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Innovation Australia Reports 2011-12


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Innovation australia annual report 2011 - 12

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© Commonwealth of Australia 2013

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the Commonwealth. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education, GPO Box 9839, Canberra ACT 2601.

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ISSN 1030-3316 ISBN 978-1-922218-49-0

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Letter of Transmittal

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

The Hon Greg Combet AM MP

Minister for Industry and Innovation

Parliament House

CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I have pleasure in presenting the Innovation Australia Annual Report on

its activities for the year ending 30 June 2012, prepared in accordance with

section 46(1) of the Industry Research and Development Act 1986.

Yours sincerely

David Miles AM

Chairman

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v

Contents

Letter of Transmittal iii

Innovation Australia’s Mission 1

Innovation Australia’s Vision 1

Chairman’s Report 2

Section 1 · Highlights 11

Section 2 · Our programs 17

Overview 18

Commercialisation Australia 19

R&D Tax Concession 24

R&D Tax Incentive 25

Innovation Investment Fund 40

Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships 45

Venture Capital Limited Partnerships 49

Clean Technology Investment Program 54

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program 59

Monitoring our Programs 64

Climate Ready Program 65

Green Car Innovation Fund 67

Re-tooling for Climate Change Program 68

Renewable Energy Development Initiative 69

Commercialising Emerging Technologies Program 70

Commercial Ready Program 72

Industry Cooperative Innovation Program 74

R&D Start Program 75

Innovation Investment Follow-on-Fund Program 77

Pooled Development Funds Program 79

Pre-Seed Fund Program 81

Renewable Energy Equity Fund 83

Section 3 · Corporate governance 85

Innovation Australia Board 86

Section 4 · Appendicies 115

a Corporate Governance 116

b Australian Government Budget, Expenditure and Forward Obligations 158

c Program by program breakdown 159

Corrigenda 173

d Comercialisation Australia Program Breakdown 174

e R&D Tax Concession Program Breakdown 197

vi

f Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) Program Breakdown 228

g Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (ESVCLP) Program Breakdown 231

h Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP) Program Breakdown 236

i Clean Techology Food and Foundries Investment Program 241

j Clean Techology Investment Program 245

k Climate Ready Program Breakdown 247

l Green Car Innovation Fund (GCIF) Program Breakdown 250

m Re-Tooling For Climate Change Program Breakdown 253

n Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET) Program Breakdown 256

o Commercial Ready Program Breakdown 258

p R&D Start Program Breakdown 260

Q Innovation Investment Follow-On Fund (IIFF) Program Breakdown 262

r Pooled Development Funds (PDF) Program Breakdown 265

s Pre-Seed Fund (PSF) Program Breakdown 269

t Marketing 271

Contact Details 274

Acronym Index 278

Index 281

1

Innovation Australia’s Mission Empowered by the Industry Research and Development Act 1986, the mission of Innovation

Australia is:

“To increase the economic return from successful technology-based enterprises

in Australia by guiding the Australian Government’s investment in the

commercialisation of the nation’s research and development and innovation”.

Innovation Australia’s Vision By accomplishing this mission, Australia will be:

“A nation that is achieving global competitiveness through

a strong culture of industry innovation”.

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA AT 30 JUNE 2012

From left to right: Mr Gerard Noonan, Mr Innes Willox, Ms Fiona Pak-Poy, Dr Laurie Hammond, Mr David Miles AM (Chairman), Ms Elizabeth Lewis-Gray, The Minister for Industry and Innovation the Hon Greg Combet AM MP, Dr Nicholas Gruen, Mr Carlos Broens, Ms Chris Butler, Dr Peter Riddles, Mr Les Hosking, Dr Jonathan Spring, Mr Ken Windle and Mr Richard Shaddick.

Absent: Ms Margaret Calvert.

2

Chairman’s Report

25 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

On behalf of the members of the Innovation Australia Board,

it is my pleasure to present the Innovation Australia Annual

Report for 2011-2012.

2011 marked the 25th anniversary of Innovation Australia and its predecessor the Industry

Research and Development Board. The Board’s work commenced in 1986, when in recognition of

the increasing importance industry research and development would play in the future economic

growth of Australia, the Australian Government established the Industry Research and

Development (IR&D) Board to administer its research and development incentives programs

under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986.

To celebrate this anniversary, the publication of Twenty-five years of Innovation in Australia was

released in 2011 1. Over the 25 years the Board’s role has evolved in recognition of the importance

of innovation more broadly as a catalyst for the development of new industries, high-wage jobs,

safer communities and a better quality of life.

In 2011-12, as Australia continues to ride out the global financial crisis, the Australian Government

has continued to support Australian businesses to boost their research and commercialisation

capabilities. A number of programs designed to provide this support are administered by

Innovation Australia.

Through the administration of well designed and targeted innovation and investment programs,

such as Commercialisation Australia and the Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) the Board has been

able to support business through these times of structural economic change. In addition, the

Board has overseen the implementation of the R&D Tax Incentive, which will support many

Australian companies by providing assistance to undertake research and development activities

to develop new products, services and processes.

The Board also worked closely with the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and

Tertiary Education2 in the design of three new programs under the Government’s Clean Energy

Future: the Clean Technology Investment Program, the Clean Technology Food and Foundries

Investment Program; and the Clean Technology Innovation Program. These programs will support

Australian industry, in particular manufacturers, to adjust to a clean energy future and assist the

economic transition to drive investment in cleaner energy, low emissions technologies and

energy efficiency.

1 The publication is available at ausindustry.gov.au/InnovationAustralia/IA-25years/Documents/25Years-InnovationinAustralia.pdf

2 On 12 December 2011, the Prime Minister announced Machinery of Government changes and the former Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research was restructured to become the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

3

The Board has continued its advocacy role and engaged in an active program of international

collaboration meeting with representatives from government and private organisations in the

UK, USA, Canada, Germany and Hong Kong. The insights and knowledge gained is being used by

the Board to provide advice to the Australian Government on industry innovation policy,

programs and mechanisms to encourage increased collaboration between industry, universities

and publically funded research organisations.

Major areas of policy advice

A key component of Innovation Australia’s activities is the provision of independent innovation

policy advice to the Government. Innovation Australia made a number of submissions and

representations in this reporting period including to the Prime Minister’s Taskforce on

Manufacturing. The Taskforce was established to identify a plan to leverage the Government’s

existing policies and programs to best capture the opportunities and respond to the sector’s

challenges. The Board’s response focused on a set of key principles that underpin a range of

initiatives, reforms and policies for the Taskforce to consider as drivers for the recovery and

growth of the Australian manufacturing sector.

Stemming from the Government’s Clean Energy Future plan the Board had the opportunity to

comment on the development of the Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC). The Board

recognises that deepening capital markets will be critical to stimulating opportunities in long

term sustainable clean energy infrastructure, businesses and processes.

Venture capital continues to be important for early stage, high potential high risk innovative

companies. The Board recognizes that the Government’s venture capital programs have played

a critical role in the sustainable development of the Australian venture capital industry by

co-investing government funding with private sector investors. The Board continues to provide

advice to Government on the state and future development of the venture capital industry.

During the year, a Business Tax Working Group (BTWG) was established by the Australian

Government to look at how the business tax system can best help businesses respond to the

pressures of a changing economy. The BTWG, among other recommendations, identified four

options to change the R&D Tax Incentive to identify savings options to facilitate a proposed

company tax cut.

The Board looks forward to the release of the Australian Government’s Industry and Innovation

Policy Statement in 2012-13 which will set out the Government’s vision for Australian industry

and jobs to 2020. Supporting the Government’s Powering Ideas, the statement will examine the

challenges and opportunities facing Australian businesses as a result of the rapidly growing

global economic environment, and propose future pathways for Australian industry and

innovation policy.

Key program outcomes 2011-12

The following provides key outputs across Innovation Australia’s suite of programs for 2011-12:

• During the 2011-12 financial year, the Commercialisation Australia Board considered

254 applications. Of these, 185 applications were approved for funding, for a total value

of $71.23 million.

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• On 24 August 2011, the Tax Laws Amendment (Research and Development) Bill 2010 was

passed in Parliament. The R&D Tax Incentive replaced the R&D Tax Concession for income

years commencing on or after 1 July 2012.

• As at 30 June 2012, there were 9,118 companies registered under the R&D Tax Concession for

the 2010-11 income year, with reported R&D expenditure totalling $16.79 billion.

• On 7 December 2011, the Australian Government called for applications for Innovation

Investment Fund (IIF) Round 3 Tranche 4. Applications will close on 2 July 2012.

• Under the IIF Program for 2011-12, total capital of $33.29 million was invested into

33 companies, of which $15.93 million was drawn from the Australian Government.

Twenty two of the 33 companies were new investments to the IIF in 2011-12.

• The two Clean Technology Investment Programs opened for applications on 16 February 2012.

As at 30 June 2012, 82 applications in total had been received for these programs - 42 for the

Clean Technology Investment Program and 40 for the Clean Technology Food and Foundries

Investment Program.

Program administration

The Board welcomed the launch of the new Clean Technology Investment Program and the Clean

Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program which are central elements of the Australian

Government’s Clean Energy Future plan. Together, the one billion Clean Technology Investment

Programs will provide grants to support Australian manufacturers to invest in energy efficient

capital equipment and low pollution technologies, processes and products. These programs will be

complemented by the $200 million Clean Technology Innovation Program commencing in 2012-13.

In recognising the importance of the Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) as a means of supporting

private sector investors to invest in new business ideas that originate in Australia, the Board

spent significant time considering several important changes for the final and fourth tranche of

IIF Round 3. The Board believes the changes to Tranche 4 will not only increase investment in

innovative companies but more effectively connect them with international markets.

The Board also welcomed the commencement of the R&D Tax Incentive which was launched in

September 2011. The Board will work closely with its R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee and

the R&D Incentives Committee on the implementation and monitoring of the new R&D Tax

Incentive as a principal measure to provide vital support for industry and development.

The Board also reviewed the administrative arrangements for the Commercialisation Australia

Program. The new funding guidelines deliver more generous arrangements for early stage

commercialisation grant recipients needing to establish manufacturing facilities in Australia to

fully commercialise their product. Where a pilot manufacturing plant is required to demonstrate

the commercial feasibility of producing innovative products or services, the entire cost of

establishing the plant, rather than just the depreciation, is now deemed eligible expenditure.

Commercialisation Australia is supporting a number of innovative manufacturing and

engineering processes across Australia’s economy.

Further details on each of these programs are contained in Section Two of the annual report.

5

Innovation advocacy

In 2011-12, Innovation Australia continued to focus and strongly advocate for collaboration

between firms, publically funded research organisations and universities to maximise the

significant government investment in research.

Key discussions included:

• Professor Robin Batterham from the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences

and Engineering delivered a presentation to the Board on “Collaboration - the

underutilised resource”.

• Professor Margaret Sheil, Chief Executive Officer from the Australian Research Council

(ARC) discussed the work the Council is undertaking in relation to the Excellence in

Research for Australia.

• Dr Noel Chambers, member of The Advisory Council on Intellectual Property (ACIP) provided

the Board with a presentation on the ACIP’s review of how intellectual property influences

collaborations between publicly funded research organisations and private sector stakeholders.

The Board looks forward to the official findings of the ACIP review.

• Professor Ian Chubb the Chief Scientist provided an in-depth analysis of the number of

challenges facing Australian science and tertiary education sectors.

On 5 and 6 March 2012, members of the Board attended two events held in honour of Maire

Geoghegan-Quinn, European Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science. This provided

a great opportunity for exchanging views with our European counterparts on how to expand

international collaboration on research and innovation.

Creating awareness

Raising awareness of the importance of business and industry innovation to lifting productivity,

economic growth and employment across Australia is integral to the Board’s advocacy role. As a

part of this role, showcasing functions and events were held in Brisbane and Perth.

This year to coincide with the Board 25th anniversary, the Department of Industry, Innovation,

Science, Research and Tertiary Education, conducted Innovation in Australia: People Making the

Difference showcase event. A Brisbane event showcased innovative Australian companies and

demonstrated the benefits of investment in innovation for businesses and the Australian society.

In addition, as part of Innovation Australia’s visit to Perth the Board held a networking business

breakfast. The opportunity gave Board members a chance to meet with business leaders and

key industry stakeholders, and discuss the many Australian Government initiatives that

encourage innovation.

At both the Brisbane and Perth events Innovation Australia members visited a number

of innovation program supported companies. These visits provide a valuable opportunity

for customers to discuss their projects, experiences and challenges with Board members

who are able to see innovation at work.

6

On 18 August 2011, members of Innovation Australia also had the opportunity to attend

a Clean Technology Showcase held at Parliament House in Canberra.

This year the Board has undertaken a number of strategic and collaborative activities including

overseas intelligence gathering exercises to better understand overseas policies and programs

aimed at improving the environment for the commercialisation of publicly funded research and

the role that industry representatives play in the design and delivery of business facing initiatives.

In February 2012, at the invitation of the Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region

I took part in the Sponsored Guest Program. Meetings with key organisations highlighted the

administrations strategic plan for innovation, offering a range of government assistance some of

which has a specific focus on small business. There are a range of lessons that Australia could

learn from Hong Kong which are being explored by the Board.

A delegation of Innovation Australia members travelled to London, Berlin, Vancouver and

San Francisco from 29 June to 15 July 2012. The aim of these meetings was to gain a better

understanding of how other national governments support industry development through policy

and program initiatives. In particular, the visit provided a platform for continuing collaboration

with our foreign counterparts to share knowledge and ideas in relation to program

administration and delivery as well as assisting Australia’s future policy development and

program design consideration.

Governance

With the establishment of new programs there have been changes to the Committees

of Innovation Australia.

The Climate Ready Committee was revoked on 31 July 2011. The ongoing responsibility for

overseeing residual activity from the Climate Ready Program and Renewable Energy Development

Initiative rests with Innovation Australia and its Innovation Grants Committee.

Effective on 1 October 2011, the Tax Concession Committee was re-named the R&D Incentives

Committee. The name change reflects the role that the committee will play in assisting the Board

in continuing to administer the R&D Tax Concession and administration of the new R&D Tax

Incentive for activities registered in income years commencing 1 July 2011.

With the commencement of the R&D Tax Incentive an interim advisory committee was

established under Innovation Australia on 3 October 2011. The role of the committee is to guide

the design and early implementation of the program.

Following the announcement of the Clean Technology Investment Program and the Clean

Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program on 16 February 2012, a Clean Technology

Investment Committee was established to provide independent expert advice and merit rank

applications under the programs.

A Clean Technology Innovation Committee was established on 1 June 2012 under Innovation

Australia. The Committee will provide technical assessment and merit rank applications under

the Clean Technology Innovation Program that will be launched by the Australian Government

in 2012-13.

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Farewells and welcome to new members

The Board farewelled three members throughout the year: Mr Peter Thomas, Ms Margaret Calvert

and Dr Beverly Ronalds. Each made significant contributions to the work of the Board.

Mr Peter Thomas was a member of Innovation Australia and its predecessor the IR&D Board for

the past eight years. Mr Thomas was Chairman of the R&D Incentives Committee (formerly the

Tax Concession Committee) for eight years.

Ms Margaret Calvert was a member of Innovation Australia and its predecessors the IR&D Board

and the Venture Capital Registration Board (formerly the Pool Development Funds Board) for

seven years. Ms Calvert was also a member of the Venture Capital Committee (formerly Fund

Management Committee) for three years. Ms Calvert continues to contribute to the Board

through her membership on the R&D Incentives Committee.

Dr Beverly Ronalds was a member of Innovation Australia from 2009 until 2012. The Board

benefited from Dr Ronalds’ knowledge and experience gained through her role with the CSIRO.

During the year the Board welcomed four new members. Mr Richard Shaddick was appointed to

the Board and as Chair of the Board’s R&D Incentives Committee. Dr Nicholas Gruen and Mr Innes

Willox were both appointed to the Board and to the Board’s R&D Tax Incentive Advisory

Committee, as members. Ms Fiona Pak-Poy was appointed to the Board and as Chair of the Clean

Technology Investment Committee.

In conclusion

The year saw a considerable increase and broadening of the activities undertaken by the Board

and its Committees and I thank my colleagues for their continued commitment and dedication.

With the support of the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary

Education and the valuable contribution of the AusIndustry team the Board was able to manage

its significant workload throughout 2011-12.

The diverse skills, independence and broad experience of the members of the Board enhances

its ability to work with the Australian Government to harness innovation potential of Australian

business, encourage collaboration with the Australian research sector so as to build capability

across the economy, improve productivity and competitiveness and support and develop

opportunities for new businesses, jobs and community prosperity which will secure our

ongoing prosperity.

David Miles AM

Chairman

8

PROGRAM ACTIVITY OVERVIEW

Innovation Australia administers a range of Australian Government programs that stimulate

innovation through research and development, investment in clean technology, the

commercialisation and increased availability of venture capital, which in turn promotes economic

growth, creates jobs and provides long term national benefits for Australia. Detail on each of

these programs is provided under Section 2.

During the year 2011-12 Innovation Australia’s programs were delivered by AusIndustry, a division

within the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

The tables below provide an overview of program activity in 2011-12. The full set of figures

underpinning this overview can be found at Appendix C and a list of Acronyms is provided

at page 278.

Table 1.1 · Innovation Support - 2011-12

Program

Australian Government budget ($m)

Benefits disbursed ($m)

Value of R&D & commercialisation supported ($m)

Number of customers assisted

R&D Tax Concession 2010-11 a N/A 1,445.00 16,794.02 9,118

Climate Ready b,c,e 6.53 5.07 10.24 40

Commercial Readyb,c,e 0.90 0.81 1.62 7

Commercialisation Australiab,c,e 51.04 48.82 101.19 268

COMET c,e 0.00 0.22 0.35 20

GCIF b,c,e 125.44 124.97 330.78 14

R&D Start d,e N/A 0.24 0.48 1

Total 183.91 1,625.13 17,238.68 9,468

Note: All financial figures are provided on a cash basis

a. There is no ‘Australian Government budget’ for the R&D Tax Concession. The 2012-13 Science, Research and Innovation Budget Table estimates the amount of assistance provided under components of this program, and these have been aggregated to produce the ‘Benefits disbursed’ figure. This is a change from the figures in previous reports which were based upon Tax Expenditure Statements, and the time series for this new basis is provided in Table C5 of Appendix C.

b. The Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia and GCIF budgets only relate to administered grant payments and do not include operating expenses.

c. Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia, COMET, GCIF and R&D Start payments reflect gross amounts and do not account for amounts that may have been repaid.

d. Payments for R&D Start grants are met from within the Commercial Ready allocation.

e. Value listed reflects the component of the investment that attracts grant funding and not necessarily total project expenditure.

f. ICIP and REDI programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year. The R&D Tax Incentive program is not included in this table because it did not open to registration applications until 1 July 2012.

9

Table 1.2 · Venture Capital and Industry Investment Support - 2011-12

Programh

Australian Government budget ($m)

Benefits disbursed ($m)

Value of Investments supported ($m)

Number of customers assisted

PDF a N/A 3.00 2.11 15

ESVCLP a,b N/A 15.00 17.55 16

VCLP a,b N/A 11.00 313.43 84

IIFc,d,e 129.03 15.93 33.29 33

IIFFc,d 6.15 0.97 1.02 6

PSF c,d 6.92 1.29 1.87 7

CTFFIP f,g 1.50 0.26 0.57 1

RCC f,g 4.80 4.16 28.32 27

Total 148.40 51.61 398.17 189

Note: All financial figures are provided on a cash basis.

a. There is no ‘Australian Government budget’ for the PDF, VCLP or ESVCLP programs. The 2012-13 Science, Research and Innovation Budget Table estimates the amount of assistance provided under each of these programs. This is a change from the figures in previous reports which were based upon Tax Expenditure Statements, and the time series for this new basis is provided in Table C5 of Appendix C.

b. The 2011 Taxation Expenditure Statement estimates the revenue foregone attributable to this program as being up to $10 million in the year its expenditure is greatest. Based on past Taxation Expenditure Statement estimates for this and predecessor programs, this maximum value has been used as the ‘Benefits disbursed’ figure.

c. The ‘Benefits disbursed’ figures reflect investments made and exclude Fund Managers’ fees and recoverable expenses. The figures include funds drawn down in 2011-12 from the Australian Government (IIF $15.93 million, PSF $1.29 million, IIFF $0.97 million).

d. The ‘number of customers’ is the number of investee companies receiving investments during the year from fund managers licensed under the relevant program. Companies that received investments from multiple fund managers are counted once.

e. The ‘Australian Government budget’ figures include Revolving Fund Proceeds of $68.31 million.

f. The CTFFIP and RCC budgets are only for administered grant payments and do not include operating expenses.

g. The CTFFIP and RCC payments reflect gross amounts and do not account for amounts that may have been repaid.

h. The CTIP did not make any payments during this year and the REEF program did not make any investments this year, therefore they are not included in the table.

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CUSTOMERS ASSISTED BY STATE AND TERRITORY DURING 2011-12

The figures below illustrate the distribution, by state, of assisted customers and benefits in 2011-12 3.

The majority of customers assisted during 2011-12 were based in New South Wales and Victoria

5,696 (59.1 per cent), with 3,947 (40.9 per cent) being based in the other states and territories.

Figure 1.1 · Customers Assisted by State and Territory - 2011-12

BENEFITS DISBURSED BY STATE AND TERRITORY DURING 2011-12

Customers based in states other than New South Wales and Victoria received assistance worth

$57.4 million in 2011-12, which is 12.5 per cent of total assistance provided by programs other than

the R&D Tax Concession.

Figure 1.2 · Benefits Disbursed by State and Territory - 2011-12

3 The Tax Concession is excluded from these figures as only the Australian Taxation Office holds data on tax return claims.

WA

1213 (12.6%)

NT

35 (0.4%)

SA

549 (5.7%)

QLD

1902 (19.7%)

NSW

3249 (33.7%)

WA

8.8m (1.9%)

NT

0.1m (0.01%)

SA

9.7m (2.1%)

QLD

30.4m (6.6%)

NSW

162.3m (35.3%)

VIC

2447 (25.4%)

TAS

141 (1.5%)

ACT

107 (1.1%)

VIC

240.7m (52.3%)

TAS

7.0m (1.5%)

ACT

1.5m (0.3%)

WA

1213 (12.6%)

NT

35 (0.4%)

SA

549 (5.7%)

QLD

1902 (19.7%)

NSW

3249 (33.7%)

WA

8.8m (1.9%)

NT

0.1m (0.01%)

SA

9.7m (2.1%)

QLD

30.4m (6.6%)

NSW

162.3m (35.3%)

VIC

2447 (25.4%)

TAS

141 (1.5%)

ACT

107 (1.1%)

VIC

240.7m (52.3%)

TAS

7.0m (1.5%)

ACT

1.5m (0.3%)

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA · ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Section 1 highlights

HIGHLIGHTS

12

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

COMMERCIALISATION AUSTRALIA

Announced as part of the 2009-10 Budget and opened to applications in January 2010,

Commercialisation Australia’s mission is to help early stage entrepreneurs build sustainable

businesses by converting innovative intellectual property into successful commercial outcomes.

Commercialisation Australia is one element of the Government’s wider strategy to increase

business innovation and capitalise on Australian research. It bridges the resources gap between

research and development (R&D) (supported by the R&D Tax Incentive) and early stage venture

or strategic investment (supported by the Innovation Investment Fund program and Venture

Capital programs).

It recognises that money is necessary for success, but to really make a difference, entrepreneurs

need access to the right people at the right time. That is why all successful applicants work with

an experienced Case Manager and have access to a network of Volunteer Business Mentors.

Since January 2010, Commercialisation Australia has provided support for 300 organisations

and allocated $122.66 million in grants. Of these, grants to the value of $106 million to

272 organisations had been publicly announced by the end of June 2012.

The success of the program is based on the three unique elements it offers:

• Grants ranging up to $2 million are tailored to meet the needs of early stage businesses. For

example, researchers and new entrepreneurs are able to access specialist advice through the

Skills and Knowledge grant and technology based start-ups can boost their management

capability by bringing in an experienced CEO through the Experienced Executives grant.

• Its national network of high calibre Case Managers work closely with each Participant. All are

experienced business builders and many have taken their own products to market. Participants

increasingly report the value their Case Manager has added to both their commercialisation

project and their business.

• The Volunteer Business Mentor network extends the reach of the program, offering

Participants a wider source of expertise and opportunities to make important connections.

Mentors have assisted Participants find manufacturing partners, meet potential investors

and identify experts in particular fields.

In December 2011, the program was refined to better meet the needs of businesses engaged

in the early stages of commercialisation. Changes included:

• Increasing the maximum size of the Experienced Executive (EE) grant from $200,000 to

$350,000 to enable the recruitment of high quality senior executives;

• Removing the repayment requirement for Early Stage Commercialisation (ESC) grants and

decreasing the minimum grant size from $250,000 to $50,000 to increase flexibility; and

• Increasing the annual turnover limit for ESC applications from $20 million to $50 million.

Commercialisation Australia’s Pilot Program component opened to applications in March 2011.

This provides a limited number of grants for organisations exploring new or alternative methods

of supporting commercialisation. To 30 June 2012, one pilot program worth $360,000 has

been supported.

HIGHLIGHTS

13

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

R&D TAX CONCESSION

Following the introduction of the R&D Tax Incentive from 1 July 2011, 2010-11 was the final year

for most companies to register under the R&D Tax Concession.

As at 30 June 2012, there were 9,118 registrations for the 2010-11 income year, corresponding

to $16.79 billion in reported industry R&D expenditure. There continued to be significant

representation from businesses with a turnover of less than $20 million per annum.

2011-12 saw continued compliance review activity by AusIndustry under the R&D Tax Concession.

During the financial year, approximately 11 per cent of registrations were reviewed for compliance.

As part of the preparations for the implementation of the R&D Tax Incentive, AusIndustry carried

out broader industry sector profiling, particularly of ICT. A number of current statutory

assessments were also used to inform future approaches to large business engagement under

the R&D Tax Incentive.

As an interim measure, prior to the introduction of the R&D Tax Incentive, the R&D expenditure

threshold for the existing R&D Tax Offset was increased from $1 million to $2 million, effective

from 1 July 2009. There were six companies in the $1 million to $2 million R&D expenditure band

in 2008-09, which increased to 170 companies in 2009-10, and 238 companies in 2010-11.

R&D TAX INCENTIVE

The R&D Tax Incentive1 is the Australian Government’s principal mechanism to encourage private

sector funded R&D activities, commencing for the financial year 2011-12.

On 12 May 2009, the Australian Government announced its intention to replace the existing

R&D Tax Concession with a new R&D Tax Incentive. The Tax Laws Amendment (Research and

Development) Bill 2010 to establish the new program was passed by the Australian Parliament

on 24 August 2011.

During 2011-12, there was a very high level of collaboration between AusIndustry and the

Australian Taxation Office (ATO) in preparation for the implementation and commencement of

the R&D Tax Incentive. This work was progressed under the joint direction of an Executive-level

management committee - the Joint Administrative Governance Group (JAGG), which was

established under a Memorandum of Understanding between AusIndustry and the ATO.

1 Previously referred to as the R&D Tax Credit.

HIGHLIGHTS

14

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

INNOVATION INVESTMENT FUND

The Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) program was established in 1997 to invest in early stage high

growth potential companies commercialising Australian research. Committed capital is used for

investment purposes and management fees.

Sixteen fund managers have been licensed under the program as at 30 June 2012. These funds

have invested in 123 investee companies, with the majority involved in the commercialisation of

information, communication or life science technologies. As at 30 June 2012, there are

currently 11 investee companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange.

For 2011-12, total capital of $33.29 million was invested into 33 companies, of which

$15.93 million was drawn from the Australian Government. Twenty two of the 33 companies

were new investees. For 2011-12, the Australian Government received returns from the

program of $4.66 million.

As at 30 June 2012, total returns to all investors under the program since its inception is

$473.37 million, of which the Australian Government share is $153.08 million. Of this amount,

$132.72 million has been added to the IIF Revolving Fund.

On 7 December 2011, the Australian Government called for applications for IFF Round 3 Tranche 4,

applications closed on 2 July 2012. The Australian Government will commit up to $100 million to

be matched at least 1:1 with privately sourced capital.

EARLY STAGE VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

Venture capital fund managers seeking to raise a new venture capital fund to make early stage

investments in Australian businesses with total assets of not more than $50 million can apply to

register the fund as an Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnership (ESVCLP).

The number of registered ESVCLPs as at 30 June 2012 was 11 (including seven conditionally

registered (i.e. raising capital), representing an increase of two since 30 June 2011. Of the

$120 million committed to registered ESVCLPs, $80 million is from funds also licensed under

the Innovation Investment Fund program (representing Government and private investor

co-investment).

Since the inception of the program in 2007, $27 million has been invested by ESVCLPs in eligible

Australian businesses, including $17.5 million in 17 businesses during 2011-12.

HIGHLIGHTS

15

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

Venture capital fund managers seeking to raise a new venture capital fund to make investments

in Australian businesses with total assets of not more than $250 million can apply to register the

fund as a Venture Capital Limited Partnership (VCLP).

As at 30 June 2012 there were 43 registered VCLPs (including three conditionally registered)

with $5.9 billion in committed capital, of which 30 per cent represents capital sourced from

foreign investors.

Since the inception of the program in 2002, $2.29 billion has been invested by VCLPs in eligible

Australian businesses, including $313 million in 84 businesses during 2011-12.

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

The Australian Government’s $1.2 billion Clean Technology Program provides incentives for

manufacturing businesses to reduce emissions and invest in clean energy, as well as for

innovative businesses in all sectors to develop new clean technologies and services. The program

is part of the Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future plan and has three components:

• the $800 million Clean Technology Investment Program to help manufacturing businesses

invest in energy efficient capital equipment and low emissions technologies, processes

and products,

• the $200 million Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program to help food

and foundry manufacturers invest in energy efficient capital equipment and low emissions

technologies, processes and products,

• the $200 million Clean Technology Innovation Program to help businesses in all sectors

undertake applied research and development, proof-of-concept and early-stage

commercialisation activities that develop new clean technologies and services, including low

emission and energy-efficient solutions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

THE CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT PROGRAM AND THE CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FOOD AND FOUNDRIES INVESTMENT PROGRAM

The two Clean Technology Investment Programs opened for applications on 16 February 2012. As

at 30 June 2012, 84 applications in total had been received for these programs - 42 for the Clean

Technology Investment Program and 42 for the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment

Program. A total of 15 applications were considered by the Clean Technology Investment

Committee, of which 13 were supported at a total project cost of more than $23 million.

At 30 June 2012, more than 3,200 people had registered to attend information sessions across

Australia, and more than 76,000 page views were recorded for the Clean Technology Programs

landing page on the AusIndustry website.

HIGHLIGHTS

16

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

THE CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION PROGRAM

On 10 July 2011, the Government announced its plan for a Clean Energy Future. The Clean

Technology Program comprised of the Clean Technology Investment, Clean Technology Food

and Foundries Investment and Clean Technology Innovation programs are elements of the

Government’s comprehensive plan to take Australia to a clean energy future.

During September and October 2011, the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research

and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE) held a series of stakeholder consultation sessions in capital cities

and key regional areas such as the Illawarra and Geelong regarding the design of the Clean

Technology Programs. Ninety six written responses to a discussion paper were received during

this consultation period.

Stakeholder feedback on the Clean Technology Innovation Program centred on issues relating

to applicant eligibility, collaboration, in-kind funding, measurement of carbon savings, the grant

period and the application process. In March 2012, the DIISRTE released a second discussion paper

responding to this feedback and to seek further comments to inform the Program Guidelines.

A further 18 responses were received on this paper.

The Clean Technology Innovation Program’s design takes into account feedback from industry.

Governance arrangements were finalised in June 2012 in preparedness for the programs launch

in early 2012-13 when funding for the program becomes available.

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA · ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Section 2

our programs

OVERVIEW

18

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Overview

Innovation Australia aims to promote the development and improve the efficiency and

international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging research and development,

investment in clean technology innovation and venture capital activities.

These programs are open for applications:

R&D and Innovation Programs

• Commercialisation Australia (CA)

• R&D Tax Concession and R&D Tax Incentive.

Venture Capital Programs

• Innovation Investment Fund (IIF)

• Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (ESVCLP)

• Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP).

Clean Technology Programs

• Clean Technology Investment Program

• Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program.

Together these programs form a suite of initiatives designed to encourage Australian industrial

R&D and innovation efforts, to assist in the successful commercialisation of R&D outcomes.

A committee structure is used to help Innovation Australia administer its programs.

COMMERCIALISATION AUSTRALIA

19

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Commercialisation Australia

ESTABLISHMENT

Commercialisation Australia was announced as part of the Australian Government’s 2009-10

Budget and is a component of the Australian Government’s 10 year vision Powering Ideas: an

Innovation Agenda for the 21st Century. It has funding of $267.70 million over the five years to

2013-14, with ongoing funding of $82 million a year thereafter.

Commercialisation Australia opened to applications on 4 January 2010.

OBJECTIVES

Commercialisation Australia aims to build the capacity of and opportunities for, Australia’s

talented researchers, entrepreneurs and firms to convert innovative IP into sustainable

commercial ventures, creating high skill jobs and increasing our global competitiveness.

Table 2.1 · Australian Government budget and expenditure (administered funding) at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m) 2014-15 ($m)

Budget 51.04 60.66 66.03 65.75

Commitments 0.00 44.13 9.72 0.53

Payments made 49.09 0.00 0.00 0.00

Program Performance

During the 2011-12 financial year, the Commercialisation Australia Board considered

254 applications. Of these, 185 applications were approved for funding, for a total value

of $71.23 million.

Table 2.2 · Commercialisation Australia Applications 2011-12

Components Considered Components Approved Approved ($m)

Skills and Knowledge 105 77 3.58

Experienced Executives 35 22 3.85

Proof of Concept 86 68 13.72

Early Stage Commercialisation 72 48 50.07

Pilot Projects 1 1 0.36

COMMERCIALISATION AUSTRALIA

20

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

OUTCOMES

As at the end of the 2011-12 financial year, Commercialisation Australia had been in operation

for 30 months.

Since its commencement in 2010, Commercialisation Australia has offered financial assistance

to support 315 projects across a wide range of industry sectors, worth a total of $122.66 million.

The Pilot Program component opened to applications in March 2011 and to 30 June 2012 one

Pilot Program has been supported at a value of $360,000.

Fifty eight Commercialisation Australia projects were completed in 2011-12. Of these, 72 per cent

were successful and proceeding to full commercialisation.

SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS

Commercialisation Australia supports Australian companies, researchers, entrepreneurs and

inventors through four funding components as well as access to Case Managers and Volunteer

Business Mentors. The funding components comprise:

• Skills and Knowledge grants up to $50,000 to access expert advice and services;

• Experienced Executives grants of up to $350,000 over two years to engage an

experienced CEO or other senior executive;

• Proof of Concept grants from $50,000 to $250,000 to undertake activities to prove

the commercial viability of a new product, service or process; and

• Early Stage Commercialisation grants from $50,000 to $2 million to develop a product

service or process through to market launch.

Participants are required to contribute to the cost of their commercialisation activities.

Participants must contribute 20 per cent for the Skills and Knowledge component, and

50 per cent for other grant components. Depending on the funding component, the maximum

duration of a project ranges from one year to two years. Participants can apply for more than one

component initially, or subsequent components as their commercialisation project progresses.

In addition to financial support, all Commercialisation Australia Participants work with a Case

Manager to guide them through the commercialisation process and help them make important

business connections. All are experienced business builders who understand the challenges of

commercialising new IP. Many have taken their own products and services to market, and all have

good industry networks and specialist expertise in particular markets and technologies.

Case Managers also have an important role in assessing new applications for funding.

This information is provided to the Commercialisation Australia Board to assist with the

merit ranking of applications.

COMMERCIALISATION AUSTRALIA

21

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Participants in Commercialisation Australia also have access to Volunteer Business Mentors

who have hands on experience in building and selling a range of businesses; specialist domain

expertise; knowledge of international markets; and access to investment capital. They can offer

guidance and practical assistance to help Participants tackle specific commercialisation hurdles

and to build valuable business networks. As at 30 June 2012, Commercialisation Australia had

registered 120 entrepreneurs, technical experts and investors as Volunteer Business Mentors.

Commercialisation Australia also has the capacity to fund pilot programs of up to 12 months

duration. Up to $2 million per year is available to run one large, or a number of smaller pilot

projects to test new commercialisation policy approaches. Applications for pilot program

proposals may be made by individuals, corporations, industry bodies or government. The intent

is to assess the practicality and effectiveness of new, alternative methods of support for

commercialisation that are consistent with and complementary to Commercialisation

Australia’s policy objective.

GOVERNANCE

Ministerial Program Guidelines and Program Directions, issued by the Minister under the

Industry Research and Development Act 1986, provide the policy and procedures for administering

the Commercialisation Australia program.

Commercialisation Australia is headed by a Chief Executive Officer (CEO), and is delivered in

partnership by the Innovation and AusIndustry Divisions of the Department of Industry,

Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. The Commercialisation Australia Board, a

Committee of Innovation Australia, provides expert advice and merit rank of applications. Board

members have a diverse range of experience and qualifications, and are equipped with the

technical and commercial expertise required to assess and provide advice on the merit of

applications. The CEO of Commercialisation Australia is an ex-officio member of the Board.

The role of the Commercialisation Australia Board is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate

Governance.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

22

Case study: HALO Medical Devices COMMERCIALISATION AUSTRALIA

Laser technology for physiotherapy

Goniometers are used by physical and occupational

therapists to measure joint motion, such as in the

elbow or knee, to better analyse the progress of

therapy. Mechanical goniometers are cumbersome

and inaccurate, which led Ms Hayley Warren, CEO of

HALO Medical Devices (formerly trading as

Firstphysio), to bridge a 40-year technology gap and

develop HALO, a digital goniometer.

The device accurately measures angles of joints in

three dimensions and displays the results on an LCD

screen, removing the guesswork from interpreting

the old analogue scale. Instead of plastic arms, HALO

utilises medical-class lasers. The device does not

contact the skin, creating zero risk of infection. The

design allows for one handed use, enabling therapists

to support patient limbs while using the device; a

new feature for joint measuring.

HALO is expected to be on the market in 2012 and has already attracted interest from the

Australian Olympic Team, AFL and NRL clubs, universities and physiotherapists worldwide.

Ms Warren plans to further develop HALO’s functionality to allow therapists to download,

synchronise and record measurements to improve patient progress records.

HALO Medical Devices received a $50,000 Skills and Knowledge grant in late 2011 from

Commercialisation Australia. The funding helped the company obtain advice about IP protection,

business planning and capital raising. HALO Medical Devices has received invaluable assistance

from its Case Manager and the Volunteer Business Mentor network.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

23

“Our Case Manager has experience in the physiotherapy industry and met with us

regularly to provide guidance about commercialising HALO,” Ms Warren said. The Case

Manager also introduced the company to a Volunteer Business Mentor with a proven track

record in commercialising medical devices. The Mentor assisted the company with its

business plan and product development, and this collaboration has led to a mutually

successful business relationship.

“Our Mentor has been highly supportive of HALO. He provided such valuable assistance that

HALO has since contracted him to assist in a number of areas. He recently accompanied me

to Singapore to explore manufacturing options and introduced me to companies he has

worked with in the past,” Ms Warren said. “Without Commercialisation Australia we would

not have made this progress.”

Ms Warren saw the market opportunity for HALO while she was studying at Curtin University.

During this time she worked in hospitals and saw, first-hand, the frustration of medical

professionals using mechanical goniometers.

Ms Warren is a 2012 “40under40” award winner, former WA Innovator of the Year, and winner

of the People’s Choice Award on the ABC’s New Inventors in 2010.

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

24

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

R&D Tax Concession

ESTABLISHMENT

The R&D Tax Concession was introduced in 1985 to encourage Australian industry to undertake

increased levels of eligible Research & Development (R&D). It is an entitlement program that

assists and encourages business R&D activities undertaken in Australia.

The program is based on the legislative framework contained in former Part IIIA of the Industry

Research and Development Act 1986 (IR&D Act) and former sections 73B to 73Z of the Income Tax

Assessment Act 1936. In addition, the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 is relevant to calculating

deductions for plant and other assets for use in R&D. The R&D Tax Offset and the R&D

Incremental (175 per cent Premium) Tax Concession were introduced following the Australian

Government’s Backing Australia’s Ability statement in January 2001.

Further changes to the R&D Tax Concession were made in May 2007, including changes to

the beneficial ownership provisions extending access to the 175 per cent Premium to Australian

companies in a multi-national enterprise group who undertake their R&D in Australia,

but hold the intellectual property overseas.

For income years commencing 1 July 2009 the grouped R&D expenditure threshold for

the R&D Tax Offset was increased from $1 million to $2 million.

The R&D Tax Concession was replaced by the R&D Tax Incentive for income years

commencing 1 July 2011.

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

25

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

R&D Tax Incentive

ESTABLISHMENT

The R&D Tax Incentive was introduced in 2011 to encourage Australian industry to undertake

increased levels of eligible R&D. It is an entitlement program that assists and encourages

business R&D activities, especially small and medium-sized business R&D activities,

undertaken in Australia.

The R&D Tax Incentive replaced the R&D Tax Concession for income years commencing on or

after 1 July 2011. The R&D Tax Incentive program is based on the legislative framework contained

in the Tax Laws Amendment (Research and Development Bill) 2010 passed by Parliament on

23 August 2011, Part III of the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 (IR&D Act), and

Division 35 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

Under the R&D Tax Incentive, a 45 per cent refundable tax offset, equivalent to a deduction of

150 per cent, is available to eligible small companies with an annual aggregate turnover of less

than $20 million, provided they are not controlled by income tax exempt entities. These

companies can receive a refundable tax offset of 45 per cent of their R&D spending as part

of the processing of their income tax return.

