership was also strong. The co

-

developed ABC Education HMB

Endeavour

and First Nations content continues to perform well and reached an audie

nce of 157K, up

from 45K in 2019

-

20.

Cook’s Voyages

and

The

Voyage

pages were amongst the most visited content.

Just under 296K students and teachers used the resources on the museum’s website this year. This

total included all pages that provide teacher r

esources,

The Voyage

,

Cook’s Voyages

and the

museum’s ‘Virtual

Endeavour

’ virtual reality tour. The original

The Voyage

game remains a favourite

with 248K visits.

Online visitation

There were 1.65M online visitors and 599K social media engagements this ye

ar. Online visitation fell

short of a very ambitious target of 2.49M website visits, established during the 2020 COVID

-

19

museum closure. The results closed strongly, however, coinciding with peak on

-

site ticketed

visitation. There is a strong correlation

between intention to visit and website visitation, with 65

%

of

web visits from Sydney residents seeking information on museum activities. Anticipating that the

December 2020 Greater Sydney COVID

-

19 outbreak would heavily impact January visitation, the

muse

um paused its normal marketing campaign, which reduced website visitation during Q2 and

Q3. The final quarter reflected strong overall website visits (almost 700K) and coincided with the

launch of a refreshed museum website.

The museum is increasingly focu

sing on social media,

achieving 22

%

growth through social media channels during the year.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

28

E

ncounters

2020

Results

2020

-

21 Target

2020

-

21 Actual

2019

-

20 Actual

Engagement

with Encounters 2020

357,836

772,089

3,439,730

Methodology

The

Encounters 2020

program, scheduled over the 2019

-

20 and 2020

-

21 financial years, included

on

-

site and off

-

site exhibitions and educational programs, plus a film, an art fair commission and a

digital game (

C

o

ok’s Voyages

). The original proposed circumnavigation voyage of

the replica

Endeavour

was suspended in early 2020. An alternative commemorative voyage did not proceed as a

result of the ongoing risks associated with the COVID

-

19 pandemic. As a result, the funding

agreement relating to Encounters 2020 with the Departmen

t of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional

Development and Communications was terminated. Therefore, in 2020

-

21 this measure is confined

to viewers of the broadcast of the funded film (

Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky

), incorporating multi

-

channel audience and s

ocial media engagement data for the film sourced from the broadcaster.

Analysis

The engagement target for the

Encounters 2020

program was exceeded by 115

%

on the strength of

engagement with the

Looky

Here Comes Cooky

documentary

.

The museum was a princip

al funder of

the documentary, which provided an Indigenous perspective

of the east coast encounters with

James Cook and his crew in 1770. It aired on NITV in August 2020 and has remained accessible

through the SBS On Demand streaming service. Combined metr

opolitan and regional audiences and

streaming chapter views exceeded 376K. Indicating the quality of this production,

Looky Looky Here

Comes Cooky

won Best Documentary at the annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Television

Arts Awards.

In addition, the

Cook’s Voyages

educational game, developed under the Encounters 2020 program

and launched in April 2020, attracted almost 30,000 engagements during 2020

-

21 (note these

players are counted towards the student participation targets).

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annu

al Performance Statement

29

Collection digitisati

on and online accessibility

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Percentage of total collection

available to public online

70%

70.29%

70.28%

68.14%

67.90%

Percentage of the total

collection digitised

61%

6

2.44%

61.65%

61.23%

61.32%

Methodology

All data pertaining to collection item management is recorded in or derived from the museum’s

collection management system (TMS). The percentage of collection objects digitised is based on the

percentage of objects

in the collection for which there is at least one digital image at 30 June.

Analysis

In November 2016, the museum officially launched the ‘unlocking the collection’ initiative which

provides the public with access to digital images and information about

objects in the collection. As

at 30 June 2021, there were 105,831 objects available online. There were 88,551 visits to the online

collection this year (up from 83,636 last year).

As at 30 June 2021, 62.44% of the objects in the National Maritime Collecti

on had been digitised.

This result was above target. The priorities of digitisation are determined by the museum’s

digitisation strategy. All high

-

value items and new acquisitions have been digitised.

Priority 2 Compelling Experiences

We are renowned a

s a ‘must visit’ museum because we put audiences at the heart of everything we

do. Our indoor, outdoor and outreach activities, exhibitions and programs tell the story of our island

nation in new and surprising ways.

We put the visitor at the centre of all

we do and tailor our offerings to their diverse needs and

expectations.

We will take every advantage of our collection, fleet, location, expertise, facilities and technology to

provide imaginative, engaging and rewarding experiences for our on

-

site visito

rs.

We will strategically improve our assets supported by long

-

term planning to maximise the impact of

our expenditure.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

30

Criterion

The key measures of performance are:

Visitation



Total number of on

-

site visitors to the organisation



Annual number of int

ernational visitors (ticketed)



Number of participants in public participation programs on

-

site.

Exhibitions



Number of major temporary exhibitions on site.

Visitor satisfaction



The percentage of our visitors who were satisfied or very satisfied with their v

isit.

Criterion source

2020

-

21 Portfolio Budget Statements, p.223.

2020

-

24 Corporate Plan, p.8.

Visitation

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

2016

-

17

Actual

Number of on

-

site

visitors to the

museum

266,3

86

407,924

916,579

1,018,019

822,421

760,009

Number of paid on

-

site

visitors to the

museum

101,155

104,091

202,310

236,832

217,124

213,346

Number of unpaid on

-

site visitors to the

museum

165,231

303,833

714,269

781,187

605,297

546,663

Number of inte

rnational

visitors to the

museum

3,125

27

64,607

89,329

80,068

73,412

Number of people

participating in public

programs

27,323

27,590

34,577

43,717

81,329

57,134

Methodology

The methodology for calculation of on

-

site visitation is described above and i

n the framework for on

-

site visitation, provided a

t

Annex A.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

31

Visitors comprise paid ticketed visitors (i.e. visitors who have purchased an entry ticket, including

tourism and group booking tickets) and unpaid ticketed visitors (i.e. visitors who have recei

ved a free

gallery ticket, including tourism and group booking tickets for the galleries only). The number of

international visitors on

-

site is the number of ticketed visitors who identify as foreigners at front of

house (collected through the AXPOS system

). In 2020

-

21 a reasonable and representative estimate

of on

-

site unpaid visitation to the museum’s free outdoor offerings has been established by

multiplying the actual number of paid on

-

site visitors (104,091) by an average multiplier of 3.41. This

figur

e is derived from the ratio of comparable on

-

site paid:unpaid visitor data reported in 2018

-

19

and 2019

-

20. The estimate has been reduced by a discount factor of 14.3

%

to ensure conservatism.

A review identified data outages and anomalies which affected on

-

site counting cameras and data

reliability during significant periods of 2020

-

21. New visitor counting technologies and systems are

being explored for implementation during 2021

-

22.

Public programs include special event programs (e.g. Lunar New Year, NAID

OC week), creative

workshops,

family activity spaces (e.g. Ocean Lab, Kids on Deck), trails, performance programs (e.g.

Badu

by ERTH), through to toddler tours and stroller tours for new parents. They exclude school

learning programs. On

-

site public progra

m participant numbers are determined by aggregating data

of actual participation collected on

-

site by manual counting. These data are compiled and

aggregated at the operational level.

Analysis

On

-

site visitation was 407,924 against a target of 266,386. Th

e target was adopted in anticipation

that COVID

-

19 would significantly constrain visitation. The starting assumption was that paid

visitation to be just half of actual 2019

-

20 results, while it was also anticipated that unpaid visitation

would be heavily i

mpacted.

Recovery in visitation was slow and stalled with the Greater Sydney COVID

-

19 outbreak in December

2020. A rebound in visitation commenced with a Free February initiative leading to the highest

February visitation on record of 20,248 visitors, mor

e than all of Q2 combined. Final quarter paid

ticketed visitation was strong as a result of the NSW Government’s COVID

-

19 Dine and Discover

voucher scheme. The museum contributed to sector advocacy, supporting extension of the scheme

through participation

in the Sydney Visitor Collective.

The estimate of unpaid on

-

site visitors in 2020

-

21 is less than half the actual unpaid on

-

site visitors

during 2019

-

20. This shortfall is accounted for by 2019

-

20 including a normal peak summer holiday

visitation period,

followed by COVID

-

19 closure over March to June 2020. The museum expects an

average of 3.4 on

-

site unpaid visitors for every on

-

site paying visitor, based on reported visitor

counts in 2019

-

20 and 2018

-

19.

The museum conducted COVID

-

safe public programs f

or 27,590 people, just ahead of a modest

target. Reflecting recovery in overall visitation, participation in public programs was strongest during

the second half the year and particularly the final quarter. The most popular programs were Kids on

Deck famil

y workshops (10,800) and the

Ocean Lab

-

a drop

-

in ocean science activity space (11,700).

In addition, a significant number of visitors participated in activity trails and collected take

-

home

pack resources.

As a result of Australian Government internation

al travel restrictions to limit the spread of COVID

-

19,

visitation by

international tourists effectively ceased during 2020

-

21.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

32

Exhibitions

Results

The following table summarises the museum’s exhibition offer this year.

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2

019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of major

exhibitions delivered

annually

3

6

6

7

9

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

On

-

site exhibitions

18

32

31

36

Major exhibitions

6

6

7

9

Minor exhibitions

12

20

13

17

Rooftop projections

2

5

11

10

Methodology

A temporary exhibition is considered major if it is over 250 square metres and or has a budget over

$100K, and has a marketing campaign attached to it.

Analysis

The major exhibitions in 2020

-

21 included

Wildli

fe Photographer of the Year (55 and 56), Sea

Monsters,

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns), Defying Empire

and

Map It!

In addition, a new

permanent Sydney Harbour Gallery was opened in November 2020.

In 2020

-

21, entry fees applied to major exhibitions incl

uding

Sea Monsters

,

Wildlife Photographer of

the Year

and

Map It!

Entry was also charged for

Action Stations

and the

Endeavour

replica.

As part of the museum’s COVID

-

19 safe plan, our submarine HMAS

Onslow

, below deck visits on the

Endeavour

replica and H

MAS

Vampire

, Cape Bowling Green Lighthouse and 3D Cinema were all

closed and unavailable for visitors for the majority of the year.

Action Stations

provided visitors with restricted top

-

deck access to the museum’s naval vessels,

HMAS

Onslow

and

HMAS

Vampi

re

,

subject to COVID

-

safe operations. Paying visitors could also visit

the top deck of the

Endeavour

replica, which was berthed at the museum throughout the year. The

other vessels in the museum’s floating collection could be observed by all visitors from

the

museum’s wharves for no charge.

Some highlights of the free offer included

A Mile in My Shoes

-

an installation during the Sydney

Festival

2021

-

and

Fire on Water’s Edge

. Ocean Spirit Rising, a free activation during May 2021,

showcased Indigenous pe

rformers and storytellers sharing their connection to Sydney Harbour in a

light, music and dance show.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

33

As part of the Sydney Festival

2021

program, the

Waves of Migration

and

Threads of Migration

rooftop projections were displayed nightly from 8

-

26 Januar

y 2021. These dynamic light shows

explored the migration stories that have helped shape Australia today.

Visitor satisfaction

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

2016

-

17

Actual

% visitor satisfaction

90

%

91%

94%

98%

92%

95%

Methodology

Visitor satisfaction is measured via post

-

visit monthly surveys sent to online ticket holders

.

Visitors

are asked to rate their experience on a scale of 1 (poor) to 10 (outstanding). The level of satisfaction

is the prop

ortion of respondents who rate the museum as

7

or higher

.

Analysis

Visitor satisfaction is ahead

of target at 91%. Of the 692 people surveyed, 627 were satisfied or very

satisfied with the museum.

Priority 3 Supporting Reconciliation

We will encourage

understanding, appreciation and deep respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander cultures and heritage, and take action to be a preferred employer and business partner.

Criterion

The key performance measures are:



Expenditure on major Indigenous acqui

sitions



Percentage of staff and volunteers who have completed cultural awareness training



Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee satisfaction with progress.

Criterion source

2020

-

24 Corporate Plan, p.9.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

34

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

2016

-

17

Actual

Expenditure on major

Indigenous

acquisitions

$80K

$101K

$189K

$35K

$295K

$378K

% staff and volunteers

who have completed

cultural awareness

training

85%

100%

100%

100%

95%

100%

Aborigi

nal and Torres

Strait Islander

Advisory Committee

satisfaction with

progress

80%

80%

85%

N/A

N/A

N/A

Methodology

Expenditure on Indigenous acquisitions is compiled by the Finance section from the finance system

records.

Cultural awareness training is r

ecorded in the museum’s Learning Management System.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee satisfaction with progress is a rating

determined by the Chairperson of the Committee, having regard to the museum’s Reconciliation

Action Plan im

plementation report and the updates provided by the museum to the Committee

throughout the year.

Analysis

This year

the

museum acquired 34 Indigenous objects valued at $101,293. New acquisitions included

four new works of art by Torres Strait Islander ar

tist Alick Tipoti for the

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual

Patterns)

exhibition. This acquisition was made possible by donations through the Australian

National Maritime Museum Foundation, particularly by the Sid Faithfull and Christine Sadler

Program.

All new st

aff and volunteers are required to complete a cultural awareness training course through

the Learning Management System as part of the induction process. The museum supplements this

formal program with a range of informal learning opportunities, such as pr

omoting watching

The

Australian Dream

and considering how truth

-

telling applies to the work we do through surveys and

NAIDOC week activities.

The Chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee has reported 80

%

satisfaction with

the museum’s progress with reconciliation. The museum is in the third year of its

Reconciliation Action Plan, and has reported on progress to Council and the Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander Advisory Committee and commenced preparation of a new Recon

ciliation Action Plan

in consultation with the Committee and Reconciliation Australia.

Some of the highlights achieved under our Reconciliation Action Plan in 2020

-

21 include:

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

35



Strong engagement with Indigenous communities or organisations, particularly i

n respect of

acquisitions; exhibitions; museum programs; and NAIDOC Week and Indigenous art fairs.



Defying Empire

, a touring exhibition from the National Gallery of Australia opened in November

2020. The exhibition commemorated the 50

th

anniversary of the

1967 Referendum recognised

Aboriginal and Torres Strategy Islander people as Australian citizens for the first time. Profiling

30 works, it was delivered as part of the Encounters 2020 program.



The

Ship and Shore

outdoor exhibition explored James Cook's vo

yage and its legacy,

incorporating the perspectives of those aboard the

Endeavour

and also the Indigenous peoples

watching it from the shore.



Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns)

a retrospective of works by Alick Tipoti, opened at the

museum in 2020 after s

ignificant artist consultation.



The museum used Supply Nation as part of its overall procurement practice and commitment to

using ‘best endeavours’ to apply the Commonwealth’s Indigenous Procurement Policy.

Further details on progress with reconciliation

including development of a new action plan is

included in Appendix 4.

Priority 4 A Trusted Voice

a

nd Custodian

We will draw on our knowledge and collection to be a uniquely relevant and trusted place of

discourse and inquiry. We will be a preferred partn

er and undertake dedicated exploration and

research to ensure our exhibition, public and learning programs are deep, authentic and widely

shared in public, media and educational forums. The collection will be managed to best

-

practice

standards and made ava

ilable for a multiplicity of educational and research purposes to promote

inquiry and understanding of the maritime heritage and contemporary issues.

Criterion

The key performance measures of success are:

Learning



Number of students participating in school

programs annually



Number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs on

-

site



Percentage of teachers reporting relevance to the classroom curriculum



Percentage of teachers reporting overall positive experience.

Partnersh

ips



Number of formal partnerships with educational and research institutions in place

National Maritime Collection



Number of acquisitions made



Number of objects accessioned



Percentage of the total collection available to the public.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

36

Criterion source

2020

-

21 Portfolio Budget Statements, p.223.

2020

-

24 Corporate Plan, p.10.

Results

Learning

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of students participating

in school programs (on

-

site, off

-

site, online)

248,000

459

,933

379,543

195,809

148,104

Number of educational institutions

participating in organised school

learning programs on

-

site

486

129

287

456

577

% of teachers reporting relevance

to the classroom curriculum

95%

96%

93%

98%

96%

% of teachers reporting ove

rall

positive experience

90%

100%

98%

100%

96%

Partnerships

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of formal partnerships

with educational and research

institutions in place

10

25

56

38

28

National Maritime

Collection

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Number of acquisitions

100

338

122

133

132

Number of objects accessioned

100

833

711

1,099

1,080

% of the total collection available

to the public

70

.00

%

71.45%

71

.14%

69.36%

69.26%

Actual at 30 June

2021

2020

2019

2018

Number of objects in the National Maritime

Collection

150,564

149,559

148,480

147,354

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance S

tatement

37

L

earning

Methodology

The methodology for student participation is described above (see Priority 1). Note that

, for the

purpose of this priority, we also count online participation involving educational materials.

The number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs on

-

site is

calculated by aggregating information from the mu

seum’s customer relationship management

system and front of house records.

Teacher satisfaction and curriculum relevance is measured by evaluating visiting teacher feedback

received by the Learning team through online survey at completion of on

-

site visit

s.

Analysis

Learning

The analysis of student participation is included above (see Priority 1). This year, 459,933 students

participated in programs. They included 6,467 students who participated in on

-

site face

-

to

-

face

formal learning, down from 25,028

students last year. A further 1,314 participated in off

-

site visits

and 293,403 engaged with the museum’s online educational resources. This included online

gamified resources, principally

The Voyage

(247,940) and

Cooks Voyages

(29,837), plus virtual tours

of the replica

Endeavour

(18,383). Additionally, 156,584 students viewed classroom materials and

curriculum

-

focused video content developed collaboratively with ABC Education.

The COVID

-

19 pandemic heavily impacted the delivery of on

-

site formal learning

programs during

2020, with school visits resuming in November, just before the summer school holidays. Overall the

number of schools visiting the museum was well below target. Reflecting the broader visitation

trend, more than half the number of school st

udents visiting the museum during the year did so in

the final quarter.

Teacher satisfaction is pleasing at 100% (from 67 respondents) against a target of 90%. Furthermore,

96% of teachers report that the museum’s

learning

programs are relevant to the cur

riculum (against

a target of 95%).

Partnerships

The number of formal partnerships with educational and research institutions, excluding Maritime

Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme

grant agreements, is recorded at the operational

level. A formal

contractual collaboration is one where a signed memorandum of understanding or a

written contract is in place. A national or international cultural or educational institution is a public

or non

-

profit institution that engages in the cultural, intellectual,

scientific, environmental,

educational or artistic enrichment of people. The number of partnerships reported reflects those

operable during the year.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

38

Analysis

The museum had 35 formal partnerships with various educational and research institutions this ye

ar,

comprising 25 based in Australia and 10 overseas. Partnership agreements typically relate to object

loans, inbound or outboard exhibitions, maritime archaeology projects, cultural diplomacy projects,

education or acquisitions. In 2020

-

21 the partnershi

ps included a memorandum of understanding

with Settlement Services International, an agreement with the Embassy of Sweden relating to the

exhibition

Paradise Lost: Daniel Solander’s legacy

and with the Schmidt Ocean Institute relating to

the upcoming

One O

cean

-

Our Future

exhibition. The museum also maintained a large number of

partnerships with commercial and government entities, as well a diverse range of informal

partnerships with educational and research institutions, which are not reflected in the abo

ve

numbers.

National Maritime Collection

Methodology

All data pertaining to collection item management (e.g. acquisitions, loans, object locations) is

recorded in or derived from the museum’s collection management system (TMS). The number of

items in the

collection and the percentage available to the public is at 30 June. To assist with

comparisons, results for past years have been adjusted to actuals at 30 June. Also, to make

movements throughout the year transparent, the annual results for public access

are now compared

with the quarterly results for these indicators.

Analysis

There were 150,564

objects in the National Maritime Collection at 30 June 2021. This year, 833

objects were accessioned to the collection against a target of 100.

The number of ne

w acquisitions

was 338 against a target of 100.

A total of 36 acquisitions comprised 26 gifts, including one donated

under the Cultural Gifts Program, plus 10 purchases.

Major acquisitions this year included a

collection of over 9000 images donated by Vale

rie Taylor AM,

an Honorary Fellow of the museum. This priceless collection represents the career arc of filmmakers

and ocean conservationists Valerie Taylor AM (born 1935) and her late husband Ron Taylor AM

(1934

-

2012), who began their underwater career as

spear fishers. The couple pioneered skin

-

diving,

scuba diving and underwater photography and cinematography in Australia.

The museum secured an important collection of MV

Krait

related objects, including medals awarded

to Lieutenant Hubert Edward ‘Ted’ Ca

rse, plus a knife and a faux Japanese ensign relating to the

World War II raid, ‘Operation Jaywick’. These purchases were made possible via the support of a

donation from the Carse family and the Australian Government’s

National

Cultural

Heritage Account

.

The acquisition was accepted into the collection by the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, Minister for

Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, on 20 April 2021.

The percentage of the collection available to the public (71%) is ahead of target (70%).

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

39

Priority 5 A Strong Financial Future

We will build on our success and achieve long

-

term sustainability, including by expanding our

audiences, philanthropy, programs and partnerships and by diversifying our income sources.

Criterion

The key measures of

performance are:



% of total income that is self

-

generated (excluding

one offs and

Encounters 2020 revenue).

Criterion source

2020

-

24 Corporate Plan, p.11.

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Percentage sel

f

-

generated revenue

(excluding one

-

offs and

Encounters 2020)

National

Cultural

Institution

Average

27.7

%

42.8

%

45

.0%

43.6

%

Methodology

Financial data, including figures for the Australian National Maritime Foundation, is derived from the

museum’s systems

and has been audited and agreed to in the Financial Statements.

The percentage of self

-

generated revenue is calculated as total revenue received by the museum

other than by appropriation from government. Total self

-

generated revenue has been adjusted for

the purpose of this calculation by removing one

-

off gains (primarily gains on donated assets for

Duyfken

($3.832M

) and National Cultural Institution grant funding

($2M)

received from the

Australian Government.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

40

Analysis

Total self

-

generated revenue was

$14.5M, which is ahead of target by 20.6

%

($2.47M).

2020

-

21

Portfolio

Budget

Statement

Target

$

’000

2020

-

21

Actual

$

’000

2019

-

20

Actual

$

’000

2018

-

19

Actual

$

’000

2017

-

18

Actual

$

’000

Total self

-

generated

revenue

12,008

14,478

19,681

18,948

17,440



Gra

nts

3,993

2,765

3,461

1,704

884



Donations

1,027

4,419

664

668

2,114



Sponsorship

426

912

993

1,902

1,914



Interest

150

116

378

898

744



Admissions and retail

1,735

2,015

4,441

4,739

4,331



Venue hire

895

564

1,542

2,283

1,769



Leasing

2,558

2,472

2,6

93

2,651

2,177



Other

1,224

1,215

5,509

4,103

3,507

Most s

elf

-

generated revenue items

were

severely affected by the ongoing restrictions of COVID

-

19

(including the loss of international visitors) in comparison to previous years’ results.

However, t

he

NSW

Government’s

Dine & Discover program

assisted with

better than budgeted admission figures,

and

cash donations exceed

ed

budget.

Priority 6 People First

Our staff and volunteers are our greatest assets.

We will continue to be a sought

-

after place to work

by promoting excellence in all we do and

supporting our people with development opportunities and effective systems and processes.

We recognise the vital role that our volunteers play in meeting the needs of our visitors.

We will commit to increasing the

diversity and cultural awareness of our staff and volunteers

through effective recruitment and training initiatives.

We will build our capabilities in emerging areas such as the use of technology and audience

engagement.

Criterion

The key measures of perf

ormance are:



Museum staff satisfaction in the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) State of the

Service Survey.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

41

Criterion source

2020

-

24 Corporate Plan, p.12.

Results

2020

-

21

Target

2020

-

21

Actual

2019

-

20

Actual

2018

-

19

Actual

2017

-

18

Actual

Pr

iority measures in the APSC

State of the Service survey

>APS

average

75%

(2020)

51%

Survey

postponed

*

64%

68%

*

2019

-

20 APSC survey was postponed until October

-

November 2020 due to COVID

-

19.

Methodology

The museum encourages Australian Public Service (APS

) staff to participate in the Australian Public

Service Commission’s annual Employee Census. The APSC’s report on the response to the repeat

question ‘Considering everything, I am satisfied with my job’ is used for this criterion.

Analysis

The 2020 APSC E

mployee Census was delayed due to COVID

-

19 and conducted during October

-

November 2020. The response rate of 76

%

was comparable with the APS average of 78

%

. The

decline in reported job satisfaction since 2018

-

19 is anticipated to reflect the impact of workf

orce

changes and organisational realignment implemented in response to the pandemic to underpin the

museum’s financial sustainability and retain APS positions. Short

-

term labour hire contract roles

were vacated upon closure of the museum in March 2020. APS

administrative staff from across the

museum business areas were redeployed to meet visitor experience and customer service needs

following the reopening of the museum in June 2020 and these arrangements extended into 2021.

Re

-

engagement of short

-

term labo

ur hire to reduce impacts on APS staff was being planned prior to

closure of the museum on 25 June 2021.

Delivery of the museum’s Statement of Intent for

2020

-

21

In 2020, the museum provided a ‘Statement of Intent’ for 2020

-

21 in response to the Governmen

t’s

‘Statement of Expectations’. The following table summarises key actions taken to deliver on the

‘Statement of Intent’.

Statement of Intent

Actions

Providing national leadership

and fostering collegiality

within the museum sector to

assist with its rec

overy from

COVID

-

19



Ongoing Director participation in Council of Australian

Museum Directors and Museum and Galleries NSW recovery

discussions.



Participation in the Sydney Visitor Collective advancing the

recovery of cultural and tourist attractions and di

alogue with

the NSW Government to aid museum recovery.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Annual Performance Statement

42

Contributing to economic

activity and recovery as social

restrictions ease, particularly

in regional centres, through

touring and other outreach

activities



Under the Maritime Museums of Australia Pro

ject Support

Scheme, 19 projects received grants totalling $135K, two

internships were supported, and a further 10 projects

received ‘in kind’ support from museum experts.



11 touring exhibitions reached 46 venues nationally, visiting

and all states and ter

ritories except the ACT.



Director participation on the Norfolk Island, Kingston and

Arthur Vale Historic Area Advisory Committee.

Focusing on how the

museum’s activities can

further encourage social

cohesion and foster diversity

and inclusion



A Mile in M

y Shoes

launched on January as part of the

Sydney Festival

2021

and extended to April 2021.



Negotiation of memorandum of understanding with

Settlement Services International and exhibition of

Motherland

-

Exile

/

Refuge

-

Migration

(r

epeat

)

.



Negotiation of

in

-

kind support for migration projects with

SBS including Welcome Wall (now National Monument to

Migration) and Sunday Stir events in March 2021.



Strong engagement with migrant and diplomatic

organisations and ethnic media regarding migration projects

incl

uding

Haenyeo

, an exhibition celebrating the sea women

of Jeju Island to commemorate the 60th anniversary of

diplomatic relations with the Republic of Korea.

Continuing to champion and

showcase our Indigenous

cultures for the education,

enrichment and ben

efit of all

Australians



Defying Empire

: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial and

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns)

opened on 25 November.



Ocean Talks, including ‘A fish

-

eye view of Warrane / Sydney

Harbour’ and ‘Connected to Sea Country’ in NAIDOC Week

,

plus

Badu

by Erth.



Ship and Shore

opened outside Wharf 7.



Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky

aired on NITV and SBS on 20

August 2020. The museum was the principal funder as part of

the

Encounters 2020

program.

Maintaining the museum’s

financial sustainabili

ty,

including through exploring

opportunities to further grow

private sector support and

increase own

-

source revenue



Implementation of recovery and reinvention plan.



Continued prudent budget management including reduction

in supplies and services expenses

.



Implementation of organisational structure changes to

support recovery.



Philanthropic revenue of $587K exceeding target of $515K

despite challenging economic conditions.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

43

Annex A

:

Framework for measurement of total onsite visitation

Total on

-

site visi

tation

Other on

-

site

interactions

Paid

Unpaid*



Students

participating in

school programs

(these are

separately

reported under the

Learning key

performance

indicators)



People

only

using

the museum’s

store



People

only

using

the museum’s

coffee container or

restaurant



People

only

using

the museum’s

amenities



People

only

requesting

information (e.g.

about non

-

museum matters)



Paid ticketed

visitors



Lighthouse

tour visitors



Members

visiting



Participants

in museum

events and

programs

(other than

school

progra

ms)

for which a

fee is

charged (e.g.

Family Fun

Day)



Participants

at events in

museum

venues

(venue hire

includes

access to

museum)

Ticketed visitation



Visitors to

Wharf 7

foyer and

tours



Visitors to

free outdoor

exhibitions

(e.g.

Ship

and Shore

)



Visitors

to

free events

and

programs

(National

Monument

to Migration

unveilings)



People

engaging

with the

outdoor

offer



People

viewing the

museum’s

rooftop

projections

from

Pyrmont

Bridge,

Cockle Bay

and Darling

Harbour

Paid ticketed

visitors



Visitors who

hav

e

purchased a

paid ticket

(Big Ticket,

Special

exhibition,

3D theatre)



Tourism and

group

booking

tickets

(except

where only

visiting

galleries)



First

purchase of

membership

Unpaid ticketed

visitors



Visitors who

have received a

free Galleries

ticket



Touri

sm and

group booking

tickets for

galleries only



Complimentary

tickets

International visitors



Individuals who reside overseas and

tourism group bookings (either paid

ticketed or unpaid ticketed)

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibitions and attractions

44

Exhibitions and attractions

In July 2020 the muse

um quickly adapted plans in light of the COVID

-

19 pandemic. Some exhibitions

were extended beyond their original display period, including

Sea Monsters

and

Wildlife:

Photographer of the Year

. These extensions enabled visitors to attend exhibitions that wer

e closed

during the March to June 2020 lockdown in Sydney, ensuring that the financial and staff investment

in these exhibits were maximised.

The museum was delighted to host

HERE: Kupe to Cook

from the Pataka Art Museum in New Zealand

as part of our

Enco

unters 2020

program. This exhibit consisted of artworks by

twenty leading

Aotearoa New Zealand and Australian contemporary artists investigating and reacting to the long

and varied histories of South Pacific voyaging

-

from Kupe to the arrival of James Coo

k in 1769.

Other exhibits that formed part of the

Encounters 2020

program included

Cook and the Pacific

, a

condensed version of a larger exhibit shown at the National Library of Australia, plus the intimate

exhibit

Paradise Lost

produced in conjunction wit

h the Solander Gallery in New Zealand and the

Swedish Embassy.

The exhibit commemorated the legacy of the

Endeavour

botanist Daniel Solander.

It featured fine art prints by ten leading contemporary New Zealand artists, selected to bring a

unique vision to

this historical event and Solander’s legacy.

Paradise Lost

also featured Australian

Indigenous scientific knowledge as a framework to explore engravings of botanical specimens

collected in Australia by Solander and Joseph Banks, which were drawn from the N

ational Maritime

Collection.

While the planned

Endeavour

voyage was cancelled, museum staff successfully reimagined the

exhibition for display in the Wharf 7 Forecourt, as

Ship and Shore

. This exhibition was originally

intended to travel in a truck and be

displayed at ports alongside the

Endeavour

replica. This display

examined Cook’s voyage and its legacy, incorporating perspectives both of those aboard

Endeavour

and the Indigenous

peoples

watching it from the shore

.

The museum team worked with the Nationa

l

Gallery of Australia to bring the exhibit

Defying Empire: the Third Indigenous Art Triennial

to

audiences over the summer period. The exhibit, first launched in 2017, commemorated the 50th

anniversary of the 1967 Referendum that first recognised Aborigin

al and Torres Strait Islander

peoples as Australian citizens. It explored the ongoing resilience of Australia’s Indigenous people

since first contact, through to the historical fight for recognition and ongoing activism in the present

day.

The latter half

of 2020 saw the opening of Sydney Harbour Gallery,

which overlooks the upgraded

Ben Lexcen Terrace. This new gallery focuses on ocean science and the

rhythms of maritime life

around the harbour

.

Architectural, structural and content changes were made to th

e Passengers

Gallery in order to increase the size of the Eora Gallery. These modifications enabled the

M

ari

w

Minaral: Spiritual Patterns

exhibition to feature larger works by renowned Torres Strait Islander

artist Alick Tipoti. This exhibition opened in N

ovember 2020 and was awarded an Indigenous Project

Award at the 202

1

Australian Museum and Galleries Association Awards.

The Museum shifted its focus toward the

United Nations

Decade of Ocean Science

for Sustainable

Development

with the opening of the Syd

ney Harbour Gallery and an exhibition titled

Beach

Couture:

a

Haute

Mess

.

