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Australian Electoral Commission—Report for 2020-21


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ANNUAL REPORT

ii

© Commonwealth of Australia 2021

ISSN: 0814-4508

Unless otherwise noted, the Australian Electoral Commission has applied the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence to this publication with the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, the AEC’s logos, the AEC’s maps and content supplied by third parties.

Use of material subject to the licence must not assert or imply any connection with or endorsement by the AEC unless with express prior written permission.

The commission asserts the right of recognition as author of the original material. The publication should be attributed as Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21. The term ‘Indigenous’ in this report refers to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people unless otherwise stated.

This report may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased.

Produced by: Australian Electoral Commission

Printed by: Elect Printing

Annual Report contact officer Director, Budget and Performance Section Australian Electoral Commission 10 Mort Street Canberra ACT 2600

Contact phone number: 02 6271 4476 Contact email: performance@aec.gov.au Entity website: www.aec.gov.au

Make an online enquiry www.aec.gov.au/enquiry

Accessible services www.aec.gov.au/about_aec/translated_information/ for telephone interpreter services in multiple languages.

Readers who are deaf or who have a hearing or speech impairment can contact the AEC through the National Relay Service (NRS)

• TTY users phone 13 36 77 and ask for 13 23 26 • Speak and Listen users phone 1300 555 727 and ask for 13 23 26 • Internet relay users connect to the NRS and ask for 13 23 26

This publication is printed on an uncoated, 30% recycled, carbon neutral paper, approved by the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification.

iii Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

CONTENTS

About this report vii

Tools to assist readers vii

Letter of transmittal viii

Section 01 - Commissioner’s review 1

Maintaining trust 2

Delivering the franchise 3

Improving our capability 4

The future 4

Section 02 - Overview of the AEC 5

Role and function 6

Organisational structure 6

AEC Organisation chart 7

Section 03 - Performance report 9

Annual statements 12

Statement by Electoral Commissioner 12

Key activity 1 13

Maintain the integrity of electoral and regulatory processes 13

Key activity 2 21

Prepare for and deliver electoral events 21

Key activity 3 26

Engage with our stakeholders through education and public awareness activities 26

Key activity 4 32

Maintain a capable and agile organisation and continue to professionalise our workforce 32

Regulator performance framework 35

2020-21 highlights 37

Delivering by-elections in a COVID-19 environment 37

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections 37

International services: building success through agility, creativity and stakeholder engagement 38

Four Countries Conference 39

Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand 39

Spotlight on virtual learning and development 40

CONTENTS iv

Spotlight on recruitment, wellbeing and the new normal: lessons from Victoria 41

Spotlight on promoting electoral engagement through Indigenous languages 42

Section 04 - Management and accountability 43

Corporate governance - principles and objectives 44

External scrutiny 46

Our people 48

Assets management 53

Purchasing 55

Section 05 - Financial statements 57

Financial performance summary 58

List of financial statements 60

Certification 61

Primary financial statements 64

Overview 70

Notes to the financial statements 71

Funding 71

Departmental financial position 76

People and relationships 83

Expenses 86

Financial instruments 87

Other information 88

Section 06 - Appendices 89

Appendix A: Resources 90

Appendix B: Governance 92

Appendix C: Commonwealth Electoral Roll information 97

Appendix D: Electoral events data 101

Appendix E: Public awareness data 102

Appendix F: Electoral redistribution data 103

Appendix G: Political party registrations and financial disclosure data 104

Appendix H: Workforce statistics 105

Section 07 - Reader guides 115

Abbreviations and acronyms 116

Glossary 118

Index to list of annual report requirements 121

General Index 127

v Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Figures Figure 1: Australia’s 151 electoral divisions as at 30 June 2021 18

Figure 2: Enrolment rate trend from 30 June 2007 to 30 June 2021 97

Tables Table 1: Performance criteria from the AEC Portfolio Budget Statements mapped against agency key activities and functions 11

Table 2: AEC performance against the regulator performance framework 36

Table 3: AEC APS workforce by employment type and classification (excluding statutory office holders), 30 June 2021 48

Table 4: New claims for compensable and non-compensable injuries 52

Table 5: Reportable consultancy contracts (2020-21) 56

Table 6: List of organisations receiving a share of consultancy contracts (2020-21) 56

Table 7: Reportable non-consultancy contracts (2020-21) 56

Table 8: List of organisations receiving non-consultancy contract expenditures (2020-21) 56

Table 9: Agency resource statement summary 90

Table 10: Expenses and resources for Outcome 1 91

Table 11: Average staffing levels 2018-19 to 2020-21 91

Table 12: Details of accountable authority during current report period (2020-21) 92

Table 13: Audit committee 92

Table 14: Business planning documents 94

Table 15: AEC management committees 95

Table 16: Recipients of electoral roll extracts 2020-21 98

Table 17: Registered political parties provided with electoral roll extracts 2020-21 99

Table 18: Government departments and agencies provided with electoral roll extracts 2020-21 100

Table 19: Provision of electoral roll information to organisations verifying identity for financial purposes 2020-21 100