A 40 per cent non-refundable tax offset is available to companies with an annual aggregate

turnover of $20 million or more - equivalent to a deduction of 133 per cent.

The R&D Tax Incentive is available to corporations that are Australian residents, foreign

corporations that are resident of a country with which Australia has a double tax agreement

and carry on business through a permanent establishment in Australia, and to public trading

trusts with a corporate trustee.

OBJECTIVES

Through the R&D Tax Incentive, the Australian Government aims to achieve its broader objective

of developing internationally competitive industries in Australia by:

• Encouraging industry to conduct research and development activities where the knowledge

gained is likely to benefit the wider Australian economy; and

• Providing an R&D incentive for industry to conduct, in a scientific way, experimental

activities for the purpose of generating new knowledge or information in either a general

or applied form.

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

26

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE AND OUTCOMES IN 2010-11

Registrations

Beneficiaries of the R&D Tax Concession and R&D Tax Incentive must apply annually to Innovation

Australia (via AusIndustry) for registration of activities undertaken in the previous income year.

Eligible companies may lodge registration applications during the 10 months after the end of

their income year, and then claim the tax incentive for R&D in their annual tax returns filed with

the Australian Taxation Office.

Registrations for the R&D Tax Incentive opened on 1 July 2012, for the income period 1 July 2011

to 30 June 2012.

Data shown in this report on R&D Tax Concession registrations for the 2010-11 income year as at

30 June 2012 are incomplete; further applications for the 2010-11 income year will continue to be

received up to 31 October 2012 from companies with non-standard income period balance dates.

A service delivery performance of 98 per cent of applications registered within the target of

30 days was achieved during 2011-12, with 96 per cent of electronically submitted applications

also registered within the target of 10 days.

As at 30 June 2012, there were 9,118 companies registered under the R&D Tax Concession for the

2010-11 income year, with reported R&D expenditure totalling $16.79 billion (see Figure 2.1).

Figure 2.1 · Summary of R&D Tax Concession registration data from 1985-86 to 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012 (incomplete data for 2010-11)

20,000

18,000

16,000

14,000

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000

0 2010-2011

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

2005-2006

2004-2005

2003-2004

2002-2003

2001-2002

2000-2001

1999-2000

1998-99

1997-98

1996-97

1995-96

1994-95

1993-94

1992-93

1991-92

1990-91

1989-90

1988-89

1987-88

1986-87

1985-86

Number of Companies Registered Expenditure $m

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

27

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

The distribution of company registrations under the R&D Tax Concession by reported

R&D expenditure for the 2010-11 income year is shown in Figure 2.2.

The majority of companies (58 per cent) reported R&D expenditure of less than or equal to

$500,000, representing approximately seven per cent of total reported R&D expenditure.

R&D activities valued at greater than $10 million were undertaken by around three per cent

of registrants, representing approximately 56 per cent of the total reported R&D expenditure.

Figure 2.2 · Registration under the R&D Tax Concession by R&D expenditure (%) for 2010-11, as at 30 June 2011 (incomplete year)

<= $500k - % of registrations by R&D expenditure 58%

>=$500k and <= $1m - % of registrations by R&D expenditure 18%

>=$1m and <= $5m - % of registrations by R&D expenditure 17%

>=$5m and <= $10m - % of registrations by R&D expenditure 3%

>=$10m - % of registrations by R&D expenditure 3% 58%

18%

17%

3% 3%

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

28

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Figure 2.3 shows that the top areas of research conducted by users of the R&D Tax Concession

for the 2010-11 income year, measured as reported R&D expenditure against Australian

Standard Research Classification (ASRC), are Engineering and Technology (62 per cent);

Information, Computing and Communication Sciences (24 per cent); Agricultural, Veterinary and

Environmental Sciences (4 per cent); and Medical and Health Sciences (4 per cent).

Figure 2.3 · R&D expenditure ($m) by field of research (Australian Standard Research Classification) for 2010-11 under the R&D Tax Concession, as at 30 June 2012 (incomplete year)

The Arts

Studies in Human Society

Physical Sciences

Medical and Health Sciences

Mathematical Sciences

Law, Justice and Law Enforcement

Language and Culture

Journalism, Librarianship and Curatorial Studies

Information, Computing and Communication Sciences

History and Archaeology

Engineering and Technology

Education

Economics

Earth Sciences

Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services

Chemical Sciences

Biological Sciences

Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences

Architecture, Urban Environment and Building

Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000

0

No. of times nominated (a) Registered Expenditure $m

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

29

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Program Elements

Under the R&D Tax Concession and the R&D Tax Incentive, companies determine the eligibility

of their R&D activities under self-assessment, with compliance monitored by AusIndustry

on behalf of Innovation Australia.

Table 2.3 illustrates the number of companies registered for different elements of the R&D Tax

Concession and their reported R&D expenditures for 2009-10 and 2010-11.

The total number of companies registered as at 30 June 2012 for the 2010-11 income year was 9,118.

Of these, a total of 3,430 companies (38 per cent) intended to claim only the R&D Tax Offset and

1,447 companies (16 per cent) intended to claim only the 175 per cent Premium, while 738 companies

(eight per cent) intended to claim both the R&D Tax Offset and the 175 per cent Premium. In

addition, a total of 57 companies indicated an intention to claim the International Premium.

Table 2.3 · Registrants for 2009-10 and 2010-11 (R&D Tax Concession) as at 30 June 20121

Registrants, as at 30 June 2012

2009-10

Number of

Companies

2009-10

Reported R&D Expenditure ($m)

2010-11

(incomplete year)

Number of Companies 2010-11 (incomplete year) Reported R&D Expenditure ($m)

Total registrants 8,756 17,633.49 9,118 16,794.02

125% R&D Tax Concession 3,244 6,654.52 3,452 7,414.84

R&D Tax Offset (a) 3,188 1,062.32 3,430 1,206.73

175% Premium (b) 1,559 8,659.93 1,447 7,390.55

International Premium (c) 45 690.61 38 179.5

Tax Offset and 175% Premium (d) 708 421.18 738 439.45

Tax Offset and International Premium (e) 3 1.98 3 1.44

175% Premium and International Premium (f) 9 142.94 10 161.51

175% Premium and Tax Offset and International Premium (g) 0 0 0 0

Total Tax Offset* 3,899 1,485.48 4,171 1,647.62

Total 175% Premium** 2,276 9,224.05 2,195 7,991.51

Total International Premium*** 57 835.53 51 342.45

1 Table 2.3 uses Innovation Australia registration data and indicates the declared intention of registrants to claim under each element. Actual benefits will vary depending on individual circumstances.

* Total registrants for the R&D Tax Offset are (A+D+E+G).

** Total registrants for the 175% Premium are (B+D+F+G).

*** Total registrants for the International Premium are (C+E+F+G).

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

30

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Figures 2.4 and 2.5 present the number of registrations under the R&D Tax Concession for 2010-11

by R&D expenditure and turnover respectively.

Figure 2.4 · Number of registrations under the R&D Tax Concession by R&D expenditure and element for 2010-11, as at 30 June 2012 (incomplete year)

Figure 2.5 · Number of registrations under the R&D Tax Concession by turnover range and element for 2010-11, as at 30 June 2012 (incomplete year)

> $50m

> $25m <= $50m

> $10m <= $25m

> $5m <= $10m

> $1m <= $5m

> $0.5m <= $1m

< = $500k

6,000

5,000

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

0

Number of registered companies

175% Premium with International Premium

Tax Offset with International Premium

Tax Offset & 175% Premium

International Premium

Incremental Tax Concession (175% Premium)

R&D Tax Offset

125% R&D Tax Concession

R&D Expenditure Range

> $50m

> $25m <= $50m

> $10m <= $25m

> $5m <= $10m

> $1m <= $5m

> $0.5m <= $1m

< = $500k

3,500

3,000

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

500

0

Number of registered companies

175% Premium with International Premium

Tax Offset with International Premium

Tax Offset & 175% Premium

International Premium

Incremental Tax Concession (175% Premium)

R&D Tax Offset

125% R&D Tax Concession

Turnover Range

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

31

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Companies reporting a turnover of less than or equal to $5 million per annum represented

the largest single group of registrants (65 per cent) for the R&D Tax Concession in the 2010-11

income year. The number of large companies with turnovers of more than $50 million per annum

represented 14 per cent of registrants.

Table 2.4 · New registrants under the R&D Tax Concession as at 30 June 20122

New Registrants a, as at 30 June 2012

2009-10 Number of

Companies

2009-10 Reported R&D

Expenditure ($m)

2010-11 (incomplete year) Number of Companies 2010-11 (incomplete year)

Reported R&D Expenditure ($m)

Total registrants 1,628 944.04 1,831 980.51

125% R&D Tax Concession 639 549.20 728 602.90

R&D Tax Offset (a) 865 237.90 1,012 292.20

175% Premium (b) 89 144.80 54 70.20

International Premium (c) 2 0.29 4 2.1

Tax Offset and 175% Premium (d) 32 11.89 33 13.1

Tax Offset and International Premium (e) 1 0.03 0 0

175% Premium and International Premium (f) 0 0 0 0

Tax Offset and Premium with International Premium (g) 0 0 0 0

Total Tax Offset* 898 249.82 1,045 305.30

Total 175% Premium** 121 156.69 87 83.30

Total International Premium*** 3 0.32 4 2.1

a. A ‘new registrant’ is a company registered for the R&D Tax Concession for the first time in a given income year. A ‘new registrant’ may be a member of a company group, other members of which may have registered for and claimed the R&D Tax Concession.

2 Table 2.4 uses Innovation Australia registration data and indicates the declared intention of registrants to claim under each element. Actual benefits will vary depending on individual circumstances.

* Total registrants for the R&D Tax Offset are (A+D+E+G).

** Total registrants for the 175% Premium are (B+D+F+G).

*** Total registrants for the International Premium are (C+E+F+G).

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

32

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Take up of the R&D Tax Incentive’s 45 per cent

refundable and non-refundable 40 per cent tax offsets

The R&D Tax Incentive was introduced for the financial year commencing 1 July 2011, and

applications opened on 1 July 2012. There is therefore no program data available in relation to

the R&D Tax Incentive, for either the 45 per cent refundable tax offset or the non refundable

40 per cent tax offset elements.

As at 30 June 2012, 134 applications for R&D Tax Incentive Overseas Findings and

22 applications for Advance Findings had been received; assessments of these applications

commenced immediately.

Take up of the R&D Tax Concession’s R&D Tax Offset and 175 per cent Premium elements

The R&D Tax Offset and the 175 per cent Premium have been in operation since the

2001-02 income year.

For the most recent complete income year 2009-10, a total of 3,899 companies indicated their

intention to claim the R&D Tax Offset (including 708 companies intending to claim both the

R&D Tax Offset and the 175 per cent Premium). This represented 45 per cent of total registrants

and approximately eight per cent of total R&D reported expenditure, which is comparable with

the equivalent figures for the 2008-09 income year (41 per cent of registrants and seven per cent

of R&D expenditure).

For the 175 per cent Premium, 1,559 companies indicated an intention to claim this element for

the 2009-10 income year (including 708 companies intending to claim both the R&D Tax Offset

and the 175 per cent Premium). This corresponded to 18 per cent of total registrants and 49 per

cent of total R&D expenditure, which represented a slight fall on the equivalent figures for the

previous income year (19 per cent and 60 per cent respectively, in 2008-09).

Research Service Providers (previously Registered Research Agencies)

The Australian Government’s commitment to encouraging business R&D is complemented by

facilitating access by small and medium sized companies to R&D expertise through the services

provided by Research Service Providers (RSPs).

RSP registration enables companies to access expertise in Australia’s public and private sector

R&D organisations, reducing unnecessary duplication of R&D facilities and improving the overall

effectiveness of Australia’s R&D effort. RSP registration also allows companies that would be

unable to claim the R&D Tax Incentive for R&D if their R&D expenditure has not reached the

minimum threshold ($20,000), to benefit from the R&D Tax Incentive by contracting their

R&D work to an organisation with RSP status.

As at 30 June 2012, 168 organisations were registered as RSPs. A list of registered RSPs can be

found at Appendix E.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Governance of the R&D Tax Concession and Incentive Programs

The R&D Tax Concession and the R&D Tax Incentive are administered by Innovation Australia

(assisted by AusIndustry) and the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

The R&D Incentives Committee (R&DIC), together with AusIndustry administers both programs

under delegation from Innovation Australia. The role of the R&DIC is outlined in Section 3 -

Corporate Governance.

Liaison with the Australian Taxation Office

As joint administrators of the R&D Tax Concession and R&D Tax Incentive programs, AusIndustry

and the ATO progressed a very high level of formal and informal interaction throughout 2010-11.

Strategies to optimise joint administration and to safeguard both programs’ integrity continued

to be developed through day-to-day contact between the two agencies and through formal

liaison meetings.

There was a very high level of collaboration in preparation for the implementation and

commencement of the R&D Tax Incentive. This work was progressed under the joint direction of

an Executive-level management committee - the Joint Administrative Governance Group (JAGG),

which was established under a Memorandum of Understanding between AusIndustry and the

ATO. The JAGG co-ordinates the implementation and delivery of an administrative framework to

ensure the continued integrity of the program and realise core program objectives (as articulated

in the relevant legislation and the Explanatory Memorandum). This joint administrative effort is

aimed at ensuring that education, guidance and compliance products delivered by both

organisations are consistent with the objectives of the program.

The JAGG ‘s principal focus is on ensuring the ongoing integrity of both the eligibility of claimed

R&D activities registered with Innovation Australia, and the veracity of related expenditure claims

lodged with the ATO by participants in the program.

In line with the above, key collaborations included:

• Strategic planning activities which involved a whole-of-program approach that looked to

optimise both R&D activity and expenditure risk management through concerted development

and delivery of both guidance and compliance products and processes;

• Establishment and ongoing consultation with a peak national industry reference group -

the R&D Incentive National Industry Reference Group (NRG), which includes key external

stakeholder groups and represents a forum for discussion of administrative and program

delivery matters;

• Review of the operational interface and ongoing exchange of information and business

intelligence by both agencies;

• Ongoing development and implementation of the joint risk management strategy

(including the establishment of a special project team to address fraud);

• Joint development of new guidance materials in line with the ongoing delivery of the

R&D Tax Incentive; and

• Extensive operational interaction between the AusIndustry and ATO distributed networks.

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

34

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Program Integrity Assurance

On behalf of Innovation Australia, AusIndustry actively monitors the R&D Tax Concession and

R&D Tax Incentive on a risk management basis. In 2011-12, AusIndustry reviewed approximately

11 per cent of all R&D Tax Concession registrations for compliance. In addition, AusIndustry carried

out broader industry sector profiling in order to improve understanding of R&D activities across

sectors, and to inform compliance risks and educational approaches. A particular focus was ICT -

approximately one-quarter of the registered R&D Tax Concession projects are ICT based, with R&D

expenditure around 25 per cent of the total expenditure under the program. A number of current

statutory assessments were used to inform future approaches to large business engagement

under the R&D Tax Incentive.

Compliance findings continue to show that the majority of companies represent a low risk in

respect of the compliance of their R&D activities. AusIndustry’s risk assessment may lead to

formal determinations of R&D eligibility by Innovation Australia or its delegate, which may in

turn result in denial of the Tax Concession and Tax Incentive deductions for R&D.

Through its national customer service network, AusIndustry continues to provide a range of

program guidance materials, educational seminars and risk assessment activities.

Customer Feedback and Liaison (R&D Tax Incentive)

The R&D Tax Incentive is the Australian Government’s principal measure to encourage industry

investment in research and development. It is a broad-based, market-driven program that aims to

boost company competitiveness, improve productivity and deliver economy-wide benefits to

Australia. The R&D Tax Incentive replaced the R&D Tax Concession for research and development

in income years commencing on or after 1 July 2011.

AusIndustry and the ATO conducted a comprehensive series of information sessions in capital

cities in September and October 2011, and regional areas through to December 2011. The sessions

raised awareness of the program, promoted benefits, and provided a broad platform to discuss

the administration of the program and gain feedback. These sessions received significant interest

with close to 3,000 attendees altogether.

AusIndustry released the discussion paper R&D Tax Incentive Implementation - Realising Effective

Compliance through Guidance and Education on 11 November 2011 with submissions closing on

31 January 2012. The paper sought industry feedback on a range of issues facing the program into

the future. AusIndustry received submissions from a broad range of entities including

consultants, large companies, small & medium-sized companies, universities, industry

associations and government bodies. A summary of the submissions that were provided to the

discussion paper is available on the AusIndustry website (ausindustry.gov.au).

AusIndustry conducted “Registration Readiness” workshops for the R&D Tax Incentive across

Australia in capital cities and regional areas to help participants in preparation for the opening of

registrations on 1 July 2012. These workshops were well attended by company representatives and

provided opportunities for feedback on guidance material. Registration workshops were also

conducted for taxation advisors. These workshops are planned to continue into 2012-13.

R&D TAX CONCESSION AND R&D TAX INCENTIVE

35

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

A peak consultative group, the R&D Tax Incentive National Reference Group (NRG) was also

established and met a total of four times in the 2011-12 income year. The NRG provides key

stakeholders and program administrators with a joint forum to identify, prioritise and discuss

technical and administrative issues relating to the R&D Tax Incentive. The NRG is co-chaired by

AusIndustry and the ATO.

The R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee (TIAC) was established as a committee of Innovation

Australia to monitor the implementation and operation of the R&D Tax Incentive program. The

TIAC will represent a range of views on the operation of the program and provide advice to the

Government, through Innovation Australia. The TIAC held its first meeting on 5 March 2012.

Other guidance continues to be prepared, and the approach adopted is grounded in effective

stakeholder liaison and feedback. This includes an R&D Tax Incentive Integrity Assurance

Framework (IAF) that will provide principle based guidance about what companies can expect

from working with AusIndustry, and how AusIndustry would like to work with program

participants. AusIndustry continues to release its quarterly R&D Tax Incentive electronic bulletin

to an extensive mailing list including participant companies, tax agents and other stakeholders.

Additional feedback was received through AusIndustry’s Hotline 13 28 46 or through the

dedicated email address rdtaxincentive@innovation.gov.au.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

36

Case study: Oz Sonotek R&D TAX INCENTIVE

Oz Sonotek is first R&D Tax Incentive Advanced Finding

With an eye to a massive global market,

West Australian company Oz Sonotek has

developed innovative patent protected needles

for use in cataract surgery. In a boost to the

company, they have received the first Advance

Finding under the new Australian Government’s

R&D Tax Incentive.

The Advance Finding means that the company

has certainty that they can register and claim for

activities covered in their finding as it binds the

program’s administrators.

Cataracts account for a major proportion of vision loss around the world. They are a common -

but treatable - cause of blindness. In fact, in sun-drenched Australia cataract surgery is the most

commonly performed eye procedure. Very simply, ultrasonic energy is delivered through a needle

to liquefy the cataract. To protect the delicate structure of the eye from this energy, fluid is

injected at the same time.

Although the procedure is quite safe and surgery is common, there are technical challenges: the

harder the cataract, the more energy required. The more energy required the greater the risk of

excess heat threatening the delicate structures of the eye. Oz Sonotek’s “D-Top” needles are over

30 per cent more energy efficient and, while other international firms have created new

complicated surgical systems to meet growing demand for cataract surgery, the needles are

the biggest technical development to cataract needles since the original technology.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

37

This Australian research and development has a potentially massive pay off: the global market

for cataract surgical devices is worth in excess of $1 billion annually. Oz Sonotek has accessed

the R&D Tax Concession previously and, having received its Advance Finding, is in the process

of transitioning to the new R&D Tax Incentive.

The inventor of the technology and founder of Oz Sonotek, Dr Nigel Morlet, said the transition

to the new R&D Tax Incentive has been an easy process. “The R&D Tax Concession allowed Oz

Sonotek to build and grow a business with strong international links right here in Australia. We

have also found the transition to the R&D Tax Incentive to be seamless,” Dr Morlet said. “Everyone

wins with R&D.”

The increased benefits under the Incentive will help us keep the bulk of our operations here in

Australia even as we grow and attract overseas partnerships. Research and development is at

the core of Oz Sonotek’s work and the R&D Tax Incentive helps make this work possible.”

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

38

Case study: Server Racks Australia R&D TAX INCENTIVE R&D TAX CONCESSION

Serving up Clean Tech innovations

A “can do” culture and excellent customer service

are behind many of Server Racks Australia’s (SRA)

innovations. The small Queanbeyan New South

Wales business - which manufactures cabinets

for computer servers - has developed a range

of innovations, many of which stem from

customers seeking tailor-made, customised

products. SRA’s best-known product, the iPAMM

(Intelligent Plenum Air Management Module)

cabinet, was developed six years ago to meet

a gap in the market for a secure purpose-built

server cabinet to house higher density (hot)

equipment.

The problem was that conventional secure cabinets - which must have very small ventilation

holes in order to be secure - traditionally required an entire room to be air conditioned in order to

prevent computer servers from overheating. The result was the iPAMM cabinet, which is designed

to enable a special cooling cassette to be installed underneath, delivering cool air via the floor to

the front of the cabinet. An overhead version is also available.

SRA, which was founded 27 years ago, started out as a high precision metal fabricator, before

specialising in computer server racks and cabinets. In recent years the company has branched out

into the project management of ‘turn key’ data centre solutions and has completed the University

of Canberra’s new data centre. SRA employs 45 people, including six apprentices, and operates

two factories six days a week, 21 hours a day. “Research and development is part of our daily

business,” Project Manager Michael Lloyd said.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

39

We dedicate at least 10 per cent of our turnover to innovation, and in some years up to 20 per cent.

The company’s most recent innovation - the High Density Cell - has positioned SRA as being

the only company in the world to produce secure high density cabinets capable of accurate fire

detection and suppression. The unit is completely sealed to stop potential fires spreading

and damaging other computer equipment.

Other innovations include:

• a simple flat pack snap-in-clip-assembled cabinet which saves on transportation and

storage costs as the units can be easily assembled at their destination;

• a power rail capable of measuring current;

• manufacturing tools, equipment and processes which are versatile and allow for rapid

changeover to cater for customised designs; and

• The company has been a customer of the R&D Tax Concession since 2005-06 and is looking

forward to the benefits of the new R&D Tax Incentive, which provides greater incentives

for research and development, especially for small businesses.

INNOVATION INVESTMENT FUND

40

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Innovation Investment Fund

ESTABLISHMENT

The Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) program was established in 1997 to promote the

development of an Australian venture capital market. The Australian Government co-invests

with private sector investors in IIF funds to invest in promising early stage, technology-based

companies commercialising Australian research. By demonstrating the returns achievable from

investing in such investee companies, the IIF program aims to encourage private sector investors

to take a more active role supporting Australian innovation.

There have been three rounds of the IIF program. Five funds were established in 1998 under

Round 1, four funds in 2001 under Round 2 and seven funds have been established to date

under Round 3.

The Australian Government committed $220.7 million for Rounds 1 and 2, with private sector

investors bringing total funding for the two rounds to $354 million. The Australian Government

committed $140 million for Round 3 Tranches 1, 2 and 3 of the IIF program. For the fourth tranche

of Round 3 the Australian Government has committed a further $100 million of Government

capital matched on at least a dollar for dollar basis with private sector capital. IIF funds operate

for a period of 10 years with an additional three years for the orderly divestment of investee

companies and wind-up of the fund if required.

IIF funds are managed by private sector fund managers who are awarded licences in a

competitive selection process. They have been assessed against merit criteria which include

expertise and capacity to manage venture capital investments and the ability to raise private

sector capital. The selection process is conducted by the Venture Capital Committee (VCC)

of Innovation Australia in accordance with the IIF Ministerial Guidelines.

Fund managers are responsible for all investment decisions and the commercial arrangements

with eligible investee companies.

OBJECTIVES

The objectives of the IIF program are:

• to develop fund managers with experience in the early stage venture capital industry;

• by addressing capital and management constraints, to encourage the development of new

companies which are commercialising research and development;

• to establish in the medium term a “revolving” or self funding scheme; and

• to develop a self-sustaining Australian early stage, venture capital market.

INNOVATION INVESTMENT FUND

41

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table 2.5 · IIF Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m) 2014-15 ($m)

Budget a 129.03 b 32.26 27.52 21.39

Commitments 30.30 c 58.60 17.07 10.54

Payments made 19.22 0.00 0.00 0.00

a. Portfolio Budget Statement 2012-13, Budget Related Paper No.113, Innovation, Industry, Science and Research Portfolio.

b. Includes Revolving Fund proceeds of $68.31 million.

c. The ‘Payments made’ figure includes management fees and recoverable expenses.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE The licensed fund managers report to Innovation Australia six monthly on operations, including

the current investment valuation. Fund managers reported varying performances during 2011-12.

For 2011-12, total capital of $33.29 million was invested into 33 companies, of which $15.93 million

was drawn from the Australian Government. Twenty two of the 33 companies were new

investments to the IIF in 2011-12.

For 2011-12, the Australian Government received returns of $4.66 million. As at 30 June 2012, total

IFF returns were $473.37 million, of which the Australian Government has received $153.08 million.

Of this, $132.72 million has been added to the IIF Revolving Fund

Note: $64.41 million of the IIF Revolving Fund was allocated to the Innovation Investment

Follow-on Fund (IIFF) Program and $40 million to the IIF Round 3 Tranche 4.

During 2011-12, three IIF Round 1 funds were wound-up and one IIF Round 1 fund was

terminated and placed under management of a trustee. During 2011-12, two IIF Round 2 funds

were wound-up. AusIndustry commissions independent wind-up compliance audits for

all terminating funds.

OUTCOMES

The IIF program has contributed to the commercialisation of Australian R&D, with investee

companies bringing new products, services and processes to both the Australian and

international markets. The program has also supported the growth of competitive firms.

Since the inception of the program, outcomes achieved include:

• private capital of $283.30 million has been raised;

• 123 individual investee companies have received investment; and

• 109 professional venture capital managers have been engaged during the life of the program.

Case studies on Osprey Medical and Vaxxas are provided in this annual report. Further examples

are provided in the publication Innovation, Investment and Venture Capital ausindustry.gov.au/

programs/venturecapital/InvestmentInnovationVentureCapital/Documents/

InvestmentInnovationVentureCapital.pdf.

INNOVATION INVESTMENT FUND

42

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

During 2011-12, twelve investee companies were fully divested and one was partially divested.

Nine of the sixteen IIF fund managers have raised other venture capital or private equity funds,

contributing to the development of the venture capital industry in Australia. Generally, these

funds invest in a broader range of investments than their IIF funds.

SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS

Investee companies eligible for investment by IIF fund managers must, amongst other things:

• be commercialising Australian research and development;

• have a majority of its employees (by number) and assets (by value) inside Australia

at the time the licensed fund first invests in the company; and

• have an annual revenue over the past two years of income that does not exceed

$5 million per year.

Investee companies supported must also be at the seed, start-up or early expansion stage

of their development.

GOVERNANCE

Innovation Australia oversees the operation of the IIF program through its VCC,

assisted by AusIndustry.

The role of the VCC is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate Governance.

For IIF Rounds 1 and 2 and the PSF and REEF programs, the Australian Government established five

wholly-owned companies (IIF Companies) which operate under the legislative framework set by

the Corporations Act 2001 and the Commonwealth Authorities and Companies Act 1997 (CAC Act).

To achieve compliance with the Uhrig Review principles Round 3 of the IIF program is now

administered by the Department. As a result the Australian Government has invested directly

into the licensed funds. This direct investment approach was also adopted for the Innovation

Investment Follow-on Fund program.

Only one of the original five IIF Companies (IIF Investments Pty Ltd) remains and its

operational details are described in a separate annual report, the IIF Investments Pty Ltd

Annual Report 2011-12.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

43

Case study: Osprey Medical INNOVATION INVESTMENT FUND

ASX listing paves way for full commercialisation

Osprey Medical’s initial public offering on the

Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) in May 2012

raised $20 million - a strong endorsement of

the company’s CINCOR device, which reduces

the risk of kidney damage from the dyes used

by cardiologists in procedures like angioplasty

and stenting.

Osprey’s CEO, Mike McCormick says the IPO

was well received by institutional investors but

the company was also surprised by the support

of retail investors.

Osprey Medical plans to conduct a pivotal clinical trial in 2012, hopefully leading to approval

by the United States’ Food & Drug Administration in 2014. The trial will involve 600 patients in

30 centres around world, with 25 centres in the United States and the others in Australia,

New Zealand, Germany and the Netherlands.

Osprey Medical’s CINCOR device has already been approved in Europe following CE Mark

approval, and a controlled market launch in Germany and the Netherlands is planned for 2012.

The idea for the CINCOR system originated with Professor David Kaye from the Baker IDI

Heart and Diabetes Institute, an independent, internationally renowned medical research

facility in Melbourne.

The CINCOR system is a catheter and vacuum system that captures and removes a significant

quantity of the toxic dyes (contrast) used in heart procedures such as angioplasty and stenting.

The CINCOR system removes these dyes as they leave the heart, before they make their way to

the kidney. These dyes can reduce blood flow in kidneys, leading to kidney cell damage.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

44

Osprey Medical was formed in 2005 to develop and commercialise Professor Kaye’s research.

In 2009, venture capital investment from Brandon Capital Partners, licensed under the Australian

Government’s Innovation Investment Fund, and CM Capital Investments, helped accelerate

the commercial development of this novel technology.

US-based Chief Executive Mike McCormick considers the ASX listing a significant milestone

for the company, but believes the venture capital support in the company’s early days was

important in getting Osprey to the stage of being able to undertake the IPO.

“Venture capital was critical to Osprey’s success and it plays a vital role in the medtech

industry,” he said.

“Venture capitalists are prepared to take the risk in the critical early stages enabling the

development of medical devices and drugs which ultimately improve patient care”.

“And venture capital support is much more than just the money. These venture capitalists

sit on our board, and because they sit on many companies’ boards they have a broad

knowledge and expertise for us to draw on.”

Osprey estimates the market is worth $US 600-800 million per year. In the US and

Western Europe alone, 2.2 million patients undergo angioplasty and stenting procedures

and around 400,000 of these patients have pre-existing kidney damage.

EARLY STAGE VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

45

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships

ESTABLISHMENT

The Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (ESVCLP) program was established in

June 2007 under the Venture Capital Act 2002 (VC Act) and amendments to the Income Tax

Assessment Act 1997 and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936.

The ESVCLP program uses a key component of the Australian Government’s approach to tax

based venture capital programs, the Incorporated Limited Partnership (ILP). A world class venture

capital fund structure, the ILP was first made available to the Australian industry in 2002 through

the Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP) program and has gained industry acceptance.

The ESVCLP vehicle is a specialised investment vehicle for fund managers seeking to raise a new

venture capital fund to make early stage venture capital investments in Australian businesses.

ESVCLPs can only make investments as provided for under the legislation. Broadly, these are new

equity investments in companies or unit trusts with total assets of not more than $50 million

that do not have property development or financial services as their predominant activity.

An ESVCLP must also divest itself of any holdings once the total assets of the investee exceed

$250 million. An ESVCLP must have its investment plan approved by Innovation Australia and

be structured as a limited partnership, with committed capital of at least $10 million and

not more than $100 million.

The ESVCLP program is an investment vehicle providing flow-through tax treatment and a

complete tax exemption for income (both revenue and capital) received by its domestic and

foreign partners. The ESVCLP program has progressively replaced the Pooled Development Funds

(PDF) program although existing registered PDFs continue to operate and are entitled to

concessional tax treatment as provided for under the PDF legislation.

OBJECTIVES

The ESVCLP program is designed to stimulate the Australian venture capital sector by

increasing the pool of capital available for investment (from both domestic and foreign sources)

in the Australian venture capital sector through providing a tax exemption to investors and to

encourage investment in start-up enterprises with a view to commercialisation of activity.

EARLY STAGE VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

46

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

The number of registered ESVCLPs as at 30 June 2012 was 11 (including seven conditionally

registered), representing an increase of two since 30 June 2011. Of the $120 million committed to

registered ESVCLPs, $80 million is from funds also licensed under the IIF program (representing

Government and private investor co-investment).

Since inception of the program in 2007, $27 million has been invested by ESVCLPs in eligible

Australian businesses, including $17.5 million in 17 businesses during 2011-12.

SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS

The ESVCLP program uses the ILP structure and offers a complete tax exemption to both

domestic and foreign investors on returns made from early stage venture capital investments.

GOVERNANCE

The ESVCLP program is jointly administered by the ATO and Innovation Australia through its

VCC with the assistance of AusIndustry. ESVCLPs are required to operate in accordance with the

VC Act and the relevant Income Tax Assessment Acts. The VCC deals with registration purposes

and the ATO provides the tax concession for partners registered under the program.

It is the role of the VCC, supported by AusIndustry, to monitor compliance and take actions

as required. Registration of applications is decided by the VCC and ESVCLP activity reports

are reviewed for compliance by both the VCC and the ATO.

The role of the VCC is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate Governance.

REVIEW OF THE VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS REGIME

On 11 May 2010, the then Assistant Treasurer and the then Minister for Financial Services,

Superannuation and Corporate Law announced that the Government had requested the Board

of Taxation to undertake a review of the tax treatment of collective investment vehicles, having

regard to the new managed investment trust tax framework and including whether a broader

range of tax flow-through vehicles should be permitted. As part of the review, it was announced

that the Board of Taxation would also examine the treatment of Venture Capital Limited

Partnership vehicles (i.e. the VCLP and ESVCLP programs).

A review of Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Skills in Australia has also been undertaken by

the Department and the Treasury. The aim of the review is to examine what future actions might

be required in the area of venture capital and entrepreneurial skills to help build early stage

Australian companies with high growth potential. The review will also incorporate the findings

of the Board of Taxation review of the VCLP and ESVCLP programs within the broader review

of venture capital. At time of writing the review of Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Skills

in Australia had not been finalised.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

47

Case study: Vaxxas EARLY STAGE VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS INNOVATION INVESTMENT FUND

Quest to bring vaccine patch to market

Vaxxas is on a quest to achieve the holy grail

of the vaccine industry - a pain free way to

deliver vaccines without needles and syringes.

Vaxxas was formed in August 2011 by a

$15 million syndicate of venture capital funds

to commercialise the Nanopatch, which was

invented in 2004 by Professor Mark Kendall

from the University of Queensland’s Australian

Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

(AIBN).

The Nanopatch is a silicon patch with thousands

of small projections that are designed to hit

abundant immune cells in the skin. A vaccine is

coated onto the Nanopatch which should be

more effective than vaccines delivered via

needles. Tests in animals have confirmed

improved immune responses compared to

standard needle and syringe injection.

While many people no doubt look forward to the day that vaccinations are pain-free, for the

developing world Vaxxas’ Nanopatch could have substantial public health benefits. It removes the

risk of needle-stick injuries, cross contamination and is expected to remove the need for

refrigeration - making transport much easier and cheaper.

Vaxxas Chairman, and OneVentures partner, Dr Paul Kelly, says the $15 million investment is one

of the largest in a start-up biotechnology company in Australia, and would help Professor Kendall

and his team take their pioneering research out of the laboratory and into the market.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

48

OneVentures is the lead investor in the syndicate, which also includes Brandon Capital Partners,

and the Medical Research Commercialisation Fund (MRCF). All three fund managers are licensed

under the Australian Government’s Innovation Investment Fund. US-based HealthCare Ventures

is another investor.

OneVentures is also registered as an Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnership (ESVCLP),

which provides tax benefits to investors for investments in investees with assets of up to

$50 million at time of initial investment. Brandon and MRCF benefit from being registered

under a related program - the Venture Capital Limited Partnership (VCLP) - which is for funds

with assets of up to $250 million.

“One of the benefits of the quantum of funds raised is that Professor Kendall and his team will

be able to spend their time doing what they are best at - developing the Nanopatch - without

having to worry about raising the necessary finance to achieve key milestones,” Dr Kelly said.

“There are significant technical hurdles that need to be overcome, including ensuring the

technology can be scaled for manufacture and is able to be reliably produced to clinical standards

in the millions. We also need to follow the well-articulated path to regulatory approval, and of

course, ensure the Nanopatch works in humans”.

“OneVentures is unusual because the bulk of its investors are private individuals, rather than

institutional investors. Being registered as an ESVCLP was attractive for these investors because

of the tax benefits this program offers,” Dr Kelly said.

Vaxxas was recently recognised at the World Vaccine Congress, April 2012, in Washington DC

winning the Vaccine Industry Excellence Award for Best Venture Deal. The award selection

considered the technology, the deal structure, the investment team and the global market

opportunity. In 2011, Vaxxas was the winner of the high-tech design category and the overall

prize in the inaugural Australian Innovation Challenge.

VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

49

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Venture Capital Limited Partnerships

The Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP) program was established in December 2002

under the Venture Capital Act 2002 (VC Act) and amendments to the Income Tax Assessment Act

1997 and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936.

Fund managers seeking to raise a new venture capital fund to make investments in

Australian businesses with total assets of not more than $250 million can apply to register

the fund as a VCLP. The VCLP program uses a key component of the Australian Government’s

approach to tax based venture capital programs, the ILP. A world-class venture capital fund

structure, the ILP was first made available to the industry in 2002 through the VCLP program and

has gained industry acceptance. A fund must have an appropriate investment plan and be

structured as an ILP with committed capital of at least $10 million. VCLP registration entitles a

fund to flow-through tax treatment (i.e. it is not a taxing point). Further, a fund’s eligible foreign

investors receive a capital gains tax exemption for their share of the fund’s gains from eligible

investments. The fund’s other investors have their share of the fund’s gains taxed in their hands.

VCLPs can only make eligible investments as defined by the VC Act and the relevant Income Tax

Assessment Acts. Broadly they are equity investments in companies or unit trusts with total

assets of not more than $250 million that do not have property development or financial

services as their predominant activity.

The VC Act also provides for two other types of registration:

• For an Australian resident general partner, registration is available for a specific limited

partnership investment vehicle called an Australian Venture Capital Fund of Funds (AFOF)

in accordance with Section 9-5 of the VC Act. Such funds can only make investments in

a VCLP or invest in a company in which a VCLP is a limited partner. To date no AFOFs

have been registered; and

• For tax-exempt foreign residents, registration is available as an Eligible Venture Capital

Investor in accordance with Part 3 of the VC Act. Registration allows the entity to make direct

investments and disregard any gain made on disposal of an eligible venture capital investment.

To date one eligible venture capital investor has been registered.

OBJECTIVES

The VCLP program is designed to stimulate the Australian venture capital industry by providing

incentives for increased foreign investment which will support patient equity capital investments

in relatively high-risk start-up and expanding businesses that would otherwise have difficulty in

attracting investment through normal commercial means.

VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

50

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

As at 30 June 2012, there were 43 registered VCLPs (including three conditionally registered)

with $5.9 billion3 in committed capital. This represents an increase of $1.4 billion in committed

capital since 30 June 2011. Approximately 30 per cent of all capital has been sourced from

foreign investors.

Since the inception of the program, $2.3 billion has been invested by VCLPs in eligible Australian

businesses, including $313 million invested in 84 businesses during 2011-12.

At 30 June 2012, VCLPs held eligible investments in 161 businesses costing $1.5 billion, which they

valued at $1.6 billion.

OUTCOMES

During 2011-12, VCLPs made 124 deals in which $313 million was invested into 84 businesses.

Thirty-eight of the deals were initial investments into businesses, and 86 were follow-on

investments. The number of deals increased slightly over the previous year’s total of 117. However,

the amount invested during the year decreased on the $432 million recorded in the previous year.

DIVESTMENTS

Eleven VCLPs reported 13 divestments during 2011-12, realising $244 million from investments

that cost $198 million for a capital gain of $46 million. This is a decrease over the previous year

in which 13 divestments were reported with a capital gain of $310 million.

SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS

A VCLP receives flow-through tax treatment - that is, it is not a taxing point. Eligible foreign

investors in a VCLP are exempt from income tax on profits or gains derived from the sale of

eligible investments by the VCLP. A VCLP’s other investors have their share of the VCLP’s gains

taxed in their hands. The general partner of a VCLP has its share of the gains made by the

VCLP on the sale of eligible investments (the carried interest) taxed as a capital gain.

GOVERNANCE

The VCLP program is jointly administered by the ATO and Innovation Australia through its VCC

with the assistance of AusIndustry. The VCC deals with registration purposes and the ATO

provides the tax concession for partners registered under the program. VCLPs are required to

operate in accordance with the VC Act and the relevant Income Tax Assessment Acts.

3 This is a headline figure as most VCLPs have a unit trust attached through which committed capital can be invested. This enables fund managers to acquire otherwise attractive investments that are deemed ineligible for a VCLP.

VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

51

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

It is the VCC’s role, supported by AusIndustry, to monitor certain aspects of compliance and

administer and take actions as required. Registration applications are decided by the VCC and

VCLP activity reports are reviewed for compliance by both the VCC and the ATO.

The role of the VCC is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate Governance.

REVIEW OF THE VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS REGIME

On 11 May 2010, the then Assistant Treasurer and the then Minister for Financial Services,

Superannuation and Corporate Law announced that the Government had requested the Board

of Taxation to undertake a review of the tax treatment of collective investment vehicles, having

regard to the new managed investment trust tax framework and including whether a broader

range of tax flow-through vehicles should be permitted. As part of the review, it was announced

that the Board of Taxation would also examine the treatment of Venture Capital Limited

Partnership vehicles (i.e. the VCLP and ESVCLP programs).