It featured a

collection of wearable pieces made from rubbish collected from

the beaches and oceans by artist Marina DeBris.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibitions and attractions

45

A Mile in My Shoes

was

launched as part of the Sydney Fe

stival in January 2021

.

Supported by the

ANMM Foundation, the exhibition was developed in conjunction with the Empathy Museum in the

UK.

T

his exhibit

was

housed i

n a modified shipping container and

incorporated

34

pairs of shoes

,

each representing the stor

y of one migrant to Australia. Numerous logistical challenges associated

with operating a participatory experience in the age of COVID

-

19 were overcome by staff.

The next iteration of

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

,

licensed

from the Natural History Mus

eum in

the UK

,

opened in April 2021.

Y

ounger visitors

were

encouraged to solve interactive navigational

challenges in the exhibit

M

ap

I

t!

,

developed by Scitech in WA

.

It

opened in March 21

but

unfortunately closed early

owing

to the

renewed

lockdown in Syd

ney.

Haenyeo: the Sea Women of

Jeju Island

p

hotographic exhibit opened in March 2021

. It

was developed in partnership with the

Korean Cultural Centre

to share

the amazing story of these female free divers.

In April 2021 the museum launched

Fire on Water’s

Edge

in the Wharf 7 Forecourt

. T

his outdoor

exhibit tells the story of the disastrous bushfires of summer 2020

,

through words and images

supplied by

Royal Australian N

avy

(RAN)

personnel, beach lifesavers and members of coastal

communities. The exhibition

was created in close consultation with curators and staff working in

regional museums in bushfire affected regions. The final temporary exhibit to open in

the reporting

period

was

War and Peace:

t

he

A

tomic

B

ombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

.

Based on an

ex

hibition

from the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum

and the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

, it was

presented as

p

art of

the

War and Peace in the Pacific 75

’ program,

supported by the USA

Bicentennial Gift Fund.

The exhibition team and museum staff more b

roadly demonstrated their ability to adapt schedules,

work plans and budgets at very short notice during

the reporting period

. The team collaborated to

provide visitors with a range of diverse, engaging and compelling exhibitions to enjoy. The effects of

s

poradic COVID

-

19

lockdowns and the reduction in visitors to the Darling Harbour precinct was

disappointing

. F

ortunately many of the exhibits will have prolonged display periods or will tour in

future years

, ensuring that

more Australians have the opportuni

ty to experience these wonderful

exhibitions.

Beach Couture and ‘The Inconvenience Store’

i

nstallation

Beach Couture: a Haute Mess

is a collection of wearable pieces

,

made

by Marina DeBris

from trash

collected from the beaches and oceans. It makes visib

le, in grotesquely amusing fashion, what is

often overlooked

-

but

shouldn’t be. Ideally, viewers will walk away aware of this growing problem

and provoked to take some action. Lower Gallery,

19 December 2020

-

18 April 2021

.

Cook and the Pacific

Visitors

were introduced to James Cook’s three remarkable Pacific voyages, and explored this

spectacular region through the eyes of the British voyagers and the First Peoples they met. This

exhibition was based on a larger

exhibition

produced by the National Libra

ry of Australia. Tasman

Light Gallery, 31 March 2020

-

15 September 2020

.

Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial

Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial

br

ought

the works of 30 contemporary

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islande

r artists from across the country into the national spotlight.

The

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibitions and attractions

46

exhibit commemorate

d

the 50th anniversary of the 1967 Referendum that recognised Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander peoples as Australians for the first time. It explore

d

the ongoing res

ilience

of Australia’s Indigenous people since first contact, through to the historical fight for recognition and

ongoing activism in the present day.

North Gallery, 26 November 2020

-

7 February 2021

.

Fire

on

Water

s Edge

Through the words and images of

RAN

personnel and surf life

-

savers, this exhibition documents the

bushfires that devastated vast tracts of coastal Victoria and New South Wales over the summer of

2019

-

20. It also examines the immediate response to the events through the artists of the Bus

hfire

Brandalism Collective.

Wharf 7 forecourt, launched 22 April 2021

.

Haenyeo: the

S

ea

W

omen of Jeju Island

Opening just before International Women’s Day

, t

his is the story of the

H

aenyeo

-

female free divers

of Korea who dive for hours at a time to harv

est food from the sea floor. Tasman Light Gallery,

launched 8 March 2021.

HERE: Kupe to Cook

Showcased artworks by twenty leading Aotearoa New Zealand and Australian contemporary artists

who investigate the long and varied histories of South Pacific voyagi

ng

.

Its subjects ranged

from

Kupe to the arrival of James Cook in 1769. Lower Gallery, 15 June 2020

-

29 November 2020

.

Map it!

Children were able to u

ndertake a quest across land, sea and space to explore the role of mapping

and navigation in everyday lif

e. Visitors

could

find seven ‘quest’ stations to solve puzzles and collect

different parts of their own map, which

could

then be viewed and brought to life through

augmented reality. Exhibition developed by SciTech and produced by Imagine Exhibitions.

Nort

h

Gallery, 27 March 2021

-

25

June 2021.

Mariw Minaral (spiritual patterns)

Mariw Minaral

brings together some of the finest examples of Torres Strait Islander Alick Tipoti’s

unique and intricate linocut printmaking practice

. The exhibition

also showcases

some of his award

-

winning sculptural works. Guided by the traditional cultural p

ractices of his people, Tipoti’

s

storytelling encompasses traditional cosmology, marine environments and ocean conservation. Eora

Gallery,

launched 25 November 2020.

Mile in m

y Shoes

A Mile in My Shoes

provided an

insight into the lives of 34

extraordinary people through a

performance walking tour with recorded storytelling. Developed in partnership with the Empathy

Museum

and the ANMM Foundation

. Darling Harbour, 6 January 202

1

-

2 May 2021

.

Motherland

-

Exile/Refuge

-

Migration (repeat)

The exhibition

brought

together artists who have experience as refugees or asylum seekers, and

artists exploring themes of migration, motherland, and displacement. Curated and produced by

Settl

ement Services International. Terrace Room,

6

-

27 January 2021

.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibi

tions and attractions

47

Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World

Banner exhibition from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History on how viruses connect

our world. Supported by the USA Bicentennial Gift Fund.

South Gallery, 20 August

-

22 September

2020 and Tasman Light Gallery, 22 September

-

14 December 2020

.

Paradise Lost: Daniel Solander’s

L

egacy

This exhibition commemorate

d

the legacy of

Endeavour

’s

botanist

,

Daniel Solander

,

and the first

encounter betwe

en Sweden and the Pacific

r

egion. A touring exhibition from the Embassy of

Sweden, Canberra and the Solander Gallery, Wellington

,

New Zealand. Tasman Light Gallery, 12

October 2020

-

14 February 2021

.

Sea Monsters

-

Prehistoric Ocean Predators

The

Sea Mons

ters

exhibition combine

d

real fossils from millions of years ago

with

gigantic replicas

including a 13m long

e

lasmosaurus and 9m long

p

rognathdon

. It also featured a

180

-

degree

immersive video that put

visitors

inside the action,

plus

hands

-

on interactives

to make

their

own

monster

s.

North Gallery, 26 September 2019

-

24 March 2020 and 15 June

-

11 October 2020

.

Ship and Shore

This

banner

exhibition

,

on display in the Wharf 7

F

orecourt, examine

d

Cook

s voyage and its legacy

.

It incorporated

the

perspectives

of those aboard

Endeavour

and the Indigenous

peoples

watching it

from the shore.

Wharf 7 F

orecourt, 2 July 2020

-

8 April 2021

.

Sydney Harbour Gallery

Visitors immerse themselves with historical and contemporary stories of Sydney Harbour

-

both

above and

below the waterline. Th

is

gallery is sponsored by the Port Authority of

NSW

. Sydney

Harbour Gallery,

launched

4 October 2020

.

War and Peace in the Pacific:

t

he

Atomic Bombing

of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Exploring stories of destruction, recovery and prosperi

ty, this exhibition highlights the importance of

achieving a peaceful world without nuclear weapons.

The exhibition is from the Hiroshima Peace

Memorial Museum and the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Lower Gallery,

launched

21 May 2021

.

Wildlife Photogra

pher of the Year 55 (2019)

The i

nternationally

-

acclaimed

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

exhibition

return

ed

to

the museum,

bigger and better than ever in 2020

.

A new installation saw the use of back

lit panels to give the

photographs even more pizazz

.

Ta

ll Gallery

,

5 March

-

24 March 2020 and 15 June

202

-

28 January

2021

.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 56 (2020)

Selected from over 49,000 entries from around the world,

t

he winners of the Wildlife Photographer

of the Year competition were backlit on lar

ge panels. Tall Gallery,

launched 1 April 2021.

Dark Victory: Operation Jaywick

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of Operation Jaywick, the museum collaborated with the

National Museum of Singapore to produce a wide

-

screen film about this daring commando

raid and

a virtual reality experience that

takes

people ‘on board’ the historic MV

Krait

.

New acquisitions to

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibitions and attractions

48

the National Maritime Collection were integrated into a renewed exhibition in 2021.

Action Station

s

,

27 September 2018

-

24 March 2020,

updated

2

2

June

2021.

Out of Hawaii

-

Surfing Goes Global

In 1961 a group of 20 Australian surfers flocked to Hawaii for its huge waves and the famed Makaha

surfing contest. This display features one of them; a young Bernard ‘Midget’ Farrelly, with photos

and conte

nt updated regularly. Tall Gallery platform,

launched 14 June 2017

.

Your Story is Our Story

An outdoor exhibition of photographic portraits of migrants was created to showcase the diversity of

people honoured on the National Monument to Migration. The port

raits by Andrew Frolows were

bookended by historic photographs from the Museum’s collection. This exhibit included QR codes to

connect visitors to the migration stories of the subjects.

Touring exhibitions

The year began with staff focused on rescheduli

ng touring exhibits due to C

OVID

-

19 and ended in

much the same way.

Submerged: Stories of Australian Shipwrecks

, developed in conjunction with the

Australian Maritime Museums Council (AMMC), continued its four

-

year tour to smaller venues in

regional Austra

lia. The

Remarkable:

Stories of

Australians and Their Boats

banner exhibition also

developed in conjunction with the AMMC launched in May 2021. These smaller banner exhibitions

are designed for display in regional towns; venues are encouraged to display th

eir own collection

material to supplement the themes explored in each exhibit. Numerous banner exhibits that were

developed for display in previous years such as

Nawi

and

War at Sea

continued to attract audiences.

Other exhibits developed as part of the fi

ve

-

year USA War and Peace in the Pacific

75 p

rogram were

shown at interested venues in Australia and the United States.

Container

opened at the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory in May 2021, after a

period of extended storage in Fremantle, W

estern Australia. The

Sea Monsters

exhibition was

displayed at Queensland Museum in Brisbane from November 2020 and was then transported to

Auckland, New Zealand, in June 2021.

Sea Monsters

was installed by host venue teams, with our

staff providing instal

lation support by Zoom and delivering detailed documentation and instructions

in advance of the exhibit’s arrival.

The museum’s large international touring exhibitions are managed by third

-

party agents, Flying Fish,

to take advantage of their strong netwo

rks and USA

-

based installation staff.

Voyage to the Deep

, an

interactive exhibit designed for young children, was first shown at our museum in 2014 and this year

delighted younger audiences at Nauticus, a maritime museum in Virginia. It is currently on dis

play at

the Doseum in San Antonio, Texas.

James Cameron

-

Challenging the Deep

made its North American debut at Durham Museum,

Nebraska, in late May 2021. This is the first venue on the North American tour. The exhibition

features large

-

scale audiovisual

installations and object loans from many private and institutional

lenders. Significant preparation work by museum staff from the registration, conservation and

touring exhibition team was required to ensure the exhibition design documentation and plans we

re

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibitions and attractions

49

transferred to Flying Fish, while the physical exhibit contents were transported from Sydney to the

United States.

In summary, the touring exhibitions team coordinated the sharing of a diverse array of exhibitions

with colleagues at host venues througho

ut Australia. They worked closely with colleagues from the

production and installation, curatorial, marketing, registration and conservation teams to reach over

700,000 visitors in another busy and productive year.

Container

-

the box that changed the worl

d

Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territo

ry, Darwin Northern Territory,

21 May 2021

-

25 July 2021.

Escape from Pompeii: the Untold Roman Rescue

Produced in conjunction with Expona.

Mosegaard Museum of Aarhus, Denmark, 1 July 2020

-

13 September

2020

.

Haenyeo: the

S

ea

W

omen of Jeju Island

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, Tasmania 7 May 2021

-

6 June 2021

.

James Cameron

-

Challenging the Deep

Durham Museum, Nebraska, United States of America, 22 May 2021

-

12 September 2021

.

Little shipma

tes

-

Cats and Dogs all at Sea

Bass Strait Maritime Centre, Devonport, Tasmania, 1 October 2020

-

31 July 2021

.

Sea Monsters

Museum of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, 20 November 2020

-

3 May 2021

.

Voyage to the Deep

Nauticus, Virginia, United States o

f America, 13 September 2020

-

3 January 2021

.

Doseum San Antonio, Texas, United States of America, 8 May 2021

-

25 September 2021

.

Banner Exhibitions

The museum has continued to tour banner exhibitions

,

enabling the museum to share the maritime

stories a

bout Indigenous watercraft, shipwrecks and naval history

. These banner exhibitions reach

Australians visiting local libraries, trade shows, historical societies, naval bases and clubs throughout

the nation.

During the reporting period the museum

developed

a new offering with the members of

the Aust

ralian Maritime Museums Council.

Remarkable:

Stories of Australians and

Their Boats

was

launched in April 2021, thanks to funding provided by the Australian Government

s Visions of

Australia program. Numerous bann

er exhibits that were developed for display as part of the five

-

year USA War and Peace in the Pacific Program were shown at interested venues in Australia and

the United States.

Submerged: Stories of Australia’s Shipwrecks

21 venues

around

Australia.

Redc

liffe Library, Queensland, 16 March

-

31 August 2020

.

Shire of Broome, Western Australia

, 1 June

-

13 July 2020

.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Exhibitions and attractions

50

Roma Libra

ry, Queensland, 25 June

-

7 August 2020

.

Edenhope Library, Victoria, 11 August

-

27 January 2021

.

Karoonda Area School, South Austral

ia, 14 August

-

18 September 2020

.

Cummins School Community Library, S

outh Australia,

2 September

-

14 October 2020

.

Kimba School Community Library, South

Australia, 21 September

-

2 November 2020

.

Roxby Downs Library, South Australia, 13 October

-

25 Nove

mber 2020

.

Art Geo Complex, Western Australia, 13 October

-

25 November 2020

.

City of

Port Lincoln, South Australia, 2 November 2020

-

8 January 2021

.

Carnarvon

Library, Western Australia, 23 November 2020

-

28 January 2021

.

City

of Burnside, South Australi

a,

9 December 2020

-

21 January 2021

.

Port Stephens Historical Society, New S

outh Wales, 21 December 2020

-

8 January 2021

.

Surat City Library, Queensland, 23 December 2020

-

22 Ja

nuary 2021.

C

ity of Unley, South Australia,

1

-

31 March 2021

.

Gladstone Libra

ry, Queensland, 25 March

-

18 May 2021

.

Cambrid

ge Library, Western Australia,

1 April

-

1 May 2021.

Logan North Library, Queensland, 19 April

-

25 June 2021

.

Logan Central Library, Queensland, 19 April

-

25 June 2021

.

City of Marion, Core

Civic Centre, Sou

th Australia,

3

-

16 May 2021

.

North Rockhampton Regional Library, Queensland, 24 May

-

4 June 2021

.

Remarkable: Stories of Australians and Their Boats

10 venues

around

Australia

.

Harbour Trust, Subb

ase Platypus, New South Wales,

1 April

-

9 May 2021

.

Irwin

District Historic

al Society, Western Australia,

8 April

-

31 May 2021

.

Beachport Wool and Grain Museum, South Australia, 15

April

-

31 May 2021

.

Wentworth Council,

Victoria,

1

-

31 May 2021

.

Hervey Bay Historical District and Museum, Queenslan

d,

8 May

-

08

June 2021

.

Ballina

Naval Museum, New South Wales,

7 June

-

28 July 2021

.

Echuca Historical Society, Victoria, 14 June

-

31 August 2021

.

Albany Historic Whaling Station, Western Australia, 14 June

-

30 July 2021

.

Millicent Branch of the National Trust, Sout

h Australia, 14 June

-

31 July 2021

.

Cundletown Museum, New South Wales, 25 June

-

6 August 2021

.

War at Sea

-

the Australian

Navy in WWI

Shopfront Imlay St Eden, New South Wales.

Tathra Wharf Museum, New South Wales

.

Nawi Indigenous Watercraft

National M

arine Science Centre, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, 1

August

-

1 December 2020.

Kingston National Trust, South Australia, 26 December 2020

-

26 January 2021.

Battle of the Coral

Sea (banner display and film)

Townsville Maritim

e Museum, Queensland, 1 July 2020

-

30 June 2021

.

Annual R

eport

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21

Exhibitions and attractions

51

Dark Victory

-

Operation Jaywick (banner display and vi

rtual reality experience)

National Museum of Singapore, Singapore, 1 July 2020

-

30 June 2021.

City of Mandurah Community Museum, Western Australia, 7

-

28 April 2021

.

Guardians of Sunda Strait

Battleship

New Jersey

,

Camden, New Jersey,

United States of America, 1 June

-

30 September 2020.

Perth Town Hall, Western Australia, 26 February

-

8 March 2021

.

War and Peace in the Pacific

USS

Kidd

Veteran’s Muse

um, Baton Rouge, New Orle

ans, United States of America,

7 September 2020

-

31 May 2021

.

Shopping Centre exhibits

Beach Couture

Wynyard Shopping Centre, Sydney.

Greenwood Shopping

Centre North Sydney.

Aussie Cossie

Harbourside Shopping Centre

.

I

nteracti

ves and multimedia

Our innovative digital artworks and documentaries are a must

-

see for visitors.

Rooftop Projections

Queensland Tourism Campaign,

3

-

5 December 2020.

Waves of Migration

Part of Sydney Festival, 6

-

26 January 2021

.

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Governance and accountability

52

Governance and account

ability

Corporate governance

The museum is a statutory authority within the Arts Portfolio. Its enabling legislation, the

Australian

National Maritime Museum Act 1990

(the ANMM Act), established a governing council

. The Council

of the ANMM (the Council)

e

nsure

s

the proper and efficient performance of its functions.

At 30 June 2020 the Council comprised

12

members, including the museum’s Director and a

representative of the Royal Australian Navy. The full Council met five times during the reporting

period.

The Council is also served by

three

committees, the Audit Committee

, the Remuneration

Committee, and

the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee.

The Council operates under a governance policy that includes a requirement for periodic self

-

assessment. The Council is committed to continuous improvement, and various changes were

implemented throughout the course of the year. A number of councillors are members of the

Australian Institute of Company Directors and subject to its code of conduct.

All councillors are

aware of the need to comply with both the letter and the spirit of relevant legislation. Operations

are informed by the highest museological standards and codes of practice and all staff are bound by

the Australian Public Service Value

s and Code of Conduct.

The museum prepares corporate plans over four years and annual operating plans for ministerial

approval in accordance with the ANMM Act. The Minister receives reports on matters of

significance, and the Chairman and Director meet wit

h the Minister as required. A senior

departmental representative attends all Council meetings as an observer and copies of the minutes

are provided to the Minister and

the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional

Development and Communications (th

e

department

)

. The museum is subject to the

Public

Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act).

All museum staff are aware of the importance of good governance, and governance is a regular item

on the agenda for the executive management

group’s fortnightly meetings.

The names of the museum’s executives and their responsibilities, as at 30 June 2020, are:

Kevin Sumption

PSM

Director and CEO

Tanya Bush

Deputy Director and Chief Financial Officer

Zena Habib

Chief People Officer

Michael Harv

ey

Assistant Director, Public Engagement and Research

,

and

Chief Experience Officer

Paul McCarthy

Senior Executive, Strategy and External Relations.

Roles and functions of the museum

The role and functions of the museum are specified in Sections 6 and 7

of the

Australian National

Maritime Museum Act 1990

.

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Governance and accountability

53

Functions of the museum (Section 6)



to exhibit, or make available for exhibition by others, in Australia or elsewhere, material

included in the National Maritime Collection or maritime historical materia

l that is otherwise

in the possession of the museum



to cooperate with other institutions (whether public or private) in exhibiting, or in making

available for exhibition, such material



to develop, preserve and maintain the National Maritime Collection



to d

isseminate information relating to Australian maritime history and information relating

to the museum and its functions



to conduct, arrange for and assist research into matters relating to Australian maritime

history



to develop sponsorship, marketing and o

ther commercial activities relating to the museum’s

functions.

Powers of the museum (Section 7)

Subject to the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990

, the museum has power to do all

things necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with

the performance of its functions

and, in particular, has power:



to purchase, commission the creation of or take on hire, deposit or loan, maritime historical

material



to lend or hire out or otherwise deal with maritime historical material



to recover, or to

arrange for or assist in the recovery of, maritime historical material from

the Australian marine environment and from other areas



to dispose of, in accordance with section 10, material included in the National Maritime

Collection and to dispose of mariti

me historical material that is otherwise in the possession

of the museum



from time to time as the occasion requires, to exhibit in Australia or elsewhere, material,

whether in written form or in any other form and whether relating to Australia or to a

fore

ign country



to accept gifts, devises, bequests or assignments made to the museum, whether on trust or



otherwise, and whether unconditionally or subject to a condition and, if a gift, devise,



bequest or assignment is accepted by the museum on trust or sub

ject to a condition, to act



as trustee or to comply with the condition, as the case may be



to acquire and operate vessels, whether in Australian waters or otherwise and whether or

not the vessels are maritime historical material



to collect, and make avail

able (whether in writing or in any other form and whether by sale

or otherwise), information relating to Australian maritime history



to make available information relating to the museum and its functions



to make available (whether by sale or otherwise) rep

roductions, replicas or other

representations (whether in writing or in any other form) of maritime historical material



to arrange for the manufacture and distribution (whether by sale or otherwise) of any article

or thing bearing a mark, symbol or writing

that is associated with the museum



to enter into contracts

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Governance and accountability

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

to acquire, hold and dispose of real or personal property



to erect buildings and structures and carry out works



to take on leases of land or buildings and to grant leases and sub

-

leases of land or

buildings



to fix charges for entry onto any land or water, or into any building, structure or vessel,

owned by, or under the control of the Museum, being charges that:

are in addition to the

charges fixed by the regulations; and relate to special exhibiti

ons or other special events



to purchase or take on hire, deposit or loan, and to dispose of or otherwise deal with,

furnishings, equipment and other goods



to raise money for the purposes of the museum by appropriate means, having regard to the

proper perfo

rmance of the functions of the museum



to charge such fees and impose such charges (in addition to the charges fixed by regulations)

as are reasonable in respect of services rendered by the museum



to act on behalf of the Commonwealth or of an authority of t

he Commonwealth in the

administration of a trust relating to maritime historical material or related matters; and



to appoint agents and attorneys and act as an agent for other persons.

The museum may exercise its powers either alone or jointly with another

person or other persons.

Role and functions of the Minister

The Minister responsible for the Australian National Maritime Museum during the reporting period

was the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the

Ar

ts. Key ministerial powers under the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990

include the

Minister’s ability to:



transfer property, real or personal, held on lease or otherwise by the Commonwealth, to the

museum for its use or for inclusion in the Nati

onal Maritime Collection (Section 8)



approve criteria and guidelines for the National Maritime Collection (Section 9)



appoint a member of the Council to act as chairperson of the Council or appoint an acting

member of Council where there is a vacancy (Sect

ion 18)



approve guidelines for the leave of absence to Council members (Section 19)



convene a meeting of the Council at any time (Section 23)



approve the Director engaging in paid employment outside the duties of the Director’s office

(Section 32)



approve

leave of absence to the Director on such terms or conditions as she or he

determines (Section 34)



appoint a person (not a member of Council) to act as Director during a vacancy with such

appointment not to exceed 12 months (Section 38)



approve financial tr

ansactions including acquisition or disposal of material or property, right

or privilege exceeding the amounts specified in the Australian National Maritime Museum

Regulations 2018 (Section 47)



enter into a lease of land exceeding 10 years (Section 47)



g

ive directions of a general nature to the Council about the performance of its functions or

the exercise of its powers (Section 53A)

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Governance and accountab

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55



d

elegate powers to the Secretary of the Department or an

Senior Executive Service

employee in the Department of Infrastruct

ure, Transport, Regional Development and

Communications (Section 53B)

.

Legislation

The museum was established by the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990

(No 90 of

1990), where its functions and powers are set out. The legislation history is publi

shed as End Note 3

in the reprint of the Act on the website

legislation.gov.au

.

The Act was amended in 1992 (Act No 118); 1993 (Act No 17); 1997 (Acts No 1 and 152); 1999 (Acts

No 146 and 156); 2001 (Act No 159); 2005 (Act No 110); 2006 (Act No 101); 2011

(Acts No 5 and 46);

2014 (Act No 62); 2015 (Acts No 36, 126 and 164)

,

2016 (Act No 61)

and 2021 (Act No 20)

.

The

National Collecting Institutions Legislation Amendment Act 202

1

included amendments to the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990

, to pr

ovide broader investment opportunities for

donated revenue and streamline administration.

The legislative reforms included standard

delegation powers, r

emoved

m

inisterial approvals

for routine financial tr

ansactions and

standardised corporate planning acro

ss all collecting institutions.

The

Australian National Maritime Museum Regulations 2018

were made on 14 September 2018

(F2018L02194)

and

amended in May 2021 to implement

the legislative reforms

.

Outcome and programme structure

As outlined in the Portfol

io Budget Statements 2020

-

21, the museum has one outcome and one

program.

Outcome 1: Increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime heritage by

managing the National Maritime Collection and staging programs, exhibitions and events.

Program 1.1: Management of maritime heritage.

Australian National Maritime Museum

Council

All members of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Council, except the Director, are non

-

Executive members.

Chairman

John Mullen AM

Term: 18 August 2019

-

18 August 2022

Mr Mullen is the Chairman of Telstra and Toll Holdings Ltd

and a former

Chief Executive Officer of

Asciano Ltd. He has worked in the logistics industry for more than two decades including roles as

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global CEO of DHL Express and global CEO of

TNT Express Worldwide. He is currently on the board of

Kimberley Foundation Australia, and is co

-

founder of the Silentworld Foundation which supports

maritime archaeology in Australia. John is passionate about maritime exploration and Indigenous

rock art i

n the Kimberley, Western Australia.

He spends his spare time diving for colonial shipwrecks and maintains a private museum dedicated

to historical material from early maritime voyages to the Pacific. Mr Mullen brings his expertise in

philanthropy, maritime

archaeology, leadership and management to the Council. As the former

Chair of the Australian National Maritime Foundation, Mr Mullen’s appointment strengthens

communication and relationships between the Council and the Foundation. He was named a

member (A

M) in the Order of Australia for significant service to business, and to the community, in

2020.

Director

& CEO

Kevin Sumption PSM

Term: 15 February 2012

-

14 February 2022

Kevin Sumption was appointed Director and CEO of the Australian National Maritime

Museum in

February 2012 after holding high

-

profile leadership roles in cultural institutions in Australia and

abroad. Mr Sumption was one of the founding curators of the museum in 1991. His international

career has focused on developing the digital landsca

pe of cultural institutions for more than 20

years, covering museum management, exhibition curation, program development, maritime

heritage and digital cultural content. Mr Sumption was awarded the Public Service Medal for

outstanding service as Director o

f the Australian National Maritime Museum in the 2017 Queen’s

Birthday Honours.

Members

Hon Ian Campbell

Term: 12 December 2014

-

16 February 2024

Mr Campbell is the ASG Group Deputy Chairman and Group Executive at Brookfield Asset

Management. Mr Campbel

l has extensive offshore and inshore yacht racing experience, including

the Sydney to Hobart

Yacht

Race, and has competed successfully in state, national and world

championships. He recently completed a circumnavigation of Australia and crossed the Tasman

Sea

from Sydney to Auckland in his own boat. In 2016 he sailed through the Beagle Channel and around

Cape Horn. As Minister for Heritage he initiated

Duyfken

’s voyage around Australia to commemorate

the 400

th

anniversary of the 1606 mapping of Cape York an

d advocated for the purchase of the HMB

Endeavour

replica.

He has also been the Chairman of

the

World Sailing Championships held in

Fremantle in 2011. Mr Campbell is Chairman of the Perth Children’s Hospital Foundation, and the

Harry Butler Institute at Mu

rdoch University. Mr Campbell was in the Howard Government Ministry

from 1996

-

2007, in the Leadership Group from 1996

-

2004 and the Expenditure Review Committee

of Cabinet from 2004

-

07.

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Stephen Coutts

Term: 29 May 2020

-

28 May 2023

Mr Coutts

has an Honours

degree in history from the University of Sydney. Upon graduating

he

worked as an adviser in the NSW Government

,

serving in the offices of the Premier and Treasurer,

the Minister for Community Services and the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs. Since 1995 St

ephen has

worked as a government relations adviser in the private sector and is currently a director at

Richardson Coutts, a bi

-

partisan firm which provides advisory services to local and international

businesses across a

wide range of industry sectors. Mr

Coutts

is a former Councillor of the Royal

Australian Historical Society, former Secretary of the Australian Asia Young Leaders Program, a

former Director of the Motor Accidents Insurance Board of Tasmania, a former Observer for

Government Relations on th

e Board of Soccer Australia and former Chair of Hear for You, a charity

which provides services for deaf and hearing impaired teenagers.

He

is a member of the Council of

the Sydney University Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation

and

a Fellow of the Australi

an Institute

of Company Directors.

Hon Justice Sarah C Derrington

Term: 4 November 2015

-

7 March 2022

Justice Derrington is currently President of the Australian Law Reform Commission and a Judge of

the Federal Court. She was previously head of School a

nd Dean of Law at TC Beirne School of Law,

University of Queensland, and has also had a distinguished academic career overseas. She

holds

a

PhD in the field of marine insurance law, has an extensive history of involvement in maritime

organisations and has

served on a range of boards and councils, including the Australian Maritime

College and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

Rear Admiral Mark Hammond AM

Term

: f

rom 17 November 2020

Rear Admiral Mark Hammond assumed the position of Commander Australi

an Fleet in November

2020. RADM Hammond joined the Royal Australian Navy in 1986 as an electronics technician. He

was commissioned as a Naval Officer in 1988 and is a graduate of the RAN Recruit School (1986)

,

the

Australian Defence Force Ac

ademy (1990),

A

ustralian C

ommand and Staff College (2004)

and the

Centre for Defence Strategic Studies (2014). RADM Hammond completed seamanship and

navigation training in various ships then volunteered for submarine service. Qualifying in Oberon

class submarines in 1994

, Hammond joined HMAS

Collins

as Navigating Officer in 1996 (during First

of Class Trials), and was selected as Flag Lieutenant to the Chief of Navy. He subsequently completed

the Principal Warfare Officer's Course and Submarine Warfare Course in 1998, and

served as the

commissioning Operations Officer in HMAS Waller. In 2001, RADM Hammond instructed the

Submarine Warfare Officer Course and assumed duties as Executive Officer in HMAS

Sheean

. In 2003

Hammond completed the Netherlands Submarine Command Course

(Perisher) and the US Navy’s

Prospective Commanding Officer Course.

RADM Hammond served as Staff Officer Future Concepts at Naval Headquarters in late 2003, and

graduated from Command and Staff Course in 2004.

He

then deployed on operations with the Royal

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Navy Submarine force, before assuming command of HMAS

Farncomb

and completing two years of

demanding operations in the Indo

-

Pacific region. Subsequent shore postings included: Assistant

Naval Attaché

-

Washington DC, USA; Director Future Submarines

-

Oper

ational Requirements; Joint

Exercise Director (J75) at Joint Operations Command; Director Submarine Sub

-

Program (Collins and

Future Submarines); and Chief of Staff to the Chief of the Defence Force, performing the latter role

for G

eneral David

Hurley from

Nov

ember

2012 to Dec

ember

2013. In late 2014, RADM Hammond

was appointed as Director General Maritime Operations, exercising

operational control

of the Navy’s

ships, submarines and detachments. In 2017, RADM Hammond was posted to the United States for

duti

es in the Pentagon as the Chief of Defence Force Liaison Officer to General Joseph Dunford, the

Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff and he was awarded the United States Legion of Merit

(Officer) for his distinguished performance in this role.

RADM Ham

mond returned to Australia in March 2018 to assume duties as the Deputy Chief of Navy.