Table 20: By-elections conducted during 2020-21 101

Table 21: Key voting data for each by-election 2020-21 101

Table 22: Advertising and media placement payments, $14,300 or more 102

Table 23: Summary of electoral redistributions conducted in 2020-21 103

Table 24: All ongoing employees current report period (2020-21) 105

Table 25: All non-ongoing employees by location current report period (2020-21) 105

Table 26: All ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20) 106

Table 27: All non-ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20) 106

Table 28: Australian Public Service Act 1999 (Public Service Act) ongoing employees current report period (2020-21) 107

Table 29: Australian Public Service Act non-ongoing employees current report period (2020-21) 107

CONTENTS vi

Table 30: Australian Public Service Act ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20) 108

Table 31: Australian Public Service Act non-ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20) 108

Table 32: Australian Public Service Act employees by full-time and part-time status current report period (2020-21) 109

Table 33: Australian Public Service Act employees by full-time and part-time status previous report period (2019-20) 109

Table 34: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location, current report period (2020-21) 110

Table 35: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location, previous report period (2019-20) 110

Table 36: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Current Report Period (2020-21) 111

Table 37: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Previous Report Period (2019-20) 111

Table 38: Australian Public Service Act Employment arrangements current report period (2020-21) 111

Table 39: Australian Public Service Act employment salary ranges by classification level (minimum/maximum) current report period (2020-21) 111

Table 40: Statutory appointments under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 as of 30 June 2021 112

Table 41: Information about remuneration for key management personnel 113

Table 42: Information about remuneration for Senior Executives (SES) 114

vii Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

ABOUT THIS REPORT

This report outlines the performance of the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) for the financial year ending 30 June 2021.

The report meets the requirements of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 for annual reports.

There are seven sections:

1. Commissioner’s review - the Electoral Commissioner reflects on the year

2. Overview of the AEC - the AEC’s role, functions and organisational structure

3. Performance report - performance against the agency purpose and key activities in the AEC 2020-21 Corporate Plan with reference to the Portfolio Budget Statements, and highlights of the year

4. Management and accountability - information on the management and accountability of the AEC

5. Financial statements - financial performance for 2020-21 including audited financial statements

6. Appendices - additional information

7. Reader guides - abbreviations and acronyms, glossary, index to the list of annual report requirements and a general index.

Tools to assist readers This publication has:

• a table of contents

• lists of figures and tables

• an alphabetical index

• a list of requirements

• cross references

• an abbreviations and acronyms section

• a glossary.

See page ii for accessible services.

This report is available online at transparency.gov.au. A PDF version is also available at aec.gov.au/2021.

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL viii

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

10 Mort Street, Canberra ACT 2600 P 02 6271 4411 www.aec.gov.au

Hon Ben Morton MP Assistant Minister for Electoral Matters Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Cc: Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham Minister for Finance

Dear Assistant Minister Morton

I have pleasure in presenting the Annual Report of the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) for the year ending 30 June 2021.

The report has been prepared for the purposes of:

(i) section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013; and (ii) section 17 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

As required by section 10 and paragraph 17AG(2)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I also certify that the AEC:

▪ has prepared fraud risk assessments and a fraud control plan; ▪ has in place appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud; and ▪ has taken all reasonable measures to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the AEC.

Yours sincerely

Tom Rogers 28 September 2021

1 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

COMMISSIONER’S REVIEW

SECTION 01

2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT

COMMISSIONER’S REVIEW 2

COMMISSIONER’S REVIEW

Globally, the electoral environment for democracies has become increasingly complex with increasing citizen expectations, more evidence of mis and disinformation, and the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Against that backdrop, the AEC is continuing to focus on delivering the highest electoral standards to ensure citizens maintain their trust in the AEC and, therefore, election results.

During this financial year, rolling lockdowns and other pandemic-related health and safety measures have changed the way we will deliver electoral events. I am immensely proud of the way our staff have adapted and responded to the changing operating environment, transforming our work practices, shifting priorities and continuing to develop and deliver safe electoral processes.

In difficult and unusual pandemic-related conditions, AEC staff delivered two electoral events this year with agility and integrity. The Eden-Monaro by-election on 4 July was the first federal electoral event held under COVID-19 conditions. The experience of this by-election in turn informed delivery of the Groom by-election on 28 November. Both events required intensive consultation with a large number of stakeholders to ensure we had accurate and up-to-date advice about health restrictions. The AEC implemented a range of safety measures for voters, AEC staff and other participants. In addition to

implementing these new safety measures, we continued to prioritise participation and maintain electoral integrity.

Maintaining trust Electoral integrity remains at the heart of the AEC’s operations. Our values of electoral integrity through quality, agility and professionalism continue to guide us, and remain highly relevant to all aspects of our work. It is this total focus on electoral integrity which enables the AEC to assure citizens that electoral outcomes reflect the will of voters, and that Australia’s electoral system remains one of the most transparent in the world.

Federal elections are one of Australia’s largest and most complex peacetime logistical exercises. The next federal election is likely to be amongst the largest and most scrutinised in Australian history. COVID-19 restrictions and implications, increased risks of mis and disinformation, and vastly increased citizen engagement through social media commentary, will all combine to create a particularly challenging electoral delivery landscape. The AEC is responding

3 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

by strengthening electoral integrity with strategies to maintain the reputation of Australia’s electoral system. This includes work to educate and inform the public about the electoral process and educating electors about disinformation, and why it is important to check the source of the information consumed at election time. Our electoral education program also provides citizens with the knowledge and confidence to participate and have trust in the result.