A review of Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Skills in Australia has also been undertaken

by the Department and the Treasury. The aim of the review is to examine what future actions

might be required in the area of venture capital and entrepreneurial skills to help build early

stage Australian companies with high growth potential. The review will also deal with the Board

of Taxation review of the VCLP and ESVCLP programs within the broader review of venture capital.

At time of writing the review of Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Skills in Australia had

not been finalised.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

52

Case study: Windlab Systems Pty Ltd VENTURE CAPITAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIPS

Australian wind energy technology takes off around the world

Windlab’s unique wind energy atmospheric

modeling systems are being used to find the

best sites for wind farms across Canada, the

United States, Australia, New Zealand and

South Africa.

Windlab Systems Pty Ltd is a global wind

energy development company established

in 2003 as a spin-out from the CSIRO.

Windlab exclusively owns and uses a suite

of world-leading atmospheric modeling and

wind energy prospecting tools to identify

and efficiently deliver ready-to-build wind

farm sites.

Windlab has rapidly secured a portfolio of

high quality wind farm sites totaling more

than 7000 megawatts (MW) of potential capacity across Canada, the United States, Australia,

New Zealand and South Africa in less than five years. Two-hundred and seventy MW of this

capacity is now operating while a further 1500 MW fully permitted and undergoing advanced

offtake and financing negotiations.

A $5 million investment led by Innovation Capital in 2007 helped Windlab accelerate development

of its technology, and since then another $20 million from Lend Lease Ventures, Innovation Capital

and other institutional investors has helped the company fund its rapid expansion.

Mr Roger Price is a partner with Innovation Capital Fund II, a venture capital fund operating

under the Australian Government’s Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP) program. He is

also the Chairman and CEO of Windlab.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

53

Mr Price said that if all the sites Windlab had identified were built today, they would be worth

more than $11 billion and over time they would make an enormous contribution to reducing

carbon dioxide emissions around the world.

The company is able to map potential sites around the world from its offices in Canberra with

a far greater accuracy than provided by industry standard tools. The technology feeds into a range

of meteorological and atmospheric data with land use and terrain information to predict wind

speed and probable wind farm energy output from any point, anywhere in the world. It tests

potential wind power sites and towers in the virtual world before they are built.

At the time of its initial investment Windlab only employed half a dozen people. It now employs

nearly 40, on three continents.

“Being registered as a VCLP provided vital support for Innovation Capital in raising its venture

fund, that has ultimately been able to support Windlab’s international expansion,” Mr Price said.

“It has proven to be an excellent vehicle to attract ‘alternate asset class’ investors to venture

capital. It gives our investors a tax-effective vehicle for what is still essentially a high-risk,

high-return investment asset class”.

It makes Australia’s venture capital industry competitive with international markets. It provides

a competitive tax structure which is certain and enshrined in legislation.

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT PROGRAM

54

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Clean Technology Investment Program

ESTABLISHMENT

On 16 February 2012, the Minister for Industry and Innovation, the Hon Greg Combet AM MP,

launched the Clean Technology Investment program.

The Clean Technology Investment Program is a central element of the Australian Government’s

Clean Energy Future plan announced in July 2011. The Clean Energy Future plan provides

transitional assistance for businesses and industry through the $8.6 billion Jobs and

Competitiveness Program, the $1.2 billion Clean Technology Program, the $300 million Steel

Transformation Plan and the $1.3 billion Coal Sector Jobs Package.

The $800 million Clean Technology Investment Program will provide support, over seven years

until 2017-18, to Australian manufacturers to maintain competitiveness in a carbon constrained

economy. The program provides grants for investments in energy efficient capital equipment and

low emission technologies, processes and products.

OBJECTIVES

The policy objective of the Clean Technology Investment Program is to assist Australian

manufacturing businesses to invest in energy efficient capital equipment and low emissions

technologies, processes and products in order to maintain the competitiveness of manufacturing

businesses in a carbon constrained economy.

The objective of the Clean Technology Investment Program will be achieved by providing grants

to existing Australian manufacturing businesses to invest in energy efficient capital equipment

and low emissions technologies, processes and products.

Table 2.6 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m) 2014-15 ($m)

Budget 0.39 79.62 114.75 154.50

Commitments 0.00 1.21 0.28 0.00

Payments made 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT PROGRAM

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE During the 2011-12 financial year, 42 applications to the Clean Technology Investment Program

were received.

AusIndustry undertakes an initial assessment of applications to determine eligibility and

completeness. Eligible applications are referred to the Clean Technology Investment Committee

for assessment against the merit criteria.

Eligible applications for grants of $5 million and greater are subsequently referred to Innovation

Australia, by the Clean Technology Investment Committee for further consideration.

Eligible applications for grants of $10 million and greater, that are supported by Innovation

Australia, are subsequently referred to the Cabinet of the Australian Government for final

consideration. For grants greater than $20 million, applicants are required to prepare and

implement an Australian Industry Participation Plan.

During the 2011-12 financial year, the Clean Technology Investment Committee met twice to

consider six applications under the Clean Technology Investment Program. Five applications were

subsequently recommended for funding. No applications were referred to Innovation Australia

or to the Cabinet of the Australian Government.

Table 2.7 · Clean Technology Investment Program

Applications Received Applications Considered

Applications Approved

Approved ($m)

Clean Technology Investment Program 42 6 5 1.49

OUTCOMES

The outcome of the Clean Technology Investment Program will be leveraged capital investment

in energy efficient and low emissions technologies, plant and equipment to reduce carbon

emissions intensity, including through improvements in energy efficiency.

The key performance indicator for the 2011-12 financial year was the proportion of companies

assisted reporting a minimum five per cent reduction in carbon intensity. All assisted companies

reached this prescribed reduction.

Table 2.8 · Outcomes of Clean Technology Investment Program

Applications Approved Total project cost ($m)

Clean Technology Investment Program 5 4.48

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT PROGRAM

56

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS Grants are provided to successful applicants to fund part of total eligible project costs. The

proportion of the cost covered by the grant is determined by the grant ratio.

For manufacturers who are not liable under the Carbon Pricing Mechanism, the available grant

ratio is dependent on the size of the grant requested and the turnover of the applicant.

Table 2.9 · Clean Technology Investment Program Grant Ratio

Grant amount Annual turnover of applicant* Applicant to grant ratio

$25,000 < $500,000 Less than $100 million Up to 1:1

$25,000 < $500,000 $100 million or more Up to 2:1

$500,000 < $10 million N/A Up to 2:1

≥ $10 million N/A 3:1**

* Applies to the annual turnover of the applicant in the financial year preceding the lodgement of an eligible application.

** unless otherwise recommended by the Cabinet of the Australian Government.

An additional funding ratio is available for some companies with manufacturing facilities

that are likely to face a direct carbon liability.

This grant ratio is available for manufactures with facilities that have emitted 25,000 tonnes

or greater, but less than 100,000 tonnes of covered emissions in the last full financial year prior

to application lodgement.

Table 2.10 · Grant Ratio for some companies with manufacturing facilities

Grant amount Annual turnover of applicant* Applicant to grant ratio

$25,000 - upwards Not Applicable Up to 1:1

GOVERNANCE

Ministerial Program Guidelines and Program Directions, issued by the Minister under the

Industry Research and Development Act 1986, provide the policy and procedures for administering

the Clean Technology Investment Program.

The Clean Technology Investment Committee, under Innovation Australia, was established to

provide a merit assessment for all eligible applications received under the Clean Technology

Investment Program. The Committee comprises members with a range of experience and

qualifications relevant to assessing applications from Australian manufacturers. The Committee

provides independent expert advice and a merit assessment of all eligible applications received.

Further information about the Committee is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate Governance.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

57

Case Study GH Varley Pty Ltd CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT PROGRAM

Varley Group switched on to reduce electricity use by 20 per cent

High electricity bills were one incentive for

G.H. Varley Pty Ltd - trading as the Varley

Group of Companies, to apply for a Clean

Technology Investment Program grant.

The NSW engineering company was awarded

$143,886 in 2012 towards a $353,836 project

at its Tomago site. The project involved

replacing inefficient air conditioning, and

installing voltage regulation equipment to

increase plant efficiency.

The company’s Commercial Manager, Tim O’Brien, says Varley would save 8-15 per cent on

its annual power bills by installing a voltage regulator.

Along with the new air conditioning system, the company hopes to reduce electricity use by

20 per cent. As well, the company’s carbon emissions intensity will be reduced by 23 per cent.

“Our air conditioning system was very old and inefficient,” Mr O’Brien said. “It either went flat

out all of the time, or didn’t work at all. The new system uses smart technology to maintain

the right temperature.”

The Varley Group of Companies employs around 600 nationally. The company has been

established for 126 years, and is one of the oldest companies in the Hunter Valley.

The company has developed an extensive depth of knowledge and experience across diverse

light and heavy engineering activities, including projects in military aerospace, defence product

development, innovative specialised vehicles, and new electric vehicle technologies.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

58

Mr O’Brien said applying for the Clean Technology Investment grant was relatively simple

as the company already had much of the required information recorded after being awarded

an Australian Government Re tooling for Climate Change grant in 2010.

“I found out about the Clean Technology Investment Program grant from the AusIndustry

website on the Monday, and lodged our application on the Thursday,” he said.

As well as the considerable savings on electricity bills, the carbon savings for the nation

as a whole, were also important.

“Our shareholders are very interested in doing the right thing by the environment,”

Mr O’Brien said.

“We were able to point out that our investment would reduce our carbon dioxide

emissions by 4.2 kilotonnes.”

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FOOD AND FOUNDRIES INVESTMENT PROGRAM

59

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program

ESTABLISHMENT

On 16 February 2012, the Minister for Industry and Innovation, the Hon Greg Combet AM MP,

launched the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program.

The Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program is a central element of the

Australian Government’s Clean Energy Future plan announced in July 2011. The Clean Energy

Future plan provides transitional assistance for businesses and industry through the $8.6 billion

Jobs and Competitiveness Program, the $1.2 billion Clean Technology Program, the $300 million

Steel Transformation Plan and the $1.3 billion Coal Sector Jobs Package.

The $200 million Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program will provide support,

over six years until 2016-17, to Australian food and foundry manufacturers to maintain

competitiveness in a carbon constrained economy. The program provides grants for investments

in energy efficient capital equipment and low emission technologies, processes and products.

OBJECTIVES

The policy objective of the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program is to assist

Australian food and foundry manufacturing businesses to invest in energy efficient capital

equipment and low emissions technologies, processes and products in order to maintain the

competitiveness of Australian manufacturing businesses in a carbon constrained economy.

The objective of the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program will be achieved by

providing grants to existing Australian food and foundry manufacturing businesses to invest in

energy efficient capital equipment and low emissions technologies, processes and products.

Table 2.11 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2011

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m) 2014-15 ($m)

Budget 1.50 35.90 50.00 55.00

Commitments 0.00 2.44 2.96 0.97

Payments made 0.26 0.00 0.00 0.00

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FOOD AND FOUNDRIES INVESTMENT PROGRAM

60

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

During the 2011-12 financial year 42 applications to the Clean Technology Food and Foundries

Investment Program were received.

AusIndustry undertakes an initial assessment of applications to determine eligibility and

completeness. Eligible applications are referred to the Clean Technology Investment Committee

for assessment against the merit criteria.

Eligible applications for grants of $5 million and greater are subsequently referred to Innovation

Australia by the Clean Technology Investment Committee for further consideration.

Eligible applications for grants of $10 million and greater, that are supported by Innovation

Australia, are subsequently referred to the Cabinet of the Australian Government for final

consideration. For grants greater than $20 million, applicants are required to prepare and

implement an Australian Industry Participation Plan.

During the 2011-12 financial year, the Clean Technology Investment Committee met twice

to consider nine applications to the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program.

Eight applications were subsequently recommended for funding. No applications were

referred to Innovation Australia or to the Cabinet of the Australian Government.

Table 2.12 · Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program

Applications Received Applications Considered

Applications Approved

Approved ($m)

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program

42 9 8 6.62

OUTCOMES The outcome of the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program will be leveraged

capital investment in energy efficient and low emissions technologies, plant and equipment to

reduce carbon emissions intensity, including through improvements in energy efficiency.

The key performance indicator for the 2011-12 financial year was the proportion of companies

assisted reporting a minimum five per cent reduction in carbon intensity. All assisted companies

reached this prescribed reduction.

Table 2.13 · Outcomes of Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program Applications Approved Total project cost ($m)

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program 8 18.67

CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FOOD AND FOUNDRIES INVESTMENT PROGRAM

61

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

SUPPORT PROVIDED TO CUSTOMERS Grants are provided to successful applicants to fund part of total eligible project costs. The

proportion of the cost covered by the grant is determined by the grant ratio.

For manufacturers who are not liable under the Carbon Pricing Mechanism, the available grant

ratio is dependent on the size of the grant requested and the turnover of the applicant.

Table 2. 14 · Clean Technologies Food and Foundries Investment Program Grant Ratio

Grant amount Annual turnover of applicant* Applicant to grant ratio

$25,000 < $500,000 Less than $100 million Up to 1:1

$25,000 < $500,000 $100 million or more Up to 2:1

$500,000 < $10 million N/A Up to 2:1

≥ $10 million N/A 3:1**

* Applies to the annual turnover of the applicant in the financial year preceding the lodgement of an eligible application.

** unless otherwise recommended by the Cabinet of the Australian Government.

An additional funding ratio is available for some companies with manufacturing facilities

that are likely to face a direct carbon liability.

This grant ratio is available for manufactures with facilities that have emitted 25,000 tonnes

or greater, but less than 100,000 tonnes of covered emissions in the last full financial year

prior to application lodgement.

Table 2.15 · Grant Ratio for some companies with manufacturing facilities

Grant amount Annual turnover of applicant* Applicant to grant ratio

$25,000 - upwards Not Applicable Up to 1:1

GOVERNANCE

Ministerial Program Guidelines and Program Directions, issued by the Minister under the

Industry Research and Development Act 1986, provide the policy and procedures for administering

the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program.

The Clean Technology Investment Committee, under Innovation Australia, was established to

provide a merit assessment for all eligible applications received under the Clean Technology Food

and Foundries Investment Program. The Committee comprises members with a range of

experience and qualifications relevant to assessing applications from Australian manufacturers,

in particular those from the food and foundries sectors. The Committee provides independent

expert advice and a merit assessment of all eligible applications received.

Further information about the Committee is outlined in Section 3 - Corporate Governance.

CASE STUDY

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

62

Case study: Crafty Chef CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT FOOD AND FOUNDRIES PROGRAM

New freezer system for Crafty Chef is recipe for success

Western Sydney food manufacturer

Crafty Chef will reduce its carbon emissions

intensity by more than 50 per cent thanks

to an Australian Government-backed project

costing $1.1 million.

Crafty Chef is one of Australia’s leading

producers of frozen prepared meals, finger

foods and sauces. The Crafty Chef products,

such as Bella’s Kitchen, The Good Meal Co

and Simply Special are widely available at all

leading Australian supermarket retailers, and

are also available to the food service industry.

The project has been funded under the

Australian Government’s $200 million Clean

Technology Food and Foundries Investment

Program, with a $499,999 grant supporting Crafty Chef’s near $600,000 investment in

a new freezer system that will bring energy efficiencies and electric power savings.

Crafty Chef will replace their existing commercial blast freezer system with an industrial

spiral freezer system using ammonia as the refrigerant. The ammonia system uses an

evaporative condenser which delivers an increase in overall system efficiency and electric

power demand savings.

At the completion of the project, as a result of increased capacity of the new freezer

system, production levels will be doubled and there will be cost savings of approximately

$20,000 per year from energy reductions.

CASE STUDY

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

63

This is the sort of project that the $800 million Clean Technology Investment Program and the

$200 million Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program were set up to support.

The Clean Technology Investment Programs are about providing practical assistance to help

manufacturers improve their operations so they can improve their competitiveness and begin

the transition to a clean-energy economy.

Mr Jitesh Gohil, Crafty Chef General Manager and co-founder, said the grant would help the

Emu Plains-based company transform its operations, reduce its energy emissions and save

on its power bills.

“The Clean Technology Investment Food and Foundries Program was pivotal for us to invest

so heavily in this project,” Mr Gohil said.

“Without the Government funding the project would not have been possible”.

“Crafty Chef is proud of this project and excited to be a manufacturer aware of the need in

the current world climate to be taking action to reduce emissions”.

“It also simply makes good business sense as the cost of power is rising and if Australia’s

manufacturers, big and small, are to continue to prosper we need to transform how we operate.”

Crafty Chef has been in operation for about 15 years, after the Gohil family moved to Australia in

1997 from the United Kingdom. It now employs about 50 staff. In 2011, Crafty Chef was awarded

Mission Australia’s Employer of the Year Award for its efforts in providing unemployed job seekers

an opportunity to gain skills and training.

MONITORING OUR PROGRAMS

64

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Monitoring our Programs

Innovation Australia and its committees monitor ongoing projects under the following

programs which are now closed to applications including:

• Climate Ready

• Green Car Innovation Fund (GCIF)

• Re-tooling for Climate Change

• Renewable Energy Development Initiative (REDI)

• Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET)

• Commercial Ready

• Industry Cooperative Innovation Program (ICIP)

• R&D Start

• Innovation Investment Follow-on Fund (IIFF)

• Pooled Development Funds (PDFs)

• Pre-Seed Fund (PSF)

CLIMATE READY

65

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Climate Ready Program

OBJECTIVES

The Climate Ready program was an element of the $240 million Clean Business Australia

initiative, announced by the Australian Government in its 2008-09 budget statement,

to support innovation projects that address the impacts of climate change.

The objectives of the Climate Ready program were to:

• support the international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging innovation

through increasing research and development (R&D), proof of concept and early-stage

commercialisation that addressed the effects of climate change; and

• generate national benefit for the Australian economy and wider community, through support

for the development and commercialisation of new products, processes or services that

addressed the effects of climate change.

Table 2.16 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 1 6.53 0.00 0.00

Commitments 0.00 1.07 0.00

Payments made 5.07 0.00 0.00

1. Some Climate Ready commitments in 2012-13 will be met from the previous year’s budget.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE Climate Ready was a competitive grants program which aimed to support the development

and commercialisation of innovative products, processes and services that addressed the effects

of climate change. The program offered grants on a matching funding basis providing up to

50 cents for each dollar spent on eligible research and development, proof-of-concept and

early-stage commercialisation activities.

The program targeted small and medium sized businesses, offering two types of grants small

($50,000 to $500,000) and large ($500,001 to $5 million). The small grants supported small

business, as well as companies controlled by universities and public sector research organisations.

Climate Ready opened for applications on 28 July 2008. A total of 102 projects were awarded

$75.95 million in grant funding through the four funding rounds.

There are nine remaining active projects as at 30 June 2012. Two projects are on schedule in

meeting contractual milestones. A further four projects are on track but slightly behind schedule

in meeting contractual milestones. Three projects are not meeting contractual milestones.

CLIMATE READY

66

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

AusIndustry will continue to work with Climate Ready grant recipients during the post project

reporting phase, which goes to 2016-17.

OUTCOMES

Supported projects addressed the effects of climate change through measures that:

demonstrated economic viability; developed/improved product, service or intellectual property;

reduced emissions; reduced energy use; reduced pollutants other than emissions; water saving

measures; and weight saving resulting in emission reduction.

The majority of projects (60 per cent) focused on climate change mitigation efforts, with

15 per cent focused on climate change adaptation and 23 per cent involving both mitigation

and adaptation.

Forty projects were completed in the 2011-12 financial year. Seventy per cent of these projects

were found to be technically successful and progressing towards commercialisation.

GREEN CAR INNOVATION FUND

67

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Green Car Innovation Fund

OBJECTIVE The Green Car Innovation Fund (GCIF) is an element of the Government’s $5.4 billion A New Car

Plan for a Greener Future to assist the automotive industry to prepare for a low carbon future. The

policy objective of the GCIF is to enhance research and development and the commercialisation

of Australian technologies that significantly reduce fuel consumption and/or greenhouse gas

emissions of passenger motor vehicles.

Table 2.17 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 1 125.44 57.68 37.70

Commitments 0.00 58.16 37.70

Payments made 124.97 0.00 0.00

1. Some GCIF commitments in 2012-13 will be met from the previous financial year’s budget.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE The GCIF opened publicly for applications on 24 April 2009. The program was subsequently closed

for new applications on 27 January 2011 as part of savings measures to support the rebuilding of

infrastructure damaged by flooding across Australia.

Although the program is closed to new applications, projects supported under existing GCIF

grant agreements continue, with Innovation Australia considering matters where appropriate.

As at 30 June 2012, the GCIF had committed funding of $411.26 million to Australian companies

under the program.

OUTCOMES Following the launch of the Cruze Sedan in February 2011, Holden launched the Cruze Hatchback

on 7 November 2011. The local production of both vehicles was assisted with a $149 million GCIF

grant and has enabled Holden to improve its production efficiency and flexibility, and increase

demand on local component suppliers to strengthen the viability of the manufacturing base.

Century Yuasa launched the Smart Drive (Eco-R) battery into the after-market during 2011,

achieving a 2 per cent reduction in fuel consumption and CO2 emissions when installed in vehicles fitted with appropriate charging systems.

Ford launched the EcoBoost engine on 23 April 2012 as part of Ford’s $230 million Sustainability

Initiative. The Falcon XT EcoBoost consumes just 8.1 litres of fuel per 100 kilometres and produces

only 192g/km of CO2 - reducing emissions by 18 per cent when compared to Ford’s six cylinder petrol engine.

RE-TOOLING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

68

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Re-tooling for Climate Change Program

OBJECTIVE

The Re-tooling for Climate Change program was announced by the Australian Government in

its 2008-09 budget statement as part of the government’s Clean Business Australia initiative.

Re-tooling for Climate Change was launched in September 2008 as a competitive merit based

grants program.

During the 2010 election, the government announced its intention to reduce funding

for the program as part of its commitment to return the Budget to surplus in three years.

On 9 November 2010, the program was closed to new applications

The objective of the Re-tooling for Climate Change program was:

• To help small and medium sized enterprises undertaking manufacturing in Australia

to reduce their environmental footprint, through projects that improve the energy and/or

water efficiency of their production processes.

Table 2.18 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 4.80 0.00 0.00

Commitments 0.00 0.00 0.00

Payments made 4.16 0.08 0.00

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE As at 30 June 2012, all projects have been fully completed.

OUTCOMES

A total of 100 grant offers worth $21.23 million were made over the life of the program.

Ninety four grant offers worth $19.61 million were accepted (5 agreements were subsequently

terminated). $17.36 million in grant funds have been paid to date. Projects supported under

the program were from a broad cross section of industry sectors.

Supported projects were predicted to save 78 kilotonnes of greenhouse gas per annum and

881 megalitres of water per annum. Projects reporting as at 30 June 2012 have reported savings

of 55 kilotonnes of greenhouse gas per annum and 721 megalitres of water per annum.

RENEWABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE

69

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Renewable Energy Development Initiative

OBJECTIVES

The Renewable Energy Development Initiative (REDI) was announced on 15 June 2004 as part

of the former Australian Government’s white paper, Securing Australia’s Energy Future. REDI was

a $100 million competitive merit based grants program to support the development of renewable

energy technology products, processes or services that had strong early stage commercialisation

and emission reduction potential. The program offered grants from $50,000 to $5 million on

a matching funding basis.

The REDI program closed to new applications in May 2008 as a result of the Australian

Government’s 2008 Budget announcement. All REDI customers have now completed their

projects.

The objectives of the REDI program were to:

• support the development of new renewable energy technology products, processes and

services that had strong early stage commercialisation and emission reduction potential;

• support the international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging innovation

through increasing the level of research and development activities, proof-of-concept and/or

early-stage commercialisation activities undertaken by Australian companies; and

• generate national benefits for the Australian economy and wider community, including

for example, through increasing productivity, supporting collaboration and developing

Australia’s skills base.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE AND OUTCOMES

REDI provided financial assistance to 29 projects, worth a total of $65.83 million. Successful

grantees represented projects from across the renewable energy sector: including bio-energy

(31 per cent or supported projects) and solar (27 per cent of supported projects). Sixty-seven

per cent of projects were considered to have had successful outcomes.

AusIndustry will continue to work with REDI grant recipients during the post project reporting

phase, which goes to 2015-16.

COMMERCIALISING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

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Commercialising Emerging Technologies Program

OBJECTIVES

The Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET) program was a merit-based assistance

program which provided tailored support to early growth companies, individuals and spin-off

companies to help commercialise their innovations. The program commenced in November 1999

and closed to new applications on 1 January 2010.

COMET was delivered by AusIndustry and supported by a network of private sector consultant

business advisers located across Australia.

The objectives of the COMET program were to:

• increase Australia’s sustainable economic growth through stimulating the

successful commercialisation of Australian innovations; and

• build sustainable and high growth firms by increasing prospects for successful

commercialisation of innovations through the attraction of capital and partners.

Table 2.19 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 0.00 0.00 0.00

Commitments a 0.00 0.03 0.00

Payments made b 0.22 0.00 0.00

a. Payments for 2012-13 commitments will be met from previous years’ funds.

b. Payments in 2011-12 were met from previous years’ funds.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE A longitudinal study of COMET firms commenced in 2006 and will conclude in 2013. It involves

48 firms selected at random between 2006 and 2009. Survey data is collected by interview

at five stages between entry into the program and up to two years after completion of the

COMET program. Information from the study will be used to inform future program design

and evaluation.

Stage 5 of the study is currently underway. Following its completion in 2013 a final report

will be prepared.

COMMERCIALISING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

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OUTCOMES

COMET assisted customers to achieve 5,266 commercialisation outcomes including 2,807

alliances, licences and agreements and 1,048 manufacturing commencements and product

or service launches.

The program awarded $117.79 million to 1,764 customers and raised approximately $714 million

in private capital. This equates to $6.50 in private capital raised for every dollar of Australian

Government assistance.

COMMERCIAL READY

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Commercial Ready Program

OBJECTIVES

The Commercial Ready program was announced in May 2004 as part of the former Australian

Government’s $5.3 billion Backing Australia’s Ability - Building Our Future through Science and

Innovation package. The program combined elements of the previous R&D Start, Biotechnology

Innovation Fund and the Innovation Access (Industry) programs.

The program was initially funded to provide approximately $200 million per year in grant

funding until 30 June 2011. In May 2007, the Australian Government announced an additional

$90.3 million to fund Commercial Ready Plus, a funding stream specifically intended to provide

small grants, between $50,000 and $250,000, to small and emerging companies and research

spin-off companies.

The program closed to new applications as a result of the Australian Government’s 2008 Budget

announcement.

The objectives of the Commercial Ready program were to:

• support the international competitiveness of Australian industry by encouraging innovation

through increasing the level of research and development , proof-of-concept and early stage

commercialisation activities undertaken by Australian companies; and

• generate national benefit for the Australian economy and wider community, including

for example, through increasing productivity, supporting collaboration and developing

Australia’s skills base.

Table 2.20 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 0.90 0.00 0.00

Commitments 0.00 0.00 0.00

Payments made 0.80 0.00 0.00

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PROGRAM PERFORMANCE Commercial Ready provided Australian companies with grant funding from $50,000, up to

a maximum of $5 million to undertake research and development, proof-of-concept and

commercialisation activities. Grants were provided on a matching funding basis, (providing

up to 50 cents for each dollar spent on eligible project activities).

AusIndustry will continue to work with Commercial Ready grant recipients during the post

project reporting phase, which goes to 2016-17.

OUTCOMES

Financial assistance was awarded to 524 projects across a wide range of industry sectors, worth

a total of $493.72 million. A total of 513 projects were completed with 81 per cent considered to be

technically successful with results to be commercialised. Seven projects were completed in the

2011-12 financial year. Five of these projects were found to be successful or mostly successful and

progressing towards commercialisation. The two others were partially successful.

INDUSTRY COOPERATIVE INNOVATION PROGRAM

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Industry Cooperative Innovation Program

OBJECTIVES

The Industry Cooperative Innovation Program (ICIP) objectives were to:

• encourage business to business cooperation on innovation projects within a sector

that enhances productivity, growth and international competitiveness of Australian

industries - the program supported projects aimed at meeting strategic industry needs,

with a focus on those identified through an action agenda; and

• generate national benefit for the Australian economy.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

Over three rounds a total of 105 applications were considered, of which 44 were approved

for funding of $22.34 million. Three applicants subsequently did not take up the offer.

The program had two streams of funding that covered small-scale cooperative projects aimed

at identifying the strategic scope of direction of future innovation in an industry and more

extensive projects aimed at progressing strategic innovation and achieving significant benefits

for an industry. All customer contracts were completed in line with the program closure

on 30 June 2011.

OUTCOMES

An evaluation of ICIP is being undertaken and is expected to be finalised in early 2013.

R&D START

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R&D Start Program

OBJECTIVES

The R&D Start program was announced in the Australian Government’s 1996 Budget as a

four year, $520 million competitive grants and loans program where successful applicants

would receive 50 cents in the dollar to undertake research and development (R&D) and

the commercialisation of technical innovations.

The program was extended in 1998 as part of the Australian Government’s Investing for Growth

statement which provided additional funding to 2001-02. In the Australian Government’s 2001

Backing Australia’s Ability science and innovation statement, further funding was announced

that continued the program until 2005-06. The program was again extended in the 2003

Budget, to 2007.

The program was closed to new applications in September 2004 and absorbed into the

Commercial Ready program.

The objectives of the R&D Start program were to:

• increase the number of projects involving R&D activities with a high commercial

potential undertaken by companies;

• foster greater commercialisation of the outcomes;

• foster collaborative R&D activities in industry and between industry and research institutions;

• encourage successful innovation in small companies by supporting commercialisation

of internationally competitive products, processes and services;

• increase the level of R&D activity in Australia that was commercialised, in a manner that

would benefit the Australian economy; and

• increase the level of R&D conducted that provided national benefit.

Table 2.21 · Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 0.00 0.00 0.00

Commitments 0.00 0.00 0.00

Payments made* 0.24 0.00 0.00

* R&D Start payments are paid from the Commercial Ready allocation.

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PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

Since inception in 1996, R&D Start provided funding of $1,365.37 million to 1,385 projects across

a wide range of industry sectors. Whilst the majority of grants ranged from $100,000 to $5 million

the program offered grants up to $15 million.

• R&D Start grants funded 1,264 projects to the value of $1,292.79 million; and

• R&D Start loans funded 121 projects to the value of $72.59 million.

All R&D Start grant projects have now been completed. At the end of the 2011-12 financial year,

there were 21 active R&D Start loan customers still remaining in the program.

AusIndustry will continue to work with R&D Start recipients during the post project reporting

phase, which goes to 2014-15.

OUTCOMES

Seventy eight per cent of the 1,264 grant projects supported were successful, with results

commercialised or expected to be commercialised.

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Innovation Investment Follow-on-Fund Program

OBJECTIVES

On 18 March 2009, the Australian Government announced the Innovation Investment Follow on

Fund (IIFF) program to provide funding to selected early stage start-up companies.

The IIFF program is a temporary and targeted program in response to the impact of the global

financial crisis on the availability of venture capital funding to early stage companies

commercialising Australian research. The $64 million fund enabled selected companies with high

potential to continue to develop and commercialise research.

The IIFF program operates for three years with the possibility of extension for an additional two

years for the orderly divestment of the investment portfolio. No investments are allowed during

this two year period.

The objectives of the IIFF program are to:

• respond to the constraint in accessing capital in the global financial crisis;

• support selected fund managers through the provision of additional

follow-on investment capital;

• ensure that the early stage venture capital industry in Australia continues to develop;

• achieve value by targeting investee companies which have the highest potential

to utilise the IIFF program funding to continue to develop;

• continue to provide the management and entrepreneurial expertise of

fund managers to investee companies;

• provide funding to investee companies in an expeditious manner; and

• replenish the IIF revolving fund with returns from the IIFF program.

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Table 2.22 · IIFF 2011-12 Expenditure (Australian Government contribution)

Fund Manager

Total Approved Funding ($m) Total Expenditure ($m)

Investees Supported to 30 June 2012

Allen & Buckeridge Asset Management Ltd 7.10 7.04 3

AMWIN Management Pty Ltd 5.44 5.37 1

Coates Myer and Company Pty Ltd 1.91 1.91 1

Divergent Capital Pty Ltd 2.75 2.75 2

GBS Venture Partners Pty Ltd 10.05 10.00 6

In-tellinc Pty Ltd 2.30 1.74 3

iQ Fund 3 Pty Ltd (trading as InQbator) 3.95 3.89 4

NEO Technology Ventures Pty Ltd 5.10 5.06 1

Playford Capital Pty Ltd 7.45 4.96 4

Starfish Ventures Pty Ltd 9.85 8.09 4

Start-Up Australia Ventures Pty Ltd 8.51 8.47 2

Total 64.41 59.28 31 *

* Thirty companies (including one co-investment by two fund managers) have received investment since the program’s inception.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE During 2011-12, $1.02 million was drawn down which brought the total IIFF program funding

to $59.28 million (including $0.26 million in recoverable expenses).

OUTCOMES

The IIFF fund managers report six monthly to Innovation Australia on operations, including

current investment valuation. Returns for 2011-12 were $5.29 million of which the Australian

Government received $4.38 million. By 30 June 2012, a total of $16.05 million had been returned,

of which the Australian Government share was $14.92 million.

POOLED DEVELOPMENT FUNDS

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Pooled Development Funds Program

OBJECTIVES

The Pooled Development Funds (PDF) program was aimed at stimulating Australia’s venture

capital sector and increasing the pool of venture capital available to fund the growth of small

and medium sized Australian companies.

The PDF program commenced on 30 June 1992 and operates subject to the Pooled Development

Funds Act 1992 (the PDF Act), the Pooled Development Funds Regulations 1992, and both the

Income Tax Assessment Act 1936 and 1997, and the Income Tax Rates Act 1986. The program was

closed to new registrations on 21 June 2007 at the time that the Government announced the

establishment of the ESVCLP program.

PDFs are venture capital funds, structured as a company, that must operate and make

investments in accordance with the requirements of the PDF Act. Broadly the PDF Act requires

that investments are new equity investments in growing Australian companies with assets of not

more than $50 million at the time of investment that are not undertaking retail sales or property

development as their primary activity. PDFs may provide management assistance to companies in

which they hold an investment and may provide debt financing in limited circumstances.

The PDF Act also provides special provisions for tax-exempt foreign superannuation funds

to register as Venture Capital Entities. Registration allows the entity to invest venture capital

into qualifying Australian small and medium sized entities. Currently there are no Venture

Capital Entities registered.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

As a result of the closure of the program to new applications in 2007 the Venture Capital

Committee (VCC) has increased its monitoring of PDFs and has targeted inactive PDFs with the

aim of revoking their registrations. Existing PDFs continue to operate and are entitled to

concessional tax treatment until such time that their registration is revoked.

As at 30 June 2012, 40 PDFs remained registered. This represents a reduction of seven PDFs

since 30 June 2011 and an overall reduction of 58 since the closure of the program in 2007.

Approximately $828 million has been invested by PDFs in eligible Australian businesses since

the program began in 1992, including $2.1 million in 15 businesses during 2011-12.

POOLED DEVELOPMENT FUNDS

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During 2011-12, PDFs reported seven full and partial divestments. PDF divestments realised

a total of $2.6 million from investments costing $15.6 million for a loss of $13 million. PDFs

reported a total of $130 million in paid-up capital as at 30 June 2012, with an additional

$2.4 million available from investors4.

OUTCOMES

Since the program’s introduction in July 1992, $993 million has been raised by PDFs and

$828 million of this capital has been invested into 747 Australian businesses.

4 PDFs provide annual reports four months after the end of each financial year (i.e. by 31 October 2012). The information above has been derived from reports received at the time of preparing this publication (September 2012). For this reason the information should not be taken to be a full and complete picture of the program’s activity

PRE-SEED FUND

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Pre-Seed Fund Program

OBJECTIVES

The Pre-Seed Fund (PSF) program was introduced in 2001 to increase the commercialisation

of promising research opportunities within Australian universities, Cooperative Research Centres

and Australian public sector research agencies. The objectives of the PSF program are to:

• assist the commercialisation of R&D activities undertaken by universities and public sector

research agencies by providing finance and managerial advice;

• encourage private sector investment in R&D activities undertaken in universities and

public sector research agencies for commercialisation;

• build linkages between universities, public sector research agencies, the finance community

and business for the commercialisation of R&D activities;

• build entrepreneurial and intellectual property management skills in Australian universities

and public sector research agencies; and

• encourage researchers in universities and public sector research agencies to consider

the commercial opportunities of their research discoveries.

Table 2.23 · PSF Australian Government budget and expenditure at 30 June 2012

2011-12 ($m) 2012-13 ($m) 2013-14 ($m)

Budget 1 6.92 0.00 0.00

Commitments 4.06 0.00 0.00

Payments made 2 2.85 0.00 0.00

1. Portfolio Budget Statements 2012-13, Budget Related Paper No. 113, Innovation, Industry, Science and Research Portfolio.

2. The ‘Payments made’ figure includes management fees and recoverable expenses of $1.60 million.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE To 30 June 2012, the four PSF funds have drawn $98.31 million of which the Australian

Government contribution is $68.65 million.

In 2011-12, $1.87 million was invested into 7 companies, of which $1.29 million was drawn

from the Australian Government.

In 2011-12, the Australian Government received a minor return of $12,239, with $5,756 returned

to private investors. At 30 June 2012 the total returned to the Australian Government was

$1.04 million.

The four PSF fund managers are now focussing on making exits and winding-up funds.

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OUTCOMES

Since the inception of the program, outcomes achieved include:

• $31.41 million of private capital has been raised for early stage commercialisation;

• 71 investments in projects and start-up companies have been made;

• 2,530 investment proposals were reviewed by the fund managers; and

• 21 professional venture capital managers have been engaged during the life of the program.

RENEWABLE ENERGY EQUITY FUND

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Renewable Energy Equity Fund

OBJECTIVE

The Renewable Energy Equity Fund (REEF) was a specialist renewable energy venture capital fund

established in 2000. It was modelled on the Innovation Investment Fund program to assist the

development of investee companies commercialising R&D in renewable energy technologies and

develop fund managers with investment experience in the renewable energy industry.

The Australian Government awarded a 10 year licence to the private sector fund manager, CVC

REEF Limited and committed $17.7 million on a 2:1 basis with private sector capital, creating a total

fund of $26.6 million. The REEF fund became fully drawn in December 2008, with no further

capital available for investment and was wound-up by 30 June 2012.

PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

There were 13 investee companies supported under the REEF program with $21.57 million invested

of which the Australian Government provided $14.38 million. The overall total return to investors

in the fund was $16.20 million, of which the Australian Government’s share was $10.80 million.

OUTCOMES

The REEF program provided venture capital investments and early stage commercialisation

support for Australian technologies in renewable energies, including biofuels, geothermal, ocean

waves, battery energy and wind power. The program’s successes include three investee companies

listing on the Australian Stock Exchange.

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Section 3

corporate governance

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

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Innovation Australia Board

Innovation Australia is an independent statutory body established to assist with

the administration of the Australian Government’s industry innovation, clean technology and

venture capital programs. Through these programs Innovation Australia seeks to increase and

support the level of investment and innovation activity in Australian industry and improve

the commercial success.

Established on 27 September 2007, Innovation Australia is an amalgamation of the former

Industry Research and Development (IR&D) Board originally established in 1986 and the Venture

Capital Registration (VCR) Board (formerly known as the Pooled Development Funds Registration

Board). On its establishment, Innovation Australia assumed the roles, responsibilities and powers

of the two former Boards and, as such, it carries responsibility for past decisions taken by the

former Boards.

Innovation Australia reports to the Minister for Industry and Innovation.

LEGISLATION

Innovation Australia operates under the auspices of the Industry Research and Development Act

1986 (IR&D Act). The aim of the IR&D Act is to promote the development, and improve the

efficiency and international competitiveness, of Australian industry by encouraging research

and development, innovation and venture capital activities.

The IR&D Act was amended in September 2007 by the Tax Laws Amendment (2007 Measures

No. 5) Act 2007, which established Innovation Australia and thereby consolidated the

administration and oversight of the government’s innovation and venture capital programs as

prescribed in the IR&D Act, the Pooled Development Funds Act 1992 (PDF Act) and the Venture

Capital Act 2002 (VC Act). The Board also advises government on income tax law (Income Tax

Assessment Act 1936 and the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997) as they operate in relation

to those Acts.

FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF INNOVATION AUSTRALIA UNDER THE IR&D ACT

Amendments were made to the IR&D Act with effect from 11 September 2004 to remove

ambiguity between the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and the IR&D Act.

The amendments removed prospectively the powers of the Board to commit, approve or

recommend expenditure of Australian Government funds and further safeguarded members

from any personal liability stemming from Board membership.

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The Board therefore retains financial responsibilities for all grant, loan and licence agreements

which were in place at 10 September 2004. This approach, while avoiding the need to amend

existing program documentation (including agreements), has nonetheless complicated the

Board’s working environment requiring two operational models until all existing agreements

are concluded. In the case of the now closed R&D Start program, contractual obligations may

run until 2014-15.

FUNCTIONS

Innovation Australia’s functions are set out in the IR&D Act and associated Ministerial Directions.