On Australia Day 2018, RADM Hammond was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM)

for exceptional service to the Australian Defence Force in senior command and s

taff roles. RADM

Hammond assumed the role of Commander Australian Fleet in November 2020. RADM Hammond

has sea experience in French, British and US nuclear attack submarines, Australian and Dutch

conventional submarines, and multiple surface vessels. Acade

mic qualifications include: Bachelor of

Science (UNSW, ADFA, 1991)

,

Masters in Management (Defence Studies,

University of Canberra

,

2004) and Masters in Maritime Studies (U

niversity of Wollongong

, 2005).

RADM

Hammond’s

interests include cricket, rugby, AFL

(Port Adelaide), chess and submarine warfare in World War II.

He is the proud restorer of a 1958 American Chris

-

Craft mahogany speedboat.

John Longley AM

Term: 6 May 2019

-

5 May 2022

John Longley has had a long career in sailing

,

initially in dinghies

and then

in

ocean racing. This led to

his involvement in the America

s Cup

,

which saw him competing in five

matches from 1974 to 1987,

including being project manager

and crewman on

Australia II

during

the

successful challenge for the

Cup in 1983. He was s

ubsequently charged with managing the build of

Endeavour

, a museum

-

standard replica of Captain James Cook's famous ship of discovery, HMB

Endeavour

. After the six

-

year build he continued to manage the project as the ship circumnavigated the globe visiting

149

ports. John was a Board Member and later Chair of the

Duyfken

1606 Foundation and managed

Duyfken

s tour of Australia in 2006 that marked the 400

th

anniversary of the first recorded landing of

a European ship

on the continent

. More recently

,

John was t

he Event Director of Perth 2011, World

Sailing

s Olympic Classes World Championship

,

which attracted

1200 competitors from 80 nations.

John was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM), was the West Australian Citizen of the

Y

ear (Sport) and has b

een inducted into the America

s Cup Hall of Fame.

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Warren Mundine AO

Term: 29 April 2021

-

29 April 2024

Nyunggai Warren Mundine AO lives in Sydney and is a descendant of Australia

s Bundjalung,

Gumbaynggirr and Yuin First Nations.

He sits on the Board

of SBS and is a businessman,

entrepreneur, company director, advisor to governments and businesses, media commentator, TV

and webinar show host, author and opinion writer.

He is a political strategist and advocate for

Australian economic reform and growth,

empowering the First Nations people of Australia to build

businesses and sustainable economies.

Mr Mundine’

s life and career is shaped by a personal

commitment to regional and Indigenous economic development.

He

has over 40 years’ experience

working in th

e public, business, policy, arts and community sectors.

Judy Potter

Term: 13 May 2021

-

13 May 2024

From Adelaide,

Ms Potter

has over 30 years’ experience as a CEO and Board Director. She is

currently Chairperson of the Adelaide Festival Corporation and t

he Adelaide Botanic Gardens and

State Herbarium

,

and a Director of Musica Viva Australia and Foundation Adelaide Festival. Her

previous appointments include Chairperson, Adelaide Fringe Festival, South Australian Film

Corporation, Adelaide Central School o

f Art, Hillcrest Trust Fund, Community Grants Fund and

Director, Come Out Youth Arts Festival, Duke of Edinburgh Award and South Australian Living Artists

Week. She has worked as a consultant in the Government and non

-

Government sector, and is the

former C

EO of SA Great, Carclew Youth Arts Centre and the South Australian Youth Arts Board.

Alison Page

Term: 12 August 2017

-

28 May 2023

Ms Page is currently a Director of the Australian Government’s Indigenous Land Corporation and

Chair of the National Centr

e of Indigenous Excellence. She has also served as a member of numerous

boards, including the Expert Panel for Constitutional Recognition of Indigenous Peoples, the

Museums and Galleries NSW Board and the Australian Museum Trust. Ms Page has substantial

ex

perience in design, communications and marketing and was a panel

l

ist for eight years on the ABC

television program

The New Inventors

,

which showcased Australian innovation. She is currently a

Professor of Practice in the school of design at the University

of Technology Sydney.

Arlene Tansey

Term: 3 August 2018

-

2 August 2021

Arlene Tansey is a Director of Aristocrat Leisure Limited, Wisetech Global, Primary Health Care,

Infrastructure NSW and Lend Lease Investment Management. Arlene is also a member of th

e

advisory board of Serco Asia Pacific. Before becoming a non

-

executive Director, Arlene Tansey

worked in commercial and investment banking in Australia and in investment banking and law in the

United States. She holds a Juris Doctor from the University of

Southern California Law Centre and an

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MBA from New York University. She is a member of Chief Executive Women and a Fellow of the

Australian Institute of Company Directors. Arlene Tansey is originally from New York and has lived

and worked in the United St

ates, South America, and Europe. She has lived in Australia for the past

23 years and is an Australian citizen.

Ms Tansey

is married with two daughters.

Dr Ian J Watt AC

Term: 22 March 2019

-

21 March 2022

Dr Ian J Watt AC has had a long career as one of

Australia’s most distinguished public servants, with

nearly 20 years at the highest levels of the public service. His most recent and most senior

appointment was as Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and head of the

Australian Pu

blic Service, a position he held from 2011 until the end of 2014.

Between 2001 and

2011

he was Secretary of the Departments of Defence; Finance; and Communications, Information

Technology and the Arts

.

Before that, he was Deputy Secretary of the Department

of the Prime

Minister and Cabinet.

Dr Watt is Chair of the International Centre for Democratic Partnerships and Chair of the ADC

Advisory Council. He is also the recently retired Chair of BAE Systems Australia. He serves on the

Boards of Citibank, Smartgr

oup Corporation, the Grattan Institute (University of Melbourne),

O’Connell Street Associates and the Committee for Ec

onomic Development of Australia

. Dr Watt is

also a Member of the Male Champions of Change, a Member of the Melbourne School of

Government

Advisory Board at the University of Melbourne, a Fellow of

Australia and New Zealand

School of Government

, and Senior Adviser to Flagstaff Partners. He also has an Honorary Doctorate

of Letters from the University of Technology Sydney and the University of

Wollongong.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Committee members

Kenny Bedford

Current Term: 4 March 2020

-

30 June 2021

Mr Kenny Bedford lives on and represents the remote island of Erub (Darnley) on the Torres Strait

Regional Authority Board. He is

a Board Member of Reconciliation Australia and has held the

Executive position of Portfolio

Member for Fisheries since 2008. Mr Bedford

is President of the Erub

Fisheries Management Association, a member of Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners (TSI)

C

orporation and sits on Far North Queensland’s Abergowrie College Community Consultative

Committee.

He

has a Bachelor of Applied Health Science and Diploma of Youth Welfare, received the

Vincent Fairfax Fellowship in 2000, and is a graduate of the Australia

n Rural Leadership Program.

Dillon Kombumerri

Current Term: 4 March 2020

-

30 June 2021

Dillon Kombumerri is employed by the NSW Government Architects Office as a Principal

Government Architect. He is a registered architect with 30 years’ experience and h

as designed

several award

-

winning projects. During this time his work has focused heavily on projects addressing

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Governance and accountability

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the well

-

documented disadvantages faced by Indigenous communities. Dillon has extensive

experience in tutoring and lecturing on a national and

international level. He has been Adjunct

Professor at the University of Sydney since 2012.

Mr Kombumerri

has featured on national radio and

television and written articles for several highly regarded professional journals.

Ray Ingrey

Current Term: 4 March

2020

-

30 June 2021

Mr Ingrey is of Dhungutti and Dharawal descent and is from the La Perouse Aboriginal community at

Botany Bay. He holds a number of

leadership positions including

Chairperson of the Gujaga

Foundation, Deputy Chairperson of the La Perous

e Local Aboriginal Land Council and leads language,

culture and research activities within his community.

Professor

John Maynard

Current Term: 4 March 2020

-

30 June 2021

John Maynard is of the Worimi people of Port Stephens, New South Wales. He is the Di

rector of the

Purai Global Indigenous History Centre and Chair of Aboriginal History at the University of

Newcastle. He completed a Diploma of Aboriginal Studies from the University of Newcastle in 1995

and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of South A

ustralia in 1999. He was awarded a PhD

from

the University of Newcastle in 2003,

examining the rise of early Aboriginal political activism.

Professor Maynard was an Australian Research Council post

-

doctoral fellow and was Deputy

Chairperson of Council with

the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

(AIATSIS) in Canberra until 2016. John was the recipient of the Aboriginal History (

Australian National

University

) Stanner Fellowship for 1996 and the New South Wales Premier

s Ind

igenous History

Fellowship for 2003

-

04.

As

a member of the Executive Committee of the Australian Historical

Association 2000

-

02 and the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Committee 2006

-

07

,

he has

worked with and within many

urban, rural and remote

Abori

ginal communities.

Professor Maynard

is the author of twelve books.

Nicholas Wappett

Current Term: 4 March 2020

-

30 June 2021

Nick Wappett is a Senior Analyst at JBWere and manages over $300 million in investments on behalf

of various not

-

for

-

profit orga

nisations. Prior to joining JBWere in June 2015,

Mr Wappett

participated in the NAB Graduate Program and in Career Trackers Indigenous Internship Program.

He

has a Bachelor of Business from the University of Technology Sydney, a Diploma of Stockbroking

fro

m Deakin University and is an accredited Foreign Exchange Advisor.

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Council

meetings and

committees

The Museum’s Council

held five ordinary meetings

this year, as well as dealing with various matters

out of session. The Council’s focus has been on various

strategic priorities, including the museum’s

funding and

recovery

. Some of the significant matters considered by Council include COVID

-

19

impacts

,

regional

outreach, the visitor experience and the corporate plan for 2021

-

24.

Australian National Maritime

Museum Council committees

There are currently

three

committees of Council:



Audit Committee



Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee



Remuneration Committee

.

The appointment of members of committees is agreed by Council. However, all Counci

llors are

eligible to attend all committee meetings and are treated as members of the Committee for that

meeting (excluding the Chairman and Director, who are ineligible to be members of the Audit

Committee).

The

Audit Committee Charter

is published on the Museum website.

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2020

-

21 Council and committee meetings

and attendance

Councillors

Number of meetings attended

Museum

Council

(

5 meetings

held)

Audit

Committee

(4 meetings

held)

Aboriginal and

Torres Strait

Islander

Advisory

Committee

(3 meetings

held)

Remuneration

Committee

(1 meeting held)

John Mullen

2

5

3*

0

1

Ian Campbell

1

5

3

0

0

Stephen Coutts

5

4

0

0

Sarah Derrington

2

4

4

0

1

Mark Hammond

(Appointed 18 November

2020)

4

0

0

0

John Longley

5

4

0

0

Warren Mundine

(Appointed 29 April 2021)

0

0

0

0

Jonathan Mead

(Appointment ceased 17

November 2020)

1

0

0

0

Alison Page

1,3

5

4

3

0

Judy Potter

(Appointed 13 May 2021)

0

0

0

0

Kevin Sumption

5

4*

3

-

Arlene Tansey

1

3

3

0

0

Ian Watt

1

5

4

0

0

Margaret White

(Appointment ceased 9

August 2020)

0

0

0

0

Committee members

Kenny Bedford

3

-

-

2

-

Raymond Ingrey

3

-

-

2

-

Dillon Kombumerr

i

3

-

-

1

-

John Maynard

3

-

-

1

-

Nicholas Wappett

3

-

-

0

-

1

Audit Committee appointed member

-

$0 remuneration paid (

PGPA

Rule

Section

17BE

(taa))

2

Remuneration Committee appointed member

3

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Advisory Committee appointed member

*

Observer

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overnance and accountability

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Legal and comp

liance

Freedom of information

The Director has authorised the Deputy Director and the Senior Executive, Strategy and External

Relations to make decisions under s23(1) of the

Freedom of Information Act 1982

and s39(1) of the

Australian National Maritime A

ct 1990

.

Agencies subject to the

Freedom of Information Act 1982

(FOI Act) are required to publish

information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme. This requirement is in Part

II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requiremen

t to publish a Section 8 statement in an

annual report. The museum’s Information Publication Plan is published on its website

at

sea.museum/about/corporate

-

information/planning

-

and

-

reporting/information

-

publication

-

plan

.

Judicial decisions and reviews by

outside bodies

There were no judicial decisions of which the museum was aware that affected the museum during

the reporting period. There were also no reports on museum operations by the Auditor

-

General, the

Office of the Australian Information Commission

er or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

The Senate

Environment and Communications Legislation Committee conducted an inquiry into the National

Collecting Institutions Legislation Amendment Bill 2020

and reported in February

2021.

Ministerial directions and

expe

ctations

 

The museum was not subject to any ministerial directions during the reporting period.

The portfolio Minister may give written directions of a general nature to the Council about the

performance of its functions or the exercise of its powers in

accordance with section 53A of the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990

.

The Portfolio Minister’s Statement of Expectations for 2020

-

21 identifying the government’s

strategic priorities and the museum’s corresponding Statement of Intent are publis

hed on the

museum’s website.

Government Policy Orders

The museum was not subject to any government policy orders during the reporting period.

Government Policy Orders are made by the Finance Minister in accordance with section 22 of the

Public Governanc

e, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

.

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Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

No current or former member of the accountable authority or officer has been given any indemnity

and there are no agreements to give any. Normal directors’ and o

fficers’ insurance is carried through

Comcover.

Non

-

compliance with Finance law

There were no significant issues reported to the responsible Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of

the

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

that relate t

o noncompliance with

finance law.

Subsidiary entities

 

The museum has one subsidiary entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation.

Capability reviews

 

There were no capability reviews released during the reporting period.

Fraud contro

l

The museum maintains a fraud control plan (FCP), which includes an enterprise

-

wide fraud risk

assessment (FRA), as well as fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection

procedures and processes. All reasonable measures have be

en taken to minimise incidents of fraud,

including regularly reviewing and updating both the FCP and FRA.

Internal audit

The museum has a five

-

year internal audit plan, which is designed to identify and address the

highest areas of financial and operatio

nal risk on a rolling basis. The plan is agreed and updated

annually in consultation with the museum’s internal audit provider, museum management and the

Council’s Audit Committee. The museum commissioned one internal audit during the financial year

to ass

ess workplace health and safety practices.

Large transactions with Commonwealth entities

There were no transactions of the kind specified in section 17BE(n) of the PGPA Rule 2014 during the

reporting period.

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People and culture

Staffing overview

At 30 Ju

ne 2021, the number of staff employed under the

Public Service Act 1999

totalled 115 (60

ongoing full

-

time, 11 ongoing part

-

time, 38 non

-

ongoing full

-

time, 3 non

-

ongoing part

-

time and 3

non

-

ongoing casual). All employees were located at the museum’s Sydney

premises.

Enterprise Agreements/Individual Flexibility Agreements (IFAs)

At 30 June 2021, the number of APS staff covered by an Enterprise Agreement was SES 1 and non

-

SES 114. The number of staff covered by an IFA was SES nil and non

-

SES 51.

Salary r

ates and benefits

The salary rates available for APS staff by classification structure (as at 30 June 2021) are as follows:

Classification

Pay point

30 June 2021

APS Level 1

1.1

$42,944

1.2

$44,388

1.3

$45,589

1.4

$47,453

1.5

$48,412

APS Level 2

2.1

$48,601

2.2

$49,941

2.3

$51,254

2.4

$52,583

2.5

$53,896

2.6

$54,973

APS Level 3

3.1

$55,359

3.2

$56,795

3.3

$58,240

3.4

$59,749

3.5

$60,946

APS Level 4

4.1

$61,698

4.2

$63,660

4.3

$65,317

4.4

$66,990

4.5

$68,328

APS Level

5

5.1

$68,816

5.2

$70,974

5.3

$72,971

5.4

$74,285

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APS Level 6

6.1

$74,325

6.2

$76,177

6.3

$78,264

6.4

$82,196

6.5

$85,379

6.6

$87,087

Executive Level 1

1.1

$95,282

1.2

$102,888

1.3

$104,948

Executive Level 2

2.1

$109,896

2.2

$115,9

36

2.3

$124,592

Non

-

salary benefits provided to employees



Access to confidential professional counselling service through Employee Assistance

Program

.



Reimbursement of costs for APS staff for vaccinations

.



Bulk influenza vaccinations on site for staf

f

.



Eyesight testing for APS staff and reimbursement for cost of spectacles

.



Provision of prescription sunglasses to employees who regularly work outdoors

.



Access to salary sacrifice

-

laptop computers, additional superannuation, novated and

associate motor

vehicle leases for staff

.



Studies assistance for ongoing APS staff

.



Access to relevant training for APS staff including first aid, fire warden, work health and

safety representatives

.



Access to purchased leave scheme for ongoing APS staff

.



Flexible workin

g hours and a range of family

-

friendly initiatives, such as working from home

and payment of child care fees if staff are required to travel away from home for museum

business

.

Performance bonus payment

The aggregate performance bonus payment to APS staf

f for the agency as a whole in 2020

-

21 was

$16,000.

Effectiveness in managing people and culture

The APS ongoing staff turnover rate in 2020

-

21 was 24.2% compared with 8.1% in 2019

-

20 and

5.8% in 2018

-

19.

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Key training and development initiatives

 

Employees undertook a range of work

-

related training activities, courses and conferences relating to

COVID

-

19. The leadership team and section managers attended various courses and conferences

across the areas of

executive leadership, digital transformation, and National

HR S

ummit and

Directors forum. All employees continued to undertake induction, compliance, fire warden, first aid,

work, health and safety

, APS Code of Conduct, bullying and harassment

,

and diversi

ty training as

required.

Commonwealth disability strategy

A new

museum

Accessibility Action Plan is to be developed.

Assessment of achievement in terms of Australian Government policy

People and Culture policies have been developed and updated in acc

ordance with Australian

Government policy and workforce requirements.

The enterprise agreement

 

The

museum’s

Enterprise Agreement for 2017

-

20 commenced on 11 September 2017 and was due

to cease on 10 September 2020. Negotiations for a new Enterprise Agr

eement have been placed on

hold due to the C

OVID

-

19 pandemic.

The Enterprise Agreement covers the following:



working conditions for staff



allowances



pay rates



leave



consultative process and terms of representation.

Indigenous employment

As at 30 June 20

21 there is 1 ongoing employee who identifies as an Indigenous employee.

Industrial democracy

 

The museum’s Joint Consultative Council (JCC) met once during this period to discuss the continuing

transformation of the museum. The JCC consists of three elected employee representatives.

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Disability reporting

Work continues on the

museum’s Accessibility Action Plan, which will highlight our deliverables over

the next three years. Explicit and transparent reference to agency

-

level information is available

through other reporting mechanisms.

Establishment and maintenance of ethical

standards

At induction all staff are briefed on the APS

V

alues and Code of Conduct. Refresher training is

provided periodically and conduct is considered as part of the performance management process.

Staffing

2020

-

21

2019

-

20

2018

-

19

Average staff lev

el

108.93

114.43

119.94

Staff by gender

2020

-

21

2019

-

20

2018

-

19

Male

Female

NI

Male

Female

NI

Male

Female

NI

Senior management

(EL 2 & SES)

10

7

-

8

4

-

9

6

-

Middle management

(EL 1)

12

10

-

15

13

1

16

12

1

Other

32

44

-

35

44

-

35

46

-

Total

54

61

-

58

61

1

60

64

1

NI = not identified

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eport

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Governance and accountability

70

Staff by division

Division

2020

-

21

2019

-

20

2018

-

19

Executive

1

4

7

Experience

66

88

60

Commercial and

Operation Services

30

17

16

Strategy and External

Relations

10

4

Division created in

2020

People and Cul

ture

8

6

Division created in

2020

Encounters 2020

Division ceased in

2020

1

Division created in

2020

Commercial and

Visitor Services

Division ceased in

2020

Division ceased in

2020

11

Operations

Division ceased in

2020

Division ceased in

2020

31

Total

115

120

125

Salaries

Division

2020

-

21

2019

-

20

2018

-

19

Executive

587,098

945,366

1,008,438

Experience

7,127,552

8,089,648

6,203,421

Commercial and

Operation Services

3,313,842

3,015,024

2,216,072

Strategy and External

Relations

1,137,102

759,218

Divis

ion created in

2020

People and Culture

1,031,504

357,739

Division created in

2020

Encounters 2020

Division ceased in

2020

417,218

Division created in

2020

Commercial and

Visitor Services

Division ceased in

2020

Division ceased in

2020

1,215,037

Operati

ons

Division ceased in

2020

Division ceased in

2020

2,538,360

Total

13,197,098

13,584,213

13,181,328

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71

Organisation structure

Work health and safety (WHS) performance

 

The museum underwent

several

WHS audits over the last year, outlining areas for improvement and

recalibrating the museum as a whole to focus on safety. With a number of personnel changes, the

museum is now focusse

d on increasing the

number of

Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs)

across the site, with the WHS committee to be re

-

established following the appointments of the

HSRs. Both HSRs and the WHS Committee are vital to the focus and implementation of safety

standards across the museum. There was one new workers compensation claim over the period with

the worker returning to full pre

-

injury duties.

Other information

Assessment of effectiveness of asset management

As part of the strategic planning process,

the

museum

engages independent reviews of its Strategic

Asset Management Plan (SAMP) to identify upcoming capital enhancement, capitalised maintenance

and regular and reactive maintenance requirements in line with contemporary cost management

processes and

sound engineering practices. The

SAMP

is forward

-

looking over 10 years and budget is

made available for this purpose. The plan is current.

The management of heritage and collection assets, including the floating vessels, involves dedicated

Conservation an

d Registration teams, museum

-

grade environmental conditions for the galleries and

a warehouse to be maintained as part of the SAMP

. It also requires

individual maintenance plans for

each of the floating vessels due to their exposure to harsh marine environ

mental

conditions.

Plans

are regularly assessed by the executive team and presented to Council as required.

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Assessment of purchasing against core policies and principles

The

museum

has a procurement policy, a delegations framework and procurement guideli

nes. These

have been developed in line with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and processes. The

procurement policy is regularly reviewed. The

museum

processes are transparent and competitive

and designed to ensure value

-

for

-

money outcomes.

Contracts and

consultanc

ies

 

Information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website. A list of

contracts valued at $100,000 or more is published on the

museum’s

website to meet obligations

under the Senate Order for Entity Contracts.

Productivity

gains

The museum’s long

-

standing commitment to continuous improvement continued throughout the

reporting period.

T

he museum implemented the following initiatives to enhance productivity and

visitor experience:



i

mplemented Vivaticket, which enables the mus

eum to sell tickets itself and capture better

information and insights about its visitors



completely r

e

novated

the Shop.

Other planned improvements were deferred owing to the COVID

-

19 pandemic.

Correction of material errors to the 2019

-

20 Annual Report

I

n the museum’s 2019

-

20 Annual Report, ‘Appendix 11

-

Index’ should have read ‘Appendix 13

-

Index’.

Advertising, design and market research (Section 311A of the

Commonwealth

Electoral Act 1918

) and statement on advertising campaigns

In the 2020

-

21 financ

ial year, the Brand, Marketing & Digital team spent the following amounts on

marketing design and strategy, media buying and advertising and market research agencies.

Creative agencies for developing advertising campaigns or strategies

A Mile in My Shoes

campaign creative: Limehouse Creative $1,500.

Defying Empire

campaign creative: Grainger Films $1,400.

Duyfken

campaign creative: Grainger Films $1,500.

General museum marketing: Slade Smith Design $120.

Map It!

campaign creative: Slade Smith Design $120.

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School holiday campaign creative: Cassandra Hannagan Photography $3,300, Grainger Films

$17,300, Limehouse Creative $3,300, Slade Smith Design $240.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

campaign creative: Slade Smith Design $210, Grainger Films

$3,300.

Fundra

ising videos for the Migration Heritage Fund: $32,004 towards outgoings.

National Monument to Migration community service announcement and promo editing with SBS

Media: $4,100.

Design of the Gift to the Nation/Foundation achievements brochure: Austen Kaupe

$1,800.

Market research

Exhibition concept testing: YouGov $11,200.

Pricing research: Lynda Kelly Networks $9,355.

NB Communications brand strategy and planning: $27,175.

Media advertising organisations

General museum advertising: Digital Advertising $3

,898, Efficient $22,279, Facebook $17,272,

Google $5,455, LinkedIn $1,299, TimeOut $5,500.

Interstate tourism advertising: The Informed Tourist $9,750, What’s On in Sydney $4,800.

Map It!

advertising: ArtsHub $550, Ella’s List $1,700, Innerwest Mums $529,

North Shore Mums

$199, What’s On Sydney $80.

School holiday advertising: Efficient $12,500, North Shore Mums $199.

Venues advertising: Efficient $7,500, general advertising $14,158.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

advertising: APN Outdoor $50,044, News L

td $3,333, TimeOut

$4,950.

National Monument to Migration campaign on SBS as community service announcement at no cost,

valued at $40,000.

National Monument to Migration campaign on SBS TV $9,050, SBS Radio $1,850, SBS On Demand

$5,000.

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eport

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Governance and accountability

74

Ecologically sus

tainable development and environmental performance (Section

516A of the

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

)

Ecological

ly

Sustainable Development

(ESD)

Report

Activity

How it accords with the

principles of ESD

How it furthers

or advances ESD principles

Compliance with Section J

of the

Environment

Protection and

Biodiversity Conservation

Act 1999

in the design and

procurement of new

projects or modification to

existing facilities

Ensures that any change or

additions to our faci

lities

take into account and

implement energy

efficiency initiatives that

will minimise the

environmental impact

related to energy usage

and/or greenhouse gas

emissions

Minimises adverse environmental impact

with the aim of reducing overall greenhouse

gas

emissions

Electricity reduction by

the implementation of

new energy

-

saving

technologies and

products, including the

installation of a 235kW

solar panel system in

Wharf 7’s roof

Planned and innovative

upgrade to new energy

-

efficient technologies,

reducing

overall electricity

usage associated with

power

-

hungry items of

equipment

Reduces overall electricity usage and

therefore greenhouse gas emissions

Water use reduction due

to the installation of new

water

-

saving devices and

fixtures in the newly

upgraded

amenities in the

museum building,

including water

-

efficient

taps and toilet cisterns

with smaller capacity

Preserves water by

reducing its usage within

our facilities to acceptable

levels

Reduces overall usage of both water and

cleaning products associate

d with the

operation and upkeep of our amenities

Implementation of e

-

water technology to

reduce then phase out the

requirement of chemical

-

based cleaning products in

kitchens, amenities and

general cleaning

Protects the environment

by minimising the risk

of

spillage or contamination,

as well as plastic sub

-

product (containers,

dispensers,

etc.

) by using

water

-

based alkaline/acid

solution for cleaning

Provides a safe workplace for staff, visitors

and contractors as well as protecting the

environment and sea

life where the museum

operates

Provision of bicycle

parking facilities for staff

and visitors

Reduces the use of private

vehicles and public

transport by encouraging

Encourages a healthier alternative for people

to

come to the museum and alleviates traffic

burden on public roads, which fosters

greener environments

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Governance and accountability

75

staff and visitors to come by

bicycle

Waste management,

including onsite rubbish

recycling, composting and

glass recovery

Waste recycling minimises

adverse impact to the

environment as well a

s the

energy required to process

waste and sub

-

products

Reduces the amount of waste going to

landfill and reduces operational expenditure

associated with waste disposal

Environmental Performance Report

Theme

Steps taken to reduce

environmental impact

M

easures to review and improve the

reducing effect

Energy efficiency

235kW solar panel system

(Wharf 7 Building)

Comparison of electricity consumption to

pre

-

solar energy baseline

Heating, ventilation and air

conditioning transitional

change from sea

-

wat

er to

cooling tower heat

-

rejection system

Comparison of electricity and water

consumption to pre

-

cooling tower baseline

Seasonal adjustment of

temperature and relative

humidity

Comparison of current usage to historical

data to determine effectiveness of

implemented strategy, plus continue

seasonal adjustments in response to results

of analysis

LED lighting upgrade

Comparison of electricity usage to pre

-

upgrade baseline, and extend LED upgrade to

cover exhibition and high

-

level lighting

Building mana

gement and

control systems upgrade

and rezoning

Comparison of electricity consumption to

pre

-

upgrade rezoning energy baseline

Voltage power optimisation

and power factor correction

units to be completed by

June 2022

Comparison of values for power factor

and

demand to historical data

Water conservation

Installation of water

-

saving

taps and devices

Comparison of water consumption to pre

-

device baseline.

Waste management

Waste audit completed

Comparison of waste landfill diversion figures

to prior years

Installation of onsite

recycling stations

Comparison of waste landfill diversion figures

to prior years

Provision of 20 secure

bicycle parking facilities for

Visual observation of usage levels and visitor

feed

back through front of house and social

media

Annual R

eport

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Governance and accountability

76

museum visitors at the

Exhibition Building

Environmental Performance Indicator Report

Theme

Performance measure

Indicators

2019

-

20

2020

-

21

Energy efficiency

Total consumption of

electricity across all

facilities

Total cost of electricity

purchased a

cross all

facilities

Amount of electricity

consumed in kWh

Cost of electricity

purchased in $

3,601,921

$662,758

3,583,698

$583,081

Total consumption of gas

across all facilities

Total cost of gas across all

facilities

Amount of gas

consumed in MJ

C

ost of gas purchased

in MJ

7,172,934

$160,828

448,128

i

$11,164

Greenhouse gas emissions

Amount of greenhouse

gases produced

(tonnes)

920

29

Water

Total consumption of water

across all facilities

Total cost of water across

all facilities

Amount of wa

ter

consumed across all

facilities in kL

Cost of water

purchased in $

13,344

$58,201

13,820

$62,976

Total trade

-

waste water

generated

Amount of grey water

captured in kL

12,421

13,075

Waste

Total co

-

mingled waste

production

Total co

-

mingled wast

e

diverted from landfill

Amount of co

-

mingled

waste produced

(tonnes)

Amount of co

-

mingled

waste diverted from

landfill (tonnes)

Amount of waste not

recorded

102

20

Nil

81

ii

18

Nil

Unrecyclable waste

production

Amount of waste going

to landfill (ton

nes) as

stated by current

service provider

82

63

Recyclable waste

production:

Recycled glass

Comingled recycling

Paper and cardboard

Organics

Return and Earn

Amount of waste going

to recycling facilities

(tonnes)

6.4

3.1

8.5

2.3

0

0

iii

4.8

17.5

0.6

0.3

iv

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eport

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Governance and accountability

77

Transport

Number of onsite parking

facilities for employees

Number of onsite

bicycle parking spots

15

15

Number of parking facilities

for visitors

Number of bicycle

parking spots

20

20

i

.

2020

-

21 figures less than previous year due to overcharg

e in previous year and faulty gas

meter

that required replacing.

ii

.

Total waste production only includes waste generated by the museum’s business as usual. Waste

generated by the Wharf tenant was extracted from the data based on the figures provided by an

external waste audit conducted in 2019. Tenant produces 33% of the waste generated across the

site.

iii

.

Glass now being collected as a part of the NSW ‘Return and Earn’ scheme (refer iv below) to

obtain

refunds on eligible containers.

iv

.

Return and Earn

scheme commenced in July 2020. All eligible containers and all glass bottles

collected and recycled. Refunds for eligible containers returned to the museum.

Grant programs

 

MMAPSS grants and internships

The museum’s Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS) provides grants

of up to $15,000 to non

-

profit organisations, such as museums and historical societies, that care for

Australia’s mar

itime heritage. Usually these are community

-

based and often run by volunteers. The

grants are designed to fund a range of projects, including those related to restoration, conservation,

collection management and exhibition development. MMAPSS is administer

ed by the museum and

jointly funded by the Australian Government with support provided by the Department of

Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications. MMAPSS demonstrates the

diversity of the nation’s maritime heritage and the impo

rtant role that local communities, smaller

museums and historical societies play in preserving it. The scheme was initiated in 1995 and since

then the program has distributed more than $1.95 million and supported organisations across

Australia to run more

than 480 projects and over 65 internships.

Funding available in 2020

-

21 was $125,000, with a maximum allocation of $15,000 to any one grant.

We received 44 project applications, requesting a total of $480,000 in funding, and two internship

applications. T

he selection committee awarded grants to 19 organisations, and in

-

kind support was

offered to six organisations. The maximum amount of $15,000 was awarded to two organisations

and internships were offered to the two applicants.

A summary of each project f

unded under MMAPSS is published below.

Information on grants awarded to the museum is available at sea.museum and in the ‘Year in

Review’ section of this report.