The AEC works productively with its stakeholders, including the members of the Electoral Integrity Assurance Taskforce (EIAT), to help safeguard elections against interference. Agencies represented on the taskforce provide a range of specialist support to the AEC, including intelligence and security expertise. The taskforce has now supported the AEC during several elections to reduce the risk of interference, most recently during the Eden-Monaro and Groom by-elections in July and November 2020.

Delivering the franchise One of the most important rights of Australian citizens is the right to vote and to exercise that right.

Australia’s voting system allows voters to easily access their vote according to their circumstances — at any polling place within their state or territory, at an interstate voting centre on election day, at one

of the hundreds of early voting centres available across Australia, at remote polling locations, via post, from overseas and even from Antarctica.

The electoral roll continues to be in the greatest shape it’s ever been, with an enrolment rate of more than 96 per cent, and this is largely due to ongoing efforts by the AEC. However, the AEC acknowledges that enrolment among Indigenous Australians is an enduring challenge. Increasing electoral participation among Indigenous Australians has long been a key focus area for the AEC and our Indigenous Electoral Participation Program. Electoral participation remains a key focus area, and we are proud of our ongoing work to grow the roll, including for Indigenous Australians.

This year the AEC oversaw the redistribution of electoral divisions in Western Australia and Victoria. Citizens in these states will vote according to these new divisions at the next election. The AEC conducted these processes in accordance with the legislation, including allowing for public consultation and objections processes — in some cases virtually, for the first time. In addition, Parliament passed legislation to retain the two seats in the Northern Territory, and to change the way future calculations would be made in the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory. This means the Northern Territory’s two federal election divisions will again be contested at the next federal election.

COMMISSIONER’S REVIEW 4

Improving our capability The 2020-21 federal Budget delivered in October 2020 included some momentous initiatives for the AEC that will enable us to continue our critical modernisation journey and secure the ongoing integrity of Australia’s democracy. It included $96.4 million in funding over three years to upgrade and modernise our core infrastructure and deliver critical foundation capabilities that underpin the AEC’s future delivery of electoral events. Work began quickly on the AEC’s Indigo Program, designed to replace our aging core election IT systems and providing agile technology solutions to improve the way we provide electoral services to citizens. The Budget also included funding to establish the AEC Command Centre: a secure, central point of command from which future elections, in all their complexity and scale, will be monitored.

Learning and development remains an integral part of professionalising our workforce and I am immensely proud of our ongoing achievements in this area. AEC staff participated in several enhanced training programs this year, covering internal education and leadership activities.

Further, the AEC is working to install a permanent interactive public exhibition space in the Museum of Australian Democracy and upgrade the National Electoral Education Centre (NEEC) at Old Parliament House. A school trip to Canberra is an excellent rite of passage for many young Australians and the NEEC is often on the itinerary. Typically welcoming around 90,000 visitors annually, the NEEC reopened following the 2020 Canberra lockdown and has continued to manage the evolving COVID-19 environment while still providing education resources to schools in appropriate formats. The improvements will include updating existing technology and adding a walk-up experience for other visitors to the museum, broadening the reach of the centre.

The future The AEC will continue to evolve and adapt to meet the challenges of the external environment. Work will continue to progress these initiatives and build the necessary foundations to better deliver elections in a changing environment, with enhanced security and an eye to future legislative changes. Reliable infrastructure is vital in our increasingly complex and dynamic operating environment. The funding received this financial year provides us with greater certainty on how we can plan to deliver electoral services beyond the next electoral cycle. The AEC aims to deliver citizen-centric electoral services, which means we seek to facilitate—not complicate—participation in federal electoral events.

The last 12 months have further demonstrated our agility in delivering electoral events in a COVID-19 environment. We are taking the lessons from electoral events delivered during this period and scenario planning to enable us to deliver, within electoral laws, successful elections regardless of whether such an event might need to be conducted under COVID-19 conditions. Should this be the case, we will be ready and mobilised. The safety of Australian voters and the integrity of the election results will remain our utmost priorities.

5 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

OVERVIEW OF THE AEC

SECTION 02

2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT

OVERVIEW OF THE AEC 6

OVERVIEW OF THE AEC

Role and function The AEC is a non-corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and an independent statutory authority, established under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Electoral Act).

It is funded to deliver one purpose and one outcome:

Maintain an impartial and independent electoral system for eligible voters through active electoral roll management, efficient delivery of polling services, and targeted education and public awareness programs.

The AEC has one program:

1.1 To deliver electoral events.

Pursuant to the Electoral Act, we do this by:

• conducting successful electoral events, including federal elections, by-elections and referendums, and industrial elections and ballots

• ensuring confidence in the Commonwealth Electoral Roll

• regulating political party registrations and financial disclosure

• supporting electoral redistributions

• undertaking public awareness activities.

We must also provide a range of electoral information and education programs both in Australia and in support of Australia’s national interests.

Our vision is:

We are a leader in refining and delivering best practice in election management.

Organisational structure The Electoral Commissioner, Tom Rogers, is appointed under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Electoral Act) and is responsible for managing and operating the AEC.