The Board’s functions include:

• administering and monitoring aspects of the R&D Tax Concession program and the

R&D Tax Incentive program;

• administering the Commercialisation Australia program, the Clean Technology Investment

Program, the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program, the Innovation

Investment Fund, the Pre-Seed Fund, the Commercial Ready and Commercial Ready Plus

programs, the Climate Ready program, the Renewable Energy Development Initiative, the

Re-Tooling for Climate Change program and the Green Car Innovation Fund and the

R&D Start program;

• registering, monitoring and revoking the registration of Pooled Development Funds, Venture

Capital Entities, Venture Capital Limited Partnerships, Australian Venture Capital Funds of Funds,

Eligible Venture Capital Investors, Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships, the Innovation

Investment Follow-on Fund and making determinations in relation to these entities; and

• advising the Minister about the operation of the IR&D Act, the PDF Act and the VC Act, and the

Commonwealth’s income tax laws as they operate in relation to those Acts.

ADDITIONAL FUNCTIONS

Ministerial Directions last issued by the then Minister for Innovation Australia on 4 November

2009 directs Innovation Australia to carry out the following activities:

• study industry research and development, innovation and venture capital, and provide

advice to the Minister;

• promote and market industry innovation activities, programs, and benefits by acting as

ambassadors for industry innovation;

• collect and analyse data on industry research and development, innovation and venture capital

programs for which the Board has an administrative responsibility, including the extent to

which programs are meeting their objectives, and advise the Minister of outcomes;

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• monitor the administration, delivery and performance of industry research and development,

innovation and venture capital programs for which the Board has an administrative

responsibility, and advise the Minister of outcomes;

• maintain the effectiveness and integrity of the industry research and development, innovation

and venture capital programs for which it has responsibility, including undertaking legal action

if required;

• cooperate with any reasonable independent evaluation of the industry research and

development, innovation and venture capital programs for which the Board has administrative

responsibility; and

• consider options to support the commercialisation of Australian ideas and technology, address

systematic and market failures along the pathway to commercialisation, and provide advice to

the Minister.

Innovation Australia and its committees engage in activities which support its decision-making

and advisory functions. The Board also contributes its views and practical advice in relation to the

programs for which it is responsible to the Minister through regular correspondence and

meetings.

POWERS

Innovation Australia derives various powers from the provisions of the IR&D Act. Section 8

of the Act gives the Board power to take all necessary and convenient action to ensure the proper

performance of its functions.

MEMBERSHIP

Members of Innovation Australia are appointed in writing by the Governor-General, through

Executive Council. The IR&D Act provides for a maximum of 15 Board members, including the

Chair and an ex-officio member. At a meeting of the Board, four members constitute a quorum.

Innovation Australia Committee members are appointed by the Minister for Industry and

Innovation. Committees operate under delegation from the Board and comprise of a Chair and up

to six members. At a Committee meeting, three members are required to form a quorum.

Board and Committee members are predominantly drawn from industry, industry representative

organisations and the research community and their qualifications and experience cover a broad

range of commercial and technical areas of expertise.

Innovation Australia and its Committee members, other than the ex-officio members, are

remunerated in accordance with determinations set by the Remuneration Tribunal.

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ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT

Innovation Australia uses a committee structure to help administer and provide expert advice

on innovation, clean technology and venture capital programs.

As of 30 June 2012, seven committees report under Innovation Australia; each Committee has

the following specific functions 1:

• R&D Incentives Committee - formerly the Tax Concession Committee - The R&D Incentives

Committee is responsible for providing advice to Innovation Australia about the operations of

the R&D Tax Concession program for income years commencing before 1 July 2011 and the R&D

Tax Incentive for income years commencing on or after 1 July 2011. In particular it is responsible

for assessing activities registered across all sectors including providing certificates to the

Commissioner for Taxation about the eligibility of activities registered for the Concession and

the Incentive. The Committee also provides advice about operational policy aspects of the

R&D Tax Concession program and the R&D Tax Incentive.

• R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee - is responsible for providing advice to Innovation

Australia about the R&D Tax Incentive. In particular it is responsible for monitoring the

implementation and operation of the program and identifying areas where the R&D Tax

Incentive is not operating in accordance with its policy intent or matters that produce

unforeseen consequences, or unintended and significant compliance costs.

• Venture Capital Committee - assists Innovation Australia to administer the suite of venture

capital investment programs by assessing applications for fund manager licences and fund

registrations, and monitoring activities for the following programs; Innovation Investment Fund

(IIF); Renewable Energy Equity Fund (REEF); Pre Seed Fund (PSF); Pooled Development Funds (PDF);

Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP); Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships

(ESVCLP). The Committee also monitors activities under the Innovation Investment Follow-on

Fund (IIFF).

• Commercialisation Australia Board - provides expert advice, technical assessments, merit

ranking and monitoring of projects under the Commercialisation Australia program.

• Clean Technology Investment Committee - assesses and merit ranks applications received

under the Clean Technology Investment Program and the Clean Technology Food and Foundries

Investment Program. These programs offer competitive grants for manufacturing businesses

to assist investment in energy efficient capital equipment and less emissions-intensive

technologies, processes and products that will enhance their competitiveness.

• Innovation Grants Committee - is responsible for monitoring and assessing requests for

variations and other matters as required under grant agreements, such as dealing with

intellectual property and change of company control matters under legacy programs,

including Commercial Ready, R&D Start, Climate Ready and the Renewable Energy

Development Initiative (REDI).

1 Clean Technology Innovation Committee was established on 1 June 2012. As at 30 June 2012 no appointments had been made.

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CODE OF CONDUCT

Innovation Australia Code of Conduct

Members of Innovation Australia and of its committees are expected to observe the following

standards when dealing with Board related matters.

• Members should perform the duties of their office impartially, uninfluenced by fear or favour.

• Members should be frank and honest in official dealings with colleagues.

• Members should avoid any situation in which the private interests of themselves or of their

immediate family, whether pecuniary or otherwise, conflict or might reasonably be thought to

conflict with their public duty.

• Members should not use information obtained in the course of official duties to gain directly or

indirectly a pecuniary or other advantage for themselves or for any other person.

• Members should not:

a. solicit or accept from any person any remuneration or benefit for the discharge

of the duties of their office over and above the official remuneration;

b. solicit or accept any benefit, advantage or promise of further advantage,

whether for themselves, their immediate family or any business concern

or trust with which they are associated from persons who are in, or seek to

be in, any contractual or special relationship with government; or

c. accept any gift, hospitality or concessional travel offered in connection with the

discharge of the duties of the office (except as permitted by the Department

of Innovation, Industry, Science, Research and Tertiary Education’s Guidelines

on the Acceptance of Gifts and Other Benefits - Secretary’s Direction).

• Members should be scrupulous in their use of public property and services, and should not

permit their misuse by other persons.

• Members should not allow the pursuit of their private interests to interfere with the proper

discharge of their public duties.

The above Code of Conduct was last reviewed by the Board on 12 August 2008.

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DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST

Innovation Australia Disclosure of Interest (DOI) Guidelines

In running its programs Innovation Australia (the Board) wishes to observe statutory

requirements and generally applicable standards concerning the management, handling and

recording of relevant interests. Accordingly the Board wishes to address indirect and direct

pecuniary interests as the IR&D Act requires but also intends the scope of these guidelines to

cover other personal or family interests.

The Board is conscious that perceptions of conflict of interest may be as important as actual

conflict. The following describes the procedures, based on the Code of Conduct adopted by the

Board, that are to be followed.

Section 16 of the IR&D Act requires Board members to disclose at a meeting of the Board the

nature of any direct or indirect pecuniary interest in matters considered or about to be considered

by the Board. The Act requires such disclosures to be recorded in minutes of meetings. This

process also applies to members of the Board’s committees (section 24).

The Board has also adopted a process whereby Board and committee members (upon

appointment) prepare and lodge with the Secretariat a disclosure statement of known pecuniary

(and other personal) interests of themselves and of their immediate family/spouse. The contents

of the statement are recorded, electronically, on the Register of Private Interests.

In addition, the Board has established formal procedures for the handling of matters involving

actual or potential conflicts of interest, which it requires all Board and committee members to

meet. These are set out below.

A member who has issues or concerns about potential conflict of interest matters may wish, prior

to a relevant meeting, to discuss them with the departmental officer who is nominated to assist

the Board in these respects.

To assist in maintaining a close focus on conflict of interest issues, an early agenda item at each

Board and committee meeting should involve formal enquiry in relation to the disclosed interests

of members and the determination of any potential conflicts.

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Disclosure of Member Interests

Where a Board or committee member is aware of an actual or potential conflict of interest,

pecuniary or otherwise, the member must advise the meeting prior to that item being discussed.

Where the interests of a member of his/her immediate family are involved, the member should

disclose those interests, to the extent they are known to them. The member must then leave the

room and this must be recorded in the minutes.

Members are required to refrain from discussing any aspects of applications with customers

unless the application has been prepared by colleagues and the member has previously disclosed

their interest to the Board.

The Board or committee has an ability to decide, in the absence of the member, that where a

conflict situation exists, the member concerned may nonetheless be present during discussion of

the matter (and take part in the discussion) or even take part in the decision making. The decision

on this could turn on whether the nature of the interest is determined to be material or

immaterial (insignificant).

If the nature of the member’s disclosed interest is judged as immaterial, the member may be

invited back in to take part in the discussions and, if appropriate, the decision-making. If the

nature of the member’s disclosed interest is judged as material, there should be no further

involvement of the member.

An occasion may arise where a member having a material conflict has some technical knowledge,

not available elsewhere, that could warrant an invitation back into the room simply to answer

specific pre-determined question(s) in relation to the technology. (This would be an exceptional

circumstance.) Upon providing comments to the questions, the member would again leave the

room and take no part in the discussion or decision-making in relation to the item.

Recording a Disclosure of Interest

The Secretariat should endeavour to determine, with respect to a forthcoming meeting, whether

any members are likely to disclose an interest about any matters on the draft agenda. To assist in

this process, the Secretariat will provide a copy of the meeting agenda, along with appropriate

further identification, to all members prior to the distribution of papers. Members would be

requested to advise if they are likely to disclose an interest in relation to any of the items listed for

consideration, and to disclose the nature of that interest. Papers relating to individual

applications will not be forwarded to members until the Secretariat receives advice that they are

unlikely to disclose an interest in relation to the items listed for consideration.

Where a member’s disclosure is subsequently determined to be of a material nature, then that

member will not receive reports or information in relation to the item under consideration.

The minutes of the meeting will record: the member disclosing the interest; the nature of the

interest; if it is judged material or immaterial by the Board or committee; and the departure of

the member from the room.

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Discussions regarding an item against which a member has disclosed an interest will be deleted

from the member’s copy of the minutes, unless the Board or committee has decided that the

nature of the interest is immaterial and that the member should be present during relevant

discussion and decision making.

Matters which shall be referred to the board for determination

If a committee has no quorum as a consequence of conflicts of interest of members, then the

matter shall be referred to the Board for determination.

Where the committee agrees that, because of conflict of interest issues, the matter is of a

particularly sensitive nature, that matter shall be referred to the Board for determination.

Independent Expert Assessments

Where a material conflict of interest arises as a consequence of a direct link between a Board or

Committee member and a matter being considered (i.e., specifically where a member holds an

operational management role in an applicant company, or is or has been a consultant to an

applicant company, or is a member of the board of an applicant company), then that matter shall

be referred to the Board for consideration. In such instances, an independent expert assessment of

the matter will be undertaken to provide advice with regard to the technical aspects of the project.

Requests from applicant companies for limited distribution of papers

In general, a request from an applicant company that a certain member not see the papers

relating to that particular application is to be accepted, provided that the Board or committee

considers that the request is reasonable.

Determining if a conflict exists 2

When considering whether a material conflict of interest exists members should have regard to

the following questions:

a. would the average member of the public, of ordinary intelligence, looking at the relevant

facts and circumstances, think that there was a real, sensible possibility of conflict?

b. with human nature being what it is, is there a danger that an average member of the public,

of ordinary intelligence, may be swayed by this kind of personal interest rather than by duty?

The above Disclosure of Interest Guidelines were considered and approved by the Board on

12 August 2008.

2 Conflict of Interest materiality test as advised by Australian Government Solicitor, October 1997

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PARTNERS IN DELIVERY

AusIndustry, the principal program delivery division of the Department of Industry,

Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE), provides primary support

to Innovation Australia.

This support is provided by AusIndustry staff in the national, state, territory and regional offices

and includes AusIndustry Secretariat as well as project reporting services, technical assessment

and promotional services.

AusIndustry officers also advise customers about other government industry support programs.

Innovation Australia is also supported by policy areas within the DIISRTE’s Industry and

Innovation and Manufacturing Divisions. Responsibility for policy aspects of Innovation Australia’s

programs resides with DIISRTE’s Innovation and Manufacturing Divisions.

AusIndustry (on behalf of Innovation Australia) and the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) jointly

administer the R&D Tax Incentive and the R&D Tax Concession. AusIndustry manages the

registration of research and development activities and conduct compliance reviews related to

the eligibility of these activities. The ATO determines if the expenditure that is claimed in a tax

return for R&D activities is eligible.

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INNOVATION AUSTRALIA MEMBERS AT 30 JUNE 2012

CHAIRMAN

Mr David Miles AM Company Director

MEMBERS

Mr Carlos Broens Managing Director Broens Industries Pty Ltd

Ms Margaret Calvert Partner Norcal

Mr Nicholas Gruen Chief Executive Officer Lateral Economics

Dr Laurie Hammond Director iQ Funds

Mr Leslie Hosking Company Director

Ms Elizabeth Lewis-Gray Managing Director Gekko Systems Pty Ltd

Mr Gerard Noonan Chair Media Super

Ms Fiona Pak-Poy General Partner Innovation Capital Limited

Dr Peter Riddles Director ViciBio Pty Ltd

Mr Richard Shaddick Board Member

Dr Jonathan Spring Managing Director CEOS Pty Ltd

Mr Innes Willox Chief Executive Officer Australian Industry Group

Mr Kenneth Windle Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Advent Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd

Ms Chris Butler Head of Division AusIndustry

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STRUCTURE OF INNOVATION AUSTRALIA AS AT JUNE 2012

The Minister for Industry and Innovation The Hon Greg Combet AM MP

Innovation Australia

R&D Tax Concession R&D Tax Incentive

R&D Incentives Committee Chair: Mr Richard Shaddick

R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee Chair: Mr David Miles

Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) Innovation Investment Follow-on Fund (IIFF) Pre-Seed Fund (PSF) Renewable Energy Equity Fund (REEF) Pooled Development Funds (PDF) Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP) Early Stage Venture Capital Limited

Venture Capital Committee Chair: Mr Gerard Noonan

Commercialisation Australia Commercialisation Australia Board

Chair: Dr Laurie Hammond

Clean Technology Investment Program Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program Clean Technology Investment Committee Chair: Fiona Pak-Poy

Climate Ready Commercial Ready Commercial Ready Plus R&D Start Renewable Energy Development Initiative

Innovation Grants Committee Chair: Dr Peter Riddles

Responsibility for the ongoing monitoring of these programs resides with Innovation Australia.

Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET) Industry Cooperative Innovation Program (ICIP) Green Car Innovation Fund (GCIF) Re-tooling for Climate Change (RCC)

programs committees

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MEETINGS OF INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Innovation Australia held seven meetings during 2011-12:

24 August 2011 Canberra

12 October 2011 Canberra

7 December 2011 Brisbane

9 February 2012 Canberra

22 March 2012 Canberra

3 May 2012 Perth

14 June 2012 Canberra

Innovation Australia also considered a number of matters via teleconference and out of session.

MARKETING

Marketing and Promotion As well as administering innovation and venture capital programs, Innovation Australia

undertakes other activities to promote industry innovation in all sectors across Australia.

A range of marketing activities were undertaken in 2011-12 to promote Innovation Australia

including:

• 177,657 Innovation Australia program-related items distributed;

• 159 Twitter posts;

• 60 Facebook posts;

• 17 Vodcasts produced; and

• 46 Ministerial media releases distributed about Innovation Australia and its programs.

This contributed to a high level of interest in Innovation Australia programs, demonstrated by:

• 767,852 website visits; and

• 7,726 hotline enquiries.

Other key marketing activities directly involving Innovation Australia for 2011-12 included:

• An Innovation Australia Showcase held in Brisbane on 7 December 2011 at the Brisbane

Convention and Exhibition Centre. The Showcase was attended by Senator the Hon Kim Carr,

the former Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, the Innovation Australia

Board, and approximately 600 customers and stakeholders, with 43 customers and key

stakeholders exhibiting at the Showcase;

• Innovation Australia - Business Leaders Breakfast held at Fraser’s at King Park in Perth on

2 May 2012. This event was attended by the Innovation Australia Board, and 115 customers

and key stakeholders;

• The publication,Twenty-five years of Innovation in Australia , was released in 2011. The

publication features stories covering a wide range of innovation in Australia and provides

a snapshot of the benefits Australia and the world continues to reap from new products,

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processes and services firms have developed by working with government and embracing

innovation and research and development. The publication is available at the AusIndustry

Website (ausindustry.gov.au);

• Development and implementation of a communication strategy to raise awareness of the

R&D Tax Incentive program among eligible Australian businesses. The strategy includes a

combination of communication activity, including third party engagement, editorial placement,

information sessions, sponsorships and marketing collateral; and

• Development and implementation of a communication strategy to raise awareness of the

Clean Technology Programs among eligible Australian businesses. The strategy includes a

combination of targeted campaign advertising across print, radio and online media and

AusIndustry business as usual communication, including information sessions, sponsorships

and marketing collateral.

Table 3.1 · Speaking engagements/Formal presentations 2011-12

Date Event Location Speaker

7 December 2011 Innovation Australia Showcase Brisbane Mr David Miles AM

2 May 2012 Innovation Australia Board

Business Leaders Breakfast

Perth Mr David Miles AM

Media Announcements 2011-12

Media announcements are listed at Appendix T.

R&D INCENTIVES COMMITTEE

Establishment The Research and Development Incentives Committee (R&DIC) replaced the former Tax

Concession Committee (TCC) on 1 October 2011. The new Committee was established to advise

and assist Innovation Australia with its administration of the R&D Tax Incentive as well

as continue to advise and assist Innovation Australia with its administration of the

R&D Tax Concession program.

Responsibilities The R&DIC provides advice to Innovation Australia about the operations of the R&D Tax

Concession program for income years commencing before 1 July 2011 and the R&D Tax Incentive

for income years commencing on or after 1 July 2011.

In particular, along with AusIndustry and under delegation from Innovation Australia, it is

responsible for assessing activities registered across all sectors including providing certificates

to the Commissioner for Taxation about the eligibility of activities registered for the Concession

and the Incentive.

The R&DIC also provides advice about operational policy aspects of the R&D Tax Concession

program and the R&D Tax Incentive.

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Meetings During 2011-12 the TCC/R&DIC held seven meetings, four teleconferences and one Planning Day,

and considered a number of matters out-of-session.

TCC 5 July 2011 Canberra

29 July 2011 Teleconference

8 September 2011 Canberra

R&DIC 27 October 2011 Canberra

8 December 2011 Canberra

9 February 2012 Teleconference

29 February 2012 Canberra (Planning Day)

1 March 2012 Canberra

1 May 2012 Perth

23 May 2012 Teleconference

13 June 2012 Canberra

28 June 2012 Teleconference

Workload During the financial year, significant activities of the TCC/R&DIC included:

• Statutory determinations on the eligibility of R&D activities and compliance issues

relating to the R&D Tax Concession program, including:

· assessment of R&D eligibility (section 39L of the IR&D Act);

· advance registration (section 39HH); and

· requests for internal review of Board decisions (section 39S).

• Findings on the eligibility of R&D activities relating to the R&D Tax Incentive, including:

· advance findings about the nature of activities (section 28A of the IR&D Act); and

· findings about activities to be conducted outside Australia (section 28C).

• Interpretation and application of the new definitions of R&D activities.

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R&D TAX INCENTIVE ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Establishment The R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee (TIAC) was established on 3 October 2011 to ensure

the R&D Tax Incentive provides the intended benefits to Australian industry from increased

investment in R&D.

Responsibilities The TIAC provides advice to Innovation Australia on the implementation and operation

of the R&D Tax Incentive.

The TIAC is responsible for canvassing a broad range of views on the operation of the R&D Tax

Incentive. This role includes consideration of program performance data and analysis provided

by the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education and

the Australian Taxation Office.

Meetings During 2011-12 the TIAC held its inaugural meeting on 5 March 2012 in Melbourne.

Workload As registrations for the R&D Tax Incentive for the 2011-12 financial year opened on 1 July 2012,

and it is anticipated significant data for analysis will become available in the second half of

2012-13, the focus of the Committee during 2011-12 included:

• establishment of the terms of reference of the TIAC and consideration of options

for fulfilling its role;

• clarification of interaction between the TIAC and the R&D Tax Incentive Committee; and

• preparation of a forward work program.

VENTURE CAPITAL COMMITTEE

Establishment On 27 September 2007 the Venture Capital Committee (VCC) was established to assist Innovation

Australia to administer the programs previously managed by the Fund Management Committee

of the former IR&D Board, and the Venture Capital Registration Board (formerly the Pooled

Development Funds Registration Board). The VCC assists Innovation Australia by administering

the following venture capital tax concession and co-investment programs:

• Pooled Development Funds (PDF);

• Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP);

• Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (ESVCLP);

• Innovation Investment Fund (IIF);

• Renewable Energy Equity Fund (REEF);

• Pre-Seed Fund (PSF); and

• Innovation Investment Follow-on Fund (IIFF).

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Responsibilities Innovation Australia has delegated to the VCC the functions and powers set out in the Pooled

Development Funds Act 1992 (PDF Act), the Venture Capital Act 2002 (VC Act), and the Income Tax

Assessment Act 1997 (ITAA). They include:

a. Registering, monitoring, and revoking the registration of:

· Pooled Development Funds (PDF Act3);

· Venture Capital Entities (PDF Act);

· Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VC Act);

· Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VC Act);

· Australian Venture Capital Funds of Funds (VC Act); and

· Eligible Venture Capital Investors (VC Act).

b. making decisions in relation to the above entities (PDF Act, VC Act, ITAA).

Innovation Australia has also delegated to the VCC a range of responsibilities related to the

management of the IIF, REEF, PSF and IIFF programs. Innovation Australia’s functions and powers

for these programs are set out in Ministerial Directions and Guidelines.

Members appointed to the VCC are also invited to take up director position on the only remaining

wholly owned Australian Government company (i.e. IIF Investments Pty Ltd) established to invest

the government’s capital into the venture capital funds licensed under IIF Rounds 1 and 2 and the

PSF and REEF programs. Round 3 of the IIF program became operational in 2007 and the

Australian Government decided to provide funds directly rather than using the interposed IIF

companies structure.

Meetings During the 2011-12 financial year the VCC held six meetings and considered a number of matters

out-of-session.

4 August 2011 Melbourne

23 September 2011 Brisbane

24 November 2011 Canberra

17 February 2012 Sydney

13 April 2012 Melbourne

7 June 2012 Sydney

3 Registrations under the PDF Act closed on 21 June 2007.

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Other Activities The VCC continued with its commitment to meet with a number of fund managers on a yearly

basis. Meetings with IIF, IIFF and VCLP fund managers were held throughout the year.

Workload Significant activities of the VCC during 2011-12 included:

• the registration of nine (conditional and unconditional) funds under the VCLP program;

• the registration of six (conditional and unconditional) funds under the ESVCLP program;

• the registration of one entity under Part 3 of the VC Act;

• the revocation of seven funds under the PDF program;

• contribution to the Review of Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Skills in Australia;

• advice on the assessment framework for IIF Round 3 Tranche 4; and

• advice on a range of VC program issues including the wind-up of funds; key person changes

and technical governance issues.

During 2011-12, the VCC considered six determination requests from fund mangers under

the IIF, PSF and REEF programs.

Decisions under the PDF Act

Table 3.2 · Decisions under the PDF Act

Type of Decision No. of Decisions

Section 20 - PDF acquiring shares 1

Section 46 - Revocation on application by PDF 5

Section 47 - Revocation at discretion of Board 1

Section 45 - Automatic revocation if PDF is not an eligible corporation 1

Total 8

Table 3.3 · Decisions under the VC Act The Committee made 19 decisions under the VC Act.

Type of Decision No. of Decisions

Section 9-4 - Allowing a partner’s committed capital to exceed the 30% limit 1

Section 13-1(1) - Registration of a partnership as a VCLP 5

Section 13-1(1A) - Registration of a partnership as an ESVCLP 1

Section 13-5(1) - Conditional registration of a partnership as a VCLP 4

Section 13-5(1A) - Conditional registration of a partnership as an ESVCLP 5

Section 17-25 - Revocation of application by partnership 2

Part 3 - Registration of eligible venture capital investors 1

Total 19

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COMMERCIALISATION AUSTRALIA BOARD

Establishment The Commercialisation Australia (CA) Board was established on 4 February 2010, to undertake

assessments of applications received under the Commercialisation Australia program. It also

provides advice on possible future initiatives to support commercialisation activity, based

on evidence gathered through the operation of the Commercialisation Australia program.

The CA Board performs these functions under delegation from Innovation Australia.

Responsibilities The role of the CA Board is to provide independent expert advice and to merit rank applications

received under the Commercialisation Australia program.

Meetings During 2011-12 the CA Board held eight meetings:

10-11 August 2011 Canberra

14 September 2011 Canberra

31 October 2011 Melbourne

13 December 2011 Canberra

7 February 2012 Canberra

13 March 2012 Canberra

30 April 2012 Melbourne

12 June 2012 Sydney

The CA Board also considered a number of matters out of session.

Workload

Table 3.4 · Applications considered by the CA Board Applications considered (no.) Applications

approved (no.)

Applications approved ($m)

Commercialisation Australia applications a 254 185 $71.23 million

a. The applications approved columns do not include applications approved where the funding was not taken up.

The CA Board also considered a number of matters as required under funding agreements for the

Commercialisation Australia program, including variations as listed in the table below.

Table 3.5 · Variations considered by the CA Board

Variations considered (no.) Variations approved (no.)

Commercialisation Australia program 32 26

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CLEAN TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT COMMITTEE

Establishment The Clean Technology Investment Committee was established effective o 3 January 2012 to

provide a merit assessment for all eligible applications received under the Clean Technology

Investment Program and the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program. The

Committee performs these functions under delegation from Innovation Australia.

Responsibilities The role of the Committee is to provide independent expert advice and a merit assessment

of all eligible applications received under the Clean Technology Investment Program and

the Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program.

Meetings During 2011-12 the Committee held two meetings:

27 April 2012 Sydney

14 May 2012 Canberra

Workload

Table 3.6 · Applications considered by the Committee

Applications Received Applications Considered

Applications Approved Approved ($m)

Clean Technology Investment Program 42 6 5 1.49

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program 42 9 8 6.62

Total 84 15 13 8.1

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INNOVATION GRANTS COMMITTEE

Establishment On 1 August 2008, the Innovation Grants Committee (IGC) was established to advise and assist

Innovation Australia with variation requests in relation to the Commercial Ready and R&D Start

programs. On 31 July 2011, when the Climate Ready Committee was revoked on 31 July 2011,

Climate Ready and the Renewable Energy Development Initiative (REDI) programs were

added to their portfolio.

Responsibilities The IGC is responsible for monitoring and assessing requests for variations and other matters as

required under grant agreements, such as dealing with Intellectual Property and change of

company control matters under legacy programs, including the Commercial Ready, R&D Start,

Climate Ready and REDI programs.

Meetings During 2011-12 the IGC held two teleconference meetings:

10 August 2011 Teleconference

21 September 2011 Teleconference

The Committee also considered a number of matters out of session.

Workload The Committee considered a number of matters as required under grant agreements for the

Commercial Ready, R&D Start, Climate Ready and REDI programs.

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ADMINISTRATION BOARD AND COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

Table 3.7 · Innovation Australia

Innovation Australia Members Terms of Appointment

Chair

Mr David Miles AM Company Director 14 October 2010 to 26 September 2013

Members

Mr Carlos Broens a Managing Director, Broens Industries Pty Ltd 27 September 2008 to 31 July 2011

Ms Margaret Calvert Partner, Norcal 14 October 2010 to 6 July 2012

Dr Nicholas Gruen Chief Executive Officer, Lateral Economics 19 September 2011 to 18 September 2014

Dr Laurie Hammond Director, iQ Funds 6 May 2010 to 7 February 2013

Mr Leslie Hosking Company Director 27 September 2009 to 26 September 2012

Ms Elizabeth Lewis-Gray Managing Director, Gekko Systems Pty Ltd 14 October 2010 to 13 October 2013

Mr Gerard Noonan Chair, Media Super 7 September 2009 to 6 September 2012

Ms Fiona Pak-Poy General Partner, Innovation Capital Limited 10 May 2012 to 11 March 2015

Dr Peter Riddles Director, ViciBio Pty Ltd 14 October 2010 to 13 October 2013

Dr Beverley Ronalds b Group Executive, CSIRO Energy 14 December 2009 to 13 December 2012

Mr Richard Shaddick 3 October 2011 to 2 October 2014

Dr Jonathan Spring Managing Director, CEOS Pty Ltd 14 October 2010 to 13 October 2013

Mr Peter Thomas Director, TFG International Pty Ltd 27 September 2008 to 26 September 2011

Mr Innes Willox Chief Executive Officer, Australian Industry Group 19 September 2011 to 18 September 2014

Mr Kenneth Windle Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Advent Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd 27 September 2009 to 26 September 2012

Ms Chris Butler Head of Division, AusIndustry Ex-officio appointment

a. Mr Broens was appointed for a second term from 1 August 2011 to 31 July 2014.

b. Dr Ronalds resigned from the Board on 17 January 2012.

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Table 3.8 · R&D Incentives Committee (formerly the Tax Concession Committee)4

R&D Incentives Committee Members Terms of Appointment

Chair

Mr Peter Thomas Director, TFG International Pty Ltd 27 September 2008 to 26 September 2011

Mr Richard Shaddick Board Member 3 October 2011 to 2 October 2014

Members

Ms Margaret Calvert Partner, Norcal 7 July 2009 to 6 July 2012

Dr Douglas Hawley Managing Director, Hellay Australia Pty Ltd 15 December 2009 to 14 December 2012

Professor Mary O’Kane Principal, Mary O’Kane and Associates Pty Ltd 16 July 2010 to 15 July 2011

Ms Suzanne Roche Director, Smartnet Pty Ltd 15 July 2011 to 14 July 2014

Dr Sabina Shugg Manager-Mining, Momentum Partners 15 July 2011 to 14 July 2014

Dr Lisa Springer Principal, Maia Partners 15 August 2011 to 14 August 2014

Mr David Wilson General Manager, Research, Development and Venture Capital Branch Ex-officio appointment

4 The Tax Concession Committee was renamed the R&D Incentives Committee on 1 October 2011 (see Appendix A).

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Table 3.9 · R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee5

R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee Terms of Appointment

Chair

Mr David Miles Company Director 3 October 2011 to 26 September 2013

Members

Mr Serg Duchini Partner, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu 3 October 2011 to 3 March 2014

Dr Nicholas Gruen Chief Executive Officer, Lateral Economics 3 October 2011 to 18 September 2014

Ms Kathy Kelly Director, Boyce Chartered Accountants 3 October 2011 to 3 March 2014

Dr Anna Lavelle Chief Executive Officer, AusBiotech 3 October 2011 to 18 September 2014

Mr Sam Turnball Managing Director, Flip Screen Australia 3 October 2011 to 3 March 2014

Mr Innes Willox Chief Executive Officer, Australian Industry Group 3 October 2011 to 18 September 2014

5 The R&D Tax Incentive Committee was established on 3 October 2011 (see Appendix A).

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Table 3.10 · Venture Capital Committee

Venture Capital Committee Terms of Appointment

Chair

Mr Gerard Noonan Chair, Media Super 9 September 2009 to 6 September 2012

Members

Professor Stephen Barkoczy Professor, Monash University 1 March 2011 to 28 February 2014

Mr Nicholas Callinan Managing Partner, Collins Hill Pty Ltd 31 July 2008 to 30 July 2011

Mr Marty Gauvin a Managing Director, Tier 5 Pty Ltd and 31 July 2008 to 30 July 2011

Mr John Grant AM b Chairman, Grantham Management 19 October 2009 to 18 October 2012

Mr Nigel Hall Manager, Innovation Centre, Sunshine Coast 1 March 2011 to 28 February 2014

Ms Debra Heitmann Managing Director, Hado Investments Pty Ltd 19 October 2009 to 18 October 2012

Ms Melissa Widner Partner, Sea Point Ventures 31 July 2011 to 30 July 2014

Ms Jennifer Zanich Co-Founder and Chair, Paloma Mobile 17 April 2012 to 12 April 2015

a. Mr Gauvin was appointed for a second term from 31 July 2011 to 30 July 2014 b. Mr Grant resigned from the committee on 12 July 2011.

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Table 3.11 · Commercialisation Australia Board

Commercialisation Australia Board Terms of Appointment

Chair

Dr Laurie Hammond Director, iQ Funds

8 February 2010 to 7 February 2013

Members

Mr Nixon Apple a Industry and Economic Adviser, Australian Manufacturing Workers Union National Office

8 February 2010 to 7 February 2013

Ms Jan Bingley General Manager, IP Licensing and Technology Transfer, CSIRO 8 February 2010 to 31 July 2012

Ms Christine Bridges-Taylor General Manager, B&R Enclosed Pty Ltd

15 June 2012 to 10 February 2015

Dr Susan Pond AM Professor, Dow Sustainability Program, United States Study Centre 8 February 2010 to 30 November 2012

Dr Bruce Whan Director, Swinburne Knowledge

8 February 2010 to 31 July 2012

Dr Katherine Woodthorpe b Chief Executive, The Australian Private Equity and Venture Capital Association Ltd

8 February 2010 to 30 November 2012

Mr Doron Ben-Meir Chief Executive Officer, Commercialisation Australia

Ex-officio appointment

a. Mr Nixon Apple resigned from the Commercialisation Australia Board on 1 June 2012.

b. Dr Katherine Woodthorpe resigned from the Commercialisation Australia Board on 30 June 2012

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Table 3.12 · Clean Technology Investment Committee6

Clean Technology Investment Committee Terms of Appointment

Chair

Ms Fiona Pak-Poy General Partner, Innovation Capital Limited

13 March 2012 to 11 March 2015

Members

Dr Michele Allan Company Director

13 March 2012 to 11 March 2015

Mr Nixon Apple Industry and Economic Advisor, Australian Manufacturing Workers Union National Office

13 March 2012 to 11 March 2015

Dr Bruce Godfrey Principal and Director, Wyld Group Pty Ltd

13 March 2012 to 11 March 2015

Mr Bruce Grey Managing Director, Advanced Manufacturing CRC

13 March 2012 to 12 June 2014

Ms Sylvia Tulloch Director, Tulloch Associates

13 March 2012 to 12 June 2014

Dr Bruce Whan Director, Swinburne Knowledge

13 March 2012 to 12 June 2014

6 The Clean Technology Investment Committee was established 3 January 2012 (see Appendix A)

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Table 3.13 · Innovation Grants Committee

Innovation Grants Committee Terms of Appointment

Chair

Dr Peter Riddles Director, ViciBio Pty Ltd

19 October 2010 to 13 October 2013

Members

Ms Julie Garland-McLellan Principal, McLellan Pty Ltd

6 May 2011 to 5 May 2014

Mr Peter Janssen a Director, J Capital Pty Ltd

1 August 2008 to 31 July 2011

Mr Peter Laver Vice President, Australian Academy Technological Sciences and Engineering 2 June 2011 to 1 June 2014

Dr Jonathan Spring Managing Director, CEOS Pty Ltd

19 October 2010 to 13 October 2013

Dr Colin Sutton b Director, Mission Pty Limited

1 August 2008 to 31 July 2011

Mr Steve Telburn Managing Director, Secret Sauce Intellectual Property Ventures 6 May 2011 to 5 May 2014

a. Mr Peter Janssen was appointed for a second term from 1 August 2011 to 31 July 2014.

b. Mr Colin Sutton was appointed for a second term from 1 August 2011 to 31 July 2014.

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LEGAL MATTERS/LITIGATION

Decisions by Courts and Administrative Appeals Tribunal During 2011-12 financial year Innovation Australia was involved in a total of eight matters

in the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT).

One new application for AAT review was received during the year. One AAT proceeding was

withdrawn by the applicant. One matter proceeded to hearing in the AAT and resulted in a

decision in favour of Innovation Australia.

Table 3.14 · Current litigation matters Current cases as at 30 June 2012 Supreme Court Federal Court Administrative Appeals Tribunal

Board as appellant/applicant 0 0 0

Board as respondent 0 0 6

Table 3.15 · Litigation matters completed Completed cases as at 30 June 2012 Supreme Court Federal Court Administrative Appeals Tribunal

Board as appellant/applicant 0 0 0

Board as respondent 0 0 2

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Section 4 appendicies

APPENDICIES

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appendix a Corporate Governance

OFFICIAL DIRECTIONS, DECLARATIONS AND APPOINTMENTS

a1 Innovation Investment Fund Round Three Direction No.1 of 2011

a2 Commercialisation Australia Program Direction No.1 of 2011

a3 Clean Technology Investment Program Direction No.1 of 2012

a4 Clean Technology Investment Food and Foundries Program Direction No.1 of 2012

a5 Clean Technology Innovation Program Direction No.1 of 2012

a6 Revoke the Climate Ready Committee, 31 July 2011

a7 Change of name for the Tax Concession Committee to the R&D Incentives

Committee, 1 October 2011

a8 Appointment of the R&D Tax Incentives Advisory Committee, 3 October 2011

a9 Appointment of the Clean Technology Investment Committee, 3 January 2012

a10 Appointment of the Clean Technology Innovation Committee, 1 June 2012

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2

APPENDICIES

118

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

3

APPENDICIES

119

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

4

APPENDICIES

120

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

5

APPENDICIES

121

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

6

APPENDICIES

122

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

7

APPENDICIES

123

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

8

APPENDICIES

124

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

9

APPENDICIES

125

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

APPENDICIES

126

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

APPENDICIES

127

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

APPENDICIES

128

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

APPENDICIES

129

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

APPENDICIES

130

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

APPENDICIES

131

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

APPENDICIES

132

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

APPENDICIES

133

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

15

APPENDICIES

134

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

16

APPENDICIES

135

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

17

APPENDICIES

136

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

18

APPENDICIES

137

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

19

APPENDICIES

138

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

20

APPENDICIES

139

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

21

APPENDICIES

140

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

22

APPENDICIES

141

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

23

APPENDICIES

142

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

24

APPENDICIES

143

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

25

APPENDICIES

144

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

26

APPENDICIES

145

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

27

APPENDICIES

146

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

28

APPENDICIES

147

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

29

APPENDICIES

148

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

30

APPENDICIES

149

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

31

APPENDICIES

150

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

32

APPENDICIES

151

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

33

APPENDICIES

152

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

34

APPENDICIES

153

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

35

APPENDICIES

154

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

36

APPENDICIES

155

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

37

APPENDICIES

156

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

38

APPENDICIES

157

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

39

APPENDICIES

158

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appendix b Australian Government Budget, Expenditure and Forward Obligations

Board Programs 2011-12

Program

Australian Government Budget ($m)

Cash

Expenditure ($m)

Forward Obligations ($m)

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program 1.50 0.26 6.36

Clean Technology Investment Program 0.39 0.00 1.49

Climate Ready a 6.53 5.07 1.07

Commercialisation Australia a 51.04 49.09 54.37

Commercial Ready a 0.90 0.80 0.00

COMET a, c 0.00 0.22 0.03

GCIF a 125.44 124.97 115.25

Re-tooling for Climate Change 4.80 4.16 0.08

R&D Start grants 0.00 0.24 0.00

IIF b 129.03 19.22 136.94

IIFF 6.15 1.02 5.13

PSF 6.92 2.85 4.06

a. Commercialisation Australia, Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, COMET, GCIF payments reflect gross amounts and do not account for amounts that may have been repaid.

b. Forward estimates include $68.31 million for the revolving fund, $4.14 million for Rounds 1 and 2 of IIF and $56.58 million for Round 3 of IIF.

c. There is no Australian Government budget for COMET for 2011-12. Cash expenditure was against amounts accrued in earlier year.