Annual R

eport

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Governance and accountability

78

MMAPSS Grants

2020

-

21

YTD actual

2019

-

20

actual

2018

-

19

actual

2017

-

18

actual

2016

-

17

actua

l

2015

-

16

actual

2014

-

15

actual

Value of grants

$125,000

$125,000

$125,000

$125,000

$125,000

$135,000

$135,353

Number of project

grants

19

17

16

11

22

19

19

Number of projects

supported in kind

6

9

3

6

4

12

10

Number of

internships

2

10

4

7

3

3

3

Num

ber of grants

and in

-

kind support

under MMAPSS

NSW

QLD

NT

WA

SA

VIC

TAS

ACT

2020

-

21

7

4

0

2

4

6

2

0

2019

-

20

9

2

2

2

4

4

3

0

2018

-

19

4

3

1

1

5

3

3

0

2017

-

18

6

3

0

1

2

3

1

1

2016

-

17

10

1

0

5

5

3

2

0

2015

-

16

14

2

1

4

3

4

3

0

2014

-

15

13

4

0

2

4

5

1

0

Recipients by State and Territory

New South Wales

Central Coast Marine Discovery Centre Inc

-

in

-

kind support

Central Coast Marine Discovery Centre (CCMDC) maritime heritage permanent display:

Lord Ashley

shipwreck and Schwanberg’s Siebe Gorman dive suit

The CCMDC possesses a range of artefacts, including; heritage shipbuilding tools, books and

shipwrecks relics. In

-

kind support is awarded for representative/s of the Australian National

Maritime Museum to provide professional collection management databa

se and/or interpretation

and design advice, plus assistance with furthering this museum’s collection and interpretive displays.

Clyde River & Batemans Bay Historical Society Inc

-

$6,525

Delivering the Goods

-

Stages 1 and 2

This project develops a public

program to make South Coast maritime heritage more accessible by

conducting a thematic analysis of data from the digitalised Illawarra Steam Navigation Company’s

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Governance and accountability

79

(ISNC) Nelligen shipping ledgers, mid 1860

-

early1880s, and cultivating an in

-

depth understand

ing of

ISNC’s strategic role in the growth of coastal industries and commerce. MMAPSS funding is awarded

for professional fees for a historian and IT consultancy.

Cundletown and Lower Manning Historical Society and Cundletown Museum

-

in

-

kind support

Sav

ing the

Sunlight

In

-

kind support is offered for one of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s curatorial team to

conduct an inspection of

Sunlight

and assist in the preparation of a Vessel Management Plan. This

cream/milk vessel is the last of its kind

left on the Manning River and this organisation’s long

-

term

plan is to undertake conservation work on

Sunlight

to bring it back to its original condition as much

as possible, so that it is preserved for members of the public to view.

Jervis Bay Maritime Mu

seum

-

$12,273

Re

-

float the

Kingfisher

Kingfisher

is a 9.23m wooden motor launch launched in 1946 by the Settree family, boat builders in

Huskisson for three generations. This project follows the Vessel Management Plan developed by the

Australian National

Maritime Museum’s Curator

-

Historic Vessels, for the preservation, restoration

and reconstruction of

Kingfisher

. It has the objective of refloating the vessel. MMAPSS funding will

allow restoration work to continue. This project is part of a plan to open

the Jervis Bay Maritime

Museum’s pond to become a living estuary from which both

Kingfisher

and

Crest

can enter

Currambene Creek. The museum will then be able to conduct traditional boat festivals and take

visitors for trips on these two historic vessels.

Lawrence Historical Society Inc

-

$13,010

Conservation of the Clarence River flood boat,

Cedar Queen

Funding is awarded for conservation and interpretation work of the Clarence River flood boat

Cedar

Queen

, currently on display at the Lawrence Museum, in

Lawrence NSW. The flood boat has strong

significance for the Clarence River district. Last year MMAPSS supported the development of a

Vessel Conservation Plan and this plan will now guide the project work and any subsequent

maintenance and display of the v

essel.

Nelson Head Lighthouse and Rescue Station Reserve Trust

-

$5,400

Light room refurbishment

This project is for the restoration and refurbishment of the inner light room to restore it to its

original condition. The original light room was designed to

provide lights for the safe entry of vessels

into Port Stephens. The restoration plans to position new lights

-

both inside and outside the light

room

-

and coloured glass in the windows to reflect the original conditions. A presentation will also

show vis

itors, particularly school groups, how the lights operated.

Port Macquarie Historical Society Inc

-

$5,409

A preservation needs assessment of the maritime collection at the Port Macquarie Museum

Funding is awarded for a professional conservator to undertak

e a preservation needs assessment

which will assist the Port Macquarie Museum to identify at

-

risk or vulnerable Maritime items in the

collection. It will also prioritise conservation work, identify storage and exhibition needs, and

develop a conservation p

rogram.

Annual R

eport

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21

Governance and ac

countability

80

Internship

-

South West Rocks Maritime Precinct Inc.

Volunteer

-

up to $3,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Queensland

Cairns Historical Society T/A Cairns Museum

-

in

-

kind support

Windows to the reef

This project aims t

o conserve the only remaining fabric of the world’s first underwater observatory,

formerly on Green Island off Cairns. In February 2020, the observatory was removed from Green

Island due to safety concerns. The 74 tonne solid steel structure was scrapped b

ut 4 portholes

-

the

windows to the reef

-

have been gifted to the Cairns Museum.

In

-

kind support is offered for one of

the Australian National Maritime Museum’s conservation team to assist with assessing the viability

of the project’s aims and to provide

advice to guide the development of a Conservation

Management Plan for the portholes.

Emu Park Historical Museum Society Inc

-

in

-

kind support

Protection, documentation and display of maritime collection

In

-

kind support is offered for one of the Australian

National Maritime Museum’s interpretation and

design team to provide professional interpretation and design advice. They will also offer assistance

with furthering the Emu Park Historical Museum’s collection and interpretive displays. The project

will als

o investigate whether an appropriate ex

-

Australian National Maritime Museum showcase

could be delivered to this organisation.

National Trust Australia Queensland

-

James Cook Museum

-

$12,924

James Cook Museum

-

Maritime Endeavour gallery refresh

The Mari

time Endeavour gallery refresh brings together narratives on environment, contact

between Bama and Europeans, and the challenges experienced by early mariners who visited

Cooktown. At present the entire space is dedicated to the narrative of James Cook and

HMB

Endeavour

. Realignment of museum display spaces will ensure visitors on entry encounter the First

Nations Bama story first. Subsequent galleries will all display dual Bama/European narratives. These

displays have been developed and agreed to through e

xtensive community consultation. Funding is

awarded for a commissioned art work, plus design and production of interpretation displays for

‘Voyages and Trade’, ‘48 Days at Endeavour River’, ‘Local Waters Ecology & Science’ and

Endeavour

’s Anchor and Canno

n’.

Queensland Maritime Museum Association

-

$7,680

Queensland Maritime Museum digital transformation project

Queensland Maritime Museum is undertaking a major three

-

stage digital transformation project.

This will consolidate and photographically digitise

its historically significant collection into a

centralised collection management system.

Funding is awarded for consultancy and project

management costs.

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eport

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Governance and accountability

81

Rockhampton Art Gallery

-

$3,636

Maritime self

-

guided tour: digital access

In 2019

-

20, through MMAPS

S, Rockhampton Art Gallery developed a Maritime Interpretation Plan

for Quay Street Cultural Precinct, Rockhampton. The Maritime Interpretation Plan identified seven

key recommendations and this project seeks support to progress on several of those

recomme

ndations by way of a self

-

guided tour. This tour could begin at Customs House and take

visitors to key locations from Quay Lane to Quay Street, such as the Bond Store and Stables, then to

the Riverside and views of the former wharves area and the Fitzroy R

iver (Tunuba).

Funding is

awarded for graphics and signage fabrication.

South Australia

Kangaroo Island Pioneers Association Inc

-

$3,200

Replacement of interpretive sign

-

contemplation seat memorial, Penneshaw, Kangaroo

Island

The Contemplation Seat s

ite was developed as a place of reflection and a memorial to the Aboriginal

women brought to Kangaroo Island by seamen in the early 19th century. It incorporates a

handcrafted wooden seat at the top of a hill overlooking Hog Bay, Penneshaw and is approache

d via

concrete steps etched with the names of these women. An interpretive sign details the contribution

these women made to the early settlement of Kangaroo Island. The entire site requires upgrading

which will be staged over several years as funding beco

mes available. MMAPSS funding is awarded

for Stage 1, to replace the interpretive sign.

Mannum Dock Museum of River History

-

$10,000 and in

-

kind support

Captain William Randell’s entrance welcome to the Mannum Dock Museum

The Mannum Dock Museum of River H

istory exhibits a series of displays. These span the Miocene

era, when the Murray River was an inland sea, to Aboriginal occupation, birthplace of the paddle

steamer and the commencement of river trade. A new entrance statement incorporating a ‘Pepper’s

Gh

ost’ effect featuring Captain William will welcome prospective patrons to explore the extensive

interactive displays at the Mannum Dock Museum. This interactive technology will also be

incorporated into the adjacent Aboriginal river life and river trade di

splays. Funding is awarded for

design and final production elements of the project. In

-

kind support is also offered for one of the

Australian National Maritime Museum’s interpretation and design team to assist by investigating if

there is appropriate ex

-

mu

seum AV equipment which can be delivered to this organisation.

Port Adelaide Historical Society

-

in

-

kind support

Preservation of the

Falie

wheelhouse and cabins

Falie

is a 46 metre ketch that traded for many years in Australian waters and saw service as

a

commissioned Royal Australian Navy

(RAN)

vessel during World War II. It was retired in 1982 as the

last ketch to operate commercially in South Australian waters and the last sail

-

powered trading

vessel in Australian waters. In

-

kind support is offered for

one of the Australian National Maritime

Museum’s conservation team to assist with an inspection of the

Falie

wheelhouse and cabins and

the preparation of a Conservation Management Plan (CMP). The development of a CMP will assist

Annual R

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Governance and accountability

82

this organisation to devel

op sound documentation and planning toward ensuring the viability of

both the planned restoration program and the object once restored.

Murray Bridge River Boat, Rail & Steam Group Inc

-

in

-

kind support

Historic milk boat

Union

restoration

The

Union

was

one of four vessels used as ‘milk boats’ traversing the River Murray between

Mannum and Wellington in South Australia, from 1919 to the mid

-

1940s.

The long

-

term plan for the

vessel is for restoration for display with interpretive signage, in a prominent po

sition under a shelter

near to the town wharf and railway precinct. In

-

kind support is offered for one of the Australian

National Maritime Museum’s curatorial team assist with an inspection of the vessel and the

preparation of a Vessel Management Plan.

T

asmania

Bass Strait Maritime Centre

-

$6,364

Bass Strait: above, below and in

-

between

This project is for the development and display of a touring exhibition and educational program

based around the social, natural, scientific, and family histories of the

Bass Strait. It will feature eight

institutions along the Bass Strait coast of Tasmania. The exhibition and educational program

explores stories from each region and collection, bringing together staff and volunteers from each

institution to network and de

velop the resources, including the exhibition and education program

kit. Funding is awarded for the continuation of development workshops, graphic design for the

exhibition and educational kits, and the printing of the exhibition and associated constructio

n of

materials.

Maritime Museum of Tasmania

-

$8,600

Regional digital vessel recording and training project

The key purpose of the project is to facilitate the recording and documenting of historic and

significant vessels in Tasmania. Funding will support

the development of a photogrammetry kit for

free loan, and provision of dedicated workshops and training to allow regional museums and

historical societies to independently record vessels in their communities. Archive digitisation will be

undertaken centra

lly by the Maritime Museum of Tasmania, utilising the voluntary services of a

professional naval architect using proprietary software.

Victoria

Islamic Museum of Australia

-

$7,847 and in

-

kind support

The Makassans’ story

-

the perahu

This project aims t

o tell the story of the Muslim fishermen from Makassar in Indonesia. It explores

their connection with the Indigenous communities along the northern and north

-

western shores of

Australia from the early 1700s. The project will take place in the Australia’s

Muslims history gallery.

It will include display and exhibit of the perahu model of the vessel which was used by the

Makassans in their journey to Australia.

Funding is awarded towards several elements of this project

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Governance and accountability

83

including design, graphic art, install

ation and a showcase for the perahu model. In

-

kind support is

also offered for one of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s interpretation and design team

to assist by investigating if there is an appropriate ex

-

museum showcase and/or an AV interactive

screen which can be delivered to this organisation.

Mallacoota and District Historical Society Inc (Bunker Museum)

-

$2,500 and in

-

kind support

SS

Riverina

lifeboat

The wreck of the SS

Riverina

near Mallacoota in 1927, along with the rescue of all pass

engers and

crew, has legendary status in Gippsland. The Bunker Museum has a collection of

Riverina

artefacts,

principally a sideboard from the salon and a lifeboat which had been converted to a cabin cruiser on

the Gippsland Lakes. MMAPSS in

-

kind support i

s awarded for one of the Australian National

Maritime Museum’s curatorial team to assist with an inspection of the vessel and the preparation of

a Vessel Management Plan (VMP) for the

Riverina

lifeboat. This VMP will provide sound

documentation and plannin

g toward ensuring the viability of both the restoration program and the

vessel once restored. Funding is also awarded for a diorama to better present the lifeboat in a form

as near as possible to its original.

Mission to Seafarers Victoria

-

$5,000

Ship to

shore: the colonial gaze in Port Phillip

This project will work with RMIT University early career artists in a multidisciplinary research

program, linking theory and practice. It will result in a unique body of photographic works that will

engage audience

s, and deliver a post

-

modern interpretation of European visual encounters with

local maritime environments, through exploration and mapping (1798

-

1850). Funding is awarded

for several elements of this project, including production of 30 large photographic

artworks on

metal, and for exhibition design and installation for public exhibition. This project is designed to

create new audiences of maritime histories and a platform for community collaboration across

maritime culture, the arts, heritage and academia.

The resultant artistic content and research will be

channelled into travelling exhibitions, education workshops, forums and talks across several cultural

institutions and RMIT University.

National Trust of Australia (Victoria)

-

$3,000

All hands on deck

-

the

Polly Woodside

shares her stories

An internationally significant three masted barque,

Polly Woodside

is a key story in

Melbourne’s

maritime history. The vessel is also of historical, scientific, technological and social significance to the

State of

Victoria. As a popular tourist destination, icon for the community, and educational site for

school children, the ship and its associated stories provide rich and intriguing information about the

past.

This project is designed to discover, share and celebr

ate the hidden stories of the many

communities involved with the

Polly Woodside

, from its early sailing days to its most recent journey.

It will also provide a vehicle for increasing contemporary public engagement with the past and

future of maritime histo

ry. Funding is awarded for one element of the planned project activities

-

for

a researcher and writer to research and develop new and refreshed stories.

Port of Echuca Discovery Centre

-

$3,532

‘Caring for the Collection’

-

a preservation workshop at the

Port of Echuca Discovery Centre

In 2019 the Port of Echuca Discovery Centre, with the support of a MMAPSS grant, engaged a

Annual R

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Governance and accountability

84

professional to undertake a preservation needs assessment of the existing collection. This

assessment identified many projects that

the Discovery Centre will need to undertake. However, a

high priority rating was given to conducting a workshop for staff and volunteers to assist with the

preservation of the collection.

Queenscliffe Maritime Museum Inc

-

In

-

kind Support

Pilot Vessel

Mav

is III

and the evolution in technology and design of the pilot vessels at

Queenscliff and Port Phillip from the 1970s to 2020

Setting off from Queenscliff, Victoria, pilots have guided vessels through the dangerous entrance

between Port Phillip and Bass St

rait since 1839 when George Tobin was granted the first pilot licence

for the Port Phillip District. In March 2020, the Pilot Vessel

Mavis III

was donated to Queenscliffe

Maritime Museum. This vessel served 26 years in ‘the Rip’ and exemplifies the shore

-

b

ased launch

service that began in 1979, ending the era of ships having to stop to transfer pilots.

In

-

kind support is

offered for one of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s curatorial team to assist with the

preparation of a Vessel Management Plan fo

r

Mavis III

.

Internship

-

Mission to Seafarers Victoria

Volunteer Curator

-

up to $3,000 for 1 week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Western Australia

Albany’s Historic Whaling Station

-

$4,500

The art of scrimshaw: a whaler’s pastime

This pr

oject follows on from the 2019

-

20 MMAPSS project: ‘Whaler’s Tales: Oral Histories of

Albany’s Past Whaling Community’, using content from one of the interviewees, Gary Tonkin. Tonkin

started his career as a meat inspector at the Cheynes Beach Whaling Compa

ny and transitioned to a

world

-

renowned scrimshaw artist. The current project will use artefacts in the collection of Albany’s

Historic Whaling Station to showcase the maritime significance of scrimshaw craft, with the support

of Tonkin’s in

-

depth knowledg

e. Albany’s Historic Whaling Station aims to enrich their scrimshaw

exhibition and to enhance engagement with the addition of interpretive panels and visual

presentations. Funding is awarded for design elements of this project.

Irwin Districts Historical S

ociety

-

$3,600

Pullin’ the Pots oral history program

‘Pullin’ the Pots

-

a History of the Port Denison Fisheries and their Environs on Western Australia’s

Abrolhos Coast’ is an overarching project focused on the histories of the local ‘cray culture’ in P

ort

Denison. It encompasses the customs and traditional practices of fishers and fishing communities,

plus boat building and maintenance, changing marine environments, and the cultural extent of

historical and contemporary fisheries.

The Pullin’ the Pots o

ral history program, within the larger

project, will conduct interviews with twelve people who have been engaged in the cray fishing

industry out of Port Denison since the late 1950s and early 1960s. It will include both fishers who

ventured out to sea as

well as fisher

-

partners who stayed ashore. Funding has been awarded for

transcriptions of the interviews.

Annual R

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Governance and accountability

85

Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation

As the fundraising arm of the museum, the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation is

overseen b

y a Board chaired by Mr Daniel Janes.

The past year has seen some considerable achievements, with $

254,157

raised. Cultural gifts valued

at $3,832,000, including the magnificent replica of the

Duyfken

. An additional, $310,000 (cash and

in

-

kind) was raised

to support Migration Heritage Fund activities.

This year the Foundation disbursed $202,500 to the Museum for a variety of priorities, including the

acquisition of Alick Tipoti artworks for the National Maritime Collection and the

A Mile in My Shoes

exhib

ition.

Ambassadors

Ms Christine Sadler, our inaugural Ambassador, has continued to be a strong supporter of the

Museum.

The Museum Council agreed to make

Dr David and Mrs Jennie Sutherland, plus Mr

Norman Banham

,

A

mbassadors in recognition of the signific

ant gifts they have made to the

Museum. Dr and Mrs Sutherland have donated over $100

,000

in support of SY

Ena

,

while

Mr

Banham has bequeathed four replica Harrison chronometers to the

m

useum. Two of the

chronometers are currently on loan and displayed in t

he

Under Southern Skies

gallery.

National Monument to Migration

On 21 March 2021, Harmony Day, the Governor

-

General elevated the Welcome Wall to the National

Monument to Migration. With 412 registrations, 846 migrants from 54 countries were honoured at

th

is ceremony. The ceremony was combined with the Sunday Stir, a collaboration with Blacktown

Arts and Settlement Services International that brought

together artists and story

-

tellers in various

disciplines to celebrate migration and our multicultural natio

n on Harmony Day.

The support of the multicultural sector, and particularly SBS, in the promotion of the National

Monument is much appreciated. We also acknowledge the extraordinary in

-

kind support provided

by Guilty Content.

Significant Object Acquisiti

ons

This year a collection of over 9000 images were donated to the Museum by Valerie Taylor AM, an

Honorary Fellow of the Museum. This priceless collection represents the career arc

of filmmakers

and ocean conservationists Valerie Taylor AM (born 1935) and

her late husband Ron Taylor AM

(1934

-

2012)

,

who began their underwater career as spear fishers. The couple pioneered skin

-

diving,

scuba diving and underwater photography and cinematography in Australia.

The Museum also secured an important collection of M

V

Krait

related objects

, including medals

awarded to L

ieutenant

Hubert

Edward

Carse,

plus

a knife and a faux Japanese ensign relating to the

World War II raid

, ‘Operation Jaywick’. These purchases were made possible via

the support of a

donation from the C

arse family and the Australian Government’s

National

Cultural

Heritage Account

.

The acquisition was accepted into the collection by the Hon Paul Fletcher MP (Minister for the Arts)

on 20 April 2021.

Annual R

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Governance and accountability

86

Bequest

Mr Norman Banham has agreed to bequeath his colle

ction of four replica Harrison chronometers to

the

m

useum in his will. This set of replica chronometers is the only set in the world made by one

single clockmaker. The chronometers are a remarkable tribute to both Norman Banham and John

Harrison, the famed

clockmaker who pursued the design of an accurate mechanical timekeeper at

sea in the 18th century in the effort to solve the problem of longitude. Mr Banham’s two

-

decade

program to replicate Harrison’s chronometers mirrors the patience and tenacity exhibi

ted by John

Harrison more than two hundred years earlier. The replica chronometers draw links across the seas

between astronomy and timekeeping, between the Royal Observatory in Greenwich and Mount

Stromlo Observatory in Canberra, and the tenacity and achi

evement of curious mechanical minds

across the centuries.

New air conditioning solution for HMAS

Onslow

Mr Ashak Nathwani AM kindly designed a new air

-

conditioning system for HMAS

Onslow

which will

enable the Museum to keep the vessel open to the public on

hot summer days and also provide a

higher standard of air quality. A donation by the Nathwani family, made in honour of the late Mrs

Samim Nathwani, covered the costs of this important work

, which will be completed in the next

reporting period

.

Governanc

e and administration

The Board met three times this year: 1 September 2020, 18 November 2020, and 3 March 2021.

List of directors and number of meetings attended:



Daniel Janes

3 (Chair)



John Mullen

2 (ex

-

officio Board Member)



Kevin Sumption

3 (ex

-

of

ficio Board Member)



Arlene Tansey

3



Peter Dexter

2



David Mathlin

3



Jeanne

-

Claude Strong

3



Tom O’Donnell

3



David Blackley

3



Simon Chan

1 (appointed 2 February 2021)

Paul McCarthy, Senior Executive Strategy and External Relations, had the

day

-

to

-

day responsibility

for management of the Foundation and supporting the Foundation Board in 2020

-

21.

Directors of the Board of the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation

Biographies of Kevin Sumption (Director and ex

-

officio member), John Mu

llen (Council Chair and ex

-

officio member) and Arlene Tansey (Council member) are available in the report section entitled

‘Australian National Maritime Museum Council’.

Annual R

eport

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Governance and accountability

87

Dan Janes

Term: 17 August 2019

-

17 August 2022

Dan Janes was appointed Chairman of t

he Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation on 17

August 2019. Mr Janes is the Managing Director and Co

-

Head of Investment Banking (Australia and

New Zealand) at Bank of America, and previously held senior positions at Credit Suisse, Barclays and

ABN

AMRO. During his 20

-

year investment banking career in London, New York and Sydney, Mr

Janes has advised and led, on behalf of clients, a wide range of high

-

profile transactions. These have

involved many of Australia's landmark transactions, including over

$120 billion successful mergers

and acquisitions transactions, and over $60 billion of capital markets transactions. He is also a Fellow

of the Institute of Chartered Accountant of England and Wales. Mr Janes has studied maritime

history and maintains an

avid interest in this field.

David Blackley

Term: 3 June 2020

-

3 June 2023

Mr Blackley was inducted into the Australian Advertising Hall of Fame in 2015 for his achievements

in the advertising industry over more than 30 years. He is a former Chairman of

Clemenger BBDO

and a member of the Worldwide Creative Board of BBDO New York, representing

the group

’s

interests across Australia, New Zealand and Asia. Under his leadership, Clemenger BBDO won the

Australian Agency of the Year award eight times. Mr Blackl

ey has been involved with Brainwave

Australia, a charity supporting children with neurological conditions, since its inception in 1994 and

joined its board in 2008. Mr Blackley was a Councillor of the Museum from 2017

-

20.

Simon Chan

Term: 2 February 2021

-

2 February 2024

Simon Chan is the Director and Founder of Art Atrium, an art gallery exhibiting contemporary

Australian, Asian and Aboriginal art with a special focus on cross

-

cultural collaboration and

expression in art as a reflection of our multicultu

ral society in a globalised world.

Mr Chan

is also a

practising architect and Director of SCA Architects.

He

has been involved in a broad range of

not

-

for

-

profit

f

oundations and community organisations.

He

is a Director on the Board of VisAsia at Art

Galle

ry of NSW

,

supporting and promoting Asian art and culture

,

and a Council member of the

Power Institute Foundation for Art and Visual Culture at

t

he University of Sydney.

A

s a member of

the

Multicultural NSW Advisory Board and Chair of Sydney South Regional

Advisory Council

, Mr Chan

is also a Director on the Board of Parramasala, an annual

m

ulticultural arts and culture festival

.

He is

also

an

executive committee member

of Contemporary Asian Australian Performance

,

supporting

and promoting Asian Australians

in performing arts.

Mr Chan

is a Director and former Chair on the Board of Aboriginal Benefits Foundation

,

fundraising

for various Aboriginal communities throughout Australia

,

with a focus on art and culture. In his role

as the President of Haymarket Chamb

er of Commerce,

he

is actively involved in representing and

acting as a conduit between businesses and residents of the Haymarket and Chinatown area in

Sydney and all Federal, State and Local government authorities.

Mr Chan

is also a Committee

Member of th

e NSW Government Chinese Garden of Friendship Advisory Committee working with

Annual R

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2020

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Governance and accountabi

lity

88

NSW Government to improve community engagement with the garden

,

as well as a Board member

of the NSW Government Geographical Names Board. He has also been involved as a

community

ambassador

for the Art Gallery of NSW

,

acting as volunteer guide of the ga

llery for the Chinese

community, as well as

a

community representative

and member of the Woollahra Council Cultural

Committee.

He

is also a member of the Sydney Water Community Advi

sory Committee and the

Public Officer and Executive Committee member of Chinese Australian Forum.

Mr Chan

was the

recipient of the inaugural NSW Premier

’s Multicultural Award for Arts and

Culture in 2013.

Peter Dexter AM

Term: 18 August 2019

-

18 August 2

022

Mr Dexter retired from his executive role as Regional Director of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics,

Oceania, in September 2005 to assume a range of non

-

executive appointments. Mr Dexter is

a

former Chairman of the Australian National Maritime Museum. He

is a fellow of the Australian

Institute of Company Directors

and was awarded the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit by the King of

Norway for his contribution to Norwegian

-

Australian business and his work during the

Tampa

crisis.

Mr Dexter

was named a member (

AM) in the Order of Australia

in 2005

for services to the

development of the shipping and maritime industries through leadership roles, to international

relations and to the community.

David Mathlin

Term: 6 December 2019

-

6 December 2022

An avid sailor,

Mr David Mathlin has a strong interest in maritime history.

He has qualifications in

Science, Engineering and Business, and served with Sinclair Knight Merz Ltd for many years

becoming senior principal and chairing the Australian arm

. He has served as

a di

rector of the

listed

Transfield Services Infrastructure Fund, as a director of the Muscular Dystrophy Foundation

and has served on various advisory Boards. He

is currently a member of the Chairman’s Council at

the Australian Chamber Orchestra.

Mr Mathlin

i

s a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia

and the

Australian

I

nstitute of Company Directors

.

Tom O’Donnell

Term: 6 December 2019

-

6 December 2022

Tom O’Donnell has had a global career in private banking and is the CEO of TOD Advisory, a strate

gic

investment company. He served on the Sydney Swans Centre Circle board for

over six

years and has

been a Taronga Zoo Foundation Board member since 2013.

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eport

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Governance and accountability

89

Dr Jeanne

-

Claude Strong

Term: 6 December 2019

-

6 December 2022

Dr Jeanne

-

Claude Strong is a prac

tising medical doctor and has been a non

-

executive director of the

Garvan Institute of Medical Research Foundation since 2011. She is also a competitive sailor with

numerous wins to her name, including the Etchells Australasian Championship in 2015.

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eport

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21

90

Fina

ncial statements 2020

-

21

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eport

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21

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-

21

91

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eport

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92

Statement by the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer

and Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021 comply with

subsection

42(2) of the

Public

Governance,

Performa

nce

and Accountability

Act 2013

(PGPA Act), and

are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41 (2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the

Australian Nationa

l Maritime Museum (the museum) will be able to pay its debts as and when they

fall due.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the muse

um’s Council.

John Mullen AM

Chairman

15 September 20201

Kevin Sumption PSM

Director and Chi

ef

Executive Officer

15 September 2021

Tanya Bush

Deputy Director, Corporate

Services & Chief Financial

Officer

15 September 2021

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eport

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Financial statements 2020

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93

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period

ended 30 June 2021

2021

2020

Original

Budget

Notes

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

NET COST OF SERVICES

EXPENSES

Employee benefits

3A

13,418

16,687

12,120

Suppliers

3B

9,892

14,990

15,484

Grants

3C

125

120

118

Depreciation and amortisation

6A

10,626

10,881

10,590

Impairment lo

ss on financial instruments

3D

-

65

-

Write

-

down and impairment of other assets

3E

5

281

-

Losses from asset sales

3F

-

1

-

Total expenses

34,066

43,025

38,312

LESS:

OWN

-

SOURCE INCOME

Own

-

so

urce revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers

4A

3,144

8,848

3,144

Interest

4B

116

378

150

Rental income

4C

2,472

2,692

2,558

Other revenue

4D

4,919

7,650

6,156

Total own

-

source revenue

10,651

19,568

12,008

Gains

Other gains

4E

3,832

113

756

Total gains

3,832

113

756

Total own

-

source income

14,483

19,681

12,764

Net cost of services

19,583

23,344

25,548

Revenue from Government

4F

2

2,548

21,217

22,548

Surplus (deficit) attributable to the Australian

Government on continuing operations

2,965

(2,127)

(3,000)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Total other comprehensive income

-

-

-

Total comprehens

ive income (deficit)

attributable to the Australian Government

2,965

(2,127)

(3,000)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Annual R

eport

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21

94

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Commentary is provi

ded where the variance between the budget and actual line item is +/

-

$500

and 10% and +/

-

2% of the budget category (e.g. Expenses, Own

-

source revenue, Financial asset,

etc.).

Explanation of variance

Line item

Amount

The increase in expenditure explained

by the museum

performing a realignment and undergoing active

recruitment during the year. This included establishing

new roles in line with achieving objectives of the

museums corporate plan.

Employee benefits

1,298

The savings in expenditure is primar

ily due to C

OVID

-

19 in

particular this is a result of strict saving measures across

the museum and reduced cost of sales.

Suppliers

(5,592)

Decrease in

other revenue

primarily explained by reduced

business activities due to COVID

-

19 restrictions including

revenue from exhibition hire and reduction in volunteer

labour as the majority of the demographic of the

volunteers are aged 60 years+. Additionally, the museum

received insurance proceeds from its insurer of $1.2

million for 2020 for business interruptio

n caused by

COVID

-

19.

Other revenue

1,237

Decrease in

o

wn

-

source income primarily d

ue to slower

recovery from COVID

-

19 in particular C

OVID

-

19 outbreak

over Christmas which reduced admissions revenue and

had ongoing significant impact on venue bookings of

fset

by increase in non

-

cash donations to the museum

including the donation of the

Duyfken

replica ship.

Own

-

source income

1,719

Increase represents the non

-

cash donations received by the

museum during the year including the

Duyfken

replica

ship.

Other ga

ins

(3,076)

Annual R

eport

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Financial statements 2020

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95

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2021

2021

2020

Original

Budget

Notes

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents

5A

30,062

24,058

17,254

Trade and other r

eceivables

5B

824

2,580

1,370

Total financial assets

30,886

26,638

18,624

Non

-

financial assets

1

Land and buildings

6A

155,389

156,839

161,883

Infrastructure, plant and equipment

6A

7,638

8,778

8,267

Heritag

e and cultural assets

6A

75,402

72,870

73,497

Intangibles

6A

4,532

4,690

6,237

Inventories

6B

271

403

403

Other non

-

financial assets

6C

833

658

658

Total non

-

financial assets

244,065

244,238

250,945

Total Assets

274,951

270,876

269,569

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers

7A

1,674

1,606

1,606

Other payables

7B

1,586

1,855

1,855

Total payables

3,260

3,461

3,461

Provisions

Employee provisions

9A

2,865

3,248

3,248

Provision for makegood obligations

8B

78

78

78

Total provisions

2,943

3,326

3,326

Total Liabilities

6,203

6,787

6,787

Net Assets

268,748

264,089

262,

782

EQUITY

Contributed equity

36,285

34,591

36,285

Reserves

180,016

180,016

180,016

Retained surplus

52,447

49,482

46,481

Total Equity

268,748

264,089

262,782

The above statement should be read in

conjuncti

on with the accompanying notes.

1. Right

-

of

-

use assets are included in the line item Land and buildings

Annual R

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Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position

Commentary is provided where the variance between the budget and actual line item

is +/

-

$500

and 10% and +/

-

2% of the budget category (e.g. Expenses, Own

-

source revenue, Financial asset

etc.).