At 30 June 2021, the AEC’s Executive Leadership Team was:

• Tom Rogers Electoral Commissioner

• Jeff Pope APM Deputy Electoral Commissioner

• Lynn White First Assistant Commissioner

• Thomas Ryan First Assistant Commissioner

• Tim Courtney First Assistant Commissioner.

An organisational chart that includes our senior executive and their responsibilities as of 30 June 2021 is on page 7.

The AEC has a three-tier structure with:

• a national office in Canberra

• state and territory offices

• divisional offices.

Section 6 of the Electoral Act establishes a three-person Commission which has exclusive powers, particularly in relation to electoral redistributions, political party registration, and funding and disclosure.

At 30 June 2021, the Commission was:

• Hon. Justice Susan Kenny AM, Chairperson

• Mr Tom Rogers, Electoral Commissioner

• Dr David Gruen, Australian Statistician and non-judicial member.

7 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

AEC Organisation Chart June 2021

Electoral Commissioner Tom Rogers Deputy Electoral Commissioner Jeff Pope

Australian Electoral Commission (the Commission) Chairperson: Hon. Justice Susan Kenny AM Non-judicial member: Dr David Gruen, Australian Statistic

Electoral Commissioner: Mr Tom Rogers

National Training and Education Unit

Community and International Engagement

Organisational Transformation Division Thomas Ryan First Assistant Commissioner

Enabling and Regulation Division Tim Courtney First Assistant Commissioner

Service Delivery Division Lynn White First Assistant Commissioner and National Election Manager (NEM)

Finance and Corporate Performance Branch

Sally So A/g Chief Finance Offi cer Budget and Performance

Section

Financial Services and Systems

NSW/ACT Michael Lynch A/g State Manager QLD/NT Stephanie Attard State Manager

VIC/TAS Nye Coffey State Manager WA Gina Dario State Manager SA Cameron Stokes State Manager

Design and Improvement Branch

Kaye Bartlett A/g Assistant Commissioner Event Design and Planning

Service Strategy and Design

Operations Governance

Industrial Elections and Ballots

Delivery and Support Branch

Kath Gleeson Assistant Commissioner Elector and Roll Services

National Event Management

Supply Chain Management

Service Enabling

People and Property Branch

Bernadette Panek A/g Chief People Offi cer

People and Culture

People Support

National Property

Disclosure, Assurance and Engagement Branch

Joanne Reid Assistant Commissioner Governance and Performance

Advisory

Parliamentary Engagement and Party Registration

Disclosure and Compliance

Digital Technology and Communications Branch

Matthew Haigh

A/g Assistant Commissioner Cyber Security, Governance and

Assurance

IT Infrastructure

AEC Service Operations

Business Systems Operations

IT Solutions

Communications

Media and Digital Engagement

Legal and Procurement Branch

Andrew Johnson Chief Legal Offi cer Legal Services Commercial Law

and Procurement

Electoral Authorisation and Investigations

Enterprise Strategy and Modernisation Branch

Rhianne Jory A/g Assistant Commissioner INDIGO Strategy and Enabling

INDIGO Technical Assistance

INDIGO Business Assurance

INDIGO Program Delivery

Information and Knowledge Management

Enterprise Project Management Offi ce

Strategic Operational Review

Vacant Assistant Commissioner

Enterprise Strategy and Design

21-1580 111021

AEC Organisation chart

OVERVIEW OF THE AEC 8

9 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

SECTION 03—PERFORMANCE REPORT

Performance against the agency purpose and key activities in the AEC Corporate Plan 2020-2024 with reference to the Portfolio Budget Statements.

PERFORMANCE REPORT

SECTION 03

2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT

PERFORMANCE REPORT 10

PERFORMANCE REPORT

The AEC’s performance is measured against the agency’s key activities, outlined in the AEC Corporate Plan 2020-21 and the performance criteria in the Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Our four key activities work towards achieving our purpose:

1 maintain the integrity of electoral and regulatory processes

2 prepare for and deliver electoral events

3 engage with our stakeholders through education and public awareness activities

4

maintain a capable and agile organisation and continue to professionalise our workforce.

11 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

The agency’s key activities guide our actions and priorities, and promote continuous improvement. Since the 2019-20 Annual Report, our performance criteria and measurement have been further refined to ensure we are focused on achieving our outcomes.

The AEC’s performance is managed in relation to two cycles, the:

• four-year Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 performance cycle

• three-year federal election cycle.

Internally, we focus on a three-year electoral cycle encompassing the three phases of election preparedness used in our election readiness framework: 1. lessons 2. implement change 3. mobilisation.

The AEC prepares for federal elections while balancing other priorities through the Election Ready Road Map. Each phase directs the activities to be undertaken and provides a path towards delivering the next federal election. These phases synchronise election preparation across the agency to meet a Directed Level of Election Readiness. The framework gives the Electoral Commissioner assurance that the AEC is at an appropriate ‘level of readiness’ to conduct a federal election when required.

In 2020-21, the AEC moved through ‘implement change’ into the ‘mobilisation’ phase.