APPENDICIES

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix c Program by program breakdown

Table C1 Innovation Australia programs by industry sector (2006 ANZSIC)

Table C2 Innovation Australia programs by Australia and New Zealand Standard

Research Classification (2008 ANZSRC - FOR) code

Table C3 Innovation Australia programs by turnover

Table C4 Innovation Australia programs by state and territory

Table C5 Benefit disbursed figures for select programs from the 2012-13 Science,

Research and Innovation Budget Tables

Corrigenda Innovation Australia Annual Report 2009-10

APPENDICIES

160

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table C1 · Innovation Australia programs by industry sector (2006 ANZSIC) Division

Description

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Number

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Expenditure $m

PDF b Number of Investees

PDF b Investments $m

ESVCLP b Number of Investees

ESVCLP b

Investments $m

VCLP b Number of Investees

VCLP b Investments $m

IIF b Number of Investees

IIF b Investments $m

IIFF b Number of Investees

IIFF b Investments $m

PSF b Number of Investees

PSF b Investments $m

RCC c Number

RCC c Payments $m

A

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

295

339.172

1

0.076

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

B

Mining

885

4,367.312

2

0.260

0

0

3

5.074

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

C

Manufacturing

3,504

5,169.494

5

0.340

1

0.180

26

101.334

10

4.040

2

0.350

2

0.310

27

4.159

D

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

282

539.696

1

0.058

1

1.200

1

0.820

2

1.200

0

0

0

0

0

0

E

Construction

277

1,002.596

0

0

0

0

1

8.354

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

F

Wholesale Trade

97

104.760

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1.810

0

0

0

0

0

0

G

Retail Trade

82

168.752

0

0

0

0

5

55.186

1

0.090

0

0

0

0

0

0

H

Accommodation and Food Services

11

16.201

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

I

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

127

365.668

0

0

0

0

2

16.102

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

J

Information Media and Telecommunications

1,265

1,193.482

0

0

10

8.574

26

52.132

8

3.900

0

0

0

0

0

0

K

Financial and Insurance Services

174

1,271.733

0

0

0

0

2

5.027

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

L

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

37

82.676

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APPENDICIES

161

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Division

Description

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Number

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Expenditure $m

PDF b Number of Investees

PDF b Investments $m

ESVCLP b Number of Investees

ESVCLP b

Investments $m

VCLP b Number of Investees

VCLP b Investments $m

IIF b Number of Investees

IIF b Investments $m

IIFF b Number of Investees

IIFF b Investments $m

PSF b Number of Investees

PSF b Investments $m

RCC c Number

RCC c Payments $m

M

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

1,667

1,598.446

6

1.381

3

6.474

13

29.635

5

2.330

4

0.620

5

0.980

0

0

N

Administrative and Support Services

54

69.859

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0.250

0

0

0

0

0

0

O

Public Administration and Safety

22

215.098

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

P

Education and Training

52

37.669

0

0

1

1.125

1

24.852

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Q

Health Care and Social Assistance

175

113.712

0

0

0

0

2

0.560

4

2.310

0

0

0

0

0

0

R

Arts and Recreation Services

39

77.453

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

S

Other Services

73

60.244

0

0

0

0

2

14.354

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

9,118

16,794.02

15

2.11

16

17.55

84

33

15.93

6

0.97

7

1.29

27

4.16

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the reported

expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia.

b. Only counts co-invested investees once. c. CTFFIP,

Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

COMET, GCIF and RCC payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

d. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI, REEF and

R&D Tax Incentive

programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

APPENDICIES

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INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table C1 · Innovation Australia programs by industry sector (2006 ANZSIC) (continued) Division

Description

CTFFIP c Number

CTFFIP c

Payments $m

Climate Ready c Number

Climate Ready c Payments $m

Commercial Read c Number

Commercial Ready c Payments $m

Commercialisation Australia c Number

Commercialisation Australia c Payments $m

COMETc Number

COMETc Payments $m

GCIF c Number

GCIF c Payments $m

R&D Start c Number

R&D Start c Payments $m

A

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

0

0

4

0.124

1

0

7

1.329

1

0.004

0

0

0

0

B

Mining

0

0

3

0.366

0

0

6

0.846

1

0.022

0

0

0

0

C

Manufacturing

1

0.259

24

3.815

3

0.136

100

18.939

9

0.095

10

79.188

1

0.240

D

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

0

0

1

0.003

0

0

7

0.800

0

0

0

0

0

0

E

Construction

0

0

1

0.020

1

0.482

1

0.071

0

0

0

0

0

0

F

Wholesale Trade

0

0

1

0.084

0

0

7

1.712

0

0

2

43.413

0

0

G

Retail Trade

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0.078

0

0

0

0

0

0

H

Accommodation and Food Services

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0.048

0

0

0

0

0

0

I

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0.677

1

0.024

0

0

0

0

J

Information Media and Telecommunications

0

0

0

0

0

0

38

8.207

2

0.003

0

0

0

0

K

Financial and Insurance Services

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0.836

0

0

0

0

0

0

L

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

0

0

1

0.044

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

APPENDICIES

163

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Division

Description

CTFFIP c Number

CTFFIP c

Payments $m

Climate Ready c Number

Climate Ready c Payments $m

Commercial Read c Number

Commercial Ready c Payments $m

Commercialisation Australia c Number

Commercialisation Australia c Payments $m

COMETc Number

COMETc Payments $m

GCIF c Number

GCIF c Payments $m

R&D Start c Number

R&D Start c Payments $m

M

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

0

0

5

0.618

1

0.125

73

12.851

4

0.013

2

2.366

0

0

N

Administrative and Support Services

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0.200

0

0

0

0

0

0

O

Public Administration and Safety

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0.103

0

0

0

0

0

0

P

Education and Training

0

0

0

0

1

0.062

11

0.772

1

0.056

0

0

0

0

Q

Health Care and Social Assistance

0

0

0

0

0

0

9

1.348

1

0.005

0

0

0

0

R

Arts and Recreation Services

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

S

Other Services

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

1

0.26

40

5.07

7

0.81

268

48.82

20

0.22

14

124.97

1

0.24

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the reported

expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia.

b. Only counts co-invested investees once. c. CTFFIP,

Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

COMET, GCIF and RCC payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

d. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI, REEF and

R&D Tax Incentive

programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

APPENDICIES

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Table C2 · Innovation Australia programs by Australia and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (2008 ANZSRC - FOR) code Group Code

Description

R&D Tax 2010-11

a,b,c

Number

R&D Tax

2010-11

a,b,c

Expenditure $m

IIF d

Number of Investees

IIF d

Investments

$m

IIFF

d

Number of Investees

IIFF

d

Investments

$m

PSF

c

Number of Investees

PSF

d

Investments

$m

01

Mathematical Sciences

40

16.190

0

0

0

0

0

0

02

Physical Sciences

59

19.988

0

0

0

0

0

0

03

Chemical Sciences

328

206.476

0

0

0

0

0

0

04

Earth Sciences

199

227.264

0

0

0

0

0

0

05

Environmental Sciences

143

97.342

0

0

0

0

0

0

06

Biological Sciences

110

69.258

4

2.260

2

0.260

0

0

07

Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences

441

553.968

2

1.200

0

0

0

0

08

Information and Computing Sciences

2,636

3,952.628

9

4.150

1

0.300

0

0

09

Engineering

4,923

10,138.017

4

1.020

1

0.090

2

0.310

10

Technology

203

456.326

6

2.770

0

0

0

0

11

Medical and Health Sciences

352

598.541

8

4.530

2

0.320

5

0.980

12

Built Environment and Design

137

344.993

0

0

0

0

0

0

13

Education

24

22.387

0

0

0

0

0

0

14

Economics

3

2.698

0

0

0

0

0

0

15

Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services

129

63.662

0

0

0

0

0

0

16

Studies in Human Society

3

8.195

0

0

0

0

0

0

APPENDICIES

165

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Group Code

Description

R&D Tax 2010-11

a,b,c

Number

R&D Tax

2010-11

a,b,c

Expenditure $m

IIF d

Number of Investees

IIF d

Investments

$m

IIFF

d

Number of Investees

IIFF

d

Investments

$m

PSF

c

Number of Investees

PSF

d

Investments

$m

17

Psychology and Cognitive Sciences

6

0.899

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

Law and Legal Studies

6

1.599

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

Studies in Creative Arts and Writing

15

9.394

0

0

0

0

0

0

20

Language, Communication and Culture

4

3.398

0

0

0

0

0

0

21

History and Archaeology

2

0.800

0

0

0

0

0

0

22

Philosophy and Religious Studies

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

9,761

16,794.02

33

15.93

6

0.97

7

1.29

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the reported

expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Registrants may nominate more than one ASRCS or ANZSRC category in their registration application.

b. Organisations are counted more than once if an organisation participates in two or more projects under different ANZSRC classifications. c. Number of times category nominated by applicant. .

d. Only counts co-invested investees once. e. Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

GCIF, RCC and

R&D Start

payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

f. The following programs are not included in this table because they do not collect ANZSRC information: PDF, ESVCLP, VCLP, CTFFIP, COMET and RCC. g. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI and REEF programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

APPENDICIES

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Table C2 · Innovation Australia programs by Australia and New Zealand Standard Research Classification (2008 ANZSRC - FOR) code (continued)

Group Code Description

Climate Ready

b,e Number

Climate Ready

b,e Payments $m

Commercial Ready

b,e Number

Commercial Ready

b,e Payments $m

Commercialisation Australia

b,e Number

Commercialisation Australia

b,e Payments $m GCIF

e

Number

GCIF

e

Payments $m

R&D Start

e

Number

R&D Start

e

Payments $m

01 Mathematical

Sciences

0 0 1 0.062 0 0 0 0 0 0

02 Physical Sciences 0 0 0 0 9 2.445 1 1.069 0 0

03 Chemical Sciences 1 0.296 1 0.023 6 0.827 0 0 0 0

04 Earth Sciences 1 0.053 0 0 3 0.339 0 0 0 0

05 Environmental

Sciences

2 0.080 0 0 1 0.022 0 0 0 0

06 Biological

Sciences

0 0 0 0 10 1.011 0 0 1 0.240

07 Agricultural and

Veterinary Sciences

2 0.042 2 0.068 11 1.566 0 0 0 0

08 Information and

Computing Sciences

3 0.044 1 0.125 79 15.180 0 0 0 0

09 Engineering 26 4.074 2 0.528 94 16.486 14 123.897 0 0

10 Technology 3 0.421 0 0 28 5.117 0 0 0 0

11 Medical and

Health Sciences

0 0 0 0 23 4.278 0 0 0 0

12 Built Environment

and Design

2 0.064 0 0 4 0.855 0 0 0 0

13 Education 0 0 0 0 2 0.127 0 0 0 0

14 Economics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15 Commerce,

Management, Tourism and Services

0 0 0 0 2 0.322 0 0 0 0

APPENDICIES

167

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Group Code Description

Climate Ready

b,e Number

Climate Ready

b,e Payments $m

Commercial Ready

b,e Number

Commercial Ready

b,e Payments $m

Commercialisation Australia

b,e Number

Commercialisation Australia

b,e Payments $m GCIF

e

Number

GCIF

e

Payments $m

R&D Start

e

Number

R&D Start

e

Payments $m

16 Studies in Human

Society

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

17 Psychology and

Cognitive Sciences 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

18 Law and Legal

Studies

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

19 Studies in Creative

Arts and Writing 0 0 0 0 1 0.243 0 0 0 0

20 Language,

Communication and Culture

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

21 History and

Archaeology

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

22 Philosophy and

Religious Studies 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 40 5.07 7 0.81 273 48.82 15 124.97 1 0.24

a. Figures for R&D Tax Concession figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the reported expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Registrants may nominate more than one ASRCS or ANZSRC category in their registration application.

b. Organisations are counted more than once if an organisation participates in two or more projects under different ANZSRC classifications.

c. Number of times category nominated by applicant.

d. Only counts co-invested investees once.

e. Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia, GCIF, RCC and R&D Start payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

f. The following programs are not included in this table because they do not collect ANZSRC information: PDF, ESVCLP, VCLP, CTFFIP, COMET and RCC.

g. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI and REEF programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

APPENDICIES

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Table C3 · Innovation Australia programs by turnover Group

Description

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Number

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Expenditure $m

PDF b Number of Investees

PDF b Investments $m

ESVCLP b Number Investees

ESVCLP b Investments $m

VCLP b Number of Investees

VCLP b Investments $m

IIF c Number of Investees

IIF c Investments $m

IIFF c Number of Investees

IIFF c Investments $m

PSF c Number of Investees

PSF c Investments $m

RCC c Number

RCC d Payments $m

Small

<=$500k

3,037

1,574.853

9

1.251

2

1.243

23

66.121

16

7.180

5

0.900

6

1.160

0

0

>500k<=$1m

824

350.940

0

0

7

4.555

7

3.033

15

8.400

1

0.070

0

0

0

0

>$1m<=$5M

2,062

1,313.747

4

0.730

6

8.036

24

22.858

2

0.350

0

0

1

0.13

6

0.332

Medium

>$5m<=$10M

673

605.799

0

0

1

3.719

12

39.634

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0.290

>$10m<=$25m

714

1,210.153

0

0

0

0

4

48.347

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0.656

>$25m<=$50m

504

1,102.081

1

0.058

0

0

4

22.079

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

2.204

Large

>$50m

1,304

10,636.450

1

0.076

0

0

10

111.358

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

0.676

Total

9,118

16,794.02

15

2.11

16

17.55

84

313.43

33

15.93

6

0.97

7

1.29

27

4.16

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the

reported expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Please note that not all registrants supply turnover figures.

b. Investees are grouped by Total Value of Investee Assets, not Turnover c. Only includes co-invested investees once.

d. CTFFIP,

Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

COMET, GCIF, RCC and

R&D Start

payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

e. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI and REEF programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

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Table C3 · Innovation Australia programs by turnover (continued) Group

Description

CTFFIP d Number

CTFFIP d Payments $m

Climate Ready d Number

Climate Ready d Payments $m

Commercial Ready d Number

Commercial Ready d Payments $m

Commercialisation Australiad Number

Commercialisation Australia d Payments $m

COMETd Number.

COMETd Payments $m

GCIF d Number

GCIF d Payments $m

R&D Start d Number

R&D Start d Payments $m

Small

<=$500k

0

0

17

1.087

1

0

208

33.064

19

0.221

4

4.429

0

0

>500k<=$1m

0

0

4

0.595

1

0.062

20

4.690

0

0

0

0

0

0

>$1m<=$5M

0

0

9

2.753

3

0.629

29

6.980

1

0.001

0

0

1

0.240

Medium

>$5m<=$10M

1

0.259

4

0.096

2

0.113

9

3.922

0

0

1

0.055

0

0

>$10m<=$25m

0

0

4

0.158

0

0

1

0.061

0

0

0

0

0

0

>$25m<=$50m

0

0

1

0.135

0

0

1

0.100

0

0

3

4.213

0

0

Large

>$50m

0

0

1

0.250

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

116.270

0

0

Total

1

0.26

40

5.07

7

0.80

268

48.82

20

0.22

14

124.97

1

0.24

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the

reported expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Please note that not all registrants supply turnover figures.

b. Investees are grouped by Total Value of Investee Assets, not Turnover c. Only includes co-invested investees once.

d. CTFFIP,

Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

COMET, GCIF, RCC and

R&D Start

payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

e. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI and REEF programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

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Table C4 · Innovation Australia programs by state and territory Description

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Number

R&D Tax 2010-11 a Expenditure $m

PDF Number of Investees

PDF Investments $m

ESVCLP d Number of Investees

ESVCLP d Investments $m

VCLP d Number of Investees

VCLP d Investments $m

IIF b,d Number of Investees

IIF b,d Investments $m

IIFF b,d Number of Investees

IIFF b,d Investments $m

PSF b,d Number of Investees

PSF b,d Investments $m

RCC c Number

RCC c Payments $m

ACT

98

79.809

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

NSW

3,087

5,824.691

4

1.051

11

11.319

29

118.139

14

9.180

1

0.060

3

0.280

7

0.526

NT

33

121.896

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

QLD

1,808

2,355.510

2

0.147

1

1.550

4

14.475

2

0.680

3

0.350

2

0.210

3

0.417

SA

506

626.557

0

0

0

0

2

0.750

0

0

1

0.250

0

0

8

1.908

TAS

125

117.828

0

0

0

0

1

5.900

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0.092

VIC

2,297

4,514.073

5

0.518

4

4.684

32

97.210

12

4.940

0

0

2

0.800

3

0.616

WA

1,164

3,153.660

4

0.399

0

0

4

2.048

4

0.850

0

0

0

0

4

0.599

Total

9,118

16,794.02

15

2.11

16

17.55

72

238.52

32

15.65

5

0.66

7

1.29

27

4.16

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the

reported expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Please note that not all registrants supply turnover figures.

b. Only includes co-invested investees once. There are one IIF and one IIFF investee companies located overseas. c. CTFFIP,

Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

COMET, GCIF and RCC payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

d. Some investees are based overseas, and these investees have not been included within this table. e. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI and REEF programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

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Table C4 · Innovation Australia programs by state and territory (continued) Description

CTFFIP c Number

CTFFIP c Payments $m

Climate Ready (c) Number

Climate Ready c Payments $m

Commercial Ready c Number

Commercial Ready c Payments $m

Commercialisation Australia c Number

Commercialisation Australia c Payments $m

COMETc Number

COMETc Payments $m

GCIF c Number

GCIF c Payments $m

R&D Start c Number

R&D Start c Payments $m

ACT

0

0

0

0

0

0

9

1.503

0

0

0

0

0

0

NSW

1

0.259

9

2.620

4

0.261

74

18.496

5

0.079

0

0

0

0

NT

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0.048

1

0.004

0

0

0

0

QLD

0

0

4

0.295

1

0.482

64

10.590

6

0.095

2

1.134

0

0

SA

0

0

9

0.486

0

0

18

3.398

1

0.004

3

2.649

1

0.240

TAS

0

0

3

0.084

2

0.062

7

0.792

1

0.020

0

0

0

0

VIC

0

0

10

0.821

0

0

68

9.915

6

0.020

8

121.157

0

0

WA

0

0

5

0.769

0

0

27

4.076

0

0

1

0.027

0

0

Total

1

0.26

40

5.08

7

0.81

268

48.82

20

0.22

14

124.97

1

0.24

a. Figures for

R&D Tax Concession

figures are as at 30 June 2012. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the

reported expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Please note that not all registrants supply turnover figures.

b. Only includes co-invested investees once. There are one IIF and one IIFF investee companies located overseas. c. CTFFIP,

Climate Ready, Commercial Ready, Commercialisation Australia,

COMET, GCIF and RCC payments reflect gross amounts and do not take account of any amounts that may have been repaid.

d. Some investees are based overseas, and these investees have not been included within this table. e. The CTIP, ICIP, REDI and REEF programs are not included in this table because they did not make any payments during the year.

APPENDICIES

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INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table C5 · Benefit disbursed figures for selected programs from the 2012-13 Science, Research and Innovation Budget Tables In previous reports, the “Benefits Disbursed” figures in the Program Activity Overview for the

R&D Tax Concession, Pooled Development Funds (PDF), Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP)

program, and Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (ESVCLP) program were based upon

estimates in the Tax Expenditure Statements.

Starting with this 2011-12 Report, the basis of the “Benefits Disbursed” figures for those programs

will be the Science, Research and Innovation Budget Tables. The table below provides the

corresponding time-series of figures back to 2003-04. 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

R&D Tax Concession 665 729 897 1,005 1,156 1,429 1,455 1,445

ESVCLP 0 0 0 0 1 5 9 15

PDF 9 7 9 11 10 6 4 3

VCLP 35 9 10 10 11 11 11 11

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Corrigenda

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT: 2009-10

Innovation Australia Programs by Turnover

Group Description R&D Tax 2009-10 a Number R&D Tax 2009-10 a Expenditure $m

Small <=$500k 2,947 $1,582.7

>500k<=$1m 770 $377.1

>$1m<=$5M 1,908 $1,100.1

Medium >$5m<=$10M 593 $566.4

>$10m<=$25m 673 $871.7

>$25m<=$50m 489 $1,026.0

Large >$50m 1,234 $11,022.7

Total 8,614 $16,546.6

a. Figures for R&D Tax Concession figures are as at 30 June 2011. The figures may vary with the subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under the legislation. The amount in the expenditure column is the reported expenditure on R&D by registrants, and does not indicate the amount of assistance by Innovation Australia. Please note that not all registrants supply turnover figures.

APPENDICIES

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INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

appendix d Comercialisation Australia Program Breakdown

Table D1 Commercialisation Australia program grant applications received by state

and territory, 2011-12

Table D2 Commercialisation Australia program grant agreements executed by state

and territory, 2011-12

Table D3 Commercialisation Australia program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table D4 Commercialisation Australia program grant agreements executed by entity, 2011-12

Table D5 Commercialisation Australia program grant payments by entity, 2011-12

Note: Appendix D, tables D2 and D4 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (b) (i-iv) of the IR&D Act 1986. Appendix D, tables D3 and D5 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table D1 · Commercialisation Australia program grant applications received by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Number

NSW 64

VIC 70

QLD 66

SA 17

WA 40

TAS 7

ACT 6

NT 1

Total* 271

* The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

Table D2 · Commercialisation Australia program grant agreements executed by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Number Value ($)

NSW 46 25,382,434

VIC 47 13,897,540

QLD 44 12,588,108

SA 15 4,380,171

WA 21 7,981,553

TAS 4 856,701

ACT 5 446,960

NT 1 50,000

Total 183 65,583,467

APPENDICIES

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INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table D3 · Commercialisation Australia program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 18,495,788 38

VIC 9,914,808 20

QLD 10,589,893 22

SA 3,397,925 7

WA 4,075,947 8

TAS 792,314 2

ACT 1,502,650 3

NT 47,500 0

Total 48,816,825 100

Table D4 · Commercialisation Australia program grant agreements executed by entity 2011-12 Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

365cups Pty Ltd 365cups: The Leaders in mobile

ordering

50,000 31-Dec-12

A W Bell Pty Ltd Project A.B.E High strength light

weight aluminium investment castings for aerospace and defence

1,532,232 30-Jun-13

A.E.M. Corporation Pty Ltd Development of an automatic transformer core manufacturing machine

250,000 08-Jan-13

Access Innovation Holdings Pty Ltd Ai-Live captioning technology scale up for national pilot and

commercialisation

1,735,960 28-Feb-13

Adelaide Research & Innovation Pty Ltd

Telari Analytics: Cellular/Mobile Network Dimensioning Tool

250,000 26-Mar-13

Aerofloat (Australia) Pty Ltd Development and commercialisation of a mid flow rate Dissolved Air Flotation system

310,957 01-Aug-13

Agricrop Pty Ltd Improved management of fungal

disease in grapes and melons

50,000 30-Apr-13

Agriculture Guided Implement Systems Pty Ltd SD-Track - innovative cost effective & efficient RF precision guidance system

212,109 31-Dec-12

Agworld Pty Ltd Agriculture focused cloud-hosted collaboration, recording, management and reporting software

750,000 30-Apr-13

Air Tip Pty Ltd AIR TIP: a new side tipper transport

solution for bulk commodities

50,000 15-May-12

APPENDICIES

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Applied Physiology Pty Ltd Commercial integration of Navigator clinical decision support system software into global patient monitoring platform

1,695,967 31-Dec-12

Aquamill Five Star Pty Ltd Market research and selection of optimal demonstration sites for the use of Aquamill’s novel high intensity evaporation water purification technology

50,000 29-Feb-12

Asdeq Labs Pty Ltd Commercialising asdeqdocs - a world first enterprise solution that delivers corporate documents securely on mobile devices, anywhere, anytime

632,183 01-Apr-14

Atcomm Enterprises Pty Ltd Fatigue Detection and Management System 44,160 30-May-12

AtCor Medical Pty Ltd Cuff based central pressure system 1,122,162 13-Nov-13

Atomo Diagnostics Pty Ltd Fully integrated device for blood based lateral flow rapid testing 249,992 31-Mar-12

Australian BioRefining Pty Ltd Commercialisation of acid/metal separation and regeneration/recovery process

860,031 31-Oct-13

Australian Rig Construction Holdings Pty Ltd Zero Ground Disturbance System for Oil and Gas sites

249,837 30-Oct-12

Australian U-Fit Security Pty Ltd Mass produce an adjustable security door and barrier door

50,000 19-Jun-13

B.Box for Kids Developments Pty Ltd Baby formula dispenser that attaches to the bottle creating an all-in-one

feeding solution

74,395 31-Mar-12

Beat the Q Pty Ltd Pilot lauch of a proprietary mobile

ordering and payment service

50,000 03-Jun-12

Billcap Pty Ltd Residential Energy Management

Service Proof of Concept

222,490 31-Mar-13

Biobike Pty Ltd Computerised sport cycling machine

for real time adjustment and performance monitoring

199,633 31-Oct-12

Bombora Wave Power Pty Ltd Wave Energy Conversion Device (WECD) 50,000 31-Jul-12

Borderless Media Pty Ltd Borderless Media Parking Advertisng System 36,000 20-Jul-12

B-Pods Pty Ltd Tractile composite roofing:

sustainable, lightweight, cyclone resistant, integrated solar energy

236,340 24-Apr-12

Braendler Engineering Pty Ltd Automated seal inspection for the food industry 48,000 30-Apr-12

APPENDICIES

178

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Brian Investments Pty Ltd Advancing mine site wear management 50,000 31-Dec-12

Bubble Gum Interactive Pty Ltd Global billing and velvet rope framework for the Little Space Heroes

Virtual Universe

255,288 30-Mar-12

Built by Team 16 Pty Ltd ‘DATE OR DUD’TM the world’s first multi-platform speed dating show 80,000 30-Jun-12

Built by Team 16 Pty Ltd ‘DATE OR DUD’© is a pioneering online multi-platform speed dating comedy show

16,160 31-Aug-11

CA TEC Pty Ltd Research of ANZ and European disc

brake market potential for Caliper Alignment Technology (CAT); proposals for corporate structuring and contracts, and; employment of an Experienced Executive

250,000 30-Nov-13

Calico Global Pty Ltd Personalised online and smartphone health support partnership with local councils

250,000 12-Aug-12

Calpain Therapeutics Pty Ltd The first pharmaceutical treatment for cataract 190,250 13-May-13

CAP-XX (Australia) Pty Ltd Surface Mount Supercapacitor 250,000 31-May-12

Ceramisphere Pty Ltd Manufacture of “Smart Particles” 250,000 28-Feb-13

Ceridia Pty Ltd Clinical and business development of

a novel drug improvement technology 48,400 26-Nov-11

CIMTECH Pty Ltd Commercialisation of a novel skincare product line.

200,000 31-Jul-13

Cintep Pty Ltd Ultra-efficient shower system 795,000 30-Sep-13

Clarinox Technologies Pty Ltd Innovative integrated design and debug environment for wireless electronic developments - wIDE

50,000 01-Mar-12

Clarity Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd A preclinical to clinical process for medical imaging

300,000 30-Nov-12

Cleanairflow Solutions Pty Ltd Animal Transport Clean Air Ventilation System

40,000 30-Apr-13

Compliance Master International Pty Ltd

Compliance assessment and control software 50,000 07-Sep-12

ConnectiX Technologies Pty Ltd ConnectiX Mobile Field Services Workforce Management Suite

916,400 30-Aug-13

CP Brothers Pty Ltd Prove the Underwater Bait Setter saves seabirds from drowning 249,623 31-Dec-12

Croker Oars Pty Ltd Croker Oars Sailing Foils Project 236,279 14-Mar-13

APPENDICIES

179

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Curtin University of Technology

Data Quality and Integrity Toolkit 50,000 30-Sep-12

DBD Innovations Pty Ltd Method of Testing Insulating Layers using Air Plasma 50,000 14-Aug-12

Dejai Live Pty Ltd Automate Mirror: Integrated

telematics for management of vehicle fleets

370,000 31-Mar-13

Dev-Audio Pty Ltd Intelligent microphone array device for enriched meeting recording and teleconferencing

246,799 31-Oct-12

Diagnotech Pty Ltd Innovative Uterine Cancer Diagnostic Test for Diagnosis and Screening 50,000 08-Jun-12

Dr Peter Bell & Associates Pty Ltd Commercialisation of the Drag+Fly Elite swim resistance training device

50,000 10-Jun-13

Easyjust Pty Ltd An invention to facilitate the easy

adjustment of tables located on uneven surfaces.

50,000 15-Jul-12

Eco Pacific Pty Ltd The project will trial the cost

effectiveness and energy efficiency of innovative compact gas ducted heaters, while S&K will fund a business plan, IP management, preparation for a capital raising

200,000 15-Apr-13

Ecobuild Solutions (Operations) Pty Ltd

Commercialisation of EasyFix wall cladding installation system and associated products

448,198 30-Apr-12

E-Diary Pty Ltd Engage a business development

partner in the USA to refine the E-CAL sports event management SaaS platform for target customers in USA & Europe and assist in structuring & concluding a funding deal

50,000 27-Aug-12

Empower Energy Pty Ltd ElektroBank - Energy Storage Optimisation 250,000 31-Mar-14

Endoluminal Sciences Pty Ltd Breakthrough Sealing Technology for Minimally Invasive Aortic Valve Replacement

227,500 31-Jan-12

eTool Pty Ltd eTool Life Cycle Assessment software

program to reduce environmental impact and costs of buildings and infrastructure in the design phase.

127,500 31-Oct-12

APPENDICIES

180

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Extreme Networks Pty Ltd Time2Roster - an easy to use innovative rostering software at an affordable price for SMEs that can integrate into standard accounting and payroll packages

245,453 30-Nov-12

Eye Co Pty Ltd Novel treatments for exudative,

diabetic and blinding diseases of the retina

50,000 28-Feb-13

FBE Pty Ltd Biological Fluid Warmer - Strategic

Commercialisation Research

49,880 24-Jul-12

FirstPhysio Pty Ltd Trading as Halo Medical Devices HALO “ The Digital Goniometer” 50,000 30-Jun-12

Fitgenes Pty Ltd Interoperable ICT system for delivering genomic based personalised healthcare

467,444 30-Aug-13

Freeform Connect Pty Ltd Generic application interfaces to turn Squirrel.it for Designers into a commercial SaaS application

75,400 21-Mar-13

Frelk Industries Pty Ltd Market validation of a tool that cuts pipe from the inside 50,000 14-May-13

Fumunda Pingers Pty Ltd as trustee for The Kataj Family Trust

Whale Avoidance Pinger 250,000 31-Dec-12

Genero Music Pty Ltd Innovative new media platform producing video content for brands through disruptive business models

228,656 30-Nov-12

Genix Ventures Pty Ltd ProTRACK lifecycle management software for membership-based professional organisations

633,750 15-Apr-13

Geo Oceans Pty Ltd Geo Oceans - Diverless Marine Habitat Mapping and Monitoring Technology

180,250 23-Apr-14

Global Kinetics Corporation Pty Ltd The Parkinson’s KinetiGraph System for the management of Parkinson’s

disease symptoms

439,625 30-Jun-13

Globaltech Corporation Pty Ltd Drill-Smart: Total integration of drill-rig instrumentation

1,536,934 28-Feb-14

Gloccamora Pty Ltd The Mortag “Power Lead Testing System and Electronic Tag” 50,000 28-Feb-13

goACT Pty Ltd goACT Journal, telehealth platform for

remote chronic disease management 300,000 11-Sep-12

Gordiantec Pty Ltd Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) cluster identification and application in disease stratification

50,000 30-Sep-12

APPENDICIES

181

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Grazer Pty Ltd Grazer SaaS ‘C Suite’ Cloud

Commercialisation

250,000 30-Oct-12

Green Distillation Technologies Pty Ltd

Emission free tyre recycling and clean energy generation 438,400 30-Sep-13

gT-Energy Technologies Pty Ltd Next generation turbo-alternator heat engine power generator

600,000 31-Dec-12

Health Risk Management Systems Pty Ltd Complete the development of 2cRisk health risk management software

application

230,167 30-Mar-12

Health-e Workforce Solutions Pty Ltd Predictive Modeller - An Innovative Workforce Knowledge System

545,800 30-Sep-13

HiSeis Pty Ltd High definition 3D seismic services

for mining exploration

2,000,000 31-Mar-14

HIVAP Pty Ltd The HIVAP air conditioning system 138,000 31-Dec-12

Hydrasyst Pty Ltd Commercialisation of a new waste water treatment process 50,000 30-Jun-12

Hydrexia Pty Ltd Solid state hydrogen storage for

industrial and refuelling applications 762,806 14-Sep-12

iCetana Pty Ltd Intelligent video surveillance software that detects rare and unusual events 890,000 31-Mar-13

Icon Global Link Pty Ltd Business and IP strategy for Integrated Standards Enforcement System (ISES®)

49,896 18-Sep-11

Inertial Orthopaedic Navigation Solutions Pty Ltd Commercialisation of the MACNAV Computer-assisted Hip Replacement

Navigation System

305,250 09-Apr-12

Ingeneus Pty Ltd Integrated vitreoretinal surgery and laser platform 250,000 31-Mar-12

Ingogo Pty Ltd ingogo.mobi peer to peer, corporate

taxi booking and payment system

250,000 16-Jun-12

Innovate AG Pty Ltd Development of an Organic Plant based Insecticide for the Australian Agricultural Industry

1,509,899 31-Dec-13

Innovative Purification Technologies Pty Ltd

Development of business strategy for the Protein Nano-Particle (PNP) technology

50,000 08-Apr-13

Ino8 Pty Ltd Oil Viscosity Energy Recovery System

(OVER 7)

153,450 30-Jun-12

InterfereX Communications Pty Ltd Market Analysis and Strategy for a Radio Modelling Product with

application to Small Cell Wireless Communication Systems

48,400 15-Aug-12

APPENDICIES

182

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Invatec Health Pty Ltd A method of identifying and managing chronic stress 252,987 31-Jul-12

Jobfit Systems International Pty Ltd JobFit System - Cloud. JobFit system to match worker capabilities to job

demands

450,000 31-Dec-13

Joss Developments Limited Development of the first Australian Supercar 28,240 15-Mar-12

Keith Engineering (Australia) Pty. Ltd.

Rotary Shaft Wave Disc Drying Technology, initially targeting the Meat Rendering Industry

1,785,000 31-Jan-14

KNOG Pty Ltd Urban Cycle Accessories for a Global

Market

994,966 19-May-13

Lactomin Australia Pty Ltd Improved value from sustainable biofuel production 141,380 01-Dec-12

Leapin Pty Ltd LEAPIN - Remote Access Control and

Security Solutions

50,000 15-Mar-12

Learning Frameworks Pty Ltd Sports knowledge management & information exchange platform 127,877 28-Feb-12

Licella Pty Ltd Proving Bio-Crude oil production at

a pre-commercial scale

2,000,000 31-Aug-12

Liquitab Systems Limited Liquitab - an innovative device transforming difficult to swallow tablets into palatable liquids

50,000 30-Jun-12

LSC Lighting Systems (Aust) Pty Ltd Integrated Lighting / Media Server Control consoles

423,750 30-Jun-12

Magellan Powertronics Pty Ltd Supplementation of aging SWER distribution networks with

revolutionary energy storage technologies

248,340 07-Sep-12

MagnePath Pty Ltd Dive-inTM Medical Imaging Platform and Portal - bringing imaging tests online

249,805 31-Dec-12

Mesaplexx Pty Ltd Ultra compact, high performance filters for the mobile telecommunications industry

924,902 30-Jun-13

Metal Science Technologies Pty Ltd Improvements in speed and corrosion resistance of post weld finishing and

surface finishing of stainless steel using a portable apparatus

161,000 31-Oct-12

Metis Technologies Pty Ltd High temperature fibre technology for custom engineered pollution control filtration

250,000 31-Aug-13

APPENDICIES

183

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Miiingle Technologies Pty Ltd Social proximity marketing through integration of social media and mobile applications

50,000 19-Jun-13

Mining Consumables Pty Ltd Friction Cable Bolt: Advanced support for high stress underground mines 49,716 30-Jun-12

Momentum Cloud Pty Ltd Streamlining performance reporting for schools and childcare centres 300,000 07-Oct-12

Monash University Real time lung motion imaging as a tool for monitoring lung disease 48,560 30-Jun-12

Mowbray Holdings Pty Ltd ATF Mowbray Holdings Trading Trust

Australian developed low toxicity durable timber floor and wall coatings 50,000 30-Jun-12

New Media Innovation Pty Ltd Multi-Catalogue, a Multi-channel (online and mobile) digital commerce

ordering and cataloguing solution

240,000 31-Mar-12

Nexvet BioPharma Pty Ltd Preparation of investment round documentation for Nexvet, a developer of veterinary therapeutic proteins for companion animals, to fund development of a portfolio of treatments from its novel platform

48,800 30-Nov-11

On-Market Bookbuilds Pty Ltd On-Market Bookbuilds 1,846,466 31-Dec-13

Optimatics Solutions Pty Ltd Water utility decision support software tool 250,000 30-Oct-12

Optimism Apps Pty Ltd Proactive Mental Health Management and Remote Monitoring 32,800 24-Nov-12

Optimized Ortho Pty Ltd Optimized orthopaedic implant positioning based on dynamic, patient-specific models

2,161,249 30-Jun-14

Otifex Therapeutics Pty Ltd Nasal spray for the treatment of fluid in the middle ear 200,000 14-Nov-13

Owen Custom Products Pty Ltd Solid state technology for swing pedals

223,834 31-Dec-13

Oz Probuild Pty Ltd Greendow Vertical Garden System 125,000 01-Nov-12

PAFtec Australia Pty Ltd Opening up markets for a state-of-the-art high performance respiratory protection device.

986,108 30-Jun-13

Palos Verdes International Pty Ltd Food for the Future - Mustard Protein A New Functional Ingredient

335,000 04-May-14

Paper Friendly Pty Ltd HubHello! connecting families, services, and Government in caring for a child

50,000 30-Jun-12

APPENDICIES

184

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Peak3 Pty Ltd Diesel particulate reduction

technology using ultrasonic agglomeration.

866,284 31-Jan-13

Perimeter Security Industries Pty Ltd Establishing commercial systems and resources for innovative fibre-optic

security system.

250,000 31-May-14

PlayFi Pty Ltd PlayFi - providing an innovative

platform to stream and sell live performances over the Internet

120,000 12-Dec-12

Professional Development Online Pty Ltd Commercialisation of an online learning platform for Smartphones

and TabletPCs

197,194 31-Dec-12

Progel Pty Ltd Better tasting and healthier functional

foods

250,000 14-Aug-12

Qlicksmart Pty Ltd Universal single handed scalpel blade remover - improving staff safety globally

162,294 31-Dec-12

qutbluebox Pty Ltd (as Trustee for QUT Bluebox Trust)

Immersive Interaction System: an early childhood education and entertainment platform.

250,000 19-Apr-12

R:Fifteen Pty Ltd Mall Shopper - In store information

fed live to shoppers

172,500 15-Jan-13

Real Time Data Pty Ltd Intuitive fisheries data recording and reporting system 280,000 14-Jul-12

Red Scout Pty Ltd Red Scout - Online training for the

beauty and fashion retailing industry 229,700 30-Jun-13

RESA Operations Pty Ltd Eco Whisper Turbines renewable energy wind project 250,000 30-Sep-12

Resource Mining Corporation Limited Innovative Hydrometallurgical Process Using Bio Renewable Citric Acid

250,000 31-Dec-12

Re-Time Pty Ltd Re-Time Light Therapy Glasses 137,875 21-Dec-12

Run With Robots Pty Ltd Mobile online social game development cross-platform system 157,963 30-Nov-12

Sabre Teeth Pty Ltd Self-sharpening ground engaging tool for earthmoving machinery 180,000 31-Mar-13

Safergate Pty Ltd “Swing Gate” - increase safety for cattle handling & save lives 45,760 27-Jun-12

Scalify Pty Ltd Peer-to-Peer networking for

multiplayer online applications

98,118 30-Apr-12

Seafoods Tasmania Pty Ltd Development of Sea Urchin Products for Export 125,000 10-Apr-13

APPENDICIES

185

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Semantic Sciences Pty Ltd Developing the Commercialisation Strategy for Sintelix 50,000 15-Sep-12

Sentient Vision Systems Pty Ltd Kestrel Automated Target Detection In Maritime Environments

445,000 30-Apr-14

Shift Geophysics Pty Ltd Development and commercialisation of an Unmanned Airborne Geophysical Platform

198,434 31-Aug-12

Signostics Limited Application Specific Handheld Ultrasound Platform 1,965,803 30-Sep-12

Smart Services CRC Pty Ltd iSee- immersive services commercialisation pathways 50,000 31-Aug-12

Smart Steel Systems Pty Ltd Automated Steel Fabrication System 446,500 28-Feb-13

SmartVet Pty Ltd Commercialise VetCap’s definitive ‘resistance busting’ fly control solution for cattle

998,475 14-Feb-14

Smartward Pty Ltd SmartWard - automated patient care system for improved care in hospital wards at lower cost

50,000 21-Nov-11

Snap Network Surveillance Pty Limited Commercialisation of world-leading large scale video surveillance

technology

200,000 03-Jun-14

Soilkee Pty Ltd The Soilkee Renovator, an agricultural

machine that effectively renovates soil and pasture

50,000 31-Oct-12

Spruik Group (Australia) Pty Ltd ProgressClaim.com - collaborative payment application and approval in

seconds, via web and smart phone

217,276 15-Sep-12

Stochastic Simulation Ltd Oil and Gas Reserves Assurance and Production and Distribution Optimisation Technologies

250,000 30-Apr-12

Strategic Lighting Pty Ltd Cost effective lighting for industrial and commercial use using T5 fluorescent lamps in high performance parabolic reflectors with adjustable, fully-sealed weatherproof housings and smart electronics

770,992 02-Aug-13

Straxcorp Pty Ltd Straxcorp has commissioned patent attorneys to secure its core medical digital imaging IP in major world markets prior to finalising commercialisation strategies and releasing it for evaluation

37,652 15-Aug-12

Student Welcome Services Pty Ltd ATF Student Welcome Service

Online portal for induction and orientation of foreign students

50,000 31-Jan-13

APPENDICIES

186

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Switch Automation Pty Ltd Switch Sustainability Platform - web-enabled automation and energy management for green buildings

2,000,000 31-Aug-13

T 2 Green Pty Ltd Portable diagnostic tool to measure

brain activity of athletes

50,000 31-Jan-13

Tapestry Pty Ltd Tapestry Intellectual Property

Protection

18,888 31-Aug-11

Tasweld Engineering Pty Ltd Rotated Arc Mixer for efficient mixing of highly viscous fluids 366,481 31-Mar-14

Technobake R&D Pty Ltd RoastRunner rotating grilling oven 250,000 20-Jan-13

The Australian National University Development of an in-vitro assay of a new anti-nematode drug target

50,000 31-Jan-13

The University of Tasmania Millispot: Taking dried blood spots to the next level 49,680 14-Dec-11

The University of Tasmania Ductless Task Air-Conditioning (DTAC) 49,838 20-Aug-12

Thereitis.com Pty Ltd Thereitis.com Business and Consumer Market Readiness Project 250,000 30-Jun-12

Timing Solutions Pty Ltd Blincas: the new wireless light solution for on-road cyclists 43,920 30-Oct-12

Total Range Design Pty Ltd The Wayo Board is a portable, battery powered, internet-enabled electronic A frame advertising board with a web-based interface so content can be changed remotely

50,000 09-Aug-12

TripleThink Pty Ltd Music Software Controller 48,560 01-Jan-13

Tritium Pty Ltd Advanced rapid charging for electric

vehicles.