Explanation of variance

Line item

Amount

A higher cash balance at year end explained by delays in

capital w

orks expenditure caused by COVID

-

19

and

restructure and realignment across the divisions of

museum

.

Cash and cash

equivalents

12,808

As mentioned above, these variances

are explained by

delays in the museum’s capital works expenditure

program, relating to u

pgrades and improvements to the

m

useum’s buildings and infrastructure and collection and

digitisation of heritage and cultural assets. The variance in

heritage and cultural

assets represents the non

-

cash

donations received by the museum during the year

including a 1606 Dutch Replica ship,

the

Duyfken

which

was donated to the museum by the Duyfken 1606 Replica

Foundation.

The variance in

i

ntangible is primarily

explained by timing re delays in

relation to

new business

system implementations.

Land and buildings

(6,494)

Heritage and cultur

al

assets

1,905

Intangibles

(1,705)

Annual R

eport

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21

Financial

statements 2020

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21

97

Statement of Changes in Equity for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021

2020

Original

Budget

Notes

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried fo

rward from previous period

34,591

31,438

34,591

Transaction with owners

Contributions by owners

Equity injection

1,694

3,153

1,694

Total transactions with owners

1,694

3,153

1,694

Closing balance as at 30 June

36,285

34,591

36,285

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period

49,482

51,609

49,481

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period

2,965

(2

,127)

(3,000)

Total comprehensive income

2,965

(2,127)

(3,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June

52,447

49,482

46,481

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous peri

od

180,016

180,016

180,016

Comprehensive income

Total comprehensive income

-

-

-

Closing balance as at 30 June

180,016

180,016

180,016

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried f

orward from previous period

264,089

263,063

264,088

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period

2,965

(2,127)

(3,000)

Total comprehensive income

2,965

(2,127)

(3,000)

Transactions with owners

Contrib

utions by owners

Equity injection

1,694

3,153

1,694

Total transactions with owners

1,694

3,153

1,694

Closing balance as at 30 June

268,748

264,089

262,782

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accomp

anying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Changes in Equity

The variances in the statement of changes in equity relate largely to differences between the

budgeted and actual balances of retained earnings at 1 July 2020 (due to 2020 activity) a

nd the

deficit for the period (discussed in the Statement of

C

omprehensive

I

ncome).

Annual R

eport

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Financial statements 2020

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21

98

Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021

2020

Original

Budget

Notes

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sale of goods and rendering services

5,428

9,471

4,332

Receipts from Government

22,548

21,217

22,548

Interest

121

462

150

Rental income

2,419

2,488

2,558

GST received

1,159

2,314

1,145

Other

7,328

4,761

6,1

59

Total cash received

39,003

40,713

36,892

Cash used

Employees

(13,085)

(15,455)

(12,120)

Suppliers

(14,792)

(20,192)

(16,610)

Other

(125)

(144)

(118)

Total cash used

(28,002)

(35,791)

(28,848

)

Net cash from operating activities

11,001

4,922

8,044

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sales of property, plant and equipment

-

45

-

Total cash received

-

45

-

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

(4,093)

(6,679)

(10,824)

Purchase of heritage and cultural items

(1,712)

(1,590)

(2,870)

Purchase of intangibles

(886)

(1,150)

(2,847)

Total cash used

(6,691)

(9,419)

(16,541)

Net cash from / (used by) investing activities

(6,691)

(9,374)

(16,541)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contributed equity

1,694

3,153

1,694

Total cash received

1,694

3,153

1,694

Net cash from / (used by) financing activities

1,694

3,153

1,694

Net increase (decrease) in cash held

6,004

(1,299)

(6,803)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of

the reporting period

24,058

25,357

24,058

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the

reporting period

5A

30,062

24,058

17,255

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Annual R

eport

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21

99

Budget Variances Commentary

Cashflow Statement

Commentary is provided where t

he variance between the budget and actual line item is +/

-

$500

and 10% and +/

-

2% of the budget category (e.g. Expenses, Own

-

source revenue, Financial asset

etc.).

Explanation of variance

Line item

Amount

This variance explained by the strict saving meas

ures

applied across the museum in lieu of C

OVID

-

19 ensuring

receivables balances were paid in a timely manner.

Sale of goods and

rendering services

1,259

Decrease in

other cash

primarily explained by reduced

busi

ness activities because of COVID

-

19 restri

ctions.

Other cash received

(2,826)

The increase in expenditure explained by the museum

performing a realignment and undergoing active

recruitment during the year. This included establishing new

roles in line with achieving objectives of the museums

corp

orate plan.

Employees

965

The savings in expen

diture is primarily due to COVID

-

19 in

particular this is a result of strict saving measures across the

museum and lower cost of sales.

Suppliers

(12,341)

As already mentioned above, these variances are expla

ined

by delays in the museum’s capital works expenditure

program, relating to upgrades and improvements to the

museum’s buildings and infrastructure and collection and

digitisation of heritage and cultural assets. The variance in

i

ntangibles

is

primarily e

xplained

by

timing re delays in

relation to new business system implementations.

Purchase of assets

3,159

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100

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2021

1.

Summary of significant accounting policies

The museum i

s structured to meet a single outcome:

Outcome 1

-

Increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime heritage by

managing the National Maritime Collection (NMC) and staging programs, exhibitions and events.

The continued existence of

the museum in its present form and with its present programmes is

dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the museum

s

administration and programs.

Basis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements

are general

-

purpose financial statements and are required by section

42 of

the

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

(PGPA Act).

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:



Public Governance, Performance

and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015

(FRR);

and



Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations

-

Reduced Disclosure Requirements

issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting

period.

The financia

l statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the

historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated,

no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results o

r the financial position. The

financial statements are presented in Australian dollars. Values are rounded to the nearest $1,000,

except key management personnel remuneration (Note 11) which is rounded to the nearest dollar.

Consolidation and associated co

mpany

The financial statements show information for the economic entity only; this reflects the

consolidated results for the parent entity, the

Australian National Maritime Museum

, and its

controlled entity, the Au

stralian National Maritime Museum Foundation (the foundation). The

results of the parent entity do not differ materially from the economic entity and have therefore not

been separately disclosed. The foundation is a company limi

ted by guarantee (see Note 1

4).

The accounting policies of the foundation are consistent with those of the museum and its assets,

liabilities and results have been consolidated with the parent entity accounts in accordance with

Accounting Standards. All internal transactions and bala

nces have been eliminated on consolidation.

New Accounting Standards

Impacts of COVID

-

19 on preparation of statements

COVID

-

19 has created significant uncertainty about future outcomes. The use of estimates and

judgements in the preparation of these financ

ial statements has been reviewed considering the

Annual R

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Financial statements 2020

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101

circumstances of COVID

-

19 at the end of, and after, the reporting date. Additional disclosures are

provided at the relevant notes as appropriate (see notes 2, 3D, 4C, 4D, 5B and 6A).

Transactions by the Gove

rnment as owner

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for the year, which include

Collection Development Acquisition Budget (CDAB), are recognised directly in Contributed Equity in

that year (

2021

:$1,694;

2020

: $3,153).

Taxation

The museum is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and Goods and

Services Tax (GST).

Breach of Section 83 of the Constitution

Th

ere were no breaches of Section 83 of the Constitution by the museum and its controlled entity

for the reporting period.

2.

Events after the reporting period

There were no events after the reporting period, including relating to the impacts of COVID

-

19, tha

t

provide evidence of conditions that existed as at 30 June

2021

or are indicative of conditions that

arose after the date that require adjustment to, or disclosure in, these financial statements.

3.

Expenses

3A: Empl

oyee benefits

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Wages and salaries

11,729

8,421

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans

-

1,358

Defined benefit plans

-

547

Leave and other entitlements

(382)

1,334

Volunteer resources, fre

e of charge

654

1,436

Workers Compensation

222

282

Labour Hire

915

2,981

Other employee expenses

280

328

Total employee benefits

13,418

16,687

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in Note 9A.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

102

3B

: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Cost of goods sold

213

401

Brand and marketing

798

2,082

Collections

78

238

Contractors

3,380

4,262

Consultants

866

1,337

Inventory consumed

-

-

Utilities

657

887

Functi

ons, exhibition, events

1,171

1,997

Staff related expenses

329

1,170

Technology and telecommunication

1,032

728

Vessels

140

340

Other

1,034

1,396

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

9,698

14,838

Goods supplied

1,380

2

,051

Services rendered

8,318

12,787

Total goods and services supplied or rendered

9,698

14,838

Other suppliers

Short

-

term leases

194

152

Total other suppliers

194

152

Total suppliers

9,892

14,990

The above lease disclosures

should be read in conjunction with notes 4C, 6A and 8.

Accounting Policy

Short

-

term leases and leases of low

-

value assets

The museum has elected not to recognise right

-

of

-

use assets and lease liabilities for short

-

term

leases of assets that have a lease

term of 12 months or less and leases of low

-

value assets (less than

$10,000). The museum recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on

a straight

-

line basis over the lease term.

3C: Grants

2021

2020

$’000

$’00

0

Non

-

profit institutions

125

120

Total grants

125

120

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

103

3D: Impairment loss on financial instruments

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Impairment on trade and other receivables

-

65

Bad debt write off

-

-

Total impairment on financial in

struments

-

65

See note 5B for details of assessment of impairment.

3E: Write

-

down and impairment of other assets

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Write

-

down on infrastructure, plant and equipment

5

108

Impairment on intangible assets

-

173

Total write

-

down and impairment of other assets

5

281

3F: Losses from asset sales

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Loss from sale of property, plant and equipment

1

Total losses from asset sales

-

1

4.

Income

Own

-

source revenue

4A: R

evenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods

438

866

Rendering of services

2,706

7,982

Total revenue from contracts with customers

3,144

8,848

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

104

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Revenue from contracts

with customers has been disaggregated into categories based on the

timing of transfer of goods and services to the customer, to enable users of financial statements to

understand the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of income and cash flows.

2021

2020

$

’000

$

’000

Major product/service line:

Chartering/hiring fees and berth sales

213

2,083

Public admissions, memberships and programs

1,921

4,339

Sale of inventory

437

865

Venues and events

564

1,543

Other

11

18

3,144

8,848

Timing of transfer of goods and services:

Over time

397

1,887

Point in time

2,747

6,961

3,144

8,848

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

The museum receives revenue from a fe

w different activities, which relate to AASB

15 Revenue from

Contracts with Customers (AASB 15), as they involve a sufficiently specific performance obligation

with the customer. These include admissions, retail and other related revenue from visitors to t

he

museum, and revenue from the hire of museum facilities for events and functions. In most instances

for revenue of this type, the performance obligation is satisfied at a point in time, namely when the

customer consumes the service (i.e. visits the museu

m, or the event/function is held).

Where the obligation occurs over time, for example annual memberships programs, the revenue is

recognised as the customer gains control of the service over the period of the membership.

The transaction price is the total

amount of consideration to which the museum expects to be

entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30

-

day terms, are recognised at the nominal

amounts due less any impai

rment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of

the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

4B: Interest

Deposits

116

378

Total interest

116

378

Accounting Policy

In

terest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements

2020

-

21

105

4C: Rental income

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Operating lease

Lease income

2,472

2,692

Total rental income

2,472

2,692

Operating Leases

In the capacity as lessor, t

he museum leases space in Wharf 7, its wharves and its main museum on a

commercial basis.

Maturity analysis of operating lease income receivables

2021

$

’000

Within 1 year

2,291

One to two years

1,286

Two to three years

Total undiscounted lea

se payments receivable

3,577

The museum has applied the National Cabinet Mandatory Code of Conduct SME Commercial Leasing

Principles During COVID

-

19 in respect of its eligible tenants. Lease income in 2021 and operating

lease income receivables within 1

year have been reduced accordingly.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 3B, 6A

and 8.

4D: Other revenue

Donations

587

550

Grants

2,766

3,461

Resources received free of charge

654

1,436

Spo

nsorship

912

993

Other

-

1,210

Total other revenue

4,919

7,650

The museum received insurance proceeds from its insurer of $1.2 million for 2020 for business

interruption caused by COVID

-

19 for the period 24

March 2020 to 31

May

2020, during opera

tion of

the NSW

Public Health (COVID

-

19 Restrictions on Gathering and Movement) Order 2020

. The

museum is in the process of lodging its insurance claim for business interruption caused by COVID

-

19

for 2021 and a final amount is yet to be determined, which

will also depend on the date the

Museum can reopen. An estimate using last year’s claim method and analysis shows expected

insurance proceeds will bring the revenue in line with the budget for FY22. The grant amount above

includes a $2 million grant the mu

seum received for the replacement of the Pontoons.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

106

Accounting Policy

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be

reliably determined, and the services would have been purchased if they had not been don

ated. Use

of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Cash donations with no commitments are recognised when received.

Grants revenue is recognised based on an assessment of the terms and obligations of the individual

grant agreement.

4E: Other gains

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Donated assets

-

heritage and cultural

3,832

113

Total other gains

3,832

113

Accounting policy

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains

at their fai

r value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another

Government entity because of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer. The

amount above includes the 1606

Dutch

replica ship, the

Duyfken

, which was donated to the museum

during the year from the Duyfken 1606 Replica Foundation.

Revenue from Government

4F: Revenue from Government

Corporate Commonwealth Entity payments f

rom the Department of

Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and

Communications

22,548

21,217

Total revenue from Government

22,548

21,217

Accounting Policy

Funding received or receivable from non

-

corporate Commonwealth entities is recognise

d as

Revenue from Government by the museum unless the funding is an equity injection or a loan. A

n

amount of $2 million for COVID

-

19 funding has been included in the above amount.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

107

5.

Financial assets

5A: Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on

deposit

30,062

24,058

Total cash and cash equivalents

30,062

24,058

5B: Trade and other receivables

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Goods and services

Goods and services

555

304

Total receivables for goods and services

555

304

Other receivables:

GST receivable from the ATO

144

142

Interest

11

16

Other

214

2,218

Total other receivables

369

2,376

Total trade and other receivables (gross)

924

2,680

Less impairment loss allowance

(100)

(100)

Total trade and other receivables (net)

824

2,580

Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance

Movements in relation to 2021

Goods &

services

Total

$

’000

$

’000

As at 1 July 2020

100

100

Increase/(Decrease) recognis

ed in net cost of services

-

-

Total as at 30 June 2021

100

100

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

The museum classifies all its financial assets as financial assets measured at amortised cost.

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables

Trade

receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the

contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principle and interest (SPPI), and

that are not provided at below

-

market interest rates, are subsequ

ently measured at amortised cost

using the effective interest method adjusted for any impairment loss allowance.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

108

The impact of COVID

-

19 on recovery of trade receivables, loans and other receivables has been

assessed at the reporting date and has been maint

ained at prior year’s allowance.

The museum currently has no loans.

6.

Non

-

financial assets

6A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment and

intangibles (2020

-

21)

Land

Buildings &

Wharves

Total Land,

Buildings &

Wharves

Infrastructure

,

Plant &

Equipment

Heritage &

Cultural Assets

Intangibles

Total

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

$

’000

As at 1 July 2020

Gross book value

52,380

108,110

160,490

17,072

80,727

16,986

275,275

Accumulated

d

epreciation,

amortisation and

impairment

-

(3,651)

(3,651)

(8,294)

(7,857)

(12,296)

(32,098)

Total as at 1 July 2020

52,380

104,459

156,839

8,778

72,870

4,690

243,177

Additions

By cost including work in

progress

1,302

1,712

886

3,900

Right

-

of

-

use assets

2,562

2,562

229

2,791

In

-

kind at fair value

3,832

3,832

Revaluations

Revaluations and

impairments

recognised in other

comprehensive income

for right

-

of

-

use assets

Impairments on right

-

of

-

use assets recognised

in net cost of services

Depreciation and

amortisation

(2,558)

(3,012)

(1,044)

(10,626)

Depreciation on right

-

of

-

use assets

(4,012)

(4,012)

Disposals

(128)

(128)

Disposals depreciation

15

15

Write

-

down and

impairment of asset

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

109

Other movements of

right

-

of

-

use assets

Transfers

Total as at 30 June 2021

52,380

103,009

155,389

7,638

75,402

4,532

242,961

Total as at 30 June 2021

represented by

Gross book value

52,380

110,672

163,

052

18,475

86,271

17,872

285,670

Accumulated

depreciation/amortisat

ion

(7,663)

(7,663)

(10,837)

(10,869)

(13,340)

(42,709)

Total as at 30 June 2021

52,380

103,009

155,389

7,638

75,402

4,532

242,961

Carrying amount of

right

-

of

-

use assets

52,380

107,021

159,401

229

-

-

159,630

1

Under AASB16, the museum is required to meet the disclosure requirements of AASB116 for items

of property, plant and equipment subject to an operating lease, and in doing so disaggregate items

of property, plant and equipment s

ubject to an operating lease from items of property, plant and

equipment not subject to an operating lease.

The asset class, Total Land, Building & Wharves consists of the museum’s site, main exhibition

building, wharves, and the Wharf 7 building, which a

re primarily held and used by the museum.

The museum has four separate commercial leasing arrangements with tenants for areas of the

museum’s site, main exhibition building, wharves, and the Wharf 7 building, and these assets are

therefore each partially

subject to an operating lease. To disaggregate each of these assets between

primarily held and used by the museum and subject to an operating lease would result in an

arbitrary allocation of values between the two categories. As the assets are primarily he

ld and used

by the museum, they are included in the tabulated disclosure in 6A and d

isaggregation has not

occurred.

Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and

cultural item were disclosed in the Herita

ge and Cultural Assets class.

All revaluations of non

-

financial assets were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy

stated in this note. The last revaluation took place at 30 June 2017, with a desktop valuation

undertaken at 30 June 2021 during

which no material changes in fair value were identified.

The impact of COVID 19 was considered at the time the desktop valuation was undertaken, and

again prior to completion of these statements, including in relation to rental returns on similar land

hol

dings to those of the museum, changes to building values (replacement costs and useful life) and

changes in active markets for heritage and cultural items. The assessment concluded that the

impacts did not result in a material change in fair value at 30 Ju

ne 2021. Asset carrying values will

continue to be reviewed as further information about the impacts of COVID 19 (if any) become

available.

No indications of impairments were identified for software assets (

i

ntangibles) for the period 30

June 2021.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

110

The mu

seum has contractual commitments for acquisitions of property, plant, equipment and

intangibles of $1.6 million (2020: $2.7 million). Total contractual commitments are due for

acquisitions of property, plant, equipment and intangibles are due within 1 year

.

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as otherwise stated below. The cost of acquisition

includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken.

Financial assets

are initi

ally measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and

income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of

financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of

acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of

similar items which are significant in

total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and

restoring the site on which it is located.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitali

sed at the commencement date of the lease and comprise the initial

lease liability amount, plus initial direct costs incurred when entering the lease, less any lease

incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate as

set

classes to corresponding assets owned outright but included in the same column as where the

corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use le

ase asset that

shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease

asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in

Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Go

vernment financial statements.

No indications of impairments were identified for the Right of Use assets for the period 30 June

2021.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are

carried at f

air value (or an amount not materially different from fair value) less subsequent

accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with

enough frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materia

lly from the

assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon

the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increm

ent is credited to equity

under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

111

revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the operating

results. Revaluation decrements for a cl

ass of assets are recognised directly in the operating results

except to the extent they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

When an item of property, plant and equipment is revalued, any accumulated depreciation as at the

revaluation

date is treated in one of the following ways:

a)

restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the

carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount; or

b)

eliminated against the gross carrying

amount of the asset and the net amount restated to the

revalued amount of the asset.

Non

-

financial assets were valued using Level 2 and Level 3 unobservable inputs.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written

-

off to their est

imated residual values

over their estimated useful lives to the museum using, in all cases, the straight

-

line method of

depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date

and necessary adjustmen

ts are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as

appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2021

2020

Wharves

5

-

10 years

5

-

60 years

Building

5

-

10 yea

rs

5

-

60 years

Property, Plant & Equipment

3

-

50 years

3

-

50 years

Heritage & Cultural

3

-

400 years

3

-

400 years

Planned expenditure on the preservation of museum buildings is depreciated over the Strategic

Asset Management Plan (SAMP) cycle of 10 years.

Th

e depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the

end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2021. Where indications of impa

irment exist, the

asset’s recoverable amount is estimated, and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s

recoverable amount is less than it is carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and

its value in

use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset.

Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to

generate future cash flows, and the asse

t would be replaced if the museum were deprived of the

asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

112

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future

economic benefits

are expected from its use or disposal.

Heritage and Cultural Assets

The museum collects, manages and displays heritage and cultural assets relating to Australia’s

maritime history. These assets are classified as heritage and cultural assets as they are pr

imarily

used for purposes that relate to their cultural significance.

Heritage and cultural assets are valued on a continuing basis by external valuers and by the

museum’s curators based on their potential market value.

The museum has adopted appropriate c

uratorial and preservation policies for the heritage and

cultural assets, which are depreciated according to the assessment of useful lives. Planned

expenditure on the conservation and preservation of heritage and cultural assets is depreciated over

the cu

rrent planning period.

Intangibles

The museum’s intangibles comprise internally developed software for internal use and digital

content for external use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and

accumulated impairment losses.

Sof

tware and digital content are amortised on a straight

-

line basis over its anticipated useful life. The

useful lives of the museum

s software are 3 to 20 years (2020: 3 to 20 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 J

une 2021.

Significant estimates and judgements

The fair value of land has been determined by an independent valuer, with reference to the market

value of similar properties, which is then discounted to recognise the restricted permitted use of the

land un

der the terms of the lease. The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value

measurement is the subjective discount factor to reflect restricted use provisions.

The fair value of the buildings, which are purpose built, has been determined by an i

ndependent

valuer at depreciable replacement cost. The last revaluation took place at 30 June 2017, with a

desktop valuation undertaken by an independent valuer at 30 June 2021 during which no material

changes in fair value were identified. The significant

unobservable inputs used in the fair value

measurement is the replacement cost of purpose built buildings.

The fair value of the wharves has been determined by an independent valuer using an income

capitalisation approach, whereby a yield is applied to th

e potential income earning capacity of the

underlying asset. The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement is the

estimated market yields.

The fair value of the vessels (a sub set of heritage and cultural assets) has been determine

d by an

independent valuer, using either the:



current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation (in the case of the

Endeavour

)

-

the

significant unobservable input used in fair value measurement is the cost of rebuilding the

vessel; or

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

113



cost approach (

in the case of all other vessels in the museum’s fleet), taking into account

both the residual (scrap) value of the vessel and indexed costs of planned maintenance

-

the

significant unobservable inputs used in fair value measurement include the scrap value

and

required condition of the vessels.

The fair value of heritage and cultural assets (excluding vessels) has been determined by either an

independent valuer or museum curators at the market value of similar heritage and cultural assets.

The last revaluat

ion took place at 30 June 2017, with a desktop valuation undertaken by an

independent valuer at 30 June 2021 during which no material changes in fair value were identified.

The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement are the mark

et values of the

individually valued items (those items assessed at over $10,000) and the sample price of items

valued by way of sampling.

Significant differences in the above

-

mentioned unobservable inputs would result in a significantly

different fair va

lue measurement.

6B: Inventories

2021

2020

$

’000

$

’000

Inventories held for sale

271

403

Total inventories

271

403

During 2019

-

20 $401 of inventory held for sale was recognised as an expense (2019: $490). All

inventories are current as

sets.

Inventories held for resale by the museum store are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable

value.

Inventories acquired at no cost or nominal consideration are initially measured at current

replacement cost at the date of acquisition.

6C: Oth

er non

-

financial assets

Prepayments

833

658

Total other non

-

financial assets

833

658

No indications of impairment were found for other non

-

financial assets. All other non

-

financial

assets are current assets.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

114

7.

Payables

7A: Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals

1,674

1,606

Total suppliers

1,674

1,606

All suppliers are expected to be settled within 12 months.

7B: Other payables

Salaries and wages

252

190

Superannuation

-

-

Deferred revenue

1,001

1,410

Other

33

3

255

Total other payables

1,586

1,855

All other payables are expected to be settled within 12 months.

Accounting Policy

All financial liabilities are classified as other financial liabilities.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liab

ilities, including borrowing costs, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction

costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest

method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest

method.

Suppliers and other payables are recognised at their amortised cost, being the amounts at which the

liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods and services have

been received and irrespective of having bee

n invoiced.

Revenue received is reported as deferred revenue, until such time as recognition as revenue is

allowed under the relevant accounting standard. This disclosure should be read in conjunction with

the accompanying note 4.

8.

Provisions

8A: Employee

provisions

Leave

2,865

3,248

Total employee provisions

2,865

3,248

Employee provisions expected to be settled:

No more than 12 months

1,167

1,316

More than 12 months

1,698

1,932

Total employee provisions

2,865

3,248

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

115

A

ccounting Policy

Liabilities for ‘short

-

term’ employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve

months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long

-

term employee benefits are measured as net total of the

present value of the defined

benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No

provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non

-

v

esting and the average sick leave

taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary

rates that will be

applied at the time the leave is taken, including the museum’s employer

superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service

rather than paid out on termination.

The non

-

current portion of the liability for l

ong service leave is recognised and measured at the

present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at

30

June

2020. The estimate of the present value of the liability considers attrition rates and pay

increases thro

ugh promotion and inflation.

Separation and redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The museum recognises a

provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has

informed th

ose employees affected that it will carry out terminations (

2021

: nil;

2020

: nil).

Superannuation

The museum’s staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS)

, the Public

Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other

superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit

schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined c

ontribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian

Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in

the Department of Finance’s administered

schedules and notes.

The museum makes employer contributions to the employees’ defined benefit superannuation

scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be enough to meet the current cost to the

Government. The museum accounts for the contributions as if

they were contributions to defined

contribution plans.

8B: Provision for makegood obligations

2021

2020

$

’000

$

’000

Provision for makegood obligations

78

78

Total other provisions

78

78

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

116

The museum has one makegood obligation relatin

g to the installation of public art works.

9.

Related party disclosures

Related party relationships

The museum is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the museum are the

Director, Key Management Personnel including Councillors, the

Portfolio Minister and Senior

Executives, and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties

The museum’s related party transactions during the financial year were nil (

2020

: nil).

Given the

breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government

sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately

disclosed in this note.

10.

Key management personnel remuneration

Key management

personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning,

directing and controlling the activities of the museum, directly or indirectly. The museum has

determined the key management personnel to be the museum’s Councillors, the Directo

r and CEO,

and all members of the museum’s Executive.

2021

2020

$

$

Short

-

term employee benefits

Salary

1,383,879

1,594,155

Performance bonus

34,211

92,221

Other short

-

term benefits

132,607

152,617

Total short

-

term employee benefits

1,550,697

1,838,993

Post

-

employment benefits

Superannuation

297,762

238,210

Total post

-

employment benefits

297,762

238,210

Other long

-

term employee benefits

Long service leave

38,631

45,827

Total other long

-

term

employee benefits

38,631

45,827

Termination Benefits

127,265

Total Termination Benefits

-

127,265

Total senior executive remuneration expenses

1,887,090

2,250,295

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

117

The total number of key management personnel include

d in the above table is 17 including 12

Councillors (2020: 20 including 12 Councillors). One Councillor's term ceased and then returned

during the year and two new Councillors were appointed.

The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the rem

uneration and other

benefits of the portfolio minister. The portfolio minister's remuneration and other benefits are set

by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the museum.

11.

Contingent liabilities

At 30

 June 2021

the museum had two

unquantifiable contingent liabilities

in respect of

legal

actions

commenced

against it.

Firstly, legal actions commenced against the museum

and multiple other parties

in the United States

of America

(the action). The act

ion

relates

to damage to a submersible vehicle while in transit to the

museum (the event).

Secondly, a legal action commenced

in the NSW District Court

against the museum in relation to

an

injury to

contractor.

It is not possible to estimate the amount o

f any eventual payments that may be required in relation

to these

events. The museum holds current insurance policies

in relation to the events. Those

policies have reimbursed legal and other expenses incurred to date

by the museum in defending the

action

and

are available in the event that any

potential damages

are

incurred.

Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position

but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty

as to the existence of a liability or

asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.

Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent

liabilities are

disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

118

12.

Current/non

-

current distinction for assets and liabilities

12A: Current/non

-

current distinction for assets and liabilities

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No

more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents

30,062

24,058

Trade and other receivables

824

2,580

Inventory

271

403

Prepayment

833

658

Total no more than 12 months

31,990

27,699

More than 12 months

Land

52,380

52,380

Buildings

103,009

104,459

Heritage and cultural

75,402

72,870

Infrastructure, plant and equipment

7,638

8,778

Other intangibles

4,532

4,690

Total more than 12 months

242,961

243,177

Total assets

274,951

270,876

Liabilities expe

cted to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

Suppliers

1,674

1,606

Other payables

1,586

1,855

Leases

-

-

Employee provisions

1,167

1,316

Total no more than 12 months

4,427

4,777

More than 12 months

Leases

-

-

Employee provisions

1,698

1,932

Other provisions

78

78

Total more than 12 months

1,776

2,010

Total liabilities

6,203

6,787

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

119

13.

The Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation

The Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation is a Compa

ny Limited by Guarantee and is

controlled by the Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum.

The Foundation’s objectives are to create a capital fund, through gifts, bequests and fundraising

activities, for the purposes of:



acquiring major additio

nal items or collections of items to develop the National Maritime

Collection;



conserving the National Maritime Collection; and



other activities which enhance the National Maritime Collection.

The financial position of the Foundation is consolidated into

the Australian National Maritime

Museum and is as follows:

2021

2020

$

’000

$

’000

Opening balance at 1 July

1,336

1,108

Revenues: Interest

-

-

Revenues: Donations

254

234

1,590

1,342

Less Expenses: Suppliers

6

6

Contributi

on to Museum collection

203

-

Closing Balance at 30 June

1,381

1,336

Represented by:

Cash at bank

1,428

1,339

Receivables

-

1

Payables

(47)

(4)

1,381

1,336

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

120

14.

Assets held in trust

The museum has established a number of trust a

ccounts which are detailed below.

Gifts and moneys received for specified purposes are placed in separate bank accounts and

expended on those purposes in accordance with the trust terms. These moneys are not available for

other purposes of the museum and

not recognis

ed in the financial statements.

2021

2020

$’000

$’000

14A: USA Bicentennial Gift Fund

A gift was received to develop and maintain the USA Gallery at the museum and upon completion of

the fitout, the assets were transferred to the muse

um. The residual of the gift is held in trust and the

financial position of the Fund is as follows:

Opening balance as at 1 July

2,996

3,666

Receipts: Distributions/Interest

21

66

3,017

3,732

Other expenses

300

736

Closing balance at 30 June

2,717

2,996

Represented by:

Cash at bank

2,838

3,968

Distributions/Interest receivable

-

4

Payable to the museum

(121)

(976)

2,717

2,996

14B: NZ Bicentennial Gift Fund

A fund was created in respect of the yacht

Akarana

.

The financial position of the Fund is as follows:

Opening balance at 1 July

96

94

Receipts: Interest

-

2

Closing balance at 30 June

96

96

Represented by Investment

96

96

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Financial statements 2020

-

21

121

14C: Louis Vuitton Fund

A fund was created to set up the Loui

s Vuitton Collection and for the acquisition of materials relating

to the maritime association between France and Australia.

The financial position of the Fund is as follows:

Opening balance at 1 July

28

27

Receipts: Interest

-

1

Closing balance at

30 June

28

28

Represented by Investment

28

28

15.

Net cash appropriation arrangements

Total comprehensive income/(loss)

-

as

per the Statement of

Comprehensive Income

2,965

(2,127)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation of assets funded through

a

ppropriations (departmental capital budget funding and/or equity

injections)

10,626

10,881

Plus: depreciation of right

-

of

-

use assets

-

-

Less: lease principal repayments

-

-

Net Cash Operating Surplus/ (Deficit)

13,591

8,754

The museum re

ceives a separate Collection Development Acquisition Budget (CDAB) provided

through an equity appropriation to fund heritage and cultural assets.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appen

dixes

122

Appendixes

1 Selected acquisitions to the Australian National Maritime Collection

In the reporting period,

338 objects were

added to the National Maritime Collection

.

A total of 36

acquisitions

comprised 26 gifts, including one donated

via

the Cultural

Heritage Account

, plus 10

purchases

,

including one purchase using the National

Cultural Gifts Program

.

Some o

f the more

significant

acquisitions

are listed below.