In difficult and unusual conditions, our people methodically delivered two electoral events this year. Lessons identified from the Eden-Monaro by-election on 4 July 2020 — the first federal electoral event held under

Table 1: Performance criteria from the AEC Portfolio Budget Statements mapped against agency key activities and functions

Portfolio Budget Statements Corporate Plan

Maintain an impartial and independent electoral system for eligible voters through active electoral roll management, efficient delivery of polling services, and targeted education and public awareness programs

Outcome in the PBS Purpose in our Corporate Plan

One program: 1.1 To deliver electoral events Key activities

Performance measures 1 2 3 4

Electoral roll management

• Percentage of eligible voters enrolled (enrolment rate) 

• Redistributions determined when planned in accordance with timeframes identified in the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 

Elections, by-elections and referendums • The writs for a federal election event are issued and returned in accordance with legislation and timeframes   

• For industrial elections and ballots, the AEC meets timeframes for key delivery of election notices, ballot periods, declared results and post-election reports  

Public awareness Deliver public awareness and education products that target all Australian citizens aged 18 years and over 

Party registrations and financial disclosure

• The AEC maintains an up-to-date public register of political parties  • Disclosure returns are published and regulated in accordance with timeframes in the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 

PERFORMANCE REPORT 12

COVID-19 conditions — informed planning of the Groom by-election on 28 November. Our teams implemented a range of safety measures for voters, our people and other participants, securing processes in polling places and at counting centres.

The rapidly changing operating environment we have experienced over the past year added further complexity to electoral administration. Events in Australia and internationally — in particular COVID-19 — required an agile response to successfully deliver electoral events. In line with the broader government response, the AEC made significant changes to how electoral services and events were delivered, and to how the AEC workforce was managed.

Within a changing operating environment, the AEC continues to balance and adjust operations and services while maintaining electoral integrity and compliance with legislation. This ensures we maintain organisational agility and are ready to deliver electoral services to the public and our stakeholders.

Annual statements The annual performance statements (included in the following tables from pages 15 to 35) detail the AEC’s performance against each of the agency’s four key activities. They include a result and explanation for each criterion:

1. met/on track to be met 2. partly met 3. not met.

The Accountable Authority signs off the performance statements for 2020-21.

Statement by Electoral Commissioner I, as the Accountable Authority of the Australian Electoral Commission, present the 2020-21 annual performance statements of the Australian Electoral Commission as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013. In my opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the Act.

Tom Rogers Electoral Commissioner 28 September 2021

13 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Key activity 1

Maintain the integrity of electoral and regulatory processes An essential feature of Australian democracy is an electoral system that operates with a high level of integrity.

The AEC maintains an impartial electoral system and processes for elections, referendums, plebiscites and by-elections in accordance with the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Electoral Act) and the Referendum (Machinery Provisions) Act 1984.

As the Australian Government’s independent electoral body, electoral integrity is central to the AEC’s values of quality, agility and professionalism.

To maintain electoral integrity, the AEC regulates important aspects of the electoral system.

This includes:

• maintaining a complete and accurate Commonwealth Electoral Roll

• driving voter turnout

• supporting electoral redistributions

• registering political parties

• regulating the funding and disclosure scheme for political entities and individuals

• regulating the authorisation of electoral communications.

This enables all eligible Australians to enrol, nominate as candidates, vote and have their votes counted accurately and securely in an electoral system that is free and fair, and that is appropriately regulated.

Active electoral roll management The Commonwealth Electoral Roll — the list of Australians eligible to vote at federal elections — is integral to election delivery. The AEC’s key electoral roll activities are:

• encouraging eligible voters to enrol and keep their enrolment up to date

• targeted enrolment programs

• enrolment processing

• measuring accuracy of the roll.

The AEC also supports state, territory and local government elections, by-elections and referendums by managing the electoral roll through joint roll arrangements.

The nature of the enrolment business is changing. The AEC has a program of continuous improvement to enhance enrolment services. One consequence of these improvements is a decrease in paper enrolment forms and an increase in uptake of online services. In 2020-21, the Federal Direct Enrolment and Update program supported Australians to meet their enrolment obligations (further explained in Key Activity 2). Through our Enrolment Digitisation program, we aim to improve customer service and increase efficiencies.

Largest electoral roll continues to grow Australia now has the largest Commonwealth Electoral Roll since Federation, with more than 16.9 million Australians enrolled at 30 June 2021.

The enrolment rate of 96.2 per cent exceeds the AEC’s target of 95 per cent.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 14

Roll data and extracts Under the Electoral Act, the AEC provides electoral roll extracts to members of the House of Representatives, senators, federally registered political parties, federal government departments and agencies, and other specified recipients. This includes sharing electoral roll information with companies that provide identity verification services.

Government departments and agencies may receive electoral roll information if they are a ‘prescribed authority’ under item 4 of the table in subsection 90B(4) of the Electoral Act. A list of government departments and agencies currently eligible to receive roll information is set out in Schedule 1 of the Electoral and Referendum Regulation 2016 (the Regulation). Each department and agency must justify access through its statutory functions and the Privacy Act 1988.

Private sector organisations may also receive electoral roll information if they are a ‘prescribed organisation’ under items 5, 6 and 7 of the table in subsection 90B(4) of the Electoral Act. This is strictly for identity verification purposes under the Financial Transactions Reports Act 1988 and the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006. The organisations carrying out customer identification procedures who may be provided roll information are listed in section 8 of the Regulation.