1,150,000 31-Dec-13

UniQuest Pty Limited Red Bayberry commercialisation project 50,000 30-Dec-12

UniQuest Pty Limited Nexgenplants 50,000 19-May-13

UniQuest Pty Limited AGENTA Accelerated breeding for wheat and barley 50,000 31-May-13

UoM Commercial Ltd TLR-2 agonist - an immunostimulant that provides protection against respiratory disease and infection

39,040 30-Jun-12

Urban Ecological Systems Australia Pty Ltd Production of barramundi and certified organic vegetables in a

zero-effluent, energy-efficient glasshouse

1,910,000 30-Jun-13

Viocorp International Pty Ltd liveBOX, making multiple live stream internet broadcasting a reality 450,000 31-Oct-13

APPENDICIES

187

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($) Completion Date

Vitel Australia Pty Ltd T/A Ag Essentials “Stick-it” Spray Drift Retardant 23,272 30-Sep-12

Voztec Pty Ltd Voztec - Full face protective helmet to

be manufactured with a rear opening and safety release system

250,000 10-Mar-13

Whispir Ltd OpenWhispir - a cloud-based

engagement platform for crisis, incident and event management

2,000,000 30-Mar-13

Williames Tea Pty Ltd World’s First Selective Tea Harvesting Machine 221,965 31-Mar-12

Yackstar Pty Ltd Yackstar - Using internal social

networks to improve employee engagement and business results

333,918 14-Apr-13

Total 65,583,467

APPENDICIES

188

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table D5 · Commercialisation Australia program grant payments by entity, 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

13 FIND Aggregation Services Pty Ltd 354,295

300K Enterprises Pty Ltd 119,414

365cups Pty Ltd 29,064

A W Bell Pty Ltd 405,403

A.E.M. Corporation Pty Ltd 123,318

AQ1 Systems Pty Ltd 68,600

Accentu8 Novotecnica Pty Ltd 185,482

Access Innovation Holdings Pty Ltd 925,627

Advanced Braking Pty Ltd 872,283

Advent Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd 147,409

Aerofloat (Australia) Pty Ltd 130,296

Aerofloat (Holdings) Pty Ltd 21,880

Aerogenesis Australia Pty Ltd 36,718

Affinity Biosciences Pty Ltd 1,268

Agent Oriented Software Pty Ltd 67,436

Agriculture Guided Implement Systems Pty Ltd 58,545

Agworld Pty Ltd 342,680

AiMedics Pty Ltd 1,089,526

Air Tip Pty Ltd 47,500

Alcidion Corporation Pty Ltd 558,144

All Homes Pty Ltd 53,040

Applied Physiology Pty Ltd 1,021,669

AquaGen Technologies Pty Ltd 7,928

Aquamill Five Star Pty Ltd 50,000

Asdeq Labs Pty Ltd 261,616

AtCor Medical Pty Ltd 534,868

Atcomm Enterprises Pty Ltd 41,952

Atomo Diagnostics Pty Ltd 237,492

Aussie Colours Pty Ltd 155,682

Australian BioRefining Pty Ltd 272,165

Australian PhytoFuel Company Pty Ltd 122,460

Australian Rig Construction Holdings Pty Ltd 163,876

APPENDICIES

189

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Australian U-Fit Security Pty Ltd 47,500

B-Pods Pty Ltd 220,089

B.Box for Kids Developments Pty Ltd 70,675

Bancaz Pty Limited 92,688

Beat the Q Pty Ltd 47,500

BioHerbicides Australia Pty Ltd 18,983

Biobike Pty Ltd 174,650

Bombora Wave Power Pty Ltd 28,770

Borderless Media Pty Ltd 34,200

Braendler Engineering Pty Ltd 36,800

Brian Investments Pty Ltd 36,000

Bubble Gum Interactive Pty Ltd 242,524

BuildingIQ Pty Ltd 1,023,664

Built by Team 16 Pty Ltd 92,160

CA TEC PTY LTD 125,000

CAP-XX (Australia) Pty Ltd 237,500

CIMTECH Pty Ltd 186,862

CP Brothers Pty Ltd 144,323

Calico Global Pty Ltd 181,796

Calpain Therapeutics Pty Ltd 55,900

Capture Plan Pty Ltd 94,780

Catchlog Trading Pty Ltd 223,705

Ceramisphere Pty Ltd 132,982

Ceridia Pty Ltd 48,400

Cintep Pty Ltd 207,498

Clarinox Technologies Pty Ltd 47,500

Clarity Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd 194,221

Cleanairflow Solutions Pty Ltd 8,000

Cloudtech Group Limited 70,322

Compliance Master International Pty Ltd 17,800

ConnectiX Technologies Pty Ltd 187,350

Court Record Solutions Group Pty Ltd 419,640

APPENDICIES

190

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Croker Oars Pty Ltd 121,518

Curtin University of Technology 66,000

DBD Innovations Pty Ltd 43,199

Dejai Live Pty Ltd 190,962

Descrete Australia Pty Ltd 132,860

Dev-Audio Pty Ltd 95,366

Diagnotech Pty Ltd 47,500

Dimerix Bioscience Pty Ltd 90,349

Dr Peter Bell & Associates Pty Ltd 28,000

E-Diary Pty Ltd 10,400

Earth Sense Pty Ltd 132,482

Easyjust Pty Ltd 47,500

Eco Pacific Pty Ltd 73,764

Ecobuild Solutions (Operations) Pty Ltd 425,788

Empower Energy Pty Ltd 72,252

Endoluminal Sciences Pty Ltd 216,125

eTool Pty Ltd 73,100

Euclideon Pty Ltd 977,208

eWater Innovation Pty Ltd 75,009

Extreme Networks Pty Ltd 143,362

Eye Co Pty Ltd 33,332

FAIRLIGHT INSTRUMENTS PTY LTD 10,045

FBE Pty Ltd 36,760

FirstPhysio Pty Ltd Trading as Halo Medical Devices 50,000

Fitgenes Pty Ltd 189,574

Florey Neuroscience Institute 24,657

Freeform Connect Pty Ltd 44,400

Frelk Industries Pty Ltd 14,800

Fumunda Pingers Pty Ltd as trustee for The Kataj Family Trus 119,940

Genero Music Pty Ltd 124,048

Genix Ventures Pty Ltd 233,889

Geo Oceans Pty Ltd 48,097

Global Detection Systems Pty Ltd 57,000

APPENDICIES

191

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Global Kinetics Corporation Pty Ltd 328,004

Globaltech Corporation Pty Ltd 326,452

Gloccamora Pty Ltd 38,400

goACT Pty Ltd 238,321

Gordiantec Pty Ltd 32,000

GrassAds Pty Ltd 133,780

Grazer Pty Ltd 79,395

Green Distillation Technologies Pty Ltd 320,316

gT-Energy Technologies Pty Ltd 421,387

HEARD Systems Pty Ltd 5,000

HIVAP Pty Ltd 71,400

Harmoni Organics Pty Ltd 24,562

Health Risk Management Systems Pty Ltd 218,659

Health-e Workforce Solutions Pty Ltd 126,573

HiSeis Pty Ltd 162,545

Hydrasyst Pty Ltd 47,500

Hydrexia Pty Ltd 677,480

HyperVibe Pty Ltd 27,013

iCetana Pty Ltd 340,353

Icon Global Link Pty Ltd 47,401

IPscape Pty Ltd 339,714

Immersaview Pty Ltd 39,361

Immune System Therapeutics Ltd 482,441

Indice Pty Ltd 129,501

Inertial Orthopaedic Navigation Solutions Pty Ltd 151,444

Ingeneus Pty Ltd 237,500

Ingogo Pty Ltd 180,810

Innovate AG Pty Ltd 212,887

Innovative Purification Technologies Pty Ltd 23,720

Ino8 Pty Ltd 145,777

Inovas Pty Ltd 108,231

InterfereX Communications Pty Ltd 24,200

Invatec Health Pty Ltd 225,237

APPENDICIES

192

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Jobfit Systems International Pty Ltd 167,500

Joinlox Pty Ltd 100,019

Joss Developments Limited 26,828

KNOG Pty Ltd 687,224

Keith Engineering (Australia) Pty. Ltd. 61,181

LSC Lighting Systems (Aust) Pty Ltd 402,562

Lactomin Australia Pty Ltd 90,000

Leapin Pty Ltd 47,500

Learning Frameworks Pty Ltd 126,351

Licella Pty Ltd 1,497,205

Liquitab Systems Limited 47,500

Locatrix International Pty Ltd 120,500

Lockbox Pty Ltd 71,250

Lockpost Pty Ltd 102,500

Madeleine Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd 107,501

Magellan Powertronics Pty Ltd 189,465

MagnePath Pty Ltd 113,006

Marathon Robotics Pty Ltd 99,137

Marinova Pty Ltd 203,083

Medivations Pty Ltd 67,877

Mesaplexx Pty Ltd 295,017

Metal Science Technologies Pty Ltd 85,209

MetalloTek Pty Ltd 139,813

Metis Technologies Pty Ltd 139,650

Miiingle Technologies Pty Ltd 20,000

Mining Consumables Pty Ltd 47,230

Momentum Cloud Pty Ltd 283,653

Monash University 40,880

Mowbray Holdings Pty Ltd ATF Mowbray Holdings Trading Trust 47,500

Navisens Pty Limited 19,553

NeuClone Pty Ltd 84,027

Neural Diagnostics Pty Ltd 197,868

New Media Innovation Pty Ltd 228,000

APPENDICIES

193

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

New Vision Biotech Pty Ltd 12,500

NewAudio Pty Ltd 381,720

Newcastle Innovation Ltd 23,337

Nexvet BioPharma Pty Ltd 48,800

Nitero Pty Ltd 895,457

NuPlant Pty Ltd 20,723

On-Market Bookbuilds Pty Ltd 307,021

Optimatics Solutions Pty Ltd 157,908

Optimism Apps Pty Ltd 12,800

Optimized Ortho Pty Ltd 554,908

Otifex Therapeutics Pty Ltd 62,500

Owen Custom Products Pty Ltd 122,994

Oz Probuild Pty Ltd 75,856

OzStar Therapeutics Pty Ltd 26,723

PAFtec Australia Pty Ltd 199,249

PLF Agritech Pty Ltd 2,500

Palos Verdes International Pty Ltd 63,250

Paper Friendly Pty Ltd 47,500

Peak3 Pty Ltd 530,115

Perimeter Security Industries Pty Ltd 28,333

Planet Innovation Pty Ltd 105,882

PlayFi Pty Ltd 66,708

Pod Active Pty Ltd 199,398

PolyActiva Pty Ltd 128,290

Posse Holdings Pty Ltd 712,251

Pressure Fresh Australia Pty Ltd 36,064

Professional Development Online Pty Ltd 109,551

Progel Pty Ltd 221,500

Qlicksmart Pty Ltd 105,442

Qs Semiconductor Australia Pty Ltd 23,100

Queensland Clams Pty Ltd 4,267

QuintessenceLabs Pty Ltd 825,777

qutbluebox Pty Ltd (as Trustee for QUT Bluebox Trust) 157,573

APPENDICIES

194

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

R:Fifteen Pty Ltd 84,847

RESA Operations Pty Ltd 154,550

Re-Time Pty Ltd 66,078

Real Time Data Pty Ltd 268,500

Red Scout Pty Ltd 62,430

RemarksPDF Pty Ltd 98,137

Resis Australia Pty Ltd 73,159

Resource Mining Corporation Limited 126,612

Respirio Pty Ltd 78,829

Rheology Solutions Pty Ltd 249,783

Run With Robots Pty Ltd 66,907

Rytech Australia Pty Ltd 17,430

SIMmersion Holdings Pty Ltd 88,189

Sabre Teeth Pty Ltd 45,600

Safergate Pty Ltd 43,472

Sangraal Pty Ltd 629,357

Saron Education Ltd 47,241

Scalify Pty Ltd 93,212

Seafoods Tasmania Pty Ltd 32,559

Seasafe Pty Ltd 163,100

Secure Systems Ltd 67,583

Semantic Sciences Pty Ltd 32,000

Sentient Vision Systems Pty Ltd 156,923

SequenceX Pty Ltd 21,816

Shift Geophysics Pty Ltd 174,516

Sienna Cancer Diagnostics Ltd 199,227

Signostics Limited 1,480,071

Smart Services CRC Pty Ltd 28,800

Smart Steel Systems Pty Ltd 243,793

SmartVet Pty Ltd 580,171

Smartward Pty Ltd 337,970

Snap Network Surveillance Pty Limited 7,663

Softchill Pty Ltd 98,897

APPENDICIES

195

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Soilkee Pty Ltd 39,950

Sonomedical Pty Ltd 57,737

Southern Innovation Trading Pty Ltd 15,000

Specialised Vehicle Solutions Pty Ltd 12,500

Spruik Group (Australia) Pty Ltd 150,390

Stochastic Simulation Ltd 206,054

Strategic Lighting Pty Ltd 399,009

Straxcorp Pty Ltd 35,769

Student Welcome Services Pty Ltd ATF Student Welcome Service 15,200

Switch Automation Pty Ltd 700,813

T 2 Green Pty Ltd 18,400

Taggle Systems Pty Ltd 676,299

Tapestry Pty Ltd 50,000

Tasweld Engineering Pty Ltd 141,753

Technobake R&D Pty Ltd 126,225

Termite Solutions Victoria Pty Ltd 32,834

The Australian National University 24,000

The Crucible Group Pty Ltd 163,255

The University of Tasmania 94,542

Thereitis.com Pty Ltd 237,500

Tilta Industries Pty Ltd 110,499

Total Range Design Pty Ltd 34,400

Tricon Defence Pty Ltd 101,922

TripleThink Pty Ltd 46,132

Tritium Pty Ltd 148,516

Ulco Engineering Pty Ltd 86,000

UniQuest Pty Limited 99,664

University of Technology Sydney 17,020

UoM Commercial Ltd 37,088

Urban Ecological Systems Australia Pty Ltd 952,840

V2i Pty Ltd 528,822

VRT Innovations Ltd 2,500

Viocorp International Pty Ltd 301,937

APPENDICIES

196

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Virtual Observer Pty Ltd 1,000

Vitel Australia Pty Ltd T/A Ag Essentials 22,108

Voztec Pty Ltd 78,150

Whispir Ltd 1,174,343

Williames Tea Pty Ltd 210,867

Yackstar Pty Ltd 245,711

Total 48,816,825

APPENDICIES

197

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix e R&D Tax Concession Program Breakdown

Table E1 Registrants per year for the R&D Tax Concession by number

and reported expenditure

Table E2 Breakdown of registrations under the R&D Tax Concession by R&D expenditure

for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012

Table E3 Percentage of registrants (number and reported expenditure) for the

R&D Tax Concession by state and territory as at 30 June 2012

Table E4 Registrants for the R&D Tax Concession by Australian Standard

Research Classification (ASRC) as at 30 June 2012

Table E5 Registrants for the R&D Tax Concession by Australian New Zealand Standard

Industry Classification (ANZSIC) as at 30 June 2012

Table E6 Registrations for the R&D Tax Offset and 175% Incremental R&D Tax Concession

by ANZSIC for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012

Table E7 Registrants for the R&D Tax Offset and 175% Incremental R&D Tax Concession

by ASRC for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012

Table E8 Research Service Providers

APPENDICIES

198

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table E1 · Registrants per year for the

R&D Tax Concession

by number and reported expenditure

Year

Number of Companies Registered

Salary Expend ($M)

To RRAs/RSPs a ($M)

To CRCs b ($M)

To Others ($M)

Other Expend ($M)

Core Tech c ($M)

CT Deduct Amount ($M)

Total Plant & Pilot Plant ($M)

Feed stock ($M)

Residual Feed stock d ($M)

Pilot Plant Dep’n e ($M)

Interest f ($M)

Build Exp ($M)

Plant Leasing g ($M)

Total Expend ($M)

1985-86

2,549

39.28

2.37

0

6.09

55.35

0.12

0

3.49

0

0

0

0

0

0

107.76

1986-87

1,666

246.8

31.11

0

85.64

285.85

0

0

52.84

0

0

0

0

10.49

0

731.45

1987-88

2,067

378.17

76.78

0

126.9

424.19

0.38

0

78.89

0

0

0

0

7.67

0

1,093.25

1988-89

2,153

450.71

75.89

0

114.64

547.05

1.12

0

122.51

0

0

0

0

7.97

0

1,321.72

1989-90

2,365

500.12

74.8

0

190.38

669.07

44.88

0

141.81

0

0

0

0

4.81

0

1,625.45

1990-91

2,499

613.71

73.46

0

359.74

851.67

50.08

0

240.92

0

0

0

0

0.09

0

2,189.91

1991-92

2,836

727.74

77.89

0

444.81

1,040.58

226.09

0

181.19

0

0

0

0

0

0

2,698.31

1992-93

2,960

758.07

54.22

4.47

483.47

1,234.47

197.92

0

242.11

0

0

0

0

0

0

2,973.30

1993-94

3,436

842.9

75.36

1.18

455.91

1,543.32

138.84

0

334.29

0

0

0

0

0

0

3,391.79

1994-95

3,624

927.58

72.5

7.12

498.36

1,911.10

170.47

0

371.34

0

0

0

0

0

0

3,958.47

1995-96

3,734

1,004.91

83.27

11.18

547.59

2,251.22

161.99

0

410.28

0

0

0

0

0

0

4,470.44

1996-97

3,295

986.95

90.45

13.91

586.87

1,911.82

66.89

0

441.25

44.53

0

0

13.89

0

0

4,173.85

1997-98

3,304

1,031.51

66.06

8.08

773.01

1,825.08

27.95

0

491.24

55.96

0

0

13.97

0

0

4,353.30

1998-99

3,185

1,136.94

78.94

7.32

970.39

1,556.75

26.71

0

1,224.60

66.52

0

0

4.12

0

0

5,094.46

1999-00

3,274

1,399.50

80.87

9.82

933.52

2,001.42

29.82

0

314.59

131.61

0

0

10.18

0

0

4,919.57

2000-01

3,732

1,638.00

80.33

8.9

1,192.09

2,191.48

22.4

0

462.22

41.28

0

2.68

18.36

0

0

5,669.83

2001-02

4,755

1,971.90

105.28

11.1

1,252.02

2,476.72

44.7

0.08

8.48

42.63

0

173.02

6.69

0

0

6,091.87

APPENDICIES

199

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Year

Number of Companies Registered

Salary Expend ($M)

To RRAs/RSPs a ($M)

To CRCs b ($M)

To Others ($M)

Other Expend ($M)

Core Tech c ($M)

CT Deduct Amount ($M)

Total Plant & Pilot Plant ($M)

Feed stock ($M)

Residual Feed stock d ($M)

Pilot Plant Dep’n e ($M)

Interest f ($M)

Build Exp ($M)

Plant Leasing g ($M)

Total Expend ($M)

2002-03

5,097

2,087.74

114.94

0

1,244.51

2,619.45

0

36.3

0

40.44

4.57

152.73

5.83

0

56.4

6,362.91

2003-04

5,646

2,189.26

97.26

0

1,440.13

2,909.34

0

25.71

0

41.34

6.77

168.33

9.2

0

35.95

6,923.29

2004-05

5,997

2,657.62

96.94

0

1,895.72

3,238.51

0

31.4

0

46.76

36.86

199.93

12.6

0

55.14

8,271.48

2005-06

6,421

3,103.87

195.1

0

2,398.10

3,533.57

0

19.34

0

84.53

68.6

269.44

15.18

0

57.34

9,745.07

2006-07

6,967

3,650.61

161.23

0

3,636.62

4,286.80

0

29.34

0

93.06

85.57

327.71

16.59

0

102.37

12,389.89

2007-08

7,910

4,351.60

268.6

0

4,106.50

5,173.20

0

32.3

0

67.5

129.1

602.55

22.6

0

168.9

14,922.81

2008-09

8,575

5,360.30

167

0

4,999.20

6,430.90

0

31.5

0

67.6

118.9

678.48

22

0

207.8

18,083.68

2009-10

8,756

5,752.90

146.4

0

4,426.90

6,319.20

0

29

0

87

94.3

582.61

22

0

173.2

17,633.49

2010-11

9,118

5,193.90

147.9

0

4,246.80

6,114.90

0

33.2

0

122.3

35.8

695.37

27.4

0

176.6

16,794.02

a. RSP = Research Service Providers. Prior to 1 July 2011, RSPs were called RRAs (Registered Research Agencies). b. CRC = Cooperative Research Centres data only available since 1992-93.

c. Recorded within ‘CT Deductible Amount’ before 2002-03. d. Residual Feedstock data available from 2002-03.

e. Recorded within ‘Total Plant & Pilot Plant’ before 2002-03. f. Interest recorded within ‘Other Expenditure’ prior to 1996-97.

g. Plant Leasing data only available from 2002-03.

Note:

This table derives from available data as at 30 June 2012. The number of registrations and reported expenditure may vary with the receipt of further applications for registrations

or subsequent amendments to registrations allowed under legislation. Note also that, due to non-existent data, minor expenditure variations may exist for pre 1993-94 figures.

APPENDICIES

200

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table E2 · Breakdown of registrations by R&D expenditure for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012

Expenditure Range

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Companies

e

125% Companies

a

175% Incremental Companies

c

International Premium Companies

d

Tax Offset Companies

b

175% Incremental with International Premium

f

Tax Offset with International Premium

g

Tax Offset, 175% Incremental and International Premium

h

Totals

>= $0 and <= $500K 392 1,844 385 4 2,696 1 2 0 5,324

> $500K and <= $1M 213 677 269 5 492 3 0 0 1,659

> $1M and <= $5M 133 662 533 13 242 0 1 0 1,584

> $5M and <= $10M 0 131 121 13 0 3 0 0 268

> $10M 0 138 139 3 0 3 0 0 283

Totals 738 3,452 1,447 38 3,430 10 3 0 9,118

a. The R&D Tax Concession allows eligible Australian companies undertaking defined R&D activities to claim a tax deduction of up to 125% of eligible expenditure when lodging their annual tax returns.

b. The R&D Tax Offset is available to eligible Australian companies with an annual group turnover of less than $5 million and R&D expenditure of up to $2 million.

c. The 175% Incremental (Premium) R&D Tax Concession encourages additional sustainable investment in R&D.

d. The International Premium seeks to increase R&D expenditure in Australia by certain companies that conduct their R&D wholly or primarily on behalf of qualifying foreign companies in the same group.

e. Companies who claim both the Tax Offset and the 175% Incremental.

f. Companies who claim both the 175% Incremental and the International Premium.

g. Companies who claim both the Tax Offset and the International Premium.

h. Companies who claim the Tax Offset, 175% Incremental and the International Premium.

APPENDICIES

201

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table E3 · Percentage of registrants (number and reported expenditure) for the R&D Tax Concession by state and territory as at 30 June 20121

State Item 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

ACT Total Registrants 97 98 98

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 66.54 62.52 79.8

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 1.13 1.12 1.07

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 0.37 0.35 0.48

NSW Total Registrants 2,973 2,963 3,087

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 6,057.70 6,165.74 5,824.70

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 34.67 33.84 33.86

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 33.5 34.97 34.68

NT Total Registrants 31 32 33

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 54.86 128.55 121.9

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 0.36 0.37 0.36

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 0.3 0.73 0.73

QLD Total Registrants 1,693 1,760 1,808

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 2,491.87 2,336.71 2,355.50

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 19.74 20.1 19.83

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 13.78 13.25 14.03

SA Total Registrants 507 506 506

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 533.74 594.53 626.6

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 5.91 5.78 5.55

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 2.95 3.37 3.73

TAS Total Registrants 135 127 125

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 128.01 100.4 117.8

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 1.57 1.45 1.37

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 0.71 0.57 0.7

VIC Total Registrants 2,164 2,178 2,297

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 5,280.22 5,320.36 4,514.10

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 25.24 24.87 25.19

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 29.2 30.17 26.88

1 This table derives from available data as at 30 June 2012. The percentage of registrations and reported expenditure may vary with receipt of further applications for registration allowed under the legislation.

APPENDICIES

202

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

State Item 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11

WA Total Registrants 975 1,092 1,164

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 3,470.73 2,924.68 3,153.70

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 11.37 12.47 12.77

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 19.19 16.59 18.78

National Total Registrants 8,575 8,756 9,118

Total Reported Expenditure ($M) 18,083.68 17,633.49 16,794.02

Per cent of Total Registrations (%) 100 100 100

Per cent of Total Reported Expenditure (%) 100 100 100

APPENDICIES

203

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table E4 · Registrants for the R&D Tax Concession by ASRC as at 30 June 20122

Division Code ASRC Category *

2008-09 Number of times

category nominated

2008-09 Expenditure ($M) 2009-10 Number of times

category nominated

2009-10 Expenditure ($M) 2010-11 Number of times

category nominated

2010-11 Expenditure ($M)

30 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences 623 571.2 589 619.3 583 651.8

31 Architecture, Urban

Environment and Building 149 459.1 146 315.7 138 344

38 Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences 10 2.4 8 0.6 6 0.9

27 Biological Sciences 185 165.9 205 171.1 206 175.8

25 Chemical Sciences 297 195.3 309 179.5 332 206.4

35 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services 124 223.8 144 249 140 63.7

26 Earth Sciences 173 126.9 197 209.7 202 227.3

34 Economics 2 1.4 3 2.6 3 2.7

33 Education 22 6.7 24 9.6 25 22.4

29 Engineering and Technology 4,571 11,489.89 4,711 10,863.41 4,880 10,485.38

43 History and Archaeology 1 0.3 1 0.4 1 0.8

28 Information, Computing and Communication Sciences 2,565 4,080.42 2,568 4,263.94 2,740 3,948.99

40 Journalism, Librarianship and Curatorial Studies 0 0 1 0 4 3.3

42 Language and Culture 1 0.2 1 0 1 0.1

39 Law, Justice and Law

Enforcement

3 0.2 5 1.8 5 1.6

23 Mathematical Sciences 31 21.8 43 25.1 43 16.2

32 Medical and Health Sciences 395 707.3 385 689.6 364 603.5

24 Physical Sciences 36 14.4 52 19.9 62 20.1

22 Philosophy and Religion 0 0 1 0 0 0

37 Studies in Human Society 3 0.3 2 0.1 3 8.3

41 The Arts 12 10.1 20 12 23 10.7

Total 9,204 18,083.68 9,415 17,633.49 9,761 16,794.02

* Registrants may nominate more than one ASRC category in their registration application.

2 This table derives from available data as at 30 June 2012. The data may vary with receipt of further applications for registration or amendments to applications allowed under the legislation.

APPENDICIES

204

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table E5 · Registrants for the R&D Tax Concession by Australian and New Zealand Standard Industry Classification (ANZSIC) as at 30 June 2012 3

Group Code ANZSIC Description *

2008-09 Number of

companies

2008-09 Expenditure

($M)

2009-10 Number

of companies

2009-10 Expenditure

($M)

2010-11 Number

of companies

2010-11 Expenditure

($M)

A Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 331 287.4 309 307.5 295 339.17

B Mining 747 5,292.00 821 4,542.80 885 4,367.31

C Manufacturing 3,458 5,246.80 3,472 5,279.90 3,504 5,169.49

D Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 245 374.2 261 449.5 282 539.70

E Construction 248 1,043.00 264 1,266.30 277 1,002.60

F Wholesale Trade 101 193.7 98 186.1 97 104.76

G Retail Trade 74 136.1 60 140.3 82 168.75

H Accommodation and Food Services 12 9.5 14 13.1 11 16.20

I Transport, Postal and Warehousing 135 452.1 128 359.6 127 365.67

J Information Media and

Telecommunications

1,118 1,269.70 1,158 1,082.50 1,265 1,193.48

K Financial and Insurance Services 189 1,693.80 196 2,034.60 174 1,271.73

L Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 34 70.6 33 21.2 37 82.68

M Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 1,502 1,523.40 1,537 1,430.70 1,667 1,598.45

N Administrative and Support Services 57 87.8 60 53.5 54 69.86

O Public Administration and Safety 30 171.7 25 197.6 22 215.10

P Education and Training 37 13 50 25 52 37.67

Q Health Care and Social Assistance 179 111.7 169 117.1 175 113.71

R Arts and Recreation Services 33 71.4 36 61.8 39 77.45

S Other Services 45 35.6 65 64.3 73 60.24

Totals 8,575 18,083.68 8,756 17,633.49 9,118 16,794.02

* Registration by four digit Australian New Zealand Standard Industry Classification

3 This table derives from available data as at 30 June 2012. The data may vary with receipt of further applications for registration or amendments to applications allowed under the legislation.

APPENDICIES

205

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table E6 · Registrations for the R&D Tax Offset and 175% Incremental

R&D Tax Concession by ANZSIC for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012 Group Code

ANZSIC Description

Total Registrants a Number of companies

Total Registrants a Expend ($M)

Tax Offset Registrants b Number of companies

Tax Offset Registrants b Expend ($M)

175% Incremental Registrants c Number of companies

175% Incremental Registrants c Expend ($M)

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Number of companies

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Expend ($M)

A

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

295

339.17

120

50.50

49

196.50

22

10.30

B

Mining

885

4,367.31

276

176.90

174

1,861.90

35

33.80

C

Manufacturing

3,504

5,169.49

1,142

346.10

635

2,212.10

255

129.80

D

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

282

539.70

105

45.10

59

213.70

20

13.40

E

Construction

277

1,002.60

49

18.20

55

373.70

14

6.10

F

Wholesale Trade

97

104.76

30

5.10

10

29.90

11

2.90

G

Retail Trade

82

168.75

33

5.60

13

103.30

3

2.40

H

Accommodation and Food Services

11

16.20

3

0.70

3

5.50

0

0

I

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

127

365.67

24

7.50

32

251.80

9

5.00

J

Information Media and Telecommunications

1,265

1,193.48

666

233.40

136

476.90

139

95.20

K

Financial and Insurance Services

174

1,271.73

45

16.10

40

879.80

7

5.10

L

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

37

82.68

10

2.00

7

39.20

1

1.90

M

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

1,667

1,598.45

754

244.70

176

526.80

183

109.90

APPENDICIES

206

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Group Code

ANZSIC Description

Total Registrants a Number of companies

Total Registrants a Expend ($M)

Tax Offset Registrants b Number of companies

Tax Offset Registrants b Expend ($M)

175% Incremental Registrants c Number of companies

175% Incremental Registrants c Expend ($M)

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Number of companies

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Expend ($M)

N

Administrative and Support Services

54

69.86

17

4.20

7

17.60

3

0.80

O

Public Administration and Safety

22

215.10

4

1.70

6

112.40

3

3.20

P

Education and Training

52

37.67

30

8.10

5

9.50

5

1.20

Q

Health Care and Social Assistance

175

113.71

81

30.30

21

40.00

21

13.80

R

Arts and Recreation Services

39

77.45

13

2.50

10

25.80

1

0.70

S

Other Services

73

60.24

28

7.80

9

14.00

6

3.80

Totals

9,118

16,794.02

3,430

1,206.70

1,447

7,390.60

738

439.50

a. The

R&D Tax Concession

allows eligible Australian companies undertaking defined R&D activities to claim a tax deduction of up to 125% of eligible expenditure when lodging their annual tax returns.

b. The

R&D Tax Offset

is available to eligible Australian companies with an annual group turnover of less than $5 million and R&D expenditure of up to $2 million.

c. The 175% Incremental (Premium)

R&D Tax Concession

encourages additional sustainable investment in R&D.

Table E6 · Registrations for the R&D Tax Offset and 175% Incremental

R&D Tax Concession by ANZSIC for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012 (continued)

APPENDICIES

207

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table E7 · Registrants for the R&D Tax Offset and 175% Incremental

R&D Tax Concession by ASRC for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012 ASRC Division Code

ASRC Description

Total Registrantsa Number of times category nominated

Total Registrantsa Expend ($M)

Tax Offset Registrantsb Number of times category nominated

Tax Offset Registrantsb Expend ($M)

175% Incremental Registrantsc Number of times category nominated

175% Incremental Registrantsc Expend ($M)

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Number of times category nominated

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Expend ($M)

30

Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences

583

651.8

197

69.7

106

381.6

32

15.8

31

Architecture, Urban Environment and Building

138

344

42

10.7

15

155.1

9

2.4

38

Behavioural and Cognitive Sciences

6

0.9

5

0.8

0

0

1

0.1

27

Biological Sciences

206

175.8

106

42.9

22

54

23

15.7

25

Chemical Sciences

332

206.4

129

37

51

76.8

29

8.9

35

Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services

140

63.7

75

15.3

14

13.2

8

3.2

26

Earth Sciences

202

227.3

101

52.1

16

46.3

11

9.1

34

Economics

3

2.7

2

0.6

0

0

1

2.1

33

Education

25

22.4

10

1.4

5

17.7

2

0.6

29

Engineering and Technology

4,880

10,485.38

1,474

507.3

914

4,381.90

337

171.6

43

History and Archaeology

1

0.8

0

0

0

0

0

0

APPENDICIES

208

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

ASRC Division Code

ASRC Description

Total Registrantsa Number of times category nominated

Total Registrantsa Expend ($M)

Tax Offset Registrantsb Number of times category nominated

Tax Offset Registrantsb Expend ($M)

175% Incremental Registrantsc Number of times category nominated

175% Incremental Registrantsc Expend ($M)

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Number of times category nominated

Tax Offset & 175% Incremental Registrants Expend ($M)

28

Information, Computing and Communication Sciences

2,740

3,948.99

1,218

398.9

362

1,952.70

298

181.9

40

Journalism, Librarianship and Curatorial Studies

4

3.3

4

3.3

0

0

0

0

42

Language and Culture

1

0.1

0

0

1

0.1

0

0

39

Law, Justice and Law Enforcement

5

1.6

2

0.2

1

0.1

0

0

23

Mathematical Sciences

43

16.2

18

2.2

6

9.6

2

0.1

32

Medical and Health Sciences

364

603.5

161

51.9

57

294.6

33

23.4

24

Physical Sciences

62

20.1

28

9.9

4

1.5

11

4.5

22

Philosophy and Religion

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

37

Studies in Human Society

3

8.3

0

0

0

0

1

0.1

41

The Arts

23

10.7

11

2.3

2

5.6

0

0

Totals

9,761

16,794.02

3,583

1,206.70

1,576

7,390.60

798

439.5

a. The

R&D Tax Concession

allows eligible Australian companies undertaking defined R&D activities to claim a tax deduction of up to 125% of eligible expenditure when lodging their annual tax returns.

b. The

R&D Tax Offset

is available to eligible Australian companies with an annual group turnover of less than $5 million and R&D expenditure of up to $2 million.

c. The

175% Incremental (Premium) R&D Tax Concession

encourages additional sustainable investment in R&D

Table E7 · Registrants for the R&D Tax Offset and 175% Incremental

R&D Tax Concession by ASRC for 2010-11 as at 30 June 2012 (continued)

APPENDICIES

209

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table E8 · List of Research Service Providers Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

4 Design Pty Ltd 45562 Suite 1, Level 1,

83-85 Foveaux Street, SYDNEY, NSW, 2010

Mr R Wells - 02 9280 4454

0702, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1199.

ABU Engineering Pty Ltd 37188 77 Malcolm Road, BRAESIDE, VIC, 3195

Mr S Buntz - 03 8587 8700

0502, 0699, 0703, 0901, 0902, 0903, 0904, 0907, 0910, 1003, 1005, 1099, 1199, 1204, 1299, 1507.

Access Macquarie Ltd 15910 Level 1, EMC2 Building, 3 Innovation Road,

MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY, NSW, 2109

Mrs V Mohan-Ram - 02 9805 3125

0104, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0704, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1108, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Adelaide Research & Innovation Pty Ltd 11564 PO Box 149, RUNDLE MALL, ADELAIDE, SA, 5000

Mr R Chalmers - 08 8303 5020

0205, 0302, 0304, 0702, 0704, 0706, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1115.

Advanced Braking Pty Ltd 38957 PO Box 1177,

OSBORNE PARK, WA, 6916

Mr K Jonsen - 08 9273 4803

0913.

AECOM Australia Pty Ltd 42976 PO Box 1307, FORTITUDE VALLEY,

QLD, 4006

Mr W Absolon - 07 3553 3000

0906, 0912, 0913, 0999.

Agricultural Business Research Institute 2939 University of New England, ARMIDALE, NSW, 2351

Mr M Scholz - 02 6773 3555

0702, 0803, 1001.

Agrisearch Services Pty Ltd 2943 PO Box 972,

ORANGE, NSW, 2800

Mr M G Collett - 02 6362 4539

0503, 0702, 0703, 0706, 0799.

Agritechnology Pty Ltd

17439 36 Underwood Road, BORENORE, NSW, 2800

Mr D MacLennan - 02 6365 2266

0501, 0601, 0604, 0605, 0704, 0799, 0904, 1104.

Akyman Investments Pty Ltd 80266 Suite 6, Level 3, 450 St. Kilda Road,

MELBOUNRE, VIC, 3004

Mr M Nicolau- 03 9620 9741

0802, 0803, 0806, 0899, 1005, 1099.

APPENDICIES

210

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Alexander S Richardson Pty Ltd 45726 Unit 16/16 Narabang Way, BELROSE, NSW, 2085

Mr A S Richardson - 02 9986 3890

0799, 0899, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1006.

Applidyne Australia Pty Ltd 45496 27 Queen Street, THEBARTON, SA, 5031

Mr P van de Loo - 08 8234 8211

0101, 0901, 0906, 0910, 0913.

ARRB Group Limited 11872 PO Box 512, LEEDERVILLE, WA, 6903

Mr P Damen - 08 9227 3000

0302, 0803, 0806, 0905, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1005, 1006, 1402, 1507.

Austin Health 16114 PO Box 5555,

HEIDELBERG, VIC, 3084

Dr B Murphy - 03 9496 5000

0301, 0304, 0601, 0605, 0608, 0702, 0806, 0999, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117.

Australasian Furnishing Research & Development Institute Ltd

15703 PO Box 2042,

LAUNCESTON, TAS, 7250

Mr RJ Panitzki - 03 6326 6155

0910, 0912, 0913, 0999.

Australian Coal Research Ltd

18125 Level 8, Suite 12,

320 Adelaide Street, BRISBANE, QLD 4000

Mr M Bennetts - 07 3010 9717

0301, 0302, 0304, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0503, 0608, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1117.

Australian Genome Research Facility Ltd 36901 Level 5, Gehrmann Laboratories, University

of Queensland, ST LUCIA, QLD, 4072

Mr I Wilson - 03 9321 3728

1001.

Australian Institute of Marine Science 13413 PMB No 3, Townsville MC, TOWNSVILLE, QLD, 4810

Mr V Bayer - 07 4753 4261

0301, 0302, 0304, 0402, 0405, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0702, 0704, 0803, 0901, 0910, 0999, 1001, 1006, 1115.

Australian Museum Trust 17433 6 College Street, SYDNEY, NSW, 2010

Dr B Lassig - 02 9320 6106

0403, 0499, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0704, 0705, 0799, 0999, 1001.

Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

12657 Private Mail Bag 1, MENAI, NSW, 2234

Ms R Robinson - 02 9717 9905

0199, 0202, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0603, 0605, 0699, 0704, 0904, 0912, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1101, 1115, 1117.

APPENDICIES

211

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Australian Proteome Analysis Facility Ltd 37823 Level 4, Building F7B, Research Park Drive,

Macquarie University, SYDNEY, NSW, 2109

Prof M Molloy - 02 9850 8211

0601, 0605, 0702, 0703, 0707, 1001, 1101, 1107, 1108, 1109.

Australian Sports Commission 16904 PO Box 176,

BELCONNEN, ACT, 2616

Mr T Kelly - 02 6214 1791

0299, 0601, 0803, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0999.

Australian Survey Research Group Pty Ltd

40503 PO Box 340, ORMOND, VIC, 3204

Dr D Willcox - 03 9578 5211

0104, 0199, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0999.

Australian Water Quality Centre 40370 GPO Box 1751, SA Water, ADELAIDE, SA, 5000

Mr M Burch - 08 7424 1012

0301, 0302, 0304, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0904, 0905.

Australian Wine Research Institute 8845 PO Box 197,

GLEN OSMOND, SA, 5064

Dr D Johnson - 08 8313 6610

0301, 0304, 0605, 0799, 0908, 0910, 1001.

Australian Wool Testing Authority Ltd 3233 PO Box 240, NORTH MELBOURNE, VIC, 3051

Mr I Ashman - 03 9371 2101

0910, 0912, 0999.

B&S Precision Engineering Pty Ltd 45935 67 Voltri Street, MENTONE, VIC, 3194

Mr R Bauer - 03 9584 1630

0901, 0902, 0903, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1005, 1006, 1007.

BCS Technologies Group Pty Ltd 43764 PO Box 1412,

LANE COVE, NSW, 1595

Mr D Kanga - 02 9420 3400

0803, 0806, 0906, 0908, 0913, 1005, 1006, 1103.

Bioscience Pty Ltd 89461 PO Box 5466,

CANNINGVALE SOUTH, WA, 6155

Dr P Keating - 08 9397 2446

0607.