Australian South Sea Islander Flag

The Australian South Sea Islander Flag was designed in 1994 in an attempt to achieve recognition

and equity for the descendants of the Pacific islanders bought to Aust

ralia in the 19th Century, to

work mainly in the sugarcane and timber industries. Symbolically the blue, white, green, and gold

represent the people of the Solomon Islands; green, gold and black represent the people of Vanuatu;

while blue and white represe

nt First Nations peoples from other parts of the South Pacific. This

particular flag was flown at the Australian National Maritime Museum in 1994, to commemorate the

25th Anniversary of formal recognition of the decedents of Australia’s blackbirding histor

y. ANMM

Collection 20201008

-

1. Gift from Waskam Emelda Davis.

White Shells, Black Heart (Aunty Esme Timbery)

Artist Blak Douglas (Adam Hill) pays homage to Bidjigal Clan woman and matriarch shell artist from

La Perouse, New South Wales.

White Shells, Black

Heart

(Aunty Esme Timbery)

was a 2019 Finalist in

the Archibald Prize. Douglas notes that ‘Aunty Esme gifted me a bucket of shells too large to use in

her own ornate works. I always entertained the thought of adding shells for the ultimate homage.

My trad

emark cracking represents antiquity of culture and in this case, the colouring directly reflects

Aunt’s choice in many of her gorgeous creations’. ANMM Collection 20190603

-

9. Purchase from Art

Atrium.

Collection of textile works from Love Welcomes

This col

lection of textile works from

Love Welcomes

includes a welcome mat, clutch purse and tote

bag woven out of strips of lifejackets washed up on the beaches of the Mediterranean. Many such

lifejackets are cheap fakes sold by people smugglers and do not offer

any protection to refugees.

These works were handmade by Syrian refugee women on the Greek island of Lesvos, helping to

upcycle and reduce waste, clean the beaches and provide refugee women with an income. ANMM

Collection 20201027

-

2. Purchase from Love Wel

comes.

Guyku

ḏ

a’s Aquarium

A selection of 19 contemporary sculptures and carvings of various fish species by Yol

ŋu artist

Guyku

ḏ

a Munu

ŋgurr. Guyku

ḏ

a is the only artist in his homeland of Garrthalala (Caledon Bay) in

North

-

East Arnhem Land. Guyku

ḏ

a distinguishes hi

mself as a completely innovative sculptor who

pioneers new materials and techniques. ANMM Collection 20191124

-

1. Purchase from Buku

-

Larrnggay Mulka Art Centre.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

123

Tony Albert

You Wreck Me

Series

Tony Albert’s practice explores contemporary legacies of colonia

lism in ways which prompt

audiences to contemplate elements of the human condition. His work

You Wreck Me

was developed

as a response to the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s arrival on Australian soil in 2020. Albert’s

farcical interpretation asks the vie

wer to reflect not only on who is written into history, but who is

written out and why. The depiction is not so much a call to action, but rather the act of a trickster,

imploring us to rethink national narratives through humour. In the artist’s words: ‘if

you can’t laugh

with me, at least have a laugh at me’. ANMM Collection 20200708

-

1. Purchase from

Sullivan+Strumpf Gallery.

Three works selected from the 2020 Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair

Three works selected from the 2020 Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair reflec

ting voices of First Nations

p

eoples in truth telling, in response to the conversations around of the 250

th

a

nniversary of James

Cook’s

v

oyage to the

e

ast coast of Australia. The three works

address

the imbalance of written

colonial history versus First Pe

oples’ oral history, through various art mediums. Artists surveyed the

impact of Cook and what he symbolises to First Peoples of Queensland. ANMM Collection 20200821

-

1. Purchase from Cairns Indigenous Art Fair Limited.

The Voyage of the First Fleeters

This

children’s game, targeted from ages ten and older, explores the 1787

-

88 voyage of the British

First Fleet to Australia under the command of Captain Arthur Phillip. It features a fold

-

out map of the

world with the game track punctuated by ports of call and

events on such a voyage including

provisioning, lost seamen, a lost cow, lost topmasts, strong headwinds, cargo shifts and convict

breakouts. The rule book features considerable actual historical detail about the ships and the

voyage from Portsmouth to

Sy

dney Cove

that has value in exploring foundation narratives of

Australian history. ANMM Collection 20200710

-

2. Gift from Barry Groom.

‘Field Sports of the Native Inhabitants of NSW’ Aquatints

Set of 10 aquatints depicting ‘field sports’ and day

-

to

-

day life

of Indigenous Australian communities.

As an early 19th century European interpretation of Indigenous Australians, there are many

representative inaccuracies to the aquatints. The works are attributed to John Heaviside Clark, and it

has been suggested that

the drawings are based off original sketches by John Lewin. The aquatints

are credited as being plated, cut, and printed by M. Dubourg. The aquatints were first printed in

1813, this series identified as printed in 1818. ANMM Collection 20200131

-

1. Purcha

se from Day

Gallery.

John William Trigg silver teapot

Carried through six generations of the Trigg family, this ornate silver teapot is a window into the

perils of early 19

th

-

century travel by sea. Gifted to John William Trigg, Chief Officer of

Sesostris

,

the

teapot is inscribed with sentiment of thanks for his conduct in protecting passengers during a voyage

to Sydney in 1839. On arrival, Trigg was tried for manslaughter for the shooting of a disorderly

seaman. The teapot provides an interesting case study

into the complexities of legal enforcement for

acts carried out at sea during the 19th century. ANMM Collection 20200909

-

1. Gift from Peter De

Low.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

124

Wooden letter opener from

SS Great Britain

This wooden letter opener made of timber from SS

Great Britain

b

elonged to Harold Gregory

Percival OBE, who served in the

RAN

during World War II on a Fairmile ship. It was common for relics

or timbers from deteriorating ships to be fashioned into souvenirs and sold to fund the vessel’s

ongoing maintenance or restorati

on. ANMM Collection 20201027

-

1. Gift from Julie Percival.

Journal from the Blackwall ship

Shannon

The

Shannon

journal provides a snapshot into life aboard a Blackwall trading vessel during the

1860s. The journal notably chronicles a complete round trip voy

age to Kolkata (1862

-

63) through

the words of officer F.J Marshall. This includes detailed crew and passenger lists, navigational

observations, and records of Marshall’s duties throughout the voyage. Falling at the tail end of the

East India Company’s oper

ation, the

Shannon

journal is an important document profiling a new

period of trade and passenger transport from the UK to India, Australia and New Zealand. The

journal is paired with a series of generational photos of Moultrie Salt, a highly experienced s

enior

officer that served aboard the

Shannon

in 1866. ANMM Collection 20201007

-

1. Gift from Sandra

Davies.

Collection of documents relating to German marine engineer Alfred Edward Engelbert Erlemann, 1880s

This collection of documents traces the maritime c

areer and naturalisation of German immigrant

Alfred Edward Engelbert Erlemann, as well as his courtship of Eliza Marshall, in the 1880s. Alfred

Erlemann arrived in Sydney in 1884, having sailed from England as an engineer on

Warwick

. On

board the ship he m

et 15

-

year

-

old Eliza Marshall, who was emigrating from England with her parents

and five younger siblings. ANMM Collection 20200522

-

1. Gift from Deborah Bushell.

Nossiter material additions

A group of items related to the Nossiter family voyage around the

world in 1935, including reloading

tool and material for the Winchester rifle used on the voyage, correspondence between Harold

Nossiter and the Duke of Edinburgh, Ricard Nossiter’s yachtsman certificate, and a fishing rod. The

Nossiter voyage is a benchma

rk in Australian blue water cruising history, the first of its kind. The

objects make a rare combination of items associated with this voyage and the Nossiter family history

in the museum photographic collection. ANMM Collection 20190619

-

1. Gift from Tim N

ossiter.

Collection relating to the migration of the Mihkelson family from Estonia to Australia, via Sweden, in

1948

This collection relates to the migration of the Mihkelson family from Estonia to Australia, via

Sweden, in 1948. It includes family heirloo

ms, household objects, handicrafts, clothing and personal

items packed when Oskar and Magda Mihkelson fled Estonia, items relating to their lives as part of a

vibrant Estonian exile community in Sweden, objects and images connected with their voyage to

Aus

tralia on

Toscana

, and items relating to the family’s early years working in the migrant

communities of Tully and Mount Isa in Queensland. ANMM Collection 20200312

-

1. Gift from Dr Anu

Mihkelson.

B&W film documenting migration of brothers Vasyl and Mikulas

Grega in 1950

These 29 rolls of film document the lives of Vasyl Grega and his brother Mikulas Grega in

Czechoslovakia at the end of World War II, their time in the Ludwigsburg and Delmenhorst

displaced

persons

camps in Germany, plus their migration to Aus

tralia on

Anna Salen

in 1950. Vasyl Grega was

Annual R

eport

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-

21

Appendixes

125

an avid photographer from the village of Ninžá Pisaná, now north

-

eastern Slovakia, who later settled

in Tully, Queensland. ANMM Collection 20190731

-

1. Gift from Karen Grega.

Two scripts and photos from televisi

on series

Gidget

, swimming program from the Stockholm Olympic

Games 1912, and a collector’s rookie card for swimmer Duke Kahanamoku c1913

This group of scripts and photos from the cult classic television series

Gidget

from 1965

,

and the

collector’s rookie

card for swimmer and later surfing demi

-

go

d Hawaiian Duke Paoa Kahanamoku,

shows cross

-

cultural exchange in American and Australian popular culture in the

20th

century.

Similarly

,

the Olympic swimming program from the Stockholm Games in 1912 shows the

inte

rnational field of medal

lists including Duke Kahanamoku

, Cecil Healy

and

William Longworth. It

also features

Fanny Durack and Mina Wylie

-

Australia’s first women competitors at the Olympic

Games who won gold and silver respectively in the 100 yards distan

ce

competition

. ANMM

Collection 20200813

-

1. Purchase from Bonhams & Butterfields Auctioneers Corporation.

Valerie Taylor photographic collection

This photographic collection represents the career arc of filmmakers and ocean conservationists

Valerie Taylor

AM (born 1935) and her late husband Ron Taylor AM (1934

-

2012) who began their

underwater career as spear fishers. The couple pioneered skin

-

diving, scuba diving

,

and underwater

photography and cinematography in Australia. Valerie and Ron’s research into sh

ark behaviour and

their vocal defence of sharks and the marine environment resulted in the protection of grey nurse

and great white sharks in Australian waters. Valerie continues to take a lead role in marine

conservation issues in Australia and overseas.

ANMM Collection 20201105

-

1. Gift from Valerie

Taylor.

Sydney to Hobart yacht race photographs

This Richard Bennett photographic series captures the challenge, drama and diversity of the Sydney

to Hobart

Yacht Race

from the mid

-

1970s to the late 2000s. Benn

ett’s photographs have become

synonymous with the history of Australia’s premier blue water classic, which has been held every

year since 1945. Highlights include the award

-

winning photograph of

Midnight Rambler

taken during

the tragic 1998 race and the ch

ampion yachts

Kialoa

, 1975,

Ragamuffin

, 1980

,

and more recently,

the record

-

breaking supermaxis,

Wild Oats XI

in 2011 and

Comanche

in 2015. ANMM Collection

20191101

-

1. Gift from Richard Bennett OAM.

Private Journals of Gunner William H. Bound detailing ser

vice aboard HM Schooner

Sandfly

, 1872

-

76

Two hard

-

bound private journals kept by Royal Navy Gunner William H. Bound relating to his

outbound voyage to Australia aboard the ship

Clara

, and subsequent three

-

year service aboard the

anti

-

blackbirding vessel, H

M Schooner

Sandfly

. ANMM Collection 20210430

-

1. Gift from Shirley

Dentith.

Items Souvenired from SMS

Emden

by Raymond Victor Cranfield

Objects souvenired from

German light cruiser

SMS

Emden

during the First World War by Stoker

Petty Officer Raymond Victor

Cranfield,

RAN

. The collection includes a partial

Emden

tally band, one

copper

-

alloy

Emden

canteen token, one Mexican silver dollar, an

Emden

leave ticket, and a dinner

plate that appears to be manufactured from either silver

-

plated ‘Alpaca’ or ‘German sil

ver’. ANMM

Collection 20201001

-

1. Gift from Judy Bull.

Annual R

eport

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21

Appendixes

126

Collection of Operation Jayw

ick Memorabilia belonging to Lieutenant

H.E. ‘Ted’ Carse

Collection of military memorabilia associated with Lieutenant Hubert Edward ‘Ted’ Carse, Royal

Australian Naval Volu

nteer Reserve, including a group of five Second World War service medals, a

Special Operations Australia

-

issued ‘knuckle knife’, faux Japanese ‘meatball’ ensign reportedly flown

aboard MV

Krait

during Operation Jaywick, and a small section of timber report

edly removed from

Krait

’s hull. As commander of the mission’s ‘mother ship’

Krait

, Carse was responsible for safely

delivering and extracting six covert operatives, and in doing so, ensured its success. ANMM

Collection 20201207

-

1. Purchased by the Australi

an National Maritime Foundation and the National

Cultural Heritage Account.

Boat cloak and tea and coffee set belonging to LCDR Michael Varley

Items belonging to

Lieutenant Commander

Michael Varley,

RAN

(and

RAN

Reserve) during his

service between 1947 and

1987

. It includes

a British

-

manufactured officer’s optional navy blue

waist

-

length boat cloak

,

25

-

piece English

-

manufactured naval officer’s tea set and four

-

piece

English

-

manufactured silver plated tea/coffee service set. ANMM Collection 20181119

-

1. Gift

from

Ann Varley.

Naval service photographs of Harry Francis Knight and Peg Trevor

The

n

aval service photographs of cousins Harry Francis Knight and Peg Trevor are representative of

two miraculous unique wartime stories. A telegraphist and Petty Officer ab

oard HMAS

Perth

, Knight

survived the ill

-

fated Battle of Sunda Strait in 1942, before enduring three separate prisoner of war

camps and returning to Australia in 1945. Margaret ‘Peg’ Trevor served with

the

Women’s Royal

Australian Naval Service

(WRANS

) at

HMAS

Penguin

in

1945. Ranked as an assistant writer, her

photographs provide valuable insight into her duties and social activities. ANMM Collection

20200501

-

1. Gift from Heather Andrews.

Personal materials relating to John Withers’ Naval Service

Personal

materials, including photographs, publications, telegrams, newspaper clippings, clothing,

and a Zippo lighter relating to John Withers’ Naval Service. The documents primarily focus on John’s

service on HMAS

Voyager

, its collision with HMAS

Melbourne

, and t

he impacts of the disaster.

Complimented by an oral history recording with John, this material acts as a highly personal and

invaluable insight into the

Voyager

tragedy, and John’s own recovery from the event. ANMM

Collection 20200210

-

1. Gift from John Wit

hers OAM.

RAN

commissioning pennant, possibly from HMAS

Voyager (II)

Cold War

-

era

RAN

commissioning pennant, possibly associated with HMAS

Voyager

(II). ANMM

Collection 20200928

-

1. Gift from Cliff Winnett.

Dana medal

In June 1928 the research ship

Dana

set

sail on a two

-

year expedition financed by Denmark’s largest

scientific fund, the Carlsberg Foundation. Starting in Copenhagen,

Dana

circled the globe from a

westerly direction stopping at a total of 661 stations, collectively travelling 6

5,000 miles by th

e trip’s

end in

June

1930. It revealed that there was an oxygen

-

free layer of intermediate water with an

unknown horizontal distribution in the eastern waters of the Pacific.

Dana

obtained specimens of

eels at different life stages near the equator

,

as wel

l as sailing through the southern Atlantic to

collect detailed data on ocean conditions. ANMM Collection 20210218

-

1. Gift from Judith Wood.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

127

Bluebottle Nemo

unmanned surface vessel and test propulsion models

The Bluebottle series of unmanned surface vessels

(USV) use rigid opening sails and hybrid marine

power in order to carry out operations in areas of oceanography, defence, security, hydrography,

and oil and gas surveillance. Developed by ‘solar sailor’ advocates Ocius, the Bluebottle prototype

vessel

Nem

o

and its partnered test propulsion design models stand as innovative examples of USV

watercraft design and sustainable oceanographic practice. ANMM Collection 20200302

-

1. Cultural

Gift Program donation from Ocius Technology Ltd.

CSIRO oceanographic and hy

drographic equipment

Two collections of CSIRO material trace the evolution of hydrographic and oceanographic research

equipment over time. The collection represents some of the more pressing issues, and progressive

approaches, within the field of oceanogra

phy, as conducted in the deep sea. This is evident through

the MUFTI

-

2 tow body and fishery management, and the MRV Solo II Array for real

-

time geostrophic

oceanography (Argo) float, an autonomous, and continually operating piece of ocean research

equipmen

t. The second group of acquisitions depict the evolving history of water sampling in ocean

science practice from the 19th and 20th centuries. ANMM Collection 20190605

-

2 and 20210211

-

1.

Gift from CSIRO.

Continuous Plankton Recorder

The Continuous Plankton R

ecorder (CPR) Survey is the longest

-

running marine biological survey in

the world. The Australian Continuous Plankton Recorder (AusCPR) survey measures plankton

communities as a guide to the health of Australia’s oceans. The unique design of the CPR Type 2

Mk

1 means that it is one of the first two CPRs ever sent to Australia from the UK:

either CPR 13

(circa1939

-

40) or CPR 105 (1966). ANMM Collection 20210225

-

1. Gift from CSIRO, Oceans and

Atmosphere.

Australian Antarctic Division

Objects associated with

post

--

World War II Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition

operations create a tangible link between the museum’s exceptional pre

-

war Antarctic collections

and the scientific and technological advancements throughout the twentieth century. ANMM

C

ollection 20210223

-

2. Gift from Australian Antarctic Division.

Stationary Electromagnetic Current Meter and Tide Gauge

This donation contains two key pieces of equipment used for monitoring coastlines. Collectively the

objects create quantifiable data wit

hin a global context about the currents and tide changes of the

ocean. ANMM Collection 20210223

-

1. Gift from the University of Sydney.

Defence Science and Technology Group

This donation includes scientific instruments

from the mid

-

twentieth century

that m

easure qualities

of the ocean. The items

are associated with coastal operations conducted by the

RAN

Experimental

Laboratory through to the establishment of the Defence, Science and Technology Group in 1984.

This collection represents the types of equipmen

t

used on smaller

coastal research vessels. These

include

various technological innovations

, including an adapted salinometer for deck

-

based analysis

designed by noted Australian ocean engineer Neil Brown

. The instruments in this acquisition are able

to me

asure salinity, dissolved oxygen, particulate matter, chemical compositions, conductivity and

pressure. ANMM Collection 20210222

-

1. Gift from the Defence Science and Technology Group.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

128

‘The South Coast is Calling’ bushfire recovery tourism posters

Canberra

Times

cartoonist artist David Pope created these posters drawing on traditions of Japanese

woodblock printing, mid

-

twentieth century vintage travel poster design, and modern comic book

graphics. While they present alluring holiday destinations, several car

ry a subtle black tinge, the

echo of bushfire. The series was commissioned in response to the bushfire crisis in the summer of

2019

-

20 by Australian Community Media to assist communities on the far south coast of New South

Wales, an area within the publish

er’s readership. ANMM Collection 20200601

-

3. Purchase from

Redbubble.

2 Objects deaccessioned from the NMC

This annual report must include particulars of any disposals

of material included in the nat

ional

maritime collection, in compliance with

s

ection 48

of the

Australian National Maritime Museum Act

1990

.

No objects were approved for deaccessioning during the

reporting period

.

3

Australian National Maritime Museum

publications

Serials

Signals

, quarterly journal of the Australian National Maritime Museu

m, Nos 127

-

131, ISSN 1033

-

4688, 80 pp, editor Janine Flew, published September, December, March, June. Free to Members.

Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2019

-

20

, ISSN 1039

-

4036 (print) / 2204

-

678X

(online), 172 pp, editor Janine Flew.

All

Hands

, e

-

magazine of Australian National Maritime Museum Volunteers, edited by a volunteer

committee: Geoff Barnes, Alex Books, Roz Gatwood, Bob Hetherington, Neale Philip, Jenny Patel,

Brooke Twyford and David van Kool, published quarterly online. Free to

museum volunteers, staff

and Council members, and to volunteers at maritime

-

related museums Australia wide.

Education resource materials

As the pandemic restricted o

ur capacity to host students on site at

the

m

useum

, we

continued to

focus on the developme

nt of online resources to support teachers and students in their homes and

classrooms. As teacher comfort with digital resource use in their classroom has increased, so has the

number of platforms and resource styles that are being used. It has been import

ant for the

m

useum

to understand these trends and follow the audience as their preferences shift.

This focus has allowed the

m

useum to achieve extremely pleasing results in terms of online

engagement. New resources developed

during the reporting period

in

clude:



Wreck Seeker

online game

.



Creating a Nation

: six videos exploring the post

-

war migrant e

xperience (a collaboration

with

ABC Education

)

.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

129

Teacher resources for each of our three, sector

-

leading games:



The Voyage



Cook’s Voyages



Wreck Seeker

On Patro

l with Bailey online resource

.

Internet

The museum’s

website:

sea.museum/

The museum’s

blog:

sea.museum/explore/blog

The museum’s digital stories:

sea.museum/explore

Facebook:

facebook.com/sea.museum/

Google

A

rts and

C

ulture:

artsandculture.google.com/partner/australia

-

national

-

maritime

-

museum

Instagram:

instagram.com/sea.museum/

Twitter:

twitter.com/seamuseum_/

YouTube

:

youtube.com/user/MaritimeMuseum

4 Reconciliation Action Plan implementation progress (as at 30 June 2021)

Relationships

Action

Deliverable

Timeline

Milestones achieved

RAP Working Group

(RWG)

actively

monitors

Reconciliation Action

Plan (

RAP

)

development and

implementation of

actions, tracking

progress and

reporting

RWG oversees the

development, endorsement

and launch of the RAP

February 2019

Completed

RWG established and all

Aboriginal and T

orres

Strai

t Islander staff are

members

All four meetings for the

2019 c

alendar year have

now been held

Meetings for 2020 have

been held in March,

June, September and

November. An additional

meeting to review the

RAP took place on 16

April

2020

Meetings f

or 20

21 were

held in March and June

Establish Terms of

Reference for the RWG

February 2019

Ensure Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander

peoples are represented on

the RWG

February 2019, 2020

Meet quarterly (with

minutes taken) to review

and report

on RAP

implementation

March. June,

September, December

2019, 2020 & 2021

Celebrate National

Reconciliation Week

(NRW) by providing

opportunities to

Organise and hold at least

one event each year for

museum

employees to

celebrate NRW

May 2019

and

2020

Com

pleted for 2019,

2020 and 2021

All staff were given the

opportunity to

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

130

build and maintain

relationships

between Aboriginal

and Torres Strait

Islander peoples and

other Aust

ralians

Register all events via

Reco

nciliation Australia’s

NRW website

May 2019

May 2020

participate in a cultural

experience on

-

board

Tribal Warrior's

Mari

Naw

i

The

Remembering Mabo

rooftop projection was

featured during

NRW

In May 2020, due to

COVID

-

19, the Museum

launched a Welcome to

Country video on the

website, in partnership

with the Metropolitan

Local Aboriginal Land

Council

Support an external

NRW

event

May 2019

May 2020

Ensure our RWG

participates in an external

event to recognise and

celebrate NRW

May 2019

May 2020

Develop and

maintain mutually

beneficial

re

lationships

between the

museum

and

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander

peoples,

communities and

organisations to

support and ensure

positive outcomes

Develop and implement a

plan to engage and work

with the

museum

’s

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander

stakeholders

June 2019

Planning is off

-

track but

engagement still occurs

as needed.

Principles and

procedures are yet to be

codified.

Meetings and

engagement have

occurred, particularly in

the context of the

Encounters 2020 project.

Preliminary work in

i

dentifying current

contacts and priority

organisations has

occurred.

Hold meetings with local

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander organisations to

develop guiding principles

for future engagement

March 2019

Establish a network of

Aboriginal and Torr

es Strait

Islander communities and

organisations that have

direct links to maritime

activities, histories and

cultures

June 2020

Raise internal and

external awareness

of our RAP to

promote

reconciliation within

the

museum

and to

all its stakeholders

and

those working

and engaging with

the cultural sector

generally

Launch the

museum’s RAP

on site with all employees,

volunteers and other

stakeholders in attendance

February 2019

RAP launched on 6

March 2019

Draft communications

strategy commenced

; i

n

the int

erim, information

shared through formal

mechanisms (such as

annual report) and

informal mechanisms

(team and whole staff

meetings)

Implementation ideas for

use as appropriate:



Divisional meetings



KPIs (referring back

to operational plan)



Next volunteers

fo

rum



Volunteers briefings

Develop, implement and

review a strategy for the

communication and

promotion of the

museum

’s

RAP and progress made on

its implementation to all

internal and external

stakehold

ers

February 2019, 2020

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

131

Ensure the RAP is effectively

promoted by the ongoing

and regular engagement by

the

museum

and the RWG

with internal and external

stakeholders in relevant

elements of the plan

March, June,

September, December,

2019, 2020, 2021



Promotion of RAP

and

achievements to

museum partners

Promote reconciliation

through ongoing active

engagement with all

stakeholders

December 2019

Establish an

Indigenous and

Torres Strait Islander

advisory committee

for the museum

Develop terms of reference

for the Indigenous and

Torres Strait Islander

ad

visory committee, the

terms and conditions of

appointment, and indicative

meeting schedule for

approval by the

museum’s

Council

June 2019

The Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander

Advisory Committee has

been established and

met for the first time at

the Ju

ne Council

Meeting

; i

t will meet

again prior

to the

November 2021 Council

Meeting

Appointmen

ts to the

committee are ongoing

Appoint the members of the

Indigenous and Torres Strait

Islander advisory committee

July 2019

Convene the first meeting of

the

Indigenous and Torres

Strait Islander advisory

committee

August 2019

Convene meetings of the

Indigenous and Torres Strait

Islander advisory committee

August 2020

Respect

Action

Deliverable

Timeline

Milestones achieved

Engage employees in

continuou

s cultural

learning

opportunities to

increase

understanding and

appreciation of

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander

cultures, histories

and achievements

Develop and implement a

cultural awareness training

strategy which defines and

addresses the Aborigin

al

and Torres Strait Islander

cultural learning needs of

museum

employees,

volunteers and contractors,

working in all areas, and

provides various options for

learning (for example,

online, face to face

workshops and cultural

immersion)

June 2019

and

ongoin

g

Strategy yet to be

formalised.

However,

staff have participated in

cultural awareness

training (face to face

and

online), as well as

procurement training

(including Indigenous

procurement).

Volunteers have had

access to online training.

The Museum lever

aged

the

Encounters 2020

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

132

Investigate and develo

p

opportunities to work with

local Traditional Owners and

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander consultants to

develop and deliver cultural

awareness training and

immersion

September 2019

31 December 2019

exhibitions

for cultural

awareness training

Councillors participated

in Cultural training

focused around truth

telling

; the m

useum has

leveraged connections

with local groups such as

Tribal Warrior

RWG members

participated in an

Australian Dream

screening and

discussion

on 12 December 2019

Terri Janke

and

Company, Aboriginal

Legal firm delivered

specific training open to

all staff on the Australian

Museums Art Galleries

Association Indigenous

Roadmap

Provide opportunities for

RWG members and o

ther

key managers to participate

in advanced cultural

awareness training,

experiences and immersion

December 2019

Engage employees in

understanding the

significance of

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander

cultural protocols

such as Welcome to

Country an

d

Acknowledgement of

Country to ensure

there is a shared

meaning

Develop, implement and

communicate a cultural

protocol document for

Welcome to Country and

Acknowledgement of

Country

February 2019

Acknowledgement of

Country incorporated

into the Bamal Badu

worldscape

Formal cultural prot

ocol

document will be

developed

Completed

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Completed

Prepare a list of key

contacts for organising and

delivering a Welcome to

Country and maintaining

respectful partnerships

February 2019

and

2

020

Invite a Traditional Owner

to provide a Welcome to

Country at all significant

museum

events, including

exhibition and program

openings

February 2019

and

ongoing

Include an

Acknowledgement of

Country at the

commencement of

important meetings

invol

ving internal and

external stakeholders

June 2019

and

ongoing

Encourage staff to include

an Acknowledgement of

Country at the

commencement of all

meetings

June 2019

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

133

Organise and display an

Acknowledgment of Country

(sign or plaque) at the

entrance or

in the foyer of

the

museum

’s main building

June 2019

Provide

opportunities for

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander

employees to engage

with their cultures

and communities by

celebrating NAIDOC

Week

Review and update People

and Culture policies and

pro

cedures to ensure that

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander employees are

provided with opportunities

and are actively encouraged

to participate in NAIDOC

Week

May 2019

May 2020

Review yet to commence

but current practice is to

encourage participa

tion

in

NAIDOC Week

initiatives

Paid day approved by

organisation for all

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander staff

members who attended

NAIDOC day community

events

Drafted for inclusion in

leave policy

-

p

otential

enterprise bargaining

agreement inclusion

Provide opportunities for all

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander employees to

participate in, and with,

their cultures and

communities during NAIDOC

Week

July 2019

July 2020

Use the National

Maritime Collection

and museum

programs to build

awa

reness of and

respect for the

richness and diversity

of Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander

peoples, cultures and

histories

Continue to develop

collections, exhibitions,

blogs and oral histories to:

-

Celebrate the maritime

culture and heritages of

Abori

ginal and Torres Strait

Islander peoples

-

Promote the use of

National Maritime

Collection material by

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander Peoples to support

cultural maintenance

-

Mark Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander dates

of significance on an a

nnual

basis

-

Present positive, diverse

images of Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander

Peoples on

our website and

in publications

Work with Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander

Peoples and organisations

to continue to develop and

care for the National

February 2019

and

ongoing

February 2019, 2020,

2021

November 2020

Bamal Badu, a work by

Brett Leavy,

was

launched d

uring NAIDOC

week

Aboriginal perspectives

of Sydney Harbour talks

and cruises offered to

guests

Kanalaritja: An Unbroken

String

, a touring

exhibition from

the

Tasmanian Museum and

Art Gallery

was exhibited

in 2019

Mariw Minaral

, a

retrospective of works

by Alick Tipoti,

opened

at the museum in 2020

after

s

ignificant artist

consultation

Defying Empire,

a

t

ouring exhibition from

the NGA

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

134

Ma

ritime Collection,

including enhancing

information about lan

guage

in our collection records

Work closely with

community to ensure our

approach to

Encounters

2020

is respectful, balanced

and committed to truth

telling

Deliver at least two

exhibitions on s

ite, as part

of

Encounters 2020

, which

give voice to contemporary

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander peoples on the

themes of the program

Ongoing changes to TMS

(regi

stration) entries are

occurring

A number of community

groups from the

locations of the

Endeav

our

voyage ports

were engaged with

The Museum delivered

Defying Empire

and

Ship

and Shore

onsite as part

of the

Encounters 2020

program

Opportunities

Action

Deliverable

Timeline

Milestones achieved

Investig

ate

opportunities to

improve and increase

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander

employment

opportunities at the

museum

Annually review (and revise

as necessary) People

and

Culture recruitment policies

and procedures to ensure

there are no barriers to

Abori

ginal and Torres Strait

Islander employment in our

workplace

May 2019

June 2020

May 2020

As

People and Culture

review policies, these

elements are being

taken into co

nsideration

on an ongoing basis

Informal consultation

with staff regarding

retention and w

ays to

develop staff

are

ongoing

Develop and implement an

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander employment and

retention strategy

June 2019

May 2020

Consult with Existing

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander staff on

employment strat

egies a

nd

on development

opportunities

May 2019

May 2020

Advertise vacancies that are

required to be advertised,

across all classifications, in

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander media

June 2019

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

135

Collect, with consent,

information on our

current

and past Aboriginal and

Torres Strait Islander staff to

inform recruitment for

future employment

opportunities

May 2019

Investigate, develop

and provide

opportunities for

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islander

businesses to supply

goods and servic

es to

the

museum

Annually review (and

update as necessary)

procurement policies and

procedures to ensure there

are no barriers to Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander

businesses supplying goods

and services to

museum

June 2019

June 2020

Supply Nation

memb

ership has been

reviewed and renewed

Best endeavours to

comply with the

Commonwealth

Indigenou

s Procurement

Policy have been

e

mbedded in t

he

museum’s Procurement

Policy

September 2019 report

ci

rculated in November

2019

Completed

Exceeded target already

t

his year

: t

wo companie

s

contracted to supply

uniforms and s

everal

new firms contracted for

Shop

Renewed until February

2022

Underway and ongoing

Provide a list of Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander

businesses that have

supplied goods and services

to the

museum

in the last

financial year to all staff

involved in procurement

March

and

September

2019

Using the Supply Nation

database, provide a list of

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander businesses and the

goods and services they

provide to

all

museum

staff

involved in procurement

March

and

September

2019

Develop at least one

additional commercial

relationship with an

Aboriginal and/or Torres

Strait Islander owned

business each year

March and

September

2019

Review Supply Nation

mem

bership

February 2019 and

2020

Use best endeavours to

comply with the

Commonwealth’s

Indigenous Procurement

Policy

February 2019

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

136

Undertake

community visits and

outreach to schools

to promote the

museum

and its

Aboriginal and Torres

Strait Islande

r

programs, and to

encourage and

inspire Aboriginal

and Torres Strait

Islander students

seeking training and

employment in the

cultural sector

Develop and implement a

program of school and

community visits for

museum

staff to promote

the

Australian Nationa

l

Maritime Museum

and

potential careers in the

cultural sector to Aboriginal

and Torres Strait Islander

students

June 2019

Currently occurs

informally

-

w

e are

encouraging

consideration of

employment in the

cultural sector at the

conclusion of tours for

I

n

digenous students and

interns

Formalisation of this

program is on hold due

to restrictions for visiting

schools a

nd

communities during

COVID

-

19

People and Culture are

reviewing the internship

framework at the

Museum, and w

ill

consider this as an

element

Develop a short

-

term

internship program, of

1

-

2

months duration, and offer

places to up to four

Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander students to

encourage training,

qualifications and careers in

the cultural sector

June 2019

June 2020

As

sess the cultural,

social and economic

impact of the

museum’s

investment in

supporting Aboriginal

and Torres Strait

Islander maritime

heritage

Engage an Aboriginal or

Torres Strait Islander

business with relevant

expertise to advise the

museum on the cultu

ral,

social and economic impact

of the museum’s investment

in supporting Aboriginal and

Torres Str

ait Islander

maritime heritages

June 2020

Not commenced

Governance, tracking, progress and reporting

Action

Deliverable

Timeline

Milestones achieved

Re

port RAP

achievements,

challenges and

learnings to

Reconciliation

Australia

Collate information/data on

RAP achievements,

challenges and learnings for

consideration by the RWG

July 2019

July 2020

Discussions have

commenced by RWG to

look at challeng

es,

ach

ievements and

learnings

Reconciliation Australia

advised that reporting

was not required in July

2019 as the RAP had not

been in place for a year

Complete and submit the

RAP Impact Questionnaire

to the

museum’s

Executive

Group for approval

August 2019

August 2020

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

137

Submit the approved and

completed

museum

RAP

Impact Measurement

Questionna

ire to

Reconciliation Australia

September 2019

Sep

tember 2020

Reporting completed for

2020

; r

eporting for 2021

against the current RAP

will

take place as per

requirement

Investigate participating in

the RAP Barometer

May 2020

Report RAP

achievements,

challenges and

learnings internally

and externally

Quarterly reports prepared

for the Executive Group,

Council and other

stakeholders on the

progress on

the

implementation of the RAP

March, June, September,

December, 2019, 2020

RAP achievements an

d

progress reported to

Council

Share

the museum’s

RAP

achievements, challenges

and learnings at regular all

-

staff meetings, in the annual

report, on the website

and

in

Signals

.