A list of registered political parties, government departments and other recipients of roll information and extracts is in appendix C. Further details can be found at www.aec.gov.au

The estimated Indigenous enrolment rate The AEC is committed to ensuring that all eligible Australians are enrolled and able to fully participate in the electoral system. The estimated enrolment rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voters is increasing in every state and territory and we are enhancing our engagement with Indigenous Australians through a multi-faceted approach.

Estimated Indigenous enrolment rates are now published annually at www.aec.gov.au

15 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY ONE

Intended result 1.1 Deliver the franchise - an Australian citizen’s right to vote

Performance measure

Percentage of eligible voters enrolled (enrolment rate)

Source Electoral roll and Australian Bureau of Statistics population data.

Method & frequency Roll and population data calculated and reported annually at the end of each financial year and at close of rolls for a federal election or referendum.

Target ≥95%

Result Met

Explanation of result: At 30 June 2021 electoral roll completeness—measured through the enrolment rate—was 96.2%. With more than 16.9 million Australians enrolled to vote, Australia now has the largest number of eligible electors on the electoral roll since Federation. We continue to exceed the AEC’s target enrolment rate of 95%.

Intended result 1.1 Deliver the franchise - an Australian citizen’s right to vote

Performance measure

Percentage of voters enrolled who turn out to vote at all federal electoral events (turnout rate)

Source AEC Tally Room.

Method & frequency Number of people enrolled to vote who cast a vote by any voting method at a federal electoral event.

Target No target. Turnout rate to be reported.

Result Met

Explanation of result: In 2020-21, the AEC conducted by-elections for the Divisions of Eden-Monaro and Groom. The Eden-Monaro by-election was held on 4 July 2020. The Groom by-election was held on 28 November 2020. Turnout was 89.13% for Eden-Monaro and 81.66% for Groom.

Intended result 1.1 Deliver the franchise - an Australian citizen’s right to vote

Performance measure

Percentage of votes cast formally for the House of Representatives and Senate at next federal election or at a referendum or for by-elections (if any held)

Source AEC Tally Room.

Method & frequency Percentage of informal votes cast when compared to all votes cast, at a federal electoral event.

Target No target.

Result Met

Explanation of result: The informality rate was 6.71% and 2.82% for the Eden-Monaro and Groom by-elections respectively.

Intended result 1.2 Maintain a high level of confidence in the electoral roll

Performance measure

Percentage accuracy of the Commonwealth Electoral Roll at the electoral division-level and individual address-level

Source The Annual Roll Integrity Review, which measures the accuracy and integrity of electoral roll data.

Method & frequency AEC roll data and other agency data, calculated and published annually at the end of each financial year.

Target ≥95% and ≥90%

Result Met

Explanation of result: The accuracy and integrity of the electoral roll - at the divisional level and individual address level - were 95% and 91% respectively. Both metrics, while declined slightly on last year’s results, remain at or above the target.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 16

Supporting electoral redistributions A redistribution of electoral divisions is undertaken in accordance with Part IV of the Electoral Act. Redistributions ensure — as close as practical — that an equal number of electors are in each electoral division for a state or territory. Each member in the House of Representatives represents an electoral division.

A redistribution is required when:

• there is a change in the number of members in the House of Representatives to which a state or territory is entitled

• the number of electors in more than one third of the electoral divisions of a state (or one electoral division in the ACT or the Northern Territory) deviates from the average divisional enrolment of that state or territory by plus or minus 10 per cent for a period of more than two months

• seven years have elapsed since the last redistribution.

Redistributions are conducted by two bodies. The Redistribution Committee proposes an initial redistribution and an augmented Electoral Commission determines the final names and boundaries of electoral divisions.

On 3 July 2020, the Electoral Commissioner determined that the number of members to be elected to the House of Representatives at the next federal election would decrease from 151 to 150. His decision stated the following:

• Victoria would increase from 38 to 39 members

• Western Australia would decrease from 16 to 15 members

• the Northern Territory would decrease from two members to one.

From 16 February 2021, changes to the Electoral Act set aside the aspect of the Electoral Commissioner’s determination of 3 July 2020 related to the Northern Territory. As a result, the divisions of Lingiari and Solomon will be contested at the next federal election on the same boundaries used at the 2019 federal election.

The Act was further amended with consequences for the next time the Electoral Commissioner determines the number of members of the House of Representatives. On this date, the basis for rounding the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory entitlement will use an alternative method. The next determination of the number of members for each state and territory will occur one year after the first sitting day of the new House of Representatives following the upcoming federal election.

As a result, the number of electorates to be contested at the next federal election remains at 151 (see figure 1 for a list of Australia’s 151 electoral divisions at 30 June 2021).

In 2020-21, redistributions commenced in Victoria and Western Australia and are expected to be finished in 2021-22. See appendix F for redistribution process milestones in 2020-21.

17 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY ONE

Intended result 1.2 Maintain a high level of confidence in the electoral roll

Performance measure

Redistributions determined when planned in accordance with timeframes identified in the Electoral Act

Source Government Gazette and newspaper notices, and the date of letters to electors lodged with Australia Post.

Method & frequency Publication of notices and letters to electors complies with requirements under the Electoral Act (Part IV).

Target All redistributions in the period determined and affected electors informed.