Biotest Laboratories Pty Ltd 87974 2 Darnick Street, UNDERWOOD, QLD, 4119

Mr J Taylor - 03 9723 1300

0301, 0304, 0601, 0605, 0699, 0707, 1003, 1117.

Birchip Cropping Group Incorporated 33278 PO Box 85,

BIRCHIP, VIC, 3483

Mr D Chamberlin - 03 5492 2787

0503, 0703.

APPENDICIES

212

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Birdlife Australia 16460 Green Building, Suite 2-05, 60 Leicester Street CARLTON, VIC, 3053

Mr J O’Connor - 03 9347 0757

0603, 0608, 0699.

Bond University Ltd 13091 Bond University Research Office,14 University Drive ROBINA, QLD, 4226

Mr A Calder - 07 5595 5039

0502, 0704, 0806, 0899, 1103, 1106, 1115, 1117, 1202, 1402, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1602, 1701, 1801.

Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority 16407 Fraser Avenue WEST PERTH, WA, 6005

Dr K W Dixon - 08 9480 3605

0501, 0502, 0503, 0599, 0601, 0602, 0603, 0604, 0605, 0606, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0703, 0705, 0706, 0799, 1001, 1002.

Botanical Resources Australia - Agricultural Services P/L

35512 PO Box 852,

SANDY BAY, TAS, 7006

Mr B Chung - 03 6224 4511

0503, 0607, 0703, 0706, 0799.

BSES Limited 3487 PO Box 86,

INDOOROOPILLY, QLD, 4068

Dr FC Botha - 07 3331 3318

0104, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0608, 0703, 0803, 0806, 0904, 0905, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 1001.

Cardiac Technology Centre 37944 Level 12, Kolling Building, Cardiology, RNSH ,

ST LEONARDS, NSW, 2065

Mrs G Nero - 02 9926 4900

0608, 1001, 1103, 1115, 1199.

Central Queensland University 3534 Bryan Jordan Drive, GLADSTONE, QLD, 4680

Prof C Hewitt - 07 4970 7204

0205, 0301, 0304, 0406, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0706, 0799, 0801, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1106, 1107, 1108, 1110, 1117, 1199, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1501, 1503, 1599, 1607, 1608, 1701, 1801, 1899, 1904.

Centre for Digestive Diseases Pty Ltd 25288 Level 1,

229 Great North Road, FIVE DOCK, NSW, 2046

Prof T J Borody - 02 9713 4011

0999, 1103, 1115.

Charles Darwin University

13420 Casuarina Campus, DARWIN, NT, 909

Prof S Bell - 08 8946 6868

0603, 0704, 0799, 0906, 0999, 1103.

APPENDICIES

213

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Charles Sturt University

35721 Locked Bag 588, WAGGA WAGGA, NSW, 2678

Prof A Bishop - 02 6933 2406

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0406, 0499, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0604, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0801, 0803, 0806, 0807, 0899, 0908, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1110, 1115, 1116, 1117, 1199, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1402, 1499, 1501, 1503, 1506, 1599, 1602, 1605, 1607, 1608, 1699, 1701, 1702, 1799, 1801, 1899, 1902, 1904, 1905, 2001, 2002, 2102, 2203, 2204, 2299.

Charlwood Design Pty Ltd 34122 50 Glasshouse Road, COLLINGWOOD, VIC, 3066

Mr P R Charlwood - 03 9416 1611

0913.

ChemCentre 16360 PO Box 1250,

BENTLEY DELIVERY CENTRE, WA, 6983

Mr P Millington - 08 9422 9800

0301, 0302, 0304, 0402, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0914, 0999, 1115, 1117.

Clarinox Technologies Pty Ltd 24480 28/296 Bay Road, CHELTENHAM, VIC, 3192

Ms P Messiter - 03 9095 8088

0899, 0906, 1005, 1006, 1199.

Clarity Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd

87582 GPO Box 5446, SYDNEY, NSW, 2001

Mr N Falzon - 02 8346 6000

0399, 0601, 1101.

CMD Product Design & Innovation Pty Ltd 45754 Versatile Accounting Pty Ltd

PO Box 2148, TOOWONG QLD 4066

Ms R Cooper - 07 3371 9189

0899, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1199.

Communication Research Institute Limited

44141 60 Park Street, NORTH FITZROY, VIC, 3068

Prof D Sless - 03 9489 8640

0806, 0899, 1199.

CRC for Advanced Composite Structures Ltd

18231 506 Lorimer Street, FISHERMANS BEND, VIC, 3207

Prof M L Scott - 03 9676 4900

0901, 0905, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999.

APPENDICIES

214

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

CSIRO 12601 Governance,

Major Transactions, PO Box 93, NORTH RYDE, NSW, 1670

Mr B Walker - 02 6276 6275

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1107, 1115, 1117.

Curtin University of Technology 12631 Office of Research and Development,

GPO Box U1987 PERTH, WA, 6845

Prof G Wright - 08 9266 3045

0101, 0104, 0301, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0499, 0603, 0608, 0702, 0704, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1103, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Cyntila Pty Ltd 45700 9 Business Park Drive,

NOTTING HILL, VIC, 3168

Mr S Lacey - 03 9544 0099

0803, 0806, 0899, 0906, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1006.

D3 Product Design Pty Ltd 19240 106 Boundary Street, PADDINGTON, NSW, 2021

Mr C S Solari - 02 9361 6477

0913.

Dairy Innovation Australia Limited 19143 180 Princess Highway, WERRIBEE, VIC, 3030

Dr I Powell - 03 9974 8910

0605, 0908, 0910, 0999.

Datapharm Australia Pty Ltd 88122 PO Box 220,

FIVE DOCK, NSW, 2046

Dr H Allars - 02 9719 2800

0104, 0199, 0799, 0903, 1004, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1199, 1605.

Deakin University 30741 Locked Bag 20000, GEELONG, VIC, 3220

Mr C Thompson - 03 5227 2159

0101, 0104, 0199, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0403, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0704, 0799, 0801, 0802, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0903, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1101, 1103, 1106, 1108, 1109, 1110, 1113, 1115, 1116, 1117, 1199, 1201, 1202, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1401, 1402, 1403, 1499, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1506, 1599, 1605, 1606, 1608, 1701, 1801, 1904, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2103, 2203.

Defence Science and Technology Organisation

13288 F2-02-071,

Fairbairn Business Park, CANBERRA, ACT 2600

Mr A Gray - 02 61286377

0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1005, 1006.

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (Queensland)

3919 GPO Box 46,

BRISBANE, QLD, 4001

Mr J Chapman - 07 3239 3033

0601, 0605, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0908, 1001.

APPENDICIES

215

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport (NRETAS)

18369 PO Box 496,

PALMERSTON, NT, 831

Ms S Kirkman - 08 8999 4547

0603, 0607, 0608, 0699.

Department of Primary Industries Victoria

39034 GPO Box 4440, MELBOURNE, VIC, 3000

Dr C Noble - 03 9658 4771

0301, 0302, 0304, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0908, 0910, 0999, 1001.

Department of Resources

13212 GPO Box 3000,

DARWIN, NT, 0801

Ms C Long - 08 8999 2394

0702, 0703, 0704, 0706, 0799.

Department of Sustainability and Environment

39035 Arthur Ryan Institute, PO Box 137, HEIDELBERG, VIC, 3084

Ms L Spencer - 03 9450 8600

0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0503, 0603, 0607, 0608, 0704, 0705, 0799.

Design and Industry Pty Ltd 13279 115-121 Mullens Street, BALMAIN, NSW, 2041

Mr M Hunter - 02 9555 1166

0910.

Diversity Arrays Technology Pty Ltd 38002 PO Box 7141, YARRALUMLA, ACT, 2600

Dr E Huttner - 02 6122 7314

0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0908, 1001, 1108.

Edith Cowan University

13237 270 Joondalup Drive, JOONDALUP, WA, 6027

Dr M Jones - 08 6304 5401

0502, 0602, 0603, 0606, 0607, 0801, 0803. 0806, 0899, 0906, 1005, 1103, 1106, 1109, 1110, 1117, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1402, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1505, 1506, 1602, 1608, 1701, 1901, 1903, 1904, 1905, 2001, 2002.

Electro Optic Systems Pty Ltd

11786 EOS Building & Space Research Centre, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, WESTON CREEK, ACT, 2611

Dr B Greene - 02 6222 7900

0803, 0806, 0912, 0999, 1005.

Epichem Pty Ltd 40915 Murdoch University, South Street, MURDOCH, WA, 6150

Dr W Best - 08 9360 7696

0304.

Fisheries Research & Development Corporation

35410 PO Box 222,

DEAKIN WEST, ACT, 2600

Mr J Wilson - 02 6285 0411

0704.

APPENDICIES

216

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Flinders Medical Centre Incorporated - SAHS

17929 Flinders Drive, BEDFORD PARK, SA, 5042

Ms Y Warncken - 08 8204 5452

0910, 0999, 1001.

Flinders Partners Pty Ltd 15696 Mark Oliphant Building, Laffer Drive,

Science Park Adelaide, BEDFORD PARK, SA, 5042

Mr A Francis - 08 8201 7788

0301, 0302, 0304, 0603, 0608, 0706, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0906, 0910, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1103, 1115, 1117.

Florey Neuroscience Institute 45845 C/University of Melbourne, MELBOURNE, VIC, 3010

Dr H De Aizpurua - 03 9035 6622

0608, 1101, 1109, 1115.

Forestry Tasmania 6414 GPO Box 207 B,

HOBART, TAS, 7001

Dr M Neyland - 03 6235 8307

0406, 0503, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0705, 0706, 0999.

Garvan Institute of Medical Research 9782 384 Victoria Street, DARLINGHURST, NSW, 2010

Mr J Dakin - 02 9295 8133

0601, 0608, 1001, 1115, 1117.

GeoConsult Pty Ltd 35343 PO Box 3324, NEWSTEAD, QLD, 4006

Mr W Smyth - 07 3851 7400

0403, 0404, 0803, 0999.

Gilmore Engineers Pty Ltd 34439 PO Box 4037, EIGHT MILE PLAINS, QLD, 4113

Dr D B Gilmore - 07 3853 5250

0299, 0901, 0910, 0912, 0913.

Grey Innovation Pty Ltd

35842 PO Box 4239, RICHMOND, VIC, 3121

Ms P Paliadelis - 03 8459 6999

0906, 0913.

Griffith University 4331 Griffith Enterprise,

Bray Centre (N54) 1.06, 170 Kessels Road, NATHAN, QLD, 4111

Ms D Caccamo - 07 3735 5513

0199, 0202, 0205, 0206, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0404, 0405, 0501, 0502, 0503, 0602, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0701, 0702, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0801, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1002, 1003, 1004, 1005, 1006, 1007, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1110, 1111, 1112, 1115, 1117, 1199, 1203, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1403, 1499, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1505, 1506, 1601, 1602, 1603, 1604, 1605, 1608, 1701, 1801, 1901, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2204.

APPENDICIES

217

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Herman Research Pty Ltd 25255 677 Springvale Road, MULGRAVE, VIC, 3170

Dr T Johnson - 03 9565 9804

0299, 0301, 0302, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0503, 0603, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0904, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999.

HRL Testing Pty Ltd 45515 22 Corunna Street, ALBION, QLD, 4010

Mr C Casingena - 07 3262 6207

0301, 0914.

Hydrix Services Pty Ltd

43660 1044a Dandenong Road, CARNEGIE, VIC, 3163

Mr M Brydon - 03 9555 3666

0803, 0806, 0899, 0902, 0910, 0913, 1005, 1006.

I D & E Pty Ltd 43250 45/8 Avenue of the

Americas, NEWINGTON, NSW, 2127

Mr G Sidis - 02 9647 2660

0806, 0903, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1006, 1007, 1199.

ICP Firefly Pty Ltd 37822 PO Box 6198,

ALEXANDRIA, NSW, 2015

Dr E Ho - 02 9310 3899

0503, 0601, 0605, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0904, 0908, 0912, 0914, 1001, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1199.

Ideal Operations Pty Ltd 45709 GPO Box 3494, SYDNEY, NSW, 2001

Mr O Kratzer - 02 9699 8644

0902, 0910, 0913.

Ideation Pty Ltd 45704 Unit 2, 107 Highbury Road, BURWOOD, VIC, 3125

Mr A Hooworth - 03 9808 1399

0999.

IDT Australia Limited 4563 45 Wadhurst Drive, BORONIA, VIC, 3155

Mr R Najdecki - 03 9837 6402

0301, 0302, 0304, 0399, 0799, 0910, 1115, 1199.

IMBcom Pty Limited 41359 Level 4,Queensland Bioscience Precinct, 306 Carmody Road, The University of Queensland, ST LUCIA, QLD, 4072

Ms D Ferguson - 07 3346 2196

0608, 1001, 1101, 1109.

Independent Metallurgical Operations Pty Ltd

38688 PO Box 8151, EAST SUBIACO, WA, 6008

Mr T Gibbons - 08 9254 6900

0914.

APPENDICIES

218

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Industrial Composite Contractors Pty Ltd 45734 PO Box 2679,

MALAGA, WA, 6944

Dr L J Walker - 08 9248 9901

0905, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1201, 1202, 1299.

Infotronix Design Pty Ltd

Unit 25, 128 Station Road, SEVEN HILLS, NSW, 2147

Mr E Zoeten - 02 9037 4146

0906.

Innova Sierra Pty Ltd 88378 PO Box 220, PATTERSON LAKES, VIC, 3197

Dr B Kumble - 03 9211 6000

0914, 1005, 1108.

Intec Ltd 15447 PO Box 1507,

NORTH SYDNEY, NSW, 2059

Mr K Rodgers - 02 9954 7888

0904, 0914.

Invetech Pty Ltd 15291 Private Bag 44,

MT WAVERLEY, VIC, 3149

Mr H Dang - 03 9211 7700

0202, 0205, 0299, 0304, 0306, 0601, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1006, 1115.

James Cook University

3734 Post Office,

TOWNSVILLE, QLD, 4811

Mr J Taylor - 07 4781 6884

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0203, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0307, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0604, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0801, 0802, 0803, 0804, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0902, 0903, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0909, 0910, 0911, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1007, 1101, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1110, 1113, 1115, 1116, 1117, 1199, 1201, 1202, 1299, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1401, 1402, 1403, 1499, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1504, 1506, 1507.

Kalyx Agriculture Pty Ltd 32907 175 Star Street, CARLISLE, WA, 6101

Mr P J Burgess - 08 6278 1777

0703, 0706.

KWA Design Group Pty Ltd 26036 PO Box 7391, South Sydney Business

Hub, ALEXANDRIA NSW, 2015

Mr K Whitley - 02 9319 3711

0899, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999.

La Trobe University 4759 Campus,

BUNDOORA, VIC, 3086

Mr M Clisby - 03 9479 2162

0101, 0102, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0204, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0402, 0403, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0602, 0603, 0604, 0605, 0606, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0703, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0906, 0908, 0912, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1106, 1107, 1109, 1110, 1114, 1115, 1117.

APPENDICIES

219

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

LC Engineering Pty Ltd

45807 PO Box 351,

GOODNA, QLD, 4300

Mr B Leslie - 07 3436 2500

0801, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1007.

Lewis Australia Pty Ltd

8833 PO Box 110,

EAST BENTLEIGH, VIC, 3165

Mr M R Hamilton - 03 9555 3666

0904, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914.

Macquarie University

15645 Research Office, Macquarie University, NSW, 2109

Prof J A Piper - 02 9850 8645

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1109, 1115, 1199.

Meat & Livestock Australia Ltd 36177 Locked Bag 991, NORTH SYDNEY, NSW, 2059

Mr H Chin - 02 9463 9396

0304, 0499, 0601, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0707, 0908, 0910, 1117.

Mimotopes Pty Ltd 34935 PO Box 1415, MDC SOUTH CLAYTON, VIC, 3169

Ms S Plompen - 03 9565 1144

0304, 0399, 0601, 0999, 1115.

Monash University 5606 Building 3D, Clayton Campus, Wellington Road, CLAYTON, VIC, 3168

Ms H Oswald - 03 9905 3006

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0406, 0499, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute 13219 Royal Children’s Hospital, Flemington Road,

PARKVILLE VIC, 3052

Mr B Dankesreither - 03 8341 6299

0601, 0806, 0999, 1001, 1103.

Murdoch University 12643 South Street, MURDOCH, WA, 6150

Mr P Hocking - 08 9360 6877

0101, 0104, 0202, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0401, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1101, 1103, 1108, 1115, 1199.

National Ageing Research Institute 17178 PO Box 2127, Royal Melbourne Hospital,

MELBOURNE VIC, 3050

Prof D Ames - 03 8387 2305

0899, 1103, 1115, 1117, 1605, 1607, 1608, 1701, 1702, 2201.

National ICT Australia Limited 45257 Locked Bag 9013, ALEXANDRIA, NSW, 1435

Ms H Devlin - 02 9376 2114

0199, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1199.

APPENDICIES

220

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Neuroscience Research Australia 30945 PO Box 1165, RANDWICK, NSW, 2031

Prof P R Schofield - 02 9399 1004

0910, 0999, 1001, 1103, 1109, 1115, 1117.

Newcastle Innovation Ltd

5313 Industry Development Centre, University Drive, CALLAGHAN, NSW, 2308

Dr B Jenkins - 02 4921 8777

0101, 0104, 0201, 0202, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0305, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0706, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117.

NewSouth Innovations Pty Ltd 6566 Rupert Myers Building, UNSW, SYDNEY, NSW, 2052

Mr F Fotea - 02 9385 7755

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Novita Tech 11515 PO Box 2438,

REGENCY PARK, SA, 5942

Ms J Astley - 08 8243 8210

0803, 0806, 0906, 0910, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1117.

NSW Department of Primary Industries 13278 Locked Bag 21,

ORANGE, NSW, 2800

Mr R Martin - 02 6391 3540

0104, 0301, 0406, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1115, 1199.

NSW Institute of Sport

45604 PO Box 476, SYDNEY MARKETS, NSW

Mr K Graham-- 02 9763 0201

0608, 1001, 1101, 1199.

NSW Roads & Maritime Services 16023 Locked Bag 928, NORTH SYDNEY, NSW, 2059

Mr C Harrison - 02 8837 0400

0304, 0306, 0404, 0905, 0912, 0999.

O’Brien Institute 32235 42 Fitzroy Street,

FITZROY, VIC, 3065

Ms J Knowlson - 03 9288 4043

0601, 0608, 1001, 1103, 1107, 1109, 1115.

Olitek Design Solutions Pty Ltd 45613 PO Box 116,

BANYO, QLD, 4014

Mr J Oliver - 07 3260 5390

0899, 0910, 0913.

Orbital Australia Pty Ltd 1494 4 Whipple Street, BALCATTA, WA, 6021

Mr G Armstrong - 08 9441 2392

0101, 0301, 0803, 0901, 0906, 0910, 0913, 0999, 1006.

APPENDICIES

221

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Ozdocs International Pty Ltd 88487 Unit 4, No 7 Packard Avenue, SYDNEY, NSW, 2154

Mr P Pandey - 02 9899 2000

0803.

Pathwest Laboratory Medicine WA 44059 Pathwest QEII, Locked Bag 2009,

NEDLANDS, WA, 6909

Mr S Palladino - 08 9346 2556

0601, 0608, 0999, 1001, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1115, 1117.

Peracto Pty Ltd 42109 16 Hillcrest Road,

DEVONPORT, TAS, 7310

Mr AG Woodcock - 03 6423 2044

0705, 0706, 0799, 0904.

Pharmaceutical Solutions Australia Pty Limited

89372 Suite G.07, MacArthur Point,25 Solent Circuit, Baulkham Hills, SYDNEY, NSW, 2153

Mr J Shaw - 02 8853 2704

1102, 1107, 1109, 1112, 1114, 1115.

PharmaSynth Pty Ltd 89446 2806 Ipswich Road, DARRA, QLD, 4076

Mr L Tillack - 07 3273 9176

1099.

Planet Innovation Pty Ltd 45801 576 Swan Street, RICHMOND, VIC, 3121

Mr S Lanyon - 03 9208 4120

0903, 0906, 0913, 0999, 1007.

Procept Pty Ltd 45759 4/2 Salisbury Street,

MELBOURNE, VIC, 3121

Mr A Maher - 03 9224 6636

0803, 0806, 0906, 0910, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1006.

Queensland Institute of Medical Research 13118 300 Herston Road, HERSTON, QLD, 4006

Ms D Hancock - 07 3362 0260

0608, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Queensland University of Technology

5983 GPO Box 2434,

BRISBANE, QLD, 4001

Mr C Melvin - 07 3138 2093

0101, 0104, 0199, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0704, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1117, 1199.

ResTech Pty Ltd 41278 School of EE & CS,

University of Newcastle, University Drive, CALLAGHAN, NSW, 2308

Mr T Wylie - 02 4921 7345

0906.

APPENDICIES

222

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

RMIT University 6107 GPO Box 2476,

MELBOURNE, VIC, 3001

Prof D Alcorn - 03 9925 4265

0199, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0404, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1115, 1201, 1202, 1299, 1403, 1504, 1506, 1599, 1605, 1606, 1699, 1999, 2099.

Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust

34023 Mrs Macquarie’s Road, SYDNEY, NSW, 2000

Prof D Mabberley - 02 9231 8112

0603, 0607, 0706.

Royal Perth Hospital 12552 GPO Box X2213, PERTH, WA, 6847

Dr F Daly - 08 9224 2281

0301, 0803, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1199.

Rural Industries Research & Development Corporation

31810 PO Box 4776,

KINGSTON, ACT, 2604

Mrs F Raymond - 02 6271 400

0101, 0103, 0104, 0105, 0199, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0303, 0304, 0305, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0501, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0602, 0603, 0605, 0606, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0701, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0803, 0804, 0806, 0807, 0899, 0903, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1002, 1003, 1004, 1005, 1007, 1099, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1111, 1112, 1115, 1117, 1199, 1203, 1205, 1299, 1301, 1399, 1402, 1403, 1499, 1503, 1505, 1507, 1603, 1604, 1605, 1608, 1699, 1801.

Safety in Mines Testing & Research Station (SIMTARS)

16144 PO Box 467,

GOODNA, QLD, 4300

Mr P Harrison - 07 3810 6300

0301, 0399, 0803, 0906, 0910, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1005, 1117.

SGS Lakefield Oretest Pty Ltd

31307 431 Victoria Road, MALAGA, WA, 6090

Mr G Lonsdale - 08 9209 8700

0699, 0904, 0908, 0914.

South Australian Forestry Corporation 6776 PO Box 162,

MT GAMBIER, SA, 5290

Mr I Robertson - 08 8724 2770

0705.

South Australian Research and Development Institute

18607 GPO Box 397, ADELAIDE, SA, 5001

Prof P Mooney - 08 8303 9434

0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0904, 0908, 1001, 1005.

Southern Cross University

26669 PO Box 157, LISMORE, NSW, 2480

Prof P Ryan - 02 6620 3172

0402, 0406, 0602, 0608, 0703, 0704, 0705, 1001, 1110, 1117, 1303, 1503, 1506, 1605.

APPENDICIES

223

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Southern Tree Breeding Association Incorporation

16431 PO Box 1811,

MOUNT GAMBIER, SA, 5290

Dr T A McRae - 08 8723 0688

0705, 0706, 0803, 0910, 1001.

Stephen Sanig Research Institute Limited

45708 PO Box 6127, UNSW, SYDNEY, NSW, 1466

Dr G Kaseko - 02 9209 4117

0101, 0299, 0601, 0699, 0908, 0999, 1001, 1107, 1115.

Sugar Research Institute

4310 PO Box 15758,

CITY EAST, QLD, 4002

Mr M Dowling - 07 3138 9401

0301, 0302, 0306, 0904, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999.

Swinburne University of Technology

6394 PO Box 218,

HAWTHORN, VIC, 3122

Ms S Mosca - 03 9214 5225

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0608, 0699, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1109, 1117, 1199.

The Australian National University 3206 Chancelry,

Building 10B, ACTON, ACT, 2000

Dr J Wellard - 02 6125 8085

0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0601, 0603, 0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1103, 1115, 1117, 1199.

The Bionics Institute of Australia 88617 384-388 Albert Street EAST MELBOURNE,

VIC, 3002

Mr T Griffiths - 03 9667 7523

0601, 0899, 0903, 0906, 1103, 1109.

The Flinders University of South Australia

4146 GPO Box 2100,

ADELAIDE, SA, 5001

Prof D Day - 08 8201 2758

0101, 0104, 0202, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0401, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0704, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117.

The Heart Research Institute Ltd 16843 7 Eliza Street, NEWTOWN, NSW, 2042

Prof M Davies - 02 8208 8900

0601, 0608, 0999, 1001, 1101, 1115.

The MacFarlane Burnett Institute for Medical Research and Public Health Ltd

16674 GPO Box 2284, MELBOURNE, VIC, 3000

Dr A Greenway - 03 9282 2112

0301, 0304, 0601, 0608, 0999, 1001, 1103, 1115, 1117.

APPENDICIES

224

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

The Mental Health Research Institute 16123 Locked Bag 11,

PARKVILLE, VIC, 3052

Prof C Masters - 03 9035 6575

0608, 1001, 1101, 1103, 1109, 1115.

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital 32244 28 Woodville Road, WOODVILLE SOUTH, SA,

5011

Ms G Graves - 08 8222 6870

1103, 1109, 1199.

The St George Hospital Orthopaedic Research Institute

26667 Dept of Orthopaedic Surgery St George Hospital, KOGARAH, NSW, 2217

Prof G Murrell, 02 9113 2827

0601, 0803, 0806, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1103, 1115, 1117.

The University of Adelaide

6574 GPO Box 498,

ADELAIDE, SA, 5005

Prof M Brooks - 08 8303 5665

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0499, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0604, 0605, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0801, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0903, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1105, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1110, 1113, 1115, 1116, 1117, 1199, 1201, 1303, 1402, 1403, 1501, 1502, 1503, 1601, 1603, 1604, 1606, 1608, 1701, 1702, 1801, 1904, 2002, 2003, 2103, 2203.

The University of New South Wales 6578 Campus,

UNIVERSITY OF NSW, NSW, 2052

Mr D Owens - 02 9385 7254

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

The University of Newcastle

6576 University Drive, CALLAGHAN, NSW, 2308

Prof M Calford - 02 4921 5441

0101, 0104, 0201, 0202, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0706, 0803, 0806, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117.

The University of Queensland

6580 Cumbrae-Stewart Building, Research Road, ST LUCIA, QLD, 4072

Mr I Harris - 07 3365 3559

0301, 0302, 0304, 0399, 0402, 0404, 0608, 0702, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006.

The University of Southern Queensland

27581 West Street,

TOOWOOMBA, QLD, 4350

Ms K Hall - 07 46321 2866

0201, 0301, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0703, 0706, 0806, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 1001, 1005, 1107, 1115, 1117.

APPENDICIES

225

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

The University of Sydney

6581 Room 314,

Margaret Telfer, K07, SYDNEY, NSW, 2006

Mr D Sun - 02 9036 9279

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

The University of Tasmania

6582 Private Bag 1,

HOBART, TAS, 7001

Dr M Potter - 03 6226 2761

0101, 0104, 0199, 0201, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0401, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0405, 0406, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

The University of Western Australia 6583 M459, 35 Stirling Highway, CRAWLEY, WA, 6009

Dr C Thomson - 08 6488 3027

0101, 0104, 0201, 0202, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1103, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Uniquest Pty Ltd 10733 Level 7, General Purpose South, Staff House Road, The University of Queensland, BRISBANE, QLD, 4072

Mr R Hewitt - 07 3365 4037

0301, 0302, 0304, 0399, 0402, 0404, 0608, 0702, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006.

University of Ballarat 7188 Research Services, PO Box 663, BALLARAT, VIC, 3353

Ms E Mahon - 03 5327 9407

0101, 0104, 0301, 0402, 0403, 0406, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0705, 0803, 0806, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1103, 1117, 1199.

University of Canberra

3531 Research Services Office, CANBERRA, ACT, 2601

Dr K Sawczak - 02 6201 5414

0101, 0104, 0199, 0301, 0305, 0399, 0406, 0499,0501, 0503, 0599, 0601, 0603, 0604, 0605, 0608, 0699, 0704, 0799, 0801, 0803, 0806, 0807, 1005, 1101, 1107, 1108, 1117, 1199.

University of Melbourne

6575 Campus,

UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, VIC, 3010

Dr D Cookson - 03 8344 2049

0301, 0302, 0304, 0402, 0404, 0608, 0702, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1103, 1117, 1199.

APPENDICIES

226

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

University of New England

6577 Research Development & Integrity, Research Services Directorate, ARMIDALE, NSW, 2351

Ms K Jacques - 02 6773 3262

0202, 0205, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0402, 0403, 0404, 0406, 0502, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0806, 0908, 0912, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1103, 1109, 1117, 1199, 1402, 1503, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1608, 1701, 1801, 1904, 2004, 2005, 2102, 2103, 2202, 2203.

University of South Australia

6283 Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, MAWSON LAKES, SA, 5095

Dr T Swift - 08 8302 3471

0101, 0104, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0306, 0399, 0402, 0403, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1117.

University of Technology Sydney 12904 Research & Innovation Office,

PO Box 123, BROADWAY, NSW, 2007

Mr J Francis - 02 9514 1256

0101, 0104, 0202, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0304, 0399, 0402, 0404, 0406, 0499, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0699, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1108, 1109, 1115, 1117, 1199.

University of Western Sydney

18480 Locked Bag 1797, PENRITH, NSW, 2751

Mr G Jones - 02 4736 0631

0101, 0104, 0201, 0202, 0299, 0301, 0302, 0304, 0399, 0402, 0403, 0406, 0503, 0601, 0603, 0605, 0607, 0608, 0702, 0703, 0704, 0705, 0706, 0707, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0899, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1005, 1006, 1101, 1199.

University of Wollongong

6584 Northfields Avenue, WOLLONGONG, NSW, 2522

Mr M Wright - 02 4221 5540

0601, 0603, 0799, 0803, 0806, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0914, 0999, 1005.

VCAMM Limited 89332 PO Box 62

BELMONT, VIC, 3216 Ms L Ratcliffe - 03 5227 1101

0902, 0910, 0912.

Victoria University 16547 PO Box 14428, Melbourne Mail Centre, MELBOURNE, VIC, 3000

Ms T Rankovic - 03 9919 5316

0101, 0102, 0205, 0299, 0301, 0601, 0602, 0606, 0608, 0799, 0801, 0803, 0805, 0806, 0899, 0901, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0908, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1001, 1005, 1006, 1106, 1110, 1115, 1116, 1302, 1303, 1399, 1402, 1501, 1503, 1504, 1506, 1599, 1601, 1602, 1603, 1604, 1607, 1608, 1701, 1801, 1902, 1904, 1905, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005.

Victorian Partnership for Advanced Computing Ltd

40150 PO Box 201,

CARLTON SOUTH, VIC, 3053

Dr T Ting - 03 9647 5431

0404, 0803, 0901, 0910, 0913, 1001.

VIPAC Engineers and Scientists Limited 15701 Private Bag No 16, PORT MELBOURNE, VIC,

3207

Mr M Smith - 03 9647 9700

0199, 0205, 0299, 0401, 0803, 0901, 0906, 0910, 0912, 0913, 0999.

APPENDICIES

227

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Name RSP No. Address Contact Registered ANZSRC Codes

Welding Technology Institute of Australia 3230 PO Box 6165,

SILVERWATER, NSW, 1811

Mr C Smallbone - 02 9748 4443

0304, 0803, 0904, 0905, 0910, 0912, 0914, 0999.

Western Australian Museum 15714 Collections & Research Directorate, Locked Bag 49,

WELSHPOOL DC, WA, 6986

Ms D Jones - 08 9212 3715

0302, 0304, 0306, 0402, 0403, 0499, 0603, 0608, 0699, 0912, 1001.

Women’s & Children’s Health Research Institute Incorporated

18489 72 King William Road, NORTH ADELAIDE, SA, 5006

Prof M Makrides - 08 8161 7443

0608, 0908, 1001, 1103, 1115, 1117, 1199.

Woolcock Institute of Medical Research Limited

24346 PO Box M77, Missenden Road, Missenden Post Office, NSW, 2050

Mr D Andrews - 02 9114 0350

0104, 029*9, 0601, 0605, 0608, 0803, 0906, 0912, 0913, 0999, 1001, 1101, 1103, 1107, 1117, 1199.

ZBB Energy Pty Ltd 12013 PO Box 2047,

KARDINYA, WA, 6163

Mr N Coad - 08 9494 2055

0301, 0906, 0912, 0999.

APPENDICIES

228

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

appendix f Innovation Investment Fund (IIF) Program Breakdown

Table F1 Australian Government funds paid to IIF investee companies

by fund manager, 2011-12

Table F2 IIF investee companies receiving financial support

by industry sector, 2011-12

Table F3 IIF investee companies receiving financial support

by state and territory, 2011-12

Note: Appendix F, tables F1 to F3 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

229

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table F1 · Australian Government funds paid to IIF investee companies by fund manager, 2011-12

Fund Manager Investment ($m)

Allen & Buckeridge Investment Management Pty Ltd 0.00

AMWIN Management Pty Ltd 0.00

Brandon Bioscience Fund No. 1 Management Partnership LP 0.82

Cleantech Ventures 2.85

Coates Myer and Company Pty Ltd 0.00

GBS Venture Partners Limited 0.00

Momentum Funds Management Pty Ltd 0.00

Stone Ridge Ventures Pty Ltd (formerly Foundation Management Pty Ltd) 0.00

Four Hats Capital Pty Ltd (formerly Kestrel Capital) 0.00

Neo Technology Ventures Pty Ltd 0.00

OneVentures Pty Ltd 3.18

Start-up Australia Ventures Pty Ltd 0.00

Yuuwa Management LP 1.80

Carnegie Venture Capital Pty Ltd 4.65

MRCF Pty Ltd 2.63

Southern Cross Venture Partners Pty Ltd 0.00

Total 15.93

APPENDICIES

230

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table F2 · IIF investee companies receiving financial support by industry sector, 2011-12

Sector No. Companies Supported

Information Technology and Telecommunications 13

Life sciences/Bioscience 15

Engineering/Manufacturing 3

Water/Waste Services 2

Total 33

Table F3 · IIF investee companies receiving financial support by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory No. Companies Supported

ACT 0

NSW 14

VIC 12

QLD 2

WA 4

NT 0

TAS 0

SA 0

Other 1

Total 33

APPENDICIES

231

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix g Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (ESVCLP) Program Breakdown

Table G1 List of current ESVCLPs at 30 June 2012

Table G2 List of partnerships that became ESVCLPs during 2011-12

Table G3 List of partnerships that ceased to be ESVCLPs during 2011-12

Table G4 List of conditional ESVCLP registrations lapsed during 2011-12

Note: Appendix G, tables G1 to G3 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2A) (g - l) of the IR&D Act 1986. In reference to section 46 (2A)( j), (k) and (l) there are no entities registered under Part 3 of the Venture Capital Act 2002.

APPENDICIES

232

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table G1 · List of ESVCLPs in existence at 30 June 2012

Full registration [s13-1(1A)]: At 30 June 2012 the following partnerships were registered  under section13-1(1A) of the Venture Capital Act 2002. Registration under this provision  is known as full registration.

Registration taken to have come into force

Carnegie Innovation Fund, LP ILP0000080 - an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 20/01/11

Constant Innovation, LP L0000199P - an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 04/06/10

OneVentures Innovation Fund, LP ILP0000063, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 04/02/09

Sydney Angels Sidecar Fund, LP ILP0000071, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 29/06/10

Conditional registration [s13-5(1A)]: Limited partnerships that do not qualify for full  registration can be conditionally registered. The partnership then has 24 months to achieve  full registration. At 30 June 2012 the following partnerships were registered under  section 13 5(1A) of the Venture Capital Act 2002.

Registration taken to have come into force

1. Arowana Partners Growth Australasian Fund II, LP ILP0000087, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 09/06/11

2. Australian Clean Tech - Innovation Partnership ILP0000092, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 23/09/11

3. Digital Accelerator, LP L0000217P, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 23/09/11

4. Early Stage Capital Expansion Fund, LP L0000196H, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 16/04/10

5. Elcano Sustainability Investments 2, LP ILP0005, an incorporated limited partnership registered in QLD 15/10/10

6. Exemplar Fund, LP ILP0009, an incorporated limited partnership registered in QLD 23/09/11

7. The Kaz Capital Innovation Fund ILP0000101, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 07/06/12

APPENDICIES

233

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table G2 · List of partnerships that became ESVCLPs during 2011-12

Full registration [section 13-1(1A)] Board decision

Registration taken to have come into force*

Sydney Angels Sidecar Fund, LP ILP0000071, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 04/08/10 29/06/10

* The Venture Capital Act 2002 [s13-10] provides for a partnership’s full registration to be backdated when the partnership was first conditionally registered, or when it was established.

Conditional registration [section 13-5(1A)]

Conditional registration effective

1. Australian Clean Tech - Innovation Partnership ILP0000092, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 23/09/11

2. Digital Accelerator, LP L0000217P, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 23/09/11

3 Early Stage Capital Expansion Fund, LP L0000196H, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 07/06/12

4. Exemplar Fund, LP ILP0009, an incorporated limited partnership registered in QLD 23/09/11

5. The Kaz Capital Innovation Fund ILP0000101, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 07/06/12

Table G3 · List of partnerships that ceased to be ESVCLPs during 2011-12

Under Section 17-25 Date revoked

1. Parallel Capital No. 1, LP ILP0000054, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 24/11/11

Table G4 · List of conditional ESVCLP registrations lapsed during 2011-12

The following conditionally registered ESVCLP had its conditional registration lapse under s13-10 of the Venture Capital Act 2002 Date lapsed

1. BGS Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnership ILP0000065, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 20/08/11

2. Early Stage Capital Expansion Fund, LP L0000196H, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 16/04/12

APPENDICIES

234

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

REPORTING REQUIREMENT

Section 15-17 Annual reports for ESVCLPs

Innovation Australia is required to publish copies of each ESVCLPs annual report on the

implementation of its approved investment plan.

Full registration

Carnegie Innovation Fund, LP

ILP0000080 - an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW

The Fund made eight investments in the 2011-12 financial year. The Fund carried on activities

related to making eligible venture capital investments and implementing its approved

investment plan during this period.

Constant Innovation, LP

L0000199P, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC

The Fund made three investments in the 2011-12 financial year. The Fund carried on activities

related to making eligible venture capital investments and implementing its approved

investment plan during this period.

OneVentures Innovation Fund, LP

ILP0000063, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW

The Fund made eight investments in the 2011-12 financial year. The Fund operates and only

carried on activities in accordance with its approved investment plan and these activities related

to the making and holding of investments as permitted by the Venture Capital Act 2002.

Sydney Angels Sidecar Fund, LP

ILP0000071, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW

The Fund made one investment in the 2011-12 financial year. The Fund has continued to operate

in accordance with its approved investment plan and activities relating to making eligible

investments.

Conditional Registration

Arowana Partners Growth Australasian Fund II, LP

ILP0000087, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW

The Fund has yet to raise capital. Once sufficient capital has been raised and full registration

achieved, investment activity, in accordance with the approved plan, will commence.

Australian Clean Tech - Innovation Partnership

ILP0000092, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW

The Fund has yet to raise capital. Once sufficient capital has been raised and full registration

achieved, investment activity, in accordance with the approved plan, will commence.

APPENDICIES

235

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Digital Accelerator, LP

L0000217P, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC

The Fund has yet to raise capital. Once sufficient capital has been raised and full registration

achieved, investment activity, in accordance with the approved plan, will commence.

Early Stage Capital Expansion Fund, LP

L0000196H, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC

The Fund was recently registered and is in the process of securing sufficient capital to gain full

registration. After this it will commence implementing its investment plan.

Elcano Sustainability Investments 2, LP

L0000196H, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC

The Fund has yet to raise capital. Once sufficient capital has been raised and full registration

achieved, investment activity, in accordance with the approved plan, will commence.

Exemplar Fund, LP

ILP0009, an incorporated limited partnership registered in QLD

The Fund has yet to raise capital. Once sufficient capital has been raised and full registration

achieved, investment activity, in accordance with the approved plan, will commence.

The Kaz Capital Innovation Fund

ILP0000101, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW

The Fund was recently registered and is in the process of securing sufficient capital to gain full

registration. After this it will commence implementing its investment plan.

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appendix h Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (VCLP) Program Breakdown

Table H1 List of current VCLPs at 30 June 2012

Table H2 List of partnerships that became VCLPs during 2011-12

Table H3 List of conditional VCLP registrations lapsed during 2011-12

Note: Appendix H, tables H1 to H4 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2A) (g - l) of the IR&D Act 1986. In reference to section 46 (2A) ( j), (k) and (l) there are no entities registered under Part 3 of the Venture Capital Act 2002.

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Table H1 · List of VCLPs in existence at 30 June 2012

Full registration [s13-1]: At 30 June 2012 the following partnerships were registered under  section 13-1 of the Venture Capital Act 2002. Registration under this provision is known as full  registration. These VCLPs have raised at least $10 million.