July 2019

July 2020

Review the RAP and

develop new RAP

Liaise with Reconciliation

Australia to develop a new

RAP based on learnings,

challenges and

achievements

April 2020

Next RAP in progress

-

c

omments from

Reconciliation Austra

lia

have been actioned,

edits made and the final

document sent to

Reconciliation Australia

for review w

ith Advisory

Committee approval

Send draft RAP to

Reconciliation Australia for

review and feedback

May 2020

Submit draft RAP to

Reconciliation Aust

ralia for

formal endorsement.

January 2021

5 Director and staff overseas travel

Due to the COVID

-

19 pandemic, neither the Director nor any other ANMM Staff travelled overseas

between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021.

6 Sponsors, partners and supporters

Major Sponsors

Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation

Nine Network

Port Authority of NSW

Partners

Evan Powis Entertainment

Guilty (Aust) Pty Ltd

Laissez

-

faire Catering

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

138

Sponsors

Anonymous Animals

AusRelief

City of Sydney

Department of Foreign Affairs an

d Trade

Good Drinks

Lockheed Martin Australia

Multicultural NSW

Netherlands Embassy

Nova Professional Services Pty Ltd

Royal Wolf

Schmidt Ocean Institute

Settlements Services International

Smit Lamnalco

Sydney.com

Sydney by Sail

Sydney Festival

Tyrrell

's Vineyards Pty Ltd

Supporters

Arts Centre Melbourne

Challis & Company

Colin Biggers & Paisley

National Collecting Institution Touring and Outreach Program

National Gallery of Australia

National Geographic

Queensland Museum Network

SBS

Shipping Australia

Silent World Foundation

Sydney Fish Market

Tomra

Visions of Australia

7 Donors and benefactors

Benefactors

Basil Jenkins

Dr Keith Jones

Janette Parkinson

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

139

Captain’s Circle Members

Dan Janes

Peter Poland

Jonathon Casson

David Mathlin

Mark Bethwaite AM

J

ohn Jeremy AM

Dawn Bradner

William Hopkins

Louise Taggart

Dr Jeff Hughes

Judy Lee

Jaz Stephens

Martin Rathbone

Hon Margaret White AO

Arlene Tansey

David N Blackley

Peter Dexter AM

Campbell Edmondson

Nicholas Yates

Doyle Cook

-

Port Kembla Gateway

Paul Bins

ted

Dr Gary Holmes

Dr Anne Reeckmann

Nigel Stoke

Dr Hamish Foster

Simon Chan

Major donors

Christine Sadler

David and Jennie Sutherland Foundation

The families of Ted Carse’s brothers

Jeanne

-

Claude Strong

Rehana Nathwani

Amyn Nathwani

Sydney Restaurant Grou

p

David Mathlin

Donors ($2,000

-

$10,000)

Charles Whitfield

Christopher Roberts Mr

MK Global PTY LTD

Paul Harris

Emmanuel Alfieris

Joanne Hogan

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

140

Mamoona Hussain

Peter Dexter AM

Daniel Paul Janes

Nick Andriotakis

Louise Taggart

Susan Doenau

Arthur Cunningham

8 Corporate Members

Epson Australia Pty Ltd

Musée Du Quai Branly Mediatheque

Port Authority of NSW

9 Recognising individuals of distinction

The museum’s honours system recognises individuals who have made a significant contribution to

the museum and to

Australian maritime heritage and culture generally. The five

levels of recognition

are as follows.

Honorary Fellowship

-

the highest honour conferred by the Council awarded to people who have

made an exceptional contribution to the museum and whose status

and ongoing association will

serve to promote the museum and its activities

Ambassador

-

awarded by Council to people who have donated $100,000 or more to the Australian

National Maritime Museum Foundation. Ambassadors are also members of the Foundation.

Honorary Life Membership

-

awarded by Council to people who have made a significant and

enduring contribution to the museum

Honorary Research Associate

-

awarded by the Director in recognition of their distinguished service

to former museum staff who wish

to continue to contribute through research or other activities

Members of the ANMM Foundation

-

invited by Council to attend Foundation meetings and help

meet its objectives.

This year four new Honorary Life Members were appointed by the Council

-

Kieran H

osty, Matt Lee,

Ron McJannett, Jonathan Mead AO VADM RAN

A full list of Honorary Fellowship holders, Ambassadors, Honorary Life Members and Honorary

Research Associates follows.

Honorary Fellowships

Mr John Mullen AM

Mr Peter Dexter AM FAICD

Ms Valerie Tay

lor AM

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

141

Ambassadors

Christine Sadler

David and Jennie Sutherland

Norman Banham

Honorary Research Associates

(year appointed)

Lindsey Shaw, former ANMM curator (2014)

Jeffrey Mellefont, former ANMM

Signals

editor (2014)

Paul Hundley, former ANMM curator (2

015)

RADM Peter Briggs AO CSC (2015)

Dr Ian MacLeod (2016)

Dr Nigel Erskine (2019)

David Payne (2020)

John Dikkenberg (2020)

Honorary Life Members

(

d

ate conferred

)

Yvonne Abadee 22/7/16

Kathy Abbass 22/6/18

Robert Albert AO RFD RD 6/1/92

Bob Allan 1/6/14

V

ivian Balmer 6/11/16

Tim Barrett AO CSC RAN 5/11/16

Maria Bentley 6/1/92

Mark Bethwaite AM 18/10/16

Paul Binsted 18/10/16

David Blackley 22/4/20

Marcus Blackmore AM 18/10/16

John Blanchfield 6/11/16

Alexander Books 15/9/16

Ian Bowie 11/8/95

Ron Brown OAM 5

/11/16

Paul Bruce 10/2/92

Anthony Buckley 15/4/93

Richard Bunting 1/10/15

Richard Burgess AM 24/2/92

Kevin Byrne 4/1/92

Sue Calwell 10/12/92

David Campbell AM 5/9/97

Marion Carter 29/11/16

Victor Chiang 1/1/16

Robert Clifford AO 5/11/16

Helen Clift 5/2/18

Peter Collins AM QC 6/11/16

John Coombs 22/11/16

Kay Cottee AO 2/12/91

Helen Coulson OAM 5/9/97

Russell Crane AO CSM 5/11/16

John Cunneen 21/10/92

Laurie Dilks 18/2/94

Leonard Ely 23/6/95

Nigel Erskine 6/3/19

John Farrell 5/11/16

Kevin Fewster

CBE AM FRSA

3/12/91

Bernard Flack 9/12/91

Daina Fletcher 6/11/16

Sally Fletcher 29/11/16

Teresia Fors 5/6/19

Derek Freeman 1/10/16

Geoff Geraghty CDR AM 5/11/16

Anthony Gibbs 5/9/16

Stephen Gilmore AM CSC 5/1/16

Paul Gorrick 22/3/94

Lee Graham 29/11/16

Macklan Gridley

6/1/92

James Hardy KBE OBE 5/9/97

Simon Harrington AM 24/3/92

Christopher Harry 28/12/19

Gaye Hart AM 15/11/16

Peter Harvie 5/11/16

Janita Hercus 20/9/93

Robyn Holt 5/11/16

William Hopkins OAM JP 22/9/92

Julia Horne PhD 5/11/16

Kieran Hosty 25/11/20

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

A

ppendixes

142

Tony

Hunt AO 16/6/95

Marilyn Jenner 11/2/92

John Jeremy AM 22/12/91

Peter Jones AO DSC 5/11/16

Tricia Kavanagh 14/10/92

John Keelty 21/12/92

Kristine Klugman OAM 10/12/92

Judy Lee 21/1/92

Matt Lee 25/11/20

David Leigh 5/7/16

Keith Leleu OAM 6/1/92

Andrew Lishmu

nd 7/4/95

James Litten 14/4/92

Hugo Llorens 11/8/16

Tim Lloyd 18/12/91

Ian David Mackinder 21/1/92

Stuart Mayer 4/10/18

Bruce McDonald AM 5/11/16

Lyn McHale 17/10/18

Jonathan Mead AO VADM RAN 25/11/20

Arthur Moss 23/12/91

Patrick Moss 5/11/16

Rob Mundle O

AM 6/11/16

Alwyn Murray 17/10/18

Martin Nakata 5/11/16

David O’Connor 24/10/95

Gary Paquet 2/10/92

David Payne 2/9/20

John Penrose AM 6/11/16

Neville Perry 17/5/94

Hon Justice Anthe Philippides 6/11/16

Peter Pigott AM 18/10/16

Len Price 5/2/18

Eda Ritchi

e AM 6/11/16

John Rothwell AO 6/11/16

Kay Saunders AM 5/9/97

Kevin Scarce AC CSC RAN (Rtd) 6/11/16

David Scott

-

Smith 23/12/91

Sergio Sergi 18/10/16

Ann Sherry AO 6/11/16

Shane Simpson AM 6/11/16

Peter John Sinclair AM CSC 6/11/16

Peter Ross Sinclair 29/6/9

9

John Singleton AM 6/11/16

Brian Skingsley 10/10/16

Eva Skira 6/11/16

Bruce Stannard AM 26/11/93

JJ Stephens OAM 29/1/93

Michael Stevens 9/12/93

Neville Stevens AO 6/11/16

Frank Talbot AM 20/8/96

Mitchell Turner 26/10/94

Adam Watson 18/2/92

Jeanette Wheil

don 6/11/16

Hon Margaret White AO 22/4/20

Mary

-

Louise Williams 2/3/93

Nerolie Withnall 6/11/16

Cecilia Woolford 5/11/16

10 Volunteers

There were

449

active volunteers during this reporting period. The decline in numbers

is

attributed

to the ongoing COV

ID

-

19 crisis. Of the 449 active volunteers, 223 contributed 23,513 hours to the

museum. Their contributions involved:



marshalling visitors



monitoring and controlling numbers in exhibitions



static guides for

A Mile in My Shoes

exhibition



developing and trai

ning for ‘white gloves’ behind

-

the

-

scenes tours of Wharf 7



static guides on the top deck on HMB

Endeavour

and at the gangway



static guides and conducting limited tours of HMAS

Vampire

by special request



static guides, conducting tours and acting as crew on

Duyfken

when it is sailing



static guides and conducting limited

-

size tours on HMAS

Onslow

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

143



collecting oral history stories from volunteers with a nautical background

, plus selected

migrants honoured on the National Monument to Migration



producing an in

-

hou

se volunteers magazine,

All Hands

, four times per year



delivering presentations to various community groups via face

-

to

-

face or electronically via

Zoom.

Volunteers conducted 1207 tours of the vessels for a total of 8381 visitors.

During Chinese Lunar New Y

ear, 17 Mandarin

-

and/or Cantonese

-

speaking volunteers conducted 14

tours for a total of 52 visitors.

Since sailing trips on

Duyfken

commenced in January 2021, 68 volunteers were trained to assist as

crew. They completed 33 sails on Sydney Harbour, compris

ing 243 shifts for a total of 1215 hours

sailing.

The volunteer Speakers Group continued to operate during difficult times, delivering

17

4

presentations to an audience of 7913 attendees. They presented to Probus, Rotary, U3A, sailing

clubs, seniors’ group

s and historical societies.

We would like to pay tribute to those volunteers who died during the year, including Ron McJannett,

Hugh Murray, Tony Reid, Derek Herbert, Anthony Duignan, Vera Taylor, Ron Miller, Peter Bennett