Result Met

Explanation of result: In 2020-21, redistributions were commenced in Victoria and Western Australia. Redistribution timelines were met in accordance with the Electoral Act. The Victorian redistribution will be determined on 26 July 2021. The Western Australian redistribution will be determined on 2 August 2021. All legislative requirements have been met.

17 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 18

Figure 1: Australia’s 151 electoral divisions as at 30 June 2021

16WA

2NT 30QLD

10SA

38VIC

47NSW 3ACT 5TAS 151 Australian Electoral

Divisions

New South Wales Banks Barton Bennelong Berowra Blaxland Bradfield Calare Chifley Cook Cowper Cunningham Dobell Eden-Monaro Farrer Fowler Gilmore Grayndler Greenway Hughes Hume Hunter Kingsford Smith Lindsay Lyne

Macarthur Mackellar McMahon Macquarie Mitchell Newcastle New England North Sydney Page Parkes Parramatta Paterson Reid Richmond Riverina Robertson Shortland Sydney Warringah Watson Wentworth Werriwa Whitlam

Tasmania Bass Braddon Clark

Franklin Lyons

Victoria Aston Ballarat Bendigo Bruce Calwell Casey Chisholm Cooper Corangamite Corio Deakin Dunkley Flinders Fraser Gellibrand Gippsland Goldstein Gorton Higgins

Holt Hotham Indi Isaacs Jagajaga Kooyong Lalor La Trobe McEwen Macnamara Mallee Maribyrnong Melbourne Menzies Monash Nicholls Scullin Wannon Wills

South Australia Adelaide Barker Boothby Grey Hindmarsh

Kingston Makin Mayo Spence Sturt

Australian Capital Territory Bean Canberra Fenner

Western Australia Brand Burt Canning Cowan Curtin Durack Forrest Fremantle

Hasluck Moore O’Connor Pearce Perth Stirling Swan Tangney

Northern Territory Lingiari Solomon

Queensland Blair Bonner Bowman Brisbane Capricornia Dawson Dickson Fadden Fairfax Fisher Flynn Forde Griffith Groom Herbert

Hinkler Kennedy Leichhardt Lilley Longman McPherson Maranoa Moncrieff Moreton Oxley Petrie Rankin Ryan Wide Bay Wright

19 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Administering political party registrations and financial disclosure The AEC helps stakeholders carry out their obligations and responsibilities under the Electoral Act. This includes maintaining the funding and disclosure scheme and providing information and services to support political party registration.

The AEC maintains the Register of Political Parties. Under the Commonwealth funding and financial disclosure scheme, we require groups and individuals to lodge annual or election period financial disclosure returns.

Financial information about donations to political parties and election campaigns

can be securely lodged online through the AEC’s eReturns system.

To support the integrity of the financial disclosures, the AEC undertakes an annual compliance program of disclosure returns.

The AEC administers public funding for political parties and candidates contesting federal elections and by-elections. Election funding rates are available at www.aec.gov.au

Intended result 1.3 Exercise our regulatory function

Performance measure

The AEC maintains an up-to-date public register of political parties

Source Electoral Act (Part XI), AEC funding and disclosure, Client and Return Management system and www.aec.gov.au

Method & frequency No identified breaches of Part XI of the Electoral Act at reporting date.

Target Compliance with Part XI of the Electoral Act.

Result Met

Explanation of result: The AEC maintained a publicly available Register of Political Parties during the year, consistent with the Electoral Act. The register was updated regularly to reflect party registration changes and decisions.

Intended result 1.3 Exercise our regulatory function

Performance measure

Disclosure returns are published and regulated in accordance with timeframes in the Electoral Act

Source Transparency Register www.aec.gov.au

Method & frequency Confirmation that publishing date is in accordance with the Electoral Act.

Target Annual returns published on the first working day in February. Election returns published 24 weeks after polling day for each electoral event.

Result Met

Explanation of result: The 2019-20 annual disclosure returns were published on the first working day in February 2021. The 2020 Eden-Monaro and Groom by-election returns were published by the AEC in accordance with legislated timeframes.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY ONE

PERFORMANCE REPORT 20

Intended result 1.3 Exercise our regulatory function

Performance measure

Compliance reviews of political parties and entities with disclosure obligations are completed and published

Source Reports to Compliance Review Committee and www.aec.gov.au

Method & frequency Compare number of completed compliance reviews against approved program as at reporting date.

Target Reviews completed annually compared to the approved program.

Result Partly met

Explanation of result: We undertake regular compliance reviews examining a sample of disclosure returns and use a risk-based approach to compliance.

The compliance review program runs on a calendar year as opposed to a financial year. At 30 June 2021, 22 reviews (from an approved program of 37) were in progress in relation to the 2020 program. This is in addition to four reviews from an approved program of 14 reviews in relation to the 2021 program. The conduct of the compliance review program has been challenging due to the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on both the agency and stakeholders. We anticipate these results improving in-line with increased recruitment and procurement activity heading into 2021-22 to support the compliance reviews.

During the year the AEC commenced enforcement action on five candidates and one political party failing to lodge the appropriate election and annual disclosure returns respectively. In relation to the five candidate election returns, the AEC received three of the outstanding returns and executed three enforceable undertakings. One case was prosecuted which resulted in a penalty of $10,000, and one case was yet to be finalised at 30 June 2021. The AEC executed one enforceable undertaking in relation to record-keeping responsibilities of a political party. The outcomes of compliance activity and enforceable undertakings are published at www.aec.gov.au

Intended result 1.3 Exercise our regulatory function

Performance measure

The AEC self-service platform is utilised by political stakeholders

Source Usage statistics and reports.

Method & frequency Evaluation of interactions with political stakeholders through usage statistics and reports.

Target Establish a baseline in 2020-21.

Result Not met

Explanation of result: The self-service platform (SSP) is intended to enable political parties, entities and individuals to engage with the AEC as they carry out their legislative and regulatory responsibilities and obligations. The SSP was not available for political stakeholders to use during the reporting period as it is still under development.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

21 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Key activity 2

1 A Senate special count may occur when a vacancy in the Senate (that is not a casual vacancy) should be filled. This is determined by the High Court of Australia sitting as the Court of Disputed Returns.

Prepare for and deliver electoral events The AEC delivers federal electoral events, industrial elections, protected action ballots, and Torres Strait Regional Authority elections in accordance with the relevant legislation and rules.

The AEC provides the best possible electoral services and events to stakeholders and the public within a complex environment and in response to increasing community expectations. The AEC must deliver these services and events with the highest degree of integrity, impartiality, and in accordance with legislation.

Conducting successful electoral events It is compulsory for all eligible Australian citizens to enrol and vote in federal elections, by-elections and referendums.

The AEC supports this by:

• providing a range of voting options

• monitoring and responding to voter turnout and formality.

The AEC also conducts Senate special counts1 and delivers other elections and ballots as required or authorised by legislation. These include elections for the Torres Strait Regional Authority board and registered organisations, and protected action ballots.

Directed Level of Electoral Readiness (DLER) dates are used to establish operational planning for the next federal election. We do this through the AEC’s election planning tool - the Election Ready Road Map.

In 2020-21, the AEC delivered two by-elections for the divisions of Eden-Monaro and Groom (see appendix D for by-election data).

Electoral Integrity Assurance Taskforce In 2020-21, the Electoral Integrity Assurance Taskforce collaborated on electoral integrity matters as required. It enabled efficient and effective communication and coordination on matters relating to the integrity of the Eden-Monaro and Groom by-elections.

The taskforce is supported as required by the national intelligence community and comprises the following agencies:

• Australian Electoral Commission (co-chair)

• Department of Finance (co-chair)

• Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

• Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

• Attorney-General’s Department

• Department of Home Affairs

• Australian Federal Police.

The taskforce advises the Electoral Commissioner on matters related to electoral integrity within the Australian federal electoral environment.

It is a model for agencies across government working together to support the integrity of Australian elections.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 22

Cyber security

As well as engaging the Electoral Integrity Assurance Taskforce, and steps taken to mitigate cyber threats at the federal election and by-elections, the AEC is committed to enhancing its cyber security posture. This includes:

• undertaking regular testing activities and using external authorities and experts to assure the security, integrity and availability of AEC systems

• establishing a commercial relationship for independent cyber security monitoring of the AEC network and systems

• conducting incident response workshops for external service providers to support the AEC’s cyber response

• implementing mitigation strategies to protect the AEC network, including the Australian Cyber Security Centre’s Essential 8 to mitigate against the risk of cyber intrusions

• ensuring staff complete mandatory cyber security awareness training

• continually improving the AEC’s technical and people capability to manage cyber risks.

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY TWO

Intended result 2.1 The AEC maintains an appropriate level of election readiness

Performance measure

AEC-wide readiness checks before and at the issue of election writs confirm an appropriate level of election readiness

Source AEC Election Readiness Framework and Assessment Framework.

Method & frequency Internal readiness assessment before the federal election.

Target Agency-wide readiness checks conducted at the following milestones: • writ ready minus 100 days • Directed Level of Electoral Readiness date (DLER).

Result Partly met

Explanation of result: Readiness checks at the first DLER date show no significant barriers to overall election readiness.

This performance measure is considered ‘partly met’ as some activities were either not ready for assessment at the first DLER deadline, or were found at assessment to be partially met. This was due to factors including staffing limitations and delays in national contracts. The second DLER readiness check occurs in September 2021.

Intended result 2.2 The public and stakeholders have confidence the electoral process is well managed in accordance with legislation

Performance measure

The writs for a federal election event are issued and returned in accordance with legislation and timeframes

Source Electoral Act, Electoral Commissioner’s advice published on www.aec.gov.au and outcomes of the Court of Disputed Returns.

Method & frequency For each electoral event, writs returned to the Governor-General or State Governors or the Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Target Date on the returned election writs falls within the timeframe specified.

Result Met

Explanation of result: In 2020-21, the AEC conducted federal by-elections for the divisions of Eden-Monaro and Groom. The writs for these were issued and returned in accordance with the Electoral Act.

The Eden-Monaro by-election was held on 4 July 2020. The writ for this was returned on 21 July 2020, before the specified date. The Groom by-election was held on 28 November 2020. The writ for this was returned on 2 December 2020, before the specified date.

23 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Intended result 2.2 The public and stakeholders have confidence the electoral process is well managed in accordance with