Registration taken to have come into force

A&B ETCF, LP ILP0000033, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 21/02/07

Anacacia Partnership 1, LP ILP0000036, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 13/06/07

Anchorage Capital Partners Fund, LP ILP0000049, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 07/04/08

ANU MTAA Super Venture Capital Partnership, LP 19000001, an incorporated limited partnership registered in the ACT 28/07/05

Archer Capital VCLP 3, LP ILP0000006, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 29/04/04

Archer Capital VCLP 4, LP ILP0000067, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 04/03/10

Archer Capital VCLP 5, LP ILP0000097, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 25/10/11

Archer Capital VCLP GF 1, LP ILP0000015, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 26/06/06

Archer Capital VCLP GF 2, LP ILP0000089, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 03/06/11

Arowana Capital Australasian Micro-Cap Private Equity Partnership 1, LP ILP0000039, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 18/07/07

BBF1 Partnership, LP ILP0000042, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 16/11/07

CHAMP Ventures Investments 7, LP ILP0000083 an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 18/02/11

Cleantech Australia Fund, LP L0000146S, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 31/08/07

Crescent Capital Partners II, LP ILP0000003, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 26/07/04

Crescent Capital Partnership III, LP ILP0000023, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 25/10/06

Crescent Capital Partners IV, LP ILP0000069, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 15/06/10

CWC Corporate Opportunity No.1 Limited Partnership, LP L0000113A, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 20/09/06

Equity Partners Fund No. 3, LP ILP0000018, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 15/11/06

Fulcrum Capital Partners No.1, LP ILP0000026, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 14/02/07

APPENDICIES

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Goldman Sachs Trans-Tasman Private Equity Fund 07, LP ILP0000028, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 14/02/07

Harbert Australian Private Equity Fund I, LP 090053575, is a limited partnership registered with the State of Delaware 23/02/09

Harbert Australian Private Equity Fund II, LP L0000188J, an incorporated limited a partnership registered in VIC 04/09/09

Innovation Capital Fund II, LP ILP0000013, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 07/10/05

Jolimont Secondaries Fund II, LP L0000119N, an incorporated limited a partnership registered in VIC 15/11/06

Lazard Australia Corporate Opportunity Fund 2A, LP ILP0000094, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 25/08/11

MRCF IIF, LP ILP0000082, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 27/01/11

Next Capital 1, LP L0000101T, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 16/11/05

Next Capital II, LP L0000159B, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 07/04/08

Propel Private Equity Fund II, LP ILP0000002, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 26/07/04

Quadrant Private Equity No 1, LP ILP0000011, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 13/09/05

Quadrant Private Equity Fund No.2, LP ILP0000030, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 14/02/07

Quadrant Private Equity Fund No.3, LP ILP0000078, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 29/11/10

South Australian Life Science Advancement Partnership, LP LP020, an incorporated limited partnership registered in SA

20/09/06

Southern Cross Fund No. 1, LP ILP0000017, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 22/06/06

Starfish Technology Fund 1, LP L0000062J, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 10/02/04

Starfish Technology Fund II, LP L0000128P, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 17/04/07

Triangle Resource Fund (Australia), LP ILP0003, an incorporated limited partnership registered in QLD 12/08/05

Wolseley Partners Fund I, LP ILP0000009, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 07/09/04

Wolseley Partners Fund II, LP ILP0000045, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 16/11/07

Yuuwa Capital, LP ILP0000058, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 10/11/08

APPENDICIES

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Conditional registration [s13-5]: Limited partnerships that have yet to raise capital and do not  qualify for full registration can be conditionally registered. The partnership then has 24 months  to achieve full registration. At 30 June 2011 the following partnerships were registered under  section 13-5 of the Venture Capital Act 2002.

Conditional registration effective

1. Advent 6 D, LP L0000216M an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 23/09/11

2. Allegro Private Equity II, LP ILP0000073 an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 15/10/10

3. Tasman Capital Partners Fund, LP ILP0000091 an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 04/08/11

Table H2 · List of partnerships that became VCLPs during 2011-12

Full registration [section 13-1] Board decision

Registration taken to have come into force a

1. Archer Capital VCLP 5, LP ILP0000097, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 13/04/12 25/10/11

2. Archer Capital VCLP GF 2, LP ILP0000089, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 18/11/11 03/06/11

3. CHAMP Ventures Investments 7, LP ILP0000083, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 23/09/11 18/02/11

4. Harbert Australian Private Equity Fund II, LP L0000188J an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 07/06/12 04/09/09

5. Lazard Australia Corporate Opportunity Fund 2A, LP ILP0000094 an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 13/04/12 25/08/11

Conditional registration [section 13-5]

Conditional registration effective

1. Archer Capital VCLP 5, LP ILP0000097, an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 24/11/11

2. Advent 6 D, LP

L0000216M an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 23/09/11

3. Lazard Australia Corporate Opportunity Fund 2A, LP ILP0000094 an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 23/09/11

4. Tasman Capital Partners Fund, LP ILP0000091 an incorporated limited partnership registered in NSW 04/08/11

a. The Venture Capital Act 2002 [s13-10] provides for a partnership’s full registration to be backdated when the partnership was first conditionally registered, or established.

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Table H3 · Conditional VCLP registrations lapsed during 2011-12

The following conditionally registered VCLP had its conditional registration lapse under section 13-10 of the Venture Capital Act 2002. Date lapsed

1. Elcano Sustainability Investments 1, LP ILP0006, an incorporated limited partnership registered in QLD

19/02/12

2. Harbert Australian Private Equity Parallel Fund I, LP L0000188J, an incorporated limited partnership registered in VIC 09/10/11

APPENDICIES

241

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix i Clean Techology Food and Foundries Investment Program

Table I1 Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant applications

received by state and territory, 2011-12

Table I2 Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant agreements

executed by state and territory 2011-12

Table I3 Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant payments

by state and territory, 2011-12

Table I4 Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant agreements

executed by entity, 2011-12

Table I5 Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant payments

by entity, 2011-12

Note: Appendix I, tables I2 and I4 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (b) (i-iv) of the IR&D Act 1986. Appendix I, tables I3 and I5 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

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Table I1 · Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant applications received by state and territory, 2011-124 State/Territory Number

NSW 7

VIC 13

QLD 5

SA 4

WA 13

TAS 0

ACT 0

NT 0

Total 42

Table I2 · Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant agreements executed by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Number Value ($)

NSW 4 5,764,904

VIC 0 0

QLD 1 300,000

SA 0 0

WA 0 0

TAS 0 0

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total 5 6,064,904

4 This table does not include applications received during the year if withdrawn from consideration during the year.

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Table I3 · Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory Total Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 259,259 100

VIC 0 0

QLD 0 0

SA 0 0

WA 0 0

TAS 0 0

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total a 259,259 100

a. The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

Table I4 · Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant agreements executed by entity, 2011-12

Recipient Activity

Agreed Grant ($)

Planned Completion Date

Bega Cheese Funding will support increased energy efficiency through the upgrade of refrigeration plants, hot water and lighting.

282,619 31-Mar-13

Crafty Chef Pty Ltd The funding will be used to replace the existing commercial style semi-hermetic blast freezer system with an industrial spiral freezer system using ammonia as refrigerant.

499,999 31-Aug-12

De Bortoli Wines Pty Ltd The grant funding will support De Bortoli to use power from the grid more efficiently, replace old equipment with improved energy efficient equipment, and use innovative solar technology to offset gas usage and power from the grid. The project will reduce De Bortoli’s carbon emissions intensity by 36.3%

4,829,405 3-Mar-14

DTR Holdings Pty Ltd Funding will be used to replace the company’s high pressure processing unit, reducing the company’s carbon emissions intensity.

300,000 30-Jul-12

Fonterra Brands (Australia) Pty Ltd

Through this project Fonterra will replace their outdated R22 refrigeration system with a modern energy efficient water cooled ammonia refrigeration system at its Wagga Wagga site.

152,881 30-Sep-12

APPENDICIES

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Table I5 · Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program grant payments by entity, 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Crafty Chef Pty Ltd 259,259

APPENDICIES

245

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix j Clean Techology Investment Program

Table J1 Clean Technology Investment Program grant applications

received by state and territory, 2011-12

Table J2 Clean Technology Investment Program grant agreements

executed by state and territory 2011-12

Table J3 Clean Technology Investment Program grant agreements

executed by entity, 2011-12

Note: Appendix J,tables J2 and J3 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (b) (i-iv) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

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Table J1 · Clean Technology Investment Program grant applications received by state and territory, 2011-125

State/Territory Number

NSW 16

VIC 14

QLD 2

SA 4

WA 5

TAS 0

ACT 1

NT 0

Total 42

Table J2 · Clean Technology Investment Program grant agreements executed by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Number Value ($)

NSW 1 143,886

VIC 0 0

QLD 0 0

SA 0 0

WA 0 0

TAS 0 0

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total 1 143,886

Table J3 · Clean Technology Investment Program grant agreements executed, 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($)

Planned Completion Date

GH Varley Pty Ltd Funding will enable the company to install voltage regulation equipment to improve site Power Factor Correction and peak demand profile, and replacing old, inefficient air conditioning.

143,886 31-Oct12

5 This table does not include applications received during the year if withdrawn from consideration during the year.

APPENDICIES

247

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix k Climate Ready Program Breakdown

Table K1 Climate Ready program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table K2 Climate Ready program grant payments by company, 2011-12

Note: Appendix K, table K2 is prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

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Table K1 · Climate Ready program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Total Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 2,620,253 52

VIC 821,363 16

QLD 294,767 6

SA 485,865 9

WA 768,684 15

TAS 83,818 2

ACT - -

NT - -

Total a 5,074,750 100

a. The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

Table K2 · Climate Ready program grant payments by company, 2011-12 Organisation Grant Payments ($)

ANSAC Pty Ltd 87,056

Air Change Pty Ltd 22,918

Aqua Diagnostic Pty Ltd 52,950

Aqua Guardian Group Ltd 24,976

Australian Bee Services Pty Ltd 24,704

BluGlass Limited 2,158,196

Broens Industries Pty Ltd 64,015

Cavitus Pty Ltd 14,019

Cogen Microsystems Pty Ltd 236,981

Cube Consulting Pty Ltd 34,479

Dadanco Pty Ltd 80,968

Ducane Research and Development Pty Ltd 20,448

Endless Solar Corporation Limited 84,348

Energy Response Pty Ltd 3,273

EnviroZymes Pty Ltd 14,905

Flip Screen Australia Pty Ltd 23,565

Frontline Australasia Pty Ltd 135,453

APPENDICIES

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Future Titanium Technology Pty Ltd 41,667

Global Valve Technology Pty Ltd 15,191

Hendon Semiconductors Pty Ltd 53,536

Hexima Ltd 379,326

Hofmann Engineering Pty Ltd 250,243

Indice Pty Ltd 25,000

LangTech International Pty Ltd 296,472

Measurement Engineering Australia Pty Ltd 7,936

MicroHeat Technologies Pty Ltd 47,797

Microbial Activity Pty Ltd 55,370

Priority Fuel Management Pty Ltd 7,741

Quickstep Technologies Pty Ltd 182,793

RTI Pty Ltd 144,048

Radar Portal Systems Pty Ltd 42,591

Rainbow Bee Eater IP Pty Ltd 26,573

Raytech Concepts Pty Ltd 7

SBS International Pty Ltd 43,732

Scanalyse Pty Ltd 214,113

Sedwyn Pty Ltd T/A SED Manufacturing Services 8,000

Seed Technology & Marketing Pty Ltd 17,570

Smart Storage Pty Ltd 17,250

SolveIT Software Pty Ltd 6,419

Xerocoat Pty Ltd 108,121

Total 5,074,750

APPENDICIES

250

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appendix l Green Car Innovation Fund (GCIF) Program Breakdown

Table L1 GCIF program grant agreements executed by state and territory, 2011-12

Table L2 GCIF program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table L3 GCIF program grant agreements executed by entity, 2011-12

Table L4 GCIF program grant payments by entity, 2011-12

Note: Appendix L, tables L2 and L4 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (b) (i-iv) of the IR&D Act 1986. Appendix L, tables L3 and L5 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table L1 · GCIF program grant agreements executed by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory Number Value ($)

NSW 0 0

VIC 2 102,817,598

QLD 0 0

SA 0 0

WA 0 0

TAS 0 0

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total 2 102,817,598

Table L2 · GCIF program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory Total Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 0 0

VIC 121,156,807 97

QLD 1,134,170 1

SA 2,648,569 2

WA 27,199 0

TAS 0 0

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total a 124,966,745 100

a. The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

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Table L3 · GCIF program grant agreements executed by entity 2011-12

Recipient Activity Agreed Grant ($)

Planned Completion Date

GM Holden Ltd Future Commodore Fuel Economy Enablers 39,817,598 20-May-13

Nexteer Automotive Australia Pty Ltd Nexteer Next Generation Electric Power Steering and Drivetrain Project (NEXTEPS)

63,000,000 31-Aug-14

Total 102,817,598

Table L4 · GCIF program grant payments by entity, 2011-12 Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Carbon Revolution Pty Ltd 994,266

Century Yuasa Batteries Pty Ltd 64,889

Composite Materials Engineering Pty Ltd 55,215

EV Engineering Limited 2,338,515

Ford Motor Co of Australia Ltd 18,564,347

GM Holden Ltd 53,556,013

Hirotec Australia Pty Ltd 962,343

Nexteer Automotive Australia Pty Ltd 1,413,149

Nissan Casting Australia Pty Ltd 1,891,383

Orbital Australia Pty Ltd 27,199

SMR Automotive Australia Pty Limited 778,066

Toyoda Gosei Australia Pty Ltd 908,160

Toyota Motor Corporation Australia Ltd 42,343,919

Very Small Particle Company Ltd 1,069,281

Total 124,966,745

APPENDICIES

253

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix m Re-Tooling For Climate Change Program Breakdown

Table M1 Re-tooling for Climate Change program payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table M2 Re-tooling for Climate Change program payments by company, 2011-12

Note: Appendix M, tables M1 and M2 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

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Table M1 · Re-tooling for Climate Change program payments by state and territory, 2011-126 State/Territory Value ($) Per cent of Total (%)

NSW 525,937 13

VIC 616,463 15

QLD 416,826 10

SA 1,908,284 46

WA 599,110 14

TAS 91,890 2

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total 4,158,510 100

Table M2 · Re-tooling for Climate Change program payments by company, 2011-12 Organisation Total Payments ($) a

Adchem (Australia) Pty Ltd 100,000

AJ Bush & Sons (Manufacturers) Pty Ltd 100,000

Boss Engineering Pty Ltd 17,385

Buderim Ginger Limited 87,678

Canon Food Services Pty Ltd as trustee for Canon Foods Unit Trust 74,110

Central Burnett Fruit Processors Co-operative Association Limited 93,759

D A Holdings Pty Ltd 41,888

Derby Industries Pty Ltd 100,000

Detmold Packaging Pty Ltd 19,463

Ferrero Australia Pty Ltd 200,000

G Patritti & Co Pty Ltd 66,790

G.H. Varley Pty Ltd 18,474

Gelita Australia Pty Ltd 235,389

Geographe Enterprises Pty Ltd 175,000

Knoll Consultants & Investments Pty Ltd 140,250

Laserbond Ltd 62,590

Lemnos Foods Pty Ltd 197,000

Lobethal Australia Pty Ltd 646,544

6 The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Organisation Total Payments ($) a

Longwarry Food Park Pty Ltd 400,000

Marinova Pty Ltd 55,336

Master Butchers Co-operative Limited 100,000

Mrs Mac’s Pty Ltd 250,000

Robern Menz (MFG) Pty Ltd 400,000

SEC Plating Pty Ltd 85,600

Tas Fab Pty Ltd 36,554

Taylors Wines Pty Ltd 250,000

Techno-Plas Pty Ltd 204,700

Total 4,158,510

a. Total payments are GST exclusive.

APPENDICIES

256

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appendix n Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET) Program Breakdown

Table N1 COMET program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table N2 COMET program grant payments by company, 2011-12

Note: Appendix N, table N2 is prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Table N1 · COMET program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Total Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 78,632 35

VIC 20,007 9

QLD 95,060 43

SA 3,568 2

WA 0 0

TAS 20,144 9

ACT 0 0

NT 4,155 2

Total 221,566 a 100

a. The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

Table N2 · COMET program grant payments by company, 2011-12

Organisation Grant Payments ($)

3D Data Guidance Pty Ltd. 21,628

Adventech Pty Ltd as Trustee for Jones Venture Trust 5,000

BOS Web Systems Pty Ltd 439

Child Essential Learning Systems Pty Ltd 55,500

Evrsafe Solutions Pty Ltd 3,567

Five Faces Pty Ltd 5,000

Interactive Transport Pty Ltd 24,000

IPOUR Pty Ltd 1,155

Isoflex Technologies International Pty Ltd. 5,483

Multitreck Wheelchairs Pty Ltd 20,144

Murray Vascular Pty Ltd 51,232

Oliver Lloyd Pty Ltd 2,944

Powered Handling Pty Ltd 2,449

Precision Pastoral Pty Ltd 4,155

REDTXT.COM.AU Pty Ltd 1,227

Skipper Industries Pty Ltd as the Trustee for the Distribution Trust 5,000

SMRT Systems Pty Ltd 5,000

Thinksmart Software Pty Ltd 5,000

Tralee Technology Holdings Pty Ltd 1,807

United Parts Group Pty Ltd 836

Total 221,566

APPENDICIES

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appendix o Commercial Ready Program Breakdown

Table O1 Commercial Ready program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table O2 Commercial Ready program grant payments by company, 2011-12

Note: Appendix O, tables O1 and O2 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

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Table O1 · Commercial Ready program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

State/Territory Total Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 260,760 32

QLD 481,992 60

TAS 61,880 8

Total 804,632 a 100

a. The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

Table O2 · Commercial Ready program grant payments by company, 2011-12 Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Alpha Chemicals Pty Ltd 22,854

CHK Gridsense Pty Ltd 46,174

I.A.H. Manufacturing Pty Ltd 67,232

Industrea Ltd 481,992

Open Kernel Labs Pty Ltd 124,500

Pivot Maritime International Pty Ltd 61,505

Tasmanian Selected Abalone Pty Ltd 375

Total 804,632

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appendix p R&D Start Program Breakdown

Table P1 R&D Start program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12

Table P2 R&D Start program grant payments by company, 2011-12

Note: Appendix P, table P1 and P2 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

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Table P1 · R&D Start program grant payments by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory Total Payments ($) Per cent of total (%)

NSW 0 0

VIC 0 0

QLD 0 0

SA 240,262 100

WA 0 0

TAS 0 0

ACT 0 0

NT 0 0

Total 240,262a 100

a. The total figure represents the value of the payments made during the year and does not include any amounts that may have been repaid.

Table P2 · R&D Start program grant payments by company, 2011-12 Organisation Grant Payments ($)

Ozone Manufacturing Pty Ltd 240,262

Total 240,262

APPENDICIES

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appendix q Innovation Investment Follow-On Fund (IIFF) Program Breakdown

Table Q1 Australian Government funds paid to IIFF investee companies

by fund manager, 2011-12

Table Q2 IIFF Investees receiving financial support by industry sector, 2011-12

Table Q3 IIFF Investees receiving financial support by state and territory, 2011-12

Note: Appendix Q, tables Q1 to Q3 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

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Table Q1 · Australian Government funds paid to IIFF investee companies by fund manager, 2011-127

Fund Manager Investment ($m)

Allen & Buckeridge Asset Management Ltd 0.00

AMWIN Management Pty Ltd 0.00

Coates Myer and Company Pty Ltd 0.00

Divergent Capital Pty Ltd 0.00

GBS Venture Partners Pty Ltd 0.22

In-tellinc Pty Ltd 0.00

iQ Fund 3 Pty Ltd (trading as InQbator) 0.00

NEO Technology Ventures Pty Ltd 0.30

Playford Capital Pty Ltd 0.25

Starfish Ventures Pty Ltd 0.20

Start-Up Australia Ventures Pty Ltd 0.00

Total 0.97

Table Q2 · IIFF investees receiving financial support by industry sector, 2011-128 Sector No. Companies Supported

Information Technology and Telecommunications 1

Life sciences/Bioscience 4

Manufacturing 0

Engineering 1

Total 6

7 Table Q1 does not include the $0.13 million in recoverable expenses.

8 Table Q2 includes companies receiving follow-on investments. One company is co-invested.

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Table Q3 · IIFF investees receiving financial support by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory No. Companies Supported a

ACT 0

NSW 1

VIC 0

QLD 3

WA 0

NT 0

TAS 0

SA 1

Other* 1

Total 6*

a. One company is located overseas.

APPENDICIES

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ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix r Pooled Development Funds (PDF) Program Breakdown

Table R1 List of current PDFs at 30 June 2012

Table R2 Companies that ceased to be PDFs during 2011-12 under sections 45, 46 and 47

Note: Appendix R, tables R1 and R 2 reflect the requirements set out in section 46 (2A) (a - f) of the IR&D Act 1986. In reference to section 46 (2A) (b), (c) and (d), the closure of the PDF program (on 21 June 2007) prevents new registrations under this program.

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Table R1 · List of PDFs in existence at 30 June 2012

Companies registered under section 14 of the Pooled Development Funds Act 1992 Date registered

Acrux Limited ACN 082 001 152

07/07/99

Advent III Private Equity Limited ACN 082 863 769

22/06/98

Allaway Weaver Williams Development Fund Pty Ltd ACN 082 012 940

29/06/98

ATF Group (PDF) Limited ACN 106 213 772

29/09/03

Ausfirst Capital Limited ACN 091 945 443

16/05/00

Austock Group Limited ACN 087 334 370

07/06/99

Australian Biomedical Fund No.4 Limited ACN 117 429 795

13/12/05

Australian Capital Fund Pty Ltd ACN 094 900 311

22/12/00

Authorised Investment Fund Limited ACN 068 793 322

03/05/95

Biotech Capital Limited ACN 091 979 172

29/03/00

Bluepeak VC Technology Pooled Fund Limited ACN 077 305 198

13/03/00

CVC Sustainable Investments Limited ACN 088 731 837

20/12/99

Efficient Energy Australia Limited ACN 078 867 446

05/08/97

EMC Solar Limited ACN 108 702 101

20/05/04

Future Capital Development Fund Limited ACN 081 825 470

06/04/98

Genesis BDI Limited ACN 081 768 907

08/10/02

Growthtech International Pty Ltd ACN 065 951 091

18/07/97

Healthnet Investments Pty Ltd ACN 088 674 846

27/09/99

Incubator Capital Limited ACN 091 499 357

29/03/00

Innovation Capital Limited ACN 086 439 107

30/03/99

APPENDICIES

267

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Companies registered under section 14 of the Pooled Development Funds Act 1992 Date registered

Match Development Fund Pty Ltd ACN 122 203 641

15/11/06

MEC Resources Ltd ACN 113 900 020

19/09/05

Mine Innovation Development Fund Pty Ltd ACN 107 370 123

21/01/04

Nanyang Australia I Limited ACN 062 516 787

20/12/93

Nanyang Australia II Limited ACN 072 468 798

26/06/96

New Frugalitas Fund Limited ACN 099 058 250

02/05/05

Northstate Capital Limited ACN 070 674 234

19/09/95

Origin Capital Limited ACN 079 800 196

06/04/98

Pacific Development Capital Limited ACN 088 964 112

05/10/99

Paragon Equity Limited ACN 096 576 439

15/06/01

Phoenix Development Fund Limited ACN 094 922 602

21/12/00

Prosperity Capital Pty Ltd ACN 106 420 811

20/12/06

Saltbush Funds Management Limited ACN 102 298 546

26/02/04

Smallco Development Capital Pty Ltd ACN 070 660 356

12/12/95

Strategic Development Fund Limited ACN 118 437 960

23/03/06

Strategic Elements Ltd ACN 122 437 503

15/11/06

Technology Development Investment Limited ACN 063 379 064

07/03/94

Teltec Capital Limited ACN 080 975 702

20/02/98

The New Millennium Fund Pty Ltd ACN 089 529 733

02/12/99

The Pioneer Development Fund (Aust) Limited ACN 103 118 761

20/12/02

APPENDICIES

268

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table R2 · List of Companies that ceased to be PDFs during 2011-12

Under Section 45 Automatic Revocation Date revoked

Hochma Development Fund Limited ACN 069 159 299

09/02/12

Under Section 46 Revocation on application by PDF Date revoked

Biofusion Capital Pty Ltd ACN 100 041 254

01/01/12

Dynamic Development Fund Pty Ltd ACN 116 187 270

04/08/11

ePark Direct Equity Fund Pty Ltd ACN 093 613 793

17/02/12

First Tasmania Investments Limited ACN 080 755 746

07/06/12

Innovest PDF Limited ACN 118 146 035

04/08/11

Under Section 47 Revocation at Innovation Australia’s discretion Date revoked

Nextec Development Capital Limited ACN 068 582 936

04/08/11

APPENDICIES

269

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix s Pre-Seed Fund (PSF) Program Breakdown

Table S1 Australian Government funds paid to PSF investee companies

by fund manager, 2011-12

Table S2 PSF investee companies receiving financial support

by industry sector, 2011-12

Table S3 PSF investee companies receiving financial support

by state and territory, 2011≠12

Note: Appendix S, tables S1 to S3 are prepared in accordance with section 46 (2) (c) (i) and (ii) of the IR&D Act 1986.

APPENDICIES

270

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table S1 · Australian Government funds paid to PSF investee companies by fund manager, 2011-12 Fund Manager Investments ($m)

Allen and Buckeridge Asset Management Ltd 0.13

GBS Venture Partners Limited 0.36

SciVentures Investments Pty Ltd 0.80

Starfish Ventures Ltd 0.00

Total 1.29

Table S2 · PSF investee companies receiving financial support by industry sector, 2011-12

Sector No. Companies Supported

Information Technology and Telecommunications 0

Life sciences/Biosciences 6

Engineering 1

Total 7

Table S3 · PSF investee companies receiving financial support by state and territory, 2011-12 State/Territory No. Companies Supported

NSW 3

VIC 2

QLD 2

WA 0

SA 0

TAS 0

ACT 0

NT 0

Total 7

APPENDICIES

271

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

appendix t Marketing

Table T1 Media announcements 2011-12

APPENDICIES

272

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Table T1 · Media Announcements 2011-12

Date Media Announcement

4 July 2011 Cleantech and ICT Inventions win backing

10 July 2011 Government supports innovation and renewable energy

11 July 2011 Comment sought on administration of new R&D support

14 July 2011 Helping business transform to meet a low carbon future

15 July 2011 $6.2m in funding to help make lighter, greener cars

22 July 2011 Commercialisation Australia - building business through innovation

22 July 2011 More skilled jobs to flow from new R&D Tax Credits

2 Aug 2011 Investment Fund helps take the pain out of vaccination

17 Aug 2011 Turning great ideas into great business

18 Aug 2011 Transforming industry for a greener future

22 Aug 2011 Challenging business with great business ideas

24 Aug 2011 R&D Tax Credit wins Parliamentary support

1 Sept 2011 Flood-affected manufacturer back in business

2 Sept 2011 R&D Tax Incentive all set to support Australian businesses

20 Sept 2011 Boosting jobs and transforming industries

22 Sept 2011 Have your say on $1.2 billion Clean Technology Programs

7 Oct 2011 High-efficiency aircon system takes Cleantech prize

12 Oct 2011 Innovation Australia Board welcomes three new members

12 Oct 2011 Business to help oversee Tax Incentive

13 Oct 2011 Innovation key to productivity growth for Australia

24 Nov 2011 World’s first commercial 3D human tissues bioprinter

5 Dec 2011 Real time speech captioning delivers for the hearing impaired

5 Dec 2011 Healthy inventions win commercialisation support

6 Dec 2011 More support for Australian innovators

7 Dec 2011 Innovation in Australia: People Making the Difference

7 Dec 2011 Investing in Innovative Companies

8 Dec 2011 Innovation Investment Fund helps create life-saving technology

20 Dec 2011 Advocates hard at work for Australian Industry

23 Jan 2012 Jobs boost for North West Tasmania - Innovation and Investment Fund

27 Jan 2012 Strong response to Illawarra Region Innovation and Investment Fund

3 Feb 2012 Australian ingenuity to save lives and improve productivity

3 Feb 2012 Innovation key to success for local manufacturer

APPENDICIES

273

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Date Media Announcement

16 Feb 2012 Clean Tech Investment - $1 billion to help Australian manufacturing move to a cleaner future

16 Feb 2012 Support for Australian business

5 March 2012 Helping business access $1 billion in clean tech funding

22 March 2012 Investing in automotive jobs and skills

22 March 2012 New initiative to boost Australia’s auto supply businesses

30 March 2012 R&D Tax Incentive registration requirements released

3 April 2012 Support for smarter and cleaner inventions

20 April 2012 Expert committee appointed to deliver $1 billion Clean Tech programs

8 May 2012 Innovation the key to driving productive industries

15 May 2012 Exporting from Bayswater North to the world

2 May 2012 Innovation collaboration will bring new industries and jobs

17 May 2012 Melbourne manufacturer wrapped with bioplastic

7 June 2012 Government helps manufacturers reduce costs

30 June 2012 New and improved R&D Tax Incentive open for business

CONTACT DETAILS

274

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Contact Details

1. How to contact Innovation Australia:

Innovation Australia Secretariat

Telephone Number: (02) 6213 7400

Fax Number: (02) 6213 7677

By email: innovationaustralia@innovation.gov.au

By post: Innovation Australia

GPO Box 2704

CANBERRA CITY ACT 2601

2. For further information about Innovation Australia and its programs,

please visit our website ausindustry.gov.au

or contact the AusIndustry hotline 13 28 46

or contact a Customer Service Manager in your state or territory as listed.

3. For further information on the publication ‘Twenty-Five Years of Innovation in Australia’,

please visit ausindustry.gov.au/InnovationAustralia/IA25years/Documents/25Years-InnovationinAustralia.pdf.

AusIndustry Offices Telephone Facsimile

Australian Capital Territory

Industry House 10 Binara Street CANBERRA CITY ACT 2601

GPO Box 9839 CANBERRA CITY ACT 2601

Email: aiact@innovation.gov.au

(02) 6213 7335 (02) 6213 7644

New South Wales

Level 5, 341 George Street SYDNEY NSW 2000

GPO Box 9839 SYDNEY NSW 2001 Email: ainsw@innovation.gov.au

(02) 9226 6000 (02) 9226 6002

CONTACT DETAILS

275

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Regional Offices

Wollongong - Illawarra and South Coast Region

Suite 1, Terrace Level Crown Tower, 200 Crown Street WOLLONGONG NSW 2520

PO Box 5427 WOLLONGONG NSW 2520

(02) 4254 5534 (02) 4225 2607

Newcastle - Newcastle Hunter Region

IDC Hunter 130 University Drive CALLAGHAN NSW 2308

PO Box 189 HUNTER REGION MC NSW 2310

(02) 4014 5977 (02) 4960 3847

Tamworth - Northern Central NSW Region

Level 1, 345 Peel Street TAMWORTH NSW 2340

PO Box 920 TAMWORTH NSW 2340

(02) 6761 3624 (02) 6761 3571

Wagga Wagga - South West NSW Region

48 Fitzmaurice Street WAGGA WAGGA NSW 2650

PO Box 5761 WAGGA WAGGA NSW 2650

(02) 6921 1828 (02) 6921 6415

Victoria

Level 5, 111 Bourke Street MELBOURNE VIC 3000

GPO Box 85 MELBOURNE VIC 3001

Email: aivic@innovation.gov.au

(03) 9268 7555 (03) 9268 7999

Regional Offices

Ballarat - Western and South Western Victoria Region

48 Sturt Street BALLARAT VIC 3350

PO Box 511 BALLARAT VIC 3353

(03) 5320 5960 (03) 5331 7973

Bendigo - Northern Victoria Region

Level 1, 56-60 King Street BENDIGO VIC 3550

PO Box 1332 BENDIGO CENTRAL VIC 3552

(03) 5442 4199 (03) 5441 8941

CONTACT DETAILS

276

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Trafalgar - Gippsland Region

Trafalgar Technology Centre 107 Princes Highway TRAFALGAR VIC 3824

PO Box 247 TRAFALGAR VIC 3439

(03) 5633 3436 (03) 5633 3439

South Australia/Northern Territory

AON Building Level 9/63 Pirie Street ADELAIDE SA 5000

GPO Box 9839 ADELAIDE SA 5001

Email: aisa@innovation.gov.au

(08) 8406 4700 (08) 8406 4717

Regional Offices

Mount Gambier - Southern South Australia Region

Old Town Hall Commercial Street East MOUNT GAMBIER SA 5290

PO Box 1537 MOUNT GAMBIER SA 5290

(08) 8723 1057 (08) 8725 8949

Port Augusta - Northern South Australia Region

34 Stirling Road PORT AUGUSTA SA 5700

GPO Box 421 PORT AUGUSTA SA 5700

(08) 8406 4707

Darwin

Ground Floor, Development House 76 The Esplanade DARWIN NT 0800

PO Box 4816 DARWIN NT 0801

(08) 8941 9250 (08) 8941 5603

Tasmania

Level 4, NAB Building 86 Collins Street HOBART TAS 7000

GPO Box 9839 HOBART TAS 7001

Email: aitas@innovation.gov.au

(03) 6230 9900 (03) 6230 9901

Regional Office

Launceston - Northern Tasmania Region

Level 1, Cornwall Square 12-16 St John Street LAUNCESTON TAS 7250

PO Box 823 LAUNCESTON TAS 7250

(03) 6331 4183 (03) 6331 3452

CONTACT DETAILS

277

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Queensland

Level 12, 100 Creek Street BRISBANE QLD 4000

GPO Box 9839 BRISBANE QLD 4001

Email: aiqld@innovation.gov.au

(07) 3227 4700 (07) 3227 4730

Regional Offices

Gold Coast - Southern Queensland and Northern Costal NSW Region

Level 1, 26 Marine Parade SOUTHPORT QLD 4215

PO Box 1448 SOUTHPORT BC QLD 4215

(07) 5503 1476 (07) 5503 1628

Townsville - Northern Queensland Region

Level 1, Enterprise House Cnr The Strand and Sir Leslie Thiess Drive TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810

PO Box 326 TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810

(07) 4721 6649 (07) 4721 0753

Bundaberg - Central Queensland Region

205 Bourbong Street BUNDABERG QLD 4670

GPO Box 1386 BUNDABERG QLD 4670

(07) 4151 0660 (07) 4151 0708

Western Australia

Level 25, St Martins Tower 44 St Georges Terrace PERTH WA 6000

GPO Box 9839 PERTH WA 6848 Email: aiwa@innovation.gov.au

(08) 9287 3500 (08) 9287 3511

Regional Office

Bunbury - South West Australia Region

Level 10, Bunbury Tower 61 Victoria Street BUNBURY WA 6230

PO Box 2488 BUNBURY WA 6231

(08) 9721 8216 (08) 9721 7584

For further information on AusIndustry State, Territory and Regional Offices

please visit ausindustry.gov.au

ACRONYM INDEX

278

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Acronym Index A

AAT Administrative Appeals Tribunal

ACIP Advisory Council on Intellectual Property

ACRE Australian Centre for Renewable Energy

AFL Australian Football League

AFOF Australian Venture Capital Fund of Funds

ANZSIC Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification

ARC Australian Research Council

ASIC Australian Securities and Investments Commission

ASRC Australian Standard Research Classification

ASX Australian Securities Exchange

ATO Australian Taxation Office

B

BTWG Business Tax Working Group

C

CA Commercialisation Australia Program

CAIAB Commercialisation Australia Interim Advisory Board

CAC Act Commonwealth Authority and Companies Act

CEFC Clean Energy Finance Corporation

CEO Chief Executive Officer

COMET Commercialising Emerging Technologies program

CRC Cooperative Research Centre

CTFFIP Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program

CTIC Clean Technology Investment Committee

CTIP Clean Technology Investment Program

D

DIISR Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research

DIISRTE Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education

DOI Disclosure of Interest

ACRONYM INDEX

279

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

E

EE Experienced Executive

ESC Early Stage Commercialisation

ESVCLP Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnership

G

GCIF Green Car Innovation Fund

GCIC Green Car Innovation Committee

GST Goods and Services Tax

I

IAF R&D Tax Incentive Integrity Assurance Framework

ICIP Industry Cooperative Innovation Program

ITC Information Comunication Technology

IGC Innovation Grants Committee

IIF Innovation Investment Fund

IIFF Innovation Investment Follow-on Fund

ILP Incorporated Limited Partnership

IP Intellectual Property

IR&D Industry Research and Development

ITAA Income Tax Assessment Act

J

JAGG Joint Administrative Governance Group

M

MVP R&D Scheme Motor Vehicle Producer R&D Scheme

N

NRL National Rugby League

ACRONYM INDEX

280

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

P

P3 Pharmaceuticals Partnerships Program

PDF Pooled Development Funds

PDF Act Pooled Development Funds Act

PSF Pre-Seed Fund

R

RCC Retooling for Climate Change

R&D Research and Development

R&DIC R&D Incentives Committee

REDI Renewable Energy Development Initiative

REEF Renewable Energy Equity Fund

RSP Research Service Providers

S

SMEs Small and medium sized enterprises

T

TIAC R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee

TCC Tax Concession Committee

V

VC Act Venture Capital Act

VCC Venture Capital Committee

VCLP Venture Capital Limited Partnerships

VCR Venture Capital Registration

INDEX

281

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

Index

A

Acronym Index (278-279)

Appendices (115)

AusIndustry Contacts (274-277)

Australian Government Budget and Expenditure (Appendix B, 158)

Assistance provided by the Board (8-10)

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Investment Program (59)

Clean Technology Investment Program (54)

Climate Ready Program (65)

Commercialisation Australia Program (19)

Commercial Ready Program (72)

COMET Program (70)

Green Car Innovation Fund (67)

IIF Program (41)

Pre-Seed Fund Program (81)

Program by Program Breakdown (Appendix C, 159)

R&D Program (75)

Re-tooling for Climate Change Program (68)

Australian Taxation Office (33, 46, 51)

Australian Venture Capital Fund of Funds (49)

B

Backing Australia’s Ability (72, 75)

Benefits Disbursed by State/Territory (10)

C

Chairman’s Report (2-10)

Clean Business Australia (65, 68)

Clean Energy Future Plan (2, 15, 54)

Clean Technology Food and Foundries Program (15, 59-63)

Program Breakdown(Appendix I, 241-244)

Clean Technology Innovation Program (16)

Clean Technology Investment Committee (89, 104)

Committee Membership (111)

Clean Technology Investment Program (15, 54-58)

Program Breakdown (Appendix J, 247-246)

Climate Ready Program (65-66)

Program Breakdown (Appendix K, 247-249)

INDEX

282

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

Code of Conduct (90)

Commercialisation Australia Program (12, 19-23, 89, 103)

Board Membership (110)

Program Breakdown (Appendix D, 174-196)

Commercial Ready Plus (72)

Commercial Ready Program (72-73)

Program Breakdown (Appendix O, 258-259)

Commercialising Emerging Technologies (COMET) Program (70-71)

Program Breakdown (Appendix N, 256-257)

Committees (89)

Board and Committee Membership (106-112)

Contacts (274-277)

Corporate Governance (Appendix A, 116-157)

CraftyChef (62-63)

Customers Assisted by State/Territory (10)

D

Disclosure of Interest (91-93)

E

Early Stage Venture Capital Limited Partnerships (14, 45-48)

Program Breakdown (Appendix G, 231-235)

F

Functions (87-88)

G

GH Varley Pty Ltd (57-58)

Green Car Innovation Fund (67)

Program Breakdown (Appendix L, 250-252)

H

Halo Medical Devices (22-23)

Highlights (11)

INDEX

283

ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12

I

Industry Cooperative Innovation Program (74)

Industry Research and Development Act 1986 (2)

Innovation Australia

Board’s structure (96)

Overview (86)

Functions (87-88)

Membership (95, 106)

Mission statement (1)

Vision statement (1)

Innovation Grants Committee (89, 105)

Committee membership (112)

Innovation Investment Fund (14, 40-44)

Program breakdown (Appendix F, 288-230)

Innovation Investment Follow-on Fund (41, 77-78)

Program breakdown (Appendix Q 262-264)

L

Legal Matters (113)

Letter of Transmittal (iii)

M

Marketing (Appendix T, 271-273)

O

Osprey Medical (43-44)

Oz Sonotek (36-37)

Our Programs (17)

P

Pooled Development Funds (79-80)

Program Breakdown (Appendix R, 265-268)

Powering Ideas: an Innovation Agenda for the 21st Century (19)

Pre-Seed Fund (81-82)

Program Breakdown (Appendix S, 269-270)

Program Breakdown (all) (Appendix C, 159-173)

Corrigenda (173)

INDEX

284

INNOVATION AUSTRALIA

R

R&D Incentives Committee (33, 35, 89, 98-99)

Committee Membership (107)

R&D Start Program (75-76)

Program Breakdown (Appendix P, 260-261)

R&D Tax Concession Program (13, 24-39)

175 per cent Premium (29-32)

Program Breakdown (Appendix E, 197-227)

R&D Tax Offset (29-32)

R&D Tax Incentive (13, 25-39)

R&D Tax Incentive Advisory Committee (35, 89, 100)

Committee Membership (108)

Registered Research Agencies (32)

Renewable Energy Development Initiative (69)

Renewable Energy Equity Fund (83)

Research Service Providers (32, Appendix E, 253-255)

Re-tooling for Climate Change Program (68)

Program Breakdown (Appendix M, 253-255)

S

Server Racks Australia (38-39)

T

Tax Concession Committee (TCC) (89, 98-99)

V

Vaxxas (47-48)

Venture Capital Committee (40, 89, 100-102)

Committee Membership (109)

Venture Capital Limited Partnerships Program (15, 49-53)

Program Breakdown (Appendix H, 236-240)

W

Windlab Systems Pty Ltd (52-53)