and Jack McBurney. We acknowledge

their service and dedication to the museum and offer our

condolences to their families

Darling Harbour volunteers

Steve Adamantidis

Harold Adolphe

Merinda Air

Hazel Allen

John Allen

Ellen Andrews

Graeme Andrews

Ian Anstee

Phillip Armstrong

Ryan Atkins

Ma

jd Babik

Les Bailey

Mark Baker

Peter Baldridge

Juliette Banerjee

Ann Barlow

Geoff Barnes

Megan Barnes

Ricardo Bauermann

Lyndyl Beard

Keith Beattie

Erina Leigh Bennett

Tony Bennett

Marisa Bishop

Claire Bissett

Ian Bissett

John Black

Steve Black

Marilyn Blac

kett

Alex Books

John Booth

Ian Boothroyd

Martin Borri

Ron Bowrey

Colin Boyd

Kel Boyd

John Braniff

Chris Bremner

Don Brian

Sue Brian

Elizabeth Bridgman

Ian Brissett

Ric Broniman

John Brownhill

Greg Buddle

Terry Burns

Barbara Burton

Orm Butler

Stephen Butt

B

rent Button

Leba Cagica

Isis Cai

Nadia Campbell

MaryAlice Campbell

Graeme Campbell

Ray Carden

Brian Carney

Marion Carter

Mohamed Chami

Mary Champion

Peter Chan

Hoifung Chan

Anthony Chandler

Lindsay Charman

Geoffrey Chisholm

Bob Clampett

Christopher Clarke

Bob Claxton

Fairlie Clifton

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

144

Graham Close

Bryan Coates

Georgina Collado

Lauren Collins

Stephen Comer

Michael Connor

Mike Connors

Guy Cooper

John Cornish

Ken Cox

David Crawford

Gavin Crawford

Peter Crawley

Leon Cremer

Peter Cribb

Darryl Cross

Pat Cullen

Davi

d Cunningham

Ivan Daly

Edward Dam

Ewan Dare

Roger Dawson

Natalia De Francisco Vela

Tamara De Silva

Trevor Dean

Richard deGrijs

Diego del Hoyo

Colin Delaney

Michael (Xin) Deng

Jim Dennis

Eric Deshon

David Diment

Dixie Dixon

Herman Djohan

Roger Doenau

Vincen

t Dorahy

Richard Doss

Russell Down

Richard Downer

Peter Allan Driscoll

Muzhgan Durrani

Peter Dzubiel

John Eades

Anthony Eastley

John Ebner

Lindsey Edgar

Emily Edwards

Doug Edwards

Alex Edwards

Derrick Ee

Karen Eldridge

John Emdin

David English

Ron Eslick

A

ysen Esso

Officer Exhibition

Hugh Farmer

Peter Farr

John Favaloro

Bill Fleming

Pam Forbes

Nastaran Forouzesh

Noelene Forrest

Neill Francis

Peter French

Greg Frewer

Randolf Fricke

Bronwyn Fritz

Rebecca Fung

Sandra Funnell

Les Gade

Terry Gaffney

Paul Gale

Vi

nce Garcia

Paul Gardiner

John Gardiner

Allan Garrick

Roz Gatwood

Rebecca Georgiades

Elizabeth Gewandt

John Gibbins

Tony Gibbs

Col Gibson

Szczepan Glewicz

Pauline Goddard

Steven Goh

Warren Gold

Tony Goode

Kade Gordon

Eddie Gordon

Margaret Grimes

Douglas Gri

nter

Dirk Gruene

Bob Guest

Bill Gunnee

Chris Guy

Janet Halliday

Dean Hansen

Michael Hanson

Janice Harbison

Peter Hardy

Debbie Hardy

Richard Harper

Emily Harper

Roger Harradence

Ron Harris

Jane Harris

Anthony Harris

Chris Harry

Dudley Hartgrove

Karim Marc H

asanic

Martin Hastings

Jim Hawkins

Breck Hayward

Issa He

Theresa He

Liam Heery

Trish Heffernan

Wayne Herdman

Bob Hetherington

Kevin Hewitson

Harry Hicks

Annette Hicks

Logann Higgins

Peter Higgs

Melissa Hill

Gregory Hill

Neil Hird

Jenny Ho

Roger Hoare

Uli H

olmes

Justin Holmwood

Matthew Honeybrook

Peter Hooker

Peter Hopkins

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

145

Peter Housego

Frank Howarth

Charles Hughes

Paul Hundley

Richard Hurley

Martin Husty

Dahyana Irarrazabal

Greg Jackson

Burkhard Jahnicke

Jim Jeans

Ian Jenkins

Jan Jensen

Stan Jodeikin

Heathe

r Johnston

John Jones

Terry Jones

Dennis Joseph

Gabriella Kaldy

Jenny Kang

Poppy Katsikaros

Daniel Kelly

John Kelly

Keith Kennedy

Richard Keyes

Lewis Klipin

Kay Knight

Renata Kontrec

Tanya Kwee

Andre Lagadec

John Laing

Allan Lambert

Terry Lancaster

Brett L

anglands

Jan Larsen

Penny Laver

Jon Lawrence

Terri Lawrence

Owen Laws

Graham Lawson

John Lea

Oliver Lennon

Edmund Leong

Gillian Lewis

Julie Lewis

Lisa Li

Wenting (Tina) Liang

Ivy (Yiwen) Liao

Jet (Guoyong) Liu

Joseph Llaneta

Terry Lloyd

Mike Lockwood

Norma

n Lorens

Margaret Love

Ian Alfred Lucas

Ernest Lui

Xin (Cynthia) Ma

John MacDonald

Matthew Machuca

Rex Malin

Irini Malliaros

Roy Marchant

Stephen Martin

Christian Martin

Tony Martin

David Matley

Hevi Mattini

Margaret McDonald

Mark McDonald

Raymond McHannan

Ken McKenzie

Scott D McKenzie

John McKeown

Colleen McLean

Anthony McNaughton

Peter Mellor

Barry Mews

Tony Michaels

Owen Michaels

-

Hardy

John Minns

Maureen Mitchell

Deborah Mitchell

Joseph Monk

Myles Mooney

Danny Moore

Tessie Mooring

Bob Moroney

John Morony

Tony Mosman

Oliver Moss

David John Moss

Steve Mountain

Jill Mueller

David Mueller

David Muir

Peter Murphy

Alwyn Murray

Sulekha Nahar

Gavin Napier

Doug Neall

Janos Nemeth

Barry Nesbitt

Chiu Ng

Danni Nguyen

Paul Nolan

Georgina Nolan

Iffat Nonee

David Norvil

l

Werner Obernier

Barry O'Regan

David O'Sullivan

John Oxley

Nicholas Paetzholdt

Shally Pais

Emily Palmer

John Papenhuyzen

John Pascall

Jenny Patel

Arthur Pearce

Martin Peebles

Stuart Pendlebury

Sandra Pericles

Gavril Peter

Ian Peters

Marie Pham

Noel Phelan

Neale Philip

Andrew Phippen

Trevor Pickering

John Pickhaver

Pauline Plowright

Roger Pottie

George Poularas

Geoff Pow

Judy Powell

Sonia Prasad

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

146

Ishwari Prasad

Lily Price

Len Price

Donna Priest

Mark Pulley

Lily (Jing) Qian

Keith Radford

Alessandra Ranalli

Ro

n Ray

Pamela Reddy

Leonard Regan

David Reid

Graham Rhind

Alun Richards

Cheryl Riley

Maddy Riley

Rhonda Riley

Judith Roach

Jane Roberts

Jay Robertson

Wal Robson

John Rohde

John Ronczka

Mervyn Rosen

Barney Ross

Jan Russell

Brett Ryall

Terry Ryan

Jill Saffron

Mark Salmon

Joy Salvetti

Dana Sattler

John Schattiger

Stephen Schmidt

Caroline Scott

Harry Seccombe

Ken Sherwell

John Shirvington

David Simpson

Gillian Simpson

Merideth Sindel

Brian Skingsley

Roslyn Slade

Kevin Smith

Roger J Smith

Allana Smith

Ross Smith

Roger Smith

Julius Spencer

Ross Spirou

Heather Stevens

Ian Stevens

Colleen Suter

Ruby Sutherland

Eric Tan

Michael Tanner

Kristen Joy Taylor

Janice Taylor

David Taylor

Ken Thomas

Joanne Lisa Thomas

Max Thomas

Eric Tilt

Greg Timms

Paula Tinney

Esther Toland

Hugh Tranter

Casandra Traucki

Madilina Tresca

Guy Tuplin

Richard Twigg

Brooke Twyford

John Tylor

Ann Usher

David van Kool

Imeldo Ventura

Anthony Viviani

Gerry Wagemans

Christopher Wallbank

Susanna Waller

Raymond Walsh

Michael Ward

James Warrand

Liz Watts

K

imberly Webber

Ted Wei

Reuben Wesek

Brian West

Bill West

Brian Wheatley

Jeannette Wheildon

Tim Wilson

Bruce Wilson

Graeme Wilson

Bill Wilson

Robert Winkler

John Withers

Karl

-

Heinz Wittge

Tony Wober

Ian Wood

Judith Woodroffe

John Worth

Anita Wright

Grahame

Yager

Kit Yee

Peiyan Zhang

Ivy Zhang

Nina Zhao

Eunice Zhao

National volunteers

Colin Aburrow

Robert Adamson

Casper Adson

Fay Agee

Jung Hyoun Ahn

Bill Alford

Terry Allen

Lisa Allen

Gloria Allen

Bryan Amarant

Sarah Amesz

Ricardo Anasco

Andrew Anastasios

M

urray Anderson

Colin Andrews

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

147

Kari Arason

Csilla Ariese

Melissa Armstrong

Phillip Armstrong

Michael Armytage

Patricia Arnold

Uschi Artym

Peter Ashburn

Jason Atkins

Andrew Attack

David Austin

John Aveyard

Dr Marie

-

Louise Ayres

Joanna Bailey

Sally Bailey

Clai

re Baillie

Leslie Baker

Jonno Ballard

Richard Balsillie

Greg Barber

Howard Barker

David Barnes

Rodney Barnett

Kym Barrett

Roger Bartlett

Warwick Barton

Peter Bate

Helen Bate

Ebony Battersby

Tom Baurley

Nigel Beeke

Pam Beinssen

Margaret Bell

Simon Bell

Lawr

ence Benbow

Peter Bennett

Geoff Bennett

Keira Bennett

Anne

-

Marie Bensley

David Bentley

Ronald Bergman

Danielle Berry

Barend Bester

Fiona Betts

Chris Bingham

Amelia Birnie

Gayle Black

Janet Blacklock

Paul Blackman

Raymond Blackshaw

Jill Blaikie

Sally

-

Ann Bl

akers

Ron Blanchard

Michael Bloomfield

Jennie

-

Maree Bock

Jane Boland

Alan Bold

Noel Bond

Mark Booth

Linda Bootherstone

Karl Borth

Rex Brady

Ken Brice

Garth Briggs

Stephanie Briggs

Peter Brilliant

Tegan Brinkman

Josh Brockbank

Ric Broniman

Robert Broughton

Susan Brown

Sholto Brown

John Buckland

Judith Bull

Greg Bullen

Rob Burgess

Mandie Burgess

Dominique Burgett

-

Leonard

Brian Burn

Mark Burton

Roy Butterfield

John Buxton

-

Rella

Terry Cain

Alex Campbell

John Campbell

Colin Campbell

Ernest Carey

Bernard Carr

Dan

ielle Carroll

David Carter

Tony Caruana

Susan Caslake

Connie Cecys

Barry Chambers

Mary Champion

Yuen Yi Chan

Lucille Chapuis

Peter Charlton

Wei

-

Lin Chen

Rodney Chiapello

Lauren Churchill

Derek Churchill

Raymond Clarke

Suzanne Clayton

-

Pearson

Tony Clegg

Mic

hael Clementson

Eric Coates

Christine Cockayne

Ross Cockle

Lyndon Cole

Barrie Cole

Margaret Coleman

Kevin Colless

Ian Collinson

Michael Collyer

Joshua Connelly

John Connors

Barry Cook

Robert Cooke

John Coombs

Harlan Cooper

Cynthia Cordingley

Andrew Cornell

-

Trapp

Eveline Cornell

-

Trapp

Laura Coulton

Sophie Couzos

Jinene Coyle

Robert Craven

Mary Crawford

Alyson Crawford

Peter Cribb

Brian Crisp

Dennis Croft

Sandy Crone

David Cropley

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

148

Robert Crouch

Laura Cunningham

Barrie Dallas

Aaron Darrell

Craig Davey

Graeme D

avey

Bianca Davis

Diane Davis

Roger Dawson

Annaliese Deitch

Sue Delaney

Janet Dennant

Patricia Dennis

Emi Dews

Graham Dimmitt

Frank Dingle

Sarah Dix

Mo Dobbie

Michael Dockerty

Ruth Dodd

Colleen Donovan

Michael Dowd

William Dowd

Glenn Dowey

Peter Downes

Bri

an Dowse

James Doyle

Leah Drummond

Brett Duck

John Dugard

Linda Dumbleton

Joshua Dunn

Tony Duvollet

Jane Dykstra

Purdey Eades

Lynda Earney

Mike Earnshaw

John Easton

David Edward

Adrian Edwards

Caitlin Edwards

Kit Edwards

Alex Edwards

James Egan

Barbra Eipp

er

Jane Elek

Owen Ellem

Bill Ellemor

John Elliott

Stewart Elston

Phil Elvery

Kay England

Jenifer English

Terry Evans

Grant Eyre

Colin Fabish

Loretta Fanning

Erica Farag

Kira Fareso

Erin Farley

Kerrie Farnsworth

Bernadette Farrell

Debra Fasano

Douglas Faunt

Julie Fedele

Russell Fielden

Jennifer Filmer

Peter Filmer

Fiona Finke

Don Firth

Matthew Fitzgibbon

Jennifer Fitzpatrick

Liam Flanagan

Yvonne Flanagan

Lloyd Fletcher

Jim Forbes

Robert Fortier

Elizabeth Frank

Ann Fraser

Thomas Fraser

Richard Freeman

Rupert

French

Christine Fudge

Paul Fuller

Jason Gale

Sally Gallacher

Marie Galloway

Helen Gane

George Gardiner

Allan Garrick

Ross Gates

John Gaul

Denis George

Patrick Gibbons

Tony Gibbs

Debbie Gibson

Ray Gibson

Anne Gibson

Lynette Giddings

Sarah Gilbert

Peter Gil

es

Gordon Gill

John Gill

Mark Gillow

Erin Giulieri

Brian Glover

Stan Glowacki

Lindsay Godson

Peter Gonder

John Gorton

Jonathon Goss

Joe Gough

Sandra Graham

Geoffrey Grant

Tania Grasbon

Rhys Gray

Denise Green

Emma Grieve

Christopher Griffin

Helen Griffin

St

ephen Groch

Jennifer Groch

Douglas Haack

David Habershon

Rebecca Hackett

Tony Hacking

Martin Hales

Cathy Hall

Susan Halliwell

Iain Hamilton

Doug Hamilton

Rhona Hamilton

Ian Hamilton

Joanne Hammond

Elizabeth Hanna

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

149

Peter Harding

Tim Harley

Nancy Harrison

Dr

Cameron Hartnell

Peter Harvey

Caroline Hayden

Ron Hayward

Claire Heath

Norman Heath

Anista Hely

Travis Hendrix

Margaret Henry

Bob Hetherington

Paul Heyward

Dennis Hilder

Tony Hillier

Adrian Hinds

Nicole Ho

Matthew Hochman

Christine Hodgson

Barbara Hogbin

R

uth Holberton

Tony Holbrook

Gilbert Hollamby

Gerald Holmes

John Honeywill

James Hood

Edmund Hore

Jill Horton

Graham Houghton

Julia Houghton

Diana Howard

Dave Hume

Ricky Hung

Ching

-

Ho Hung

Rick Hunt

James Hunter

Feng Huo

Stanley Hutchings

Bill Hutchison

Jac

queline Hyde

David I'Anson

Peter Illidge

Tammy Irvine

Reg Jackson

Richard Jackson

Judith Jackson

Pamela Jacobs

Sari Jacobsen

Brian Jacobsen

David James

Ross James

Emily Jateff

Jalal Jazayeri

Zack Jenkin

Bob Jenkins

Carla Jenkins

Jan Jensen

Ken Johnson

Phil

ip Johnson

Norman Johnson

Roz Johnston

Kingsley Joliffe

Christine Jones

Kylie Jones

Katrina Jones

Daniel Jones

Elizabeth Jones

Alvina Judkins

Robert Kaberry

Marian Kay

Janet Keese

Jack Keir

Pamela Kelly

Des Kelly

Perryn Kember

David Kemp

Bryan Kendrick

Kei

th Kennedy

Bill Kennedy

Peter Kenny

Phyl Kerridge

Peter Kervin

Hazel Kewin

Anthony Kimber

Ron Kirby

Graham Kirby

Colin Kline

John Klopp

Roger Knowles

Ruth Knowles

Terrance Knowles

Horst Koerner

Adrian Koolhof

Christopher Korvin

Adrian Kraft

Kerry Kyle

-

Litt

le

Kerry Lamb

Trudy Lamberton

Dorothy Lane

David Lanyon

Joan Latham

Gerald Latham

Kathleen Le Fevre

Hannah Lee

Connor Leech

Alan Lepp

Alison Lepp

Martin Lewis

Melinda Lewis

Sarah Liddiard

David Liddle

Robyn Liddle

John Livesley

Robin Loblinks

Geoffrey Lock

Jill Lockerbie

Carmen Lockerbie

Kathryn Lockier

Norma Lodge

Niklas Lohse

Kathleen Loncar

Graham Long

Russell Luckock

Juliet Ludbrook

Maureen Lum

Lai

-

Shy Lye

Pey

-

Shy Lye

David Mackay

Damian Macrae

Rex Malin

David Malton

Hailey Mannell

Tony Manning

Barry Ma

rks

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

150

Ric Marley

Darka Marotte

Robyn Marsden

Katrina Matuszkiewicz

Debbie McBride

Peter McCabe

Terence McCall

Bill McCarthy

David McCuaig

David McEwan

Julie McGilvray

Kay McGowan

Bernie McIntosh

Kevin McIntosh

Meg McKavanagh

Isabelle McKenna

John McKernan

Jo

no McLaren

Michael McLean

Marilyn McLean

Ian McMaster

Lynne McNaughton

Keith Mellis

Steve Merson

Tony Metcalf

Evelyn Michell

Terry Michell

Michael Michie

Amanda Midlam

Naomi Miles

John Mill

Donald Millar

Bruce Millinger

Austin Mills

Jason Milton

Andrew Mir

tschin

Don Mitchell

Peter Moffat

Arene Moir

Thomas Moorhead

John Morony

Florian Morris

Rick Morris

David Moss

Robyn Mounster

Margaret Muir

Ian Munday

Lila Murgatroyd

John Murphy

Kelly Needham

Jeff Nemec

Karen Nemec

Selah Newall

Robert Newbury

Dr Jonathan N

ewbury

Yoke

-

Leng Ng

Adrian Nicoll

Karen Nicoll

Malcolm Nicolson

Christine Nimmo

Louisa Norman

Paul Nutt

Shenae O'Brien

John O'Brien

Shane O'Brien

Barry O'Driscoll

Veronica O'Keefe

Oladipupo Olubowale

Bryce Onions

Wayne Onions

Denis O'Reilly

Danielle Ostare

k

-

Gammon

Dennis O'Sullivan

Dianne Page

Michael Paget

Debra Paini

Doug Palmer

Nina Park

Doug Parker

Craig Parker

Ray Parks

Suzanne

-

Jo Patterson

Tony Peace

Alan Pead

Ian Pearce

Richard Pearce

Bruce Pearson

Danielle Pender

Frank Penistan

Meg Pennington

Scott

Perry

Barry Peters

Louise Phelps

Neale Philip

Peter Phillips

Mirabai Phillips

Bruce Phillips

Julie Pinel

John Pinel

Ernest Pitts

Hugh Pitty

Louise Plug

Mark Polzer

Peter Pomi

Jessie Poon

Andrew Porteous

Bill Porter

Bob Potter

Bill Potts

Larraine Potts

Laur

en Powell

Ian Powell

Rick Price

Lily Price

Roy Priest

Lea Priestley

Sandra Pugh

Reg Pugh

Edward Purcell

Sally Rackham

Kevin Radcliffe

Greg Raffin

Ron Ray

Heather Redman

Carolyn Reeve

Trevor Reeve

Catherine Reeves

Martin Regis

Helen Reis

Dr John Renney

Adri

an Rhodes

Christopher Rice

Brian Richardson

Alana Richardson

Mathew Richmond

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

151

David Rickard

Maria Riedl

Jillian Riethmuller

Peter Rigby

Patrick Riley

Kingsley Riley

Wayne Rizzi

Keith Roberts

Emma Roberts

Richard Rogers

Vivian Rogers

David Rollins

Yara Rood

Colin Rose

Sandra Rose

Kathleen Rousseaux

David Rout

Stephen Rowse

Stefan Rucinski

Daphne Rudd

Jan Russell

Tony Ruth

Trish Ryan

Warren Sahr

Mark Salmon

Richard Salom

Catherine Sandland

Charles Sapsford

Irene Schaffer

Jodie Schipper

Shirley Schlesinger

Norm

an Scholes

Dennis Schram

Peter Scrine

Wendy Sekuloff

Sophie Sexton

Susan Seymor

Christopher Sharp

Dr Peter Sharp

Kevin Shaw

Glen Shaw

David Shea

Jill Shearman

Ken Sheehan

Robin Shepperson

Michael Sheridan

Narelle Sheridan

Michael Shreeve

Howard Simcoe

Merv

Simmons

Peter Simon

Campbell Sinclair

Carmel Sinnott

Dianne Skaines

Donald Skerman

Peter Slattery

Rachel Slatyer

Tracy Sleeman

Anthony Sly

Peter Small

Robert Smallman

Christopher Smith

Laura Smith

Serenity Smith

Alan Smith

Graham Smith

Roger Smith

Robert

Smith

Valda Smith OAM

Susan Sneddon

Jillian Snell

Bill Snooks

Xiaohan Song

Colin South

John Spooner

Edwin Spriggins

George Springhall

Adrian Stagg

Chris Stain

Robert Stanley

Kate Starr

Sheryl Stead

Kay Stehn

Mark Stephenson

Jeanne

-

Marie Stevens

Gordon Stok

es

Jon Strachan

Muriel Strahm

Brian Stronach

Russell Stuckey

Brayden Stum

Jo Sullivan

Mike Sumerling

Shane Sutton

Anthea Swann

Barbara Sweet

Stephanie Syme

Robert Symington

Wendy Takos

Ian Tarry

Christine Taylor

Fran Taylor

David Taylor

Frank Taylor

Diane

Taylor

Zheng

-

Yi Teoh

John Thiele

Chris Thomas

Greg Thomas

Peter Thomas

John Thomas

Peter Thompson

Jeff Thompson

Katherine Thomson

Wendy Thornton

Gail Thornton

Christopher Thorpe

Lyndon Thurlow

Cindy Tilbrook

Karen Tiller

Howard Timbury

Cheryl Timbury

Micha

el Todd

Joel Torison

Corine Toune

Gary Towart

Marian Trafalski

Charles Trafford

Peter Tredgett

Madalina Tresca

Shane Trimby

Allan Trotter

Zoi Tsa Tsembelis

Lyn Tucker

Nazim Tuncay

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

152

John Turnwald

David Twitchen

Eddie Utberg

George Vajda

John van de Lustgraaf

Stephanie van den Hoek

Bob Vellacott

Plony Verkerk

Con Vervaart

John Villanti

Nicola Vragalis

Richard Waddy

Dennis Wagstaff

Elizabeth Walker

Ron Wall

Phil Wallbank

Robert Walsh

Joy Walterfang

Donna

-

Maree Ware

Rik Watson

Dennis Watt

Ian Watts

John Watts

Ge

orgia Watts

Shirley Way

Vincent Weafer

Lawrie Webb

Claire Webber

Geoffrey Weeks

David Westwood

Susan Westwood

Harry Wetherall

Jodie Whan

Jodie Whan

David Wharington

Victoria Whitcomb

Judith White

Bob White

Bari Whitehouse

Monissa Whiteley

Michael Whiting

S

tuart Whiting

Tallulah Whiting

Jeffrey Whittington

Eric Whyatt

William Wiadrowski

Graeme Wiencke

Vivienne Wigg

Tabetha Wilkes

Alastair Will

John Williams

Rex Williams

Philippa Williams

Rhianna Williams

Geoff Williams

Patrice Williams

Wendy Williams

Alan Wi

lliams

Dennis Williams

Fred Williams

Elizabeth Williams

Raymond Willing

Odette Willows

Ian Wilson

Robert Wilson

David Wilson

Kelvin Wilson

Dorothy Winchester

John Winchester

David Winter

David Winterforde

-

Young

Emilia Wisniewski

Jaimy Wisse

Bruce Wood

Reg

Wood

Graham Woodall

Jack Woods

Alison Worrell

Mike Wraith

Lew Wray

Marilyn Anne Wright

Gai Wright

Betty Wright

Madeline Wright

Mark Wyborn

Greg Youdale

Maggie Youett

Anne Young

Antonia Zavone

Sonia Zhu

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

153

11

Key management personnel and remuneration

Key

M

anagement Personnel

(KMP)

are those persons having authority and responsibility for

planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly. The museum has

determined the key management personnel to be the museum’s Councill

ors, the Director and CEO,

and all members of the museum’s Executive.

The following table identifies the key management personnel during the reporting period

, excluding

two Councillors who did not receive additional remuneration (Hon Justice S C Derrington

and RADM

Mark Hammond AM).

Position title

Short

-

term benefits

Post

employ

-

ment

benefits

Other long

-

term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Base salary

Bonuses

Other benefits

& allowances

Superannuation

contributions

Long service

leave

O

ther long

-

term

benefits

MULLEN,

John Patrick

Chairman

44,350

-

-

6,830

-

-

-

51,180

CAMPBELL,

Ian Gordon

Councillor

18,154

-

-

2,796

-

-

-

20,950

COUTTS,

Stephen

William

Councillor

22,180

-

-

3,416

-

-

-

25,596

LONGLEY,

John Francis

Cou

ncillor

22,180

-

-

3,416

-

-

-

25,596

MUNDINE,

Nyunggai

Warren

Councillor

3,160

-

-

487

-

-

-

3,647

PAGE,

Alison Joy

Councillor

22,180

-

-

3,416

-

-

-

25,596

POTTER,

Judith

Councillor

2,309

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,309

TANSEY,

Arlene May

Councillo

r

22,180

-

-

3,416

-

-

-

25,596

WATT, Ian

James

Councillor

22,180

-

-

3,416

-

-

-

25,596

WHITE,

Margaret

Jean

Councillor

3,124

-

-

481

-

-

-

3,606

SUMPTION,

Kevin Stuart

Director/CEO

277,057

20,711

-

32,481

10,685

-

-

340,935

BUSH,

Ta

nya

Maree

Deputy

Director,

Commercial

198,707

-

26,287

47,029

6,125

-

-

278,148

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

154

Operations

Services/CFO

HABIB,

Zena

Chief People

Officer

198,280

-

26,285

35,083

4,901

-

-

264,550

HARRIS,

William

Program

Director

Encounters

2020

64,941

13,500

10,109

13,687

1,678

-

-

103,915

HARVEY,

Michael

Chief

Experience

Officer

170,723

-

25,778

67,632

6,301

-

-

270,434

MCCARTHY,

Paul Joseph

Senior

Executive,

Strategy &

External

Relations

177,335

-

26,366

50,492

5,925

-

-

260,118

WESLEY,

Ric

hard

Chief

Experience

Officer

10,933

-

1,606

1,787

332

-

-

14,657

Total

1,279,973

34,211

116,431

275,865

35,947

-

-

1,742,427

Note on

k

ey management personnel and remuneration

The Audit Committee comprised exclusively of existing Councillo

rs (part

-

time officer holders) and $0

remuneration was paid in respect of Audit Committee during 2020

-

21.

The museum executive comprised six KMP at the start of 2020

-

21 and this was reduced to five KMP

following the closure of the

Encounters 2020

program i

n November 2020. William Harris was

Program Director

Encounters 2020

during part of the reporting period from 1 July 2020 to 11

November 2020 and then transferred to a non

-

KMP role as Head of Programs and Site Activation.

Michael Harvey was Chief Experienc

e Officer

for

part of the reporting period from 1 July 2020 to 25

June 2021.

Richard Wesley was Chief Experience Officer

for

part of the reporting period from 31 May 2021 to 30

June 2021. There was a handover period between Mr Harvey and Mr Wesley.

The KMP

total remuneration reported above is $144,664 less than disclosed in the Financial

Statements under Note 10 Key Management Personnel Remuneration

,

which overstate KMP

remuneration benefits for William Harris. The above disclosure table reflects only remun

eration Mr

Harris received while a KMP between 1 July 2020 and 11 November 2020

,

consistent with guidance

contained within Resource Management Guide No. 138

-

Commonwealth

E

ntities Executive

Remuneration Reporting Guide for Annual Reports.

No senior execut

ives are employed by the Museum

,

other than the Director/CEO and Deputy

Director whose remuneration is disclosed above under key management personnel. There were

no other employees who met the criteria for ‘other highly paid staff’ remuneration disclosure

during 2020

-

21.

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

155

12

Glossary of acronyms

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

AIATSIS Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

AMMC Australian Maritime Museums Council

ANMM Australian National Maritime Museum

APS

Australi

an Public Service

APSC Australian Public Service Commission

AusCPR Australian Continuous Plankton Recorder

CDAB Collection Development Acquisition Budget

CMP

Conservation Management Plan

CPR Continuous Plankton Recorder

CRM Customer Relationship Management

ESD Ecologically Sustainable Development

FBT Fringe Benefits Tax

FCP Fraud control plan

FOI Act

Freedom of Information Act 1982

FRA Fraud risk assessment

GST Goods and Services Tax

HSR Health and Safety Representative

IFA Individual Flexibility Agreement

JCC

Joint Consultative Council

KMP

Key Management Personnel

MAGNA

Museums and Galleries National Award

MMAPSS Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme

NAIDOC National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee

NCI

National Collecting Ins

titutions

NRW National Reconciliation Week

PGPA Act

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

RAN Royal Australian Navy

RAP Reconciliation Action Plan

ROP

Right of Use

RWG Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group

SAMP Strategic Asset Mana

gement Plan

TMS The Museum System

USV Unmanned Surface Vessel

VMP Vessel Management Plan

WHS Work Health and Safety

WRANS Women’s Royal Australian Naval Service

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

156

13

List of Requirements

PGPA Rule

Reference

Part of

Report

Description

Requirement

17BE

Con

tents

of

annual

report

17BE(a)

Legislation

Details of the legislation establishing the body

Mandatory

17BE(b)(i)

Roles and functions of

the museum

A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as

set out in legislation

Mandatory

17BE(b)(ii)

Purp

ose of the

museum

Results for 2020

-

21

The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s

corporate plan for the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(c)

Corporate governance

The names of the persons holding the position of

responsible Minister or responsib

le Ministers during the

reporting period, and the titles of those responsible

Ministers

Mandatory

17BE(d)

Legal and compliance

Directions given to the entity by the Minister under an

Act or instrument during the reporting period

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(e)

Legal and compliance

Any government policy order that applied in relation to

the entity during the reporting period under section 22

of the Act

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(f)

Legal and compliance

Particulars of non

-

compliance with:

(a)

a direction g

iven to the entity by the Minister

under an Act or instrument during the reporting

period; or

(b)

a government policy order that applied in relation

to the entity during the reporting period under

section 22 of the Act

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(g)

Deliver

y of the

museum’s Statement

of Intent for 2020

-

21

Annual performance statements in accordance with

paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the

rule

Mandatory

17BE(h),

17BE(i)

Legal and compliance

A statement of significant issues reported to the

Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that

relates to non

-

compliance with finance law and action

taken to remedy non

-

compliance

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(j)

ANMM Council

Information on the accountable authority, or each

member of the accountabl

e authority, of the entity

during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(k)

Organisation structure

Outline of the organisational structure of the entity

(including any subsidiaries of the entity)

Mandatory

17BE(ka)

Staffing overview

Statistics on the entity

’s employees on an ongoing and

non

-

ongoing basis, including the following:

(a)

statistics on full

-

time employees;

(b)

statistics on part

-

time employees;

(c)

statistics on gender;

(d)

statistics on staff location

Mandatory

17BE(l)

Location of major

activities and faciliti

es

Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of

major activities or facilities of the entity

Mandatory

17BE(m)

Corporate governance

Legal and compliance

Information relating to the main corporate governance

practices used by the entity during

the reporting period

Mandatory

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Appendixes

157

17BE(n),

17BE(o)

Legal and compliance

For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or

related company where the value of the transaction, or

if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of

those transactions,

is more than $10,000 (inclusive of

GST):

(a)

the decision

-

making process undertaken by the

accountable authority to approve the entity paying

for a good or service from, or providing a grant to,

the related Commonwealth entity or related

company; and

(b)

the value

of the transaction, or if there is more

than one transaction, the number of transactions

and the aggregate of value of the transactions

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(p)

Chairman’s letter of

transmittal

Director’s overview

Results for 2020

-

21

Any signific

ant activities and changes that affected the

operation or structure of the entity during the reporting

period

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(q)

Legal and compliance

Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of

administrative tribunals that may have a

significant

effect on the operations of the entity

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(r)

Legal and compliance

Particulars of any reports on the entity given by:

(a)

the Auditor

-

General (other than a report under

section 43 of the Act); or

(b)

a Parliamentary Committee

; or

(c)

the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d)

the Office of the Australian Information

Commissioner

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(s)

N/A

An explanation of information not obtained from a

subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the

information on the a

nnual report

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(t)

Legal and compliance

Details of any indemnity that applied during the

reporting period to the accountable authority, any

member of the accountable authority or officer of the

entity against a liability (includ

ing premiums paid, or

agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority,

member or officer’s liability for legal costs)

If applicable,

mandatory

17BE(ta)

Appendix 11

Information about executive remuneration

Mandatory

17BE(taa)

https://www.sea.mus

eum/about/about

-

the

-

museum/our

-

people/museum

-

council

2020

-

21 Council and

committee meetings

Appendix 11

The following information about the audit committee

for the entity

:

(a)

a direct electronic address of the charter

determining the functions of the audit committee;

(b)

the name of each member of the audit committee;

(c)

the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience

of each member of the audit committee;

(d)

information about each

member’s attendance at

meetings of the audit committee;

(e)

the remuneration of each member of the audit

committee

Mandatory

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Index

158

Index

A Mile in My Shoes

13, 32, 42, 45, 46, 72,

85,

142

ABC Education

19, 24, 27

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory

Com

mittee

33, 34

, 52, 62, 63, 131

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

44, 46

supporting reconciliation

13

0

-

4

Accessibility Action Plan 68, 69

Acronyms

15

5

Acquisitions and donations

20, 35, 36, 38, 85,

12

2

-

8

Action Stations

32

Ambassadors (museum)

85, 14

0

, 14

1

ANMM Council

5

-

6, 18, 52, 54, 85, 9

0

, 1

19

,

14

0

committees 52, 62, 15

4

meetings

62

-

3

members

55

-

60

APSC State of the Service Survey

40

-

41

Asset management

71, 11

1

Assyrian Australian National Federation

13

Audit Committee

62, 15

4

AusTender

7

2

Australian Antarctic Division

12

7

Australian Arab Chamber of Commerce

13

The Australian Dream

34

Australian National Maritime Museum

acquisitions and donations

20, 35, 36, 38,

85, 12

2

-

8

annual performance statement

18

-

43

closure due to COVID

-

19

2

Council see ANMM Council

digitisation strategy

29

entry fees

2

-

3

functions

18, 52

-

4, 55

grants

and awards

received

9

-

10

highlights

9

location

18

mission

8, 18

organisational realignment

14, 20, 41, 9

4

,

9

6, 99

organisation structure

71

outcom

e and program structure

55

priorities

6, 8, 19, 20

-

41

publications

129

-

30

purpose

18, 19

results 2019

-

20

5, 11, 19

-

20

roles

and functions 52

-

4

subsidiary entities

65

vision

8

year in review

9

-

10

Australian National Maritime Museum Act

1990

(the ANMM

Act)

7, 18, 52

-

5, 64, 12

8

history of legislation

55

section 6

53

section 7

54

-

5

Australian National Maritime Museum

Foundation

85

-

9, 10

0

, 1

19

governance and administration

86

Australian National Maritime Museum

Regulations 2018

54, 55

Australian South

Sea Islander Flag

12

2

Banham, Norman

85, 86, 14

1

Banner exhibitions

47

-

9

Battle of the Coral Sea

52

Beach Couture: a Haute Mess

44, 45

Bedford, Kenny

60, 63

Benefactors

13

8

Ben Lexcen Terrace

9, 12

-

13, 20, 44

Blackley, David

86, 87, 1

39

, 14

1

Bluebottle

Ne

mo

12

7

Briggs, Peter

14

1

Bush, Tanya

52, 15

3

Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair

12

3

Cameron, James

19, 48, 49

Campbell, Hon Ian

56, 63, 15

3

Capability reviews

65

Carse, Lieutenant Hubert Edward ‘Ted’

c

ollection

9, 13

-

14, 20, 38, 85, 12

6

family

12, 14, 20, 38, 8

5, 1

39

Chairman’s letter of transmittal

5

Chan, Simon

86, 87

-

88, 1

39

Chinese Australian Historical Society

13

City of Sydney’s CBD Activation Grant

2020

-

21

9

Cook

s Voyages

-

the View from the Shore

9, 10, 16

-

17, 23, 24, 27, 28, 1

29

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Index

159

Collection digitisati

on

21, 29

Collins, Hon Peter, AM QC

14

1

Comcover

65

Commonwealth Disability Strategy

68

Commonwealth entities

65, 10

6

, 15

4

large transactions with

65

Commonwealth Procurement Rules

72

Container: the

B

ox that

C

hanged the

W

orld

19, 48, 49

Continuous Plankt

on Recorder

12

7

Contracts and consultancies

72

Cook, James

16, 28, 35, 44, 45, 46, 47, 80, 12

3

Cook and the Pacific

44, 45

Corporate governance

53

Corporate members

14

0

Coutts, Stephen

57, 63, 154

COVID

-

19 pandemic

2, 5

-

6, 9, 11

-

12, 19, 20,

24

-

5, 27, 28, 3

1, 32, 37, 40, 41, 44, 45, 48,

62, 68, 72, 9

4

, 9

6,

99

0, 10

0

-

1

, 10

5

, 10

6

,

10

8

, 13

7

, 14

2

closure due to

2

impact on revenue

20, 40, 9

4

,

99

, 10

5

CSIRO

128

Cultural awareness training course

32, 34

Dana

medal

12

6

Dark Victory: Operation Jaywick

47

-

8, 51

Davi

d and Jennie Sutherland Foundation

139

Defence Science and Technology Group

12

7

Defying Empire: 3

rd

National Indigenous Art

Triennial

19, 32, 35, 42, 44, 45, 72

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

13

8

Department of Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional D

evelopment and

Communications

14, 24, 28, 52, 55, 77, 10

6

Derrington, Hon Justice Sarah C

57, 63, 15

3

Destination NSW

9

Dexter, Peter, AM FAICD

14, 86, 88, 1

39, 140

Director

highlight of

16

-

17

report

11

-

15

statement

7

Disability reporting

69

Diversity C

ouncil Australia

13

Donors

13

8

-

4

0

Duyfken

3, 5

-

6, 11, 12, 39, 56, 72, 85, 9

4

, 9

6

,

10

6

, 14

2

, 14

3

Duyfken 1606 Foundation

9, 12, 58

Ecologically sustainable development

74

-

5

Education resource materials

12

8

SY

Ena

85

Erlemann, Alfred Edward Engelbert

12

4

Emb

assy of Sweden

38, 47

SMS

Emden

12

5

Empathy Museum (London)

13, 45, 46

Encounters 2020

program

11, 14, 19, 21, 23,

24, 28, 35, 39, 42, 44, 70, 15

4

HMB

Endeavour

2, 3, 14, 16, 24, 27, 28, 32,

35, 37, 44, 47, 56, 58, 80, 11

2

, 14

2

E

ntry fees

2

-

3

Environmental

performance indicator report

76

-

7

Environmental performance report

75

-

6

Enterprise Agreement 66, 68

Eora Gallery

44, 46

Erskine, Dr Nigel

14

1

Escape from Pompeii: the Untold Roman

Rescue

49

Ethical standards

69, 90

Exhibitions

major

32

shopping centre

exhibits

51

temporary

44

-

8

Federation of Australian Indian Associations

13

Field Sports of the Native Inhabitants of NSW

12

3

Finance law,

non

-

compliance with

65

Financial statements 2020

-

21

90

-

12

1

Fire on Water’s Edge

19, 32, 45, 46

Fletcher, Hon Paul MP

5, 7, 38, 54, 85

Fraternal Society of Tripoli and Mena

13

Fraud control plan 5, 65

Freedom of information

64

Gidget

12

5

Glossary of acronyms

15

5

Government Policy Orders

64

Grant

programs

77

-

84

SS

Great Britain

12

4

Greek Orthodox Community of NSW

13

Grega,

Vasyl and Mikulas

12

4

-

5

Guardians of Sunda Strait

51

Guyku

ḏ

a’s Aquarium

12

2

Habib, Zena

52, 15

4

Haenyeo: the Sea Women of Jeju Island

42, 45, 46, 49

Hammond, RADM Mark, AM

6, 57

-

8, 63, 15

3

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Index

160

Harbour Garden

9, 13

Harrison chronometers

85, 86

Harvey, Michael

52, 15

4

HERE: Kupe to Cook

44, 46

Honorary Fellowship

s

14

0

Honorary Life Members

14

0

, 14

1

-

2

Honorary Research Associates

14

1

Hundley, Paul

14

1

Hurley, Hon David, AC DSC (Retd)

13, 58

Indemnities and insurance premiums for

officers 65

Indigenous acquisitions

20, 33, 34

Indigenous employment

68

Indigenous mar

itime heritage

6

Indigenous Procurement Policy

35

Individu

al Flexibility Agreements 66

Individuals of distinction

14

0

Indonesia

82

Indonesian Association of NSW

13

Industrial democracy

68

Infor

mation Publication Scheme 64

Ingrey, Ray

61, 63

Internal audit

65

Interactives and multimedia 51

James Cameron

-

Challenging the Deep

19,

48, 49

Janes, Daniel

85, 86, 87, 14

0

Joint Consultative Council

68

Judicial decisions and reviews by outside

bodies 64

Kahanamoku, Paoa

12

5

Key management personnel

remuneration

10

0

, 11

6

-

1

7

, 15

3

-

4

Kingdom of the Netherlands

13

Kombumerri, Dillon

60

-

1, 63

MV

Krait

12, 13

-

14, 120, 38, 47, 85, 12

6

Kytherian Association of Australia

13

Legal and compliance

64

-

5

List of requirements

15

6

-

7

Little Ripper Group, The

13

Little Ripper unscrew

ed aerial vehicle 12

Little shipmates

-

Cats and Dogs

A

ll at Sea

49

Longley, John, AM

58, 63, 15

3

Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky

14, 19, 28, 42

Love Welcomes

12

2

McCarthy, Paul

52, 86, 15

4

MacLeod, Ian

14

1

Major sponsors

13

7

Makaha surfing contest

48

Makassa

ns 82

Map It!

19, 32, 45, 46, 72, 73

Maritime Museums of Australia Project

Support Scheme

37, 42, 77

-

84

Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns)

9, 10, 13,

19, 32, 34, 35, 42, 44, 46

Mathlin, David

86, 88, 1

39

Maynard, Professor John

61, 63

Mead, Rear Admiral Jo

nathan

6, 60, 63, 14

0

,

14

2

Mellefont, Jeffrey

14

1

MG Kailis Group

12

Mihkelson family

12

4

Minister

role and functions

54

-

5

Statement of Expectations 2020

-

21

41

-

2, 64

Ministerial directions

and expectations 64

Motherland

-

Exile/Refuge

-

Migration

42,

46

Mullen, John, AM

14, 55

-

6, 63, 86, 14, 15

3

Multicultural NSW

87, 13

8

Mundine, Nyunggai Warren, AO

6, 59, 63, 153

Mundle, Rob, OAM

14

2

Nathwani, Ashak

and

Samim

86

National Collecting Institutions Cultural Grant

5, 55, 65

NAIDOC Week

31, 34, 35, 42

Nati

onal

Cultural

Heritage Account

38, 85,

12

2

National Library of Australia

44, 45

National Maritime Collection

acquisitions and donations to

12, 36, 38,

1

19

, 12

2

-

8

digitisation

29

growth in

9, 12

item management

19, 20, 21, 53, 55

major acquisitio

ns

1

19

objects in

36, 38

National Monument to Migration

9, 13, 20,

42, 48, 73, 85, 14

3

National Museum of Singapore

47, 51

Nawi Indigenous Watercraft

50

New Zealand

44, 46, 48

NSW Jewish Board of Deputies

13

Nossiter family

12

4

Ocean Spirit Rising

9, 13,

19, 32

O’Donnell, Tom

86, 88

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Index

161

Online accessibility

21, 29

Online participation

22

-

4, 37

HMAS

Onslow

32, 86, 14

2

Operation Jaywick

9, 13, 38, 47

-

8, 57, 85, 12

6

Organisation of African Communities

13

Organisation structure

71

Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connect

ed World

47

Out of Hawaii

-

Surfing Goes Global

48

Overseas travel,

Director and

staff

13

7

Page, Alison

59, 63, 15

3

Paradise Lost

-

Daniel Solander’s legacy

38, 44, 47

Partners

13

7

Partnerships

36, 37

-

8

Passengers Gallery

44

People and Culture

66

-

70

achievement, assessment of

68

effectiveness in managing

67

Performance bonus payment

67

HMAS

Penguin

12

6

HMAS

Perth

12

6

Port Authority of NSW 13, 47, 13

7

, 14

0

Potter, Judy

6, 59, 63, 15

3

Priorities

compelling experiences

29

-

33

people first

40

-

1

sharing

the

national maritime story

20

-

9

strong financial future

39

-

40

supporting reconciliation

33

-

5

trusted voice and custodian

35

-

8

Procurement policy

72

Productivity gains

72

PS Herald VR Experience

-

PS Herald Virtueller

Tauchgang

10

Public Governance, Pe

rformance and

Accountability Act 2013

5, 7, 18, 52, 64, 65,

90, 91, 93, 10

0

Public programs

30

-

1

Publications

12

8

-

9

Quebec Club

13

Reconciliation Action Plan

20, 34, 1

29

-

37

Reef Design Lab

13

Re

markable: Australians and Their Boats

13,

48, 49, 50

Remun

eration Committee

52, 62, 63

Rooftop projections

32, 33, 51

Royal Australian Navy

45, 52

Royal Wolf

13

8

Sadler, Christine

12, 34, 85, 1

39

, 14

1

Salaries

70

non

-

salary benefits

66, 70

rates and benefits

67

HM Schooner

Sandfly

12

5

SBS

13, 28, 42, 73, 85, 1

3

8

Sea Monsters

-

Prehistoric

Ocean P

redators

19, 32, 44, 47, 48, 49

Self

-

generated revenue

39

-

40

Shannon

12

4

Shaw, Lindsey

14

1

Ship and Shore

19, 35, 42, 44, 47

Singapore

9, 19, 26, 47, 51

Slovakian Embassy

13

Smit Lamnalco

12, 13

8

The South Coast is Call

ing

12

8

Speakers Group

14

3

Sponsors, partners and supporters

13

7

-

8

Staff

division, by

70

gender, by

69

overseas travel

13

7

overview 66

satisfaction

40

-

1

training and development initiatives

68

turnover rate

67

Statement of Intent

, 2020

-

21

delive

ry against

41

-

2

Strategic Asset Management Plan 71, 11

1

Stationary Electromagnetic Current Meter and

Tide Gauge

12

7

Stockholm Olympic Games

12

5

Strong, Jeanne

-

Claude

86, 89, 1

39

Student

participation

9, 22, 23

-

4, 27, 28, 37

Submerged: Stories of Australia

’s

S

hipwrecks

19, 48, 49

-

50

Sumption, Kevin, PSM

52, 56, 63, 86, 15

3

Sunday Stir

13, 19, 20, 42, 85

Supply Nation

35

Sutherland, David and Jennie

12, 85, 139

, 14

1

Sydney Festival 2021

9, 13, 32, 33, 42, 45, 51,

13

8

Sydney Harbour

13, 32, 42, 47, 14

3

Sydney

Harbour Gallery

9, 12

-

13, 19, 32, 42,

47

Sydney Institute of Marine Science

13

Sydney Solstice

9, 13

Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race

56, 12

5

Annual R

eport

2020

-

21

Index

162

Tansey, Arlene

59

-

60, 63, 86, 1

39

, 15

3

Taylor, Valerie, AM

12, 20, 38, 85, 12

5

, 14

0

Teacher satisfaction

19, 36, 37

Th

reads of Migration

33

Tipoti, Alick

13, 34, 35, 44, 46, 85

Torres Strait Islander artists

45

-

6

Touring exhibitions

11, 19, 25, 26

-

7, 42, 48

-

9

Trigg, John William

12

3

Tyrell’s Wines

12

Under Southern Skies

85

Union of French Abroad

13

United Nations Decade

of Ocean Science for

Sustainable Development 44

Unlocking the

c

ollection

29

United States of America

48, 49, 51, 11

7

USA Bicentennial Gift Fund

45, 47, 12

0

HMAS

Vampire

2, 3, 32, 14

2

Varley, LCDR Michael

127

Virtual

Endeavour

tour

24, 27

Virtual reality

2

7, 47, 51

Visions of Australia

program 49, 13

8

Visitation

COVID

-

19

24

offsite

11, 21, 23

-

6

online

19, 21, 23

-

7

onsite

9, 11, 19, 21, 23

-

5, 30

-

1

total

22

-

5, 30

-

1

Visitors

international

20, 30, 31, 40

satisfaction

9, 11, 19, 30, 33

VIVID

13

Volunt

eers

6, 11, 15, 20, 33, 34, 40, 9

4

, 12

8

,

14

2

-

5

2

The Voyage

16, 23, 24, 27, 37, 1

29

The Voyage of the First Fleeters

12

3

Voyage to the Deep

48, 49

HMAS

Voyager

12

6

Wappett, Nicholas

61, 63

War and Peace in the Pacific 75

45, 48, 51

War and Peace: the Atomic

Bombing of

Hiroshima and Nagasaki

45, 47

Watt, Dr Ian J, AC

60, 63, 15

3

Waves of Migration

33, 51

Welcome Wall see National Monument to

Migration

White, Hon Margaret, AO

6, 63, 1

39

, 14

2

, 15

3

White Shells, Black Heart

12

2

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

(55 and 56)

19, 32, 45, 47, 73

Withers, John, OAM

12

6

Work health and safety performance

71

Wreck Seeker

16, 19, 24, 12

8

, 1

29

You Wreck Me

12

3

Your Story is Our Story

48

Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2020-21

Australian National Maritime Museum - Annual Report 2020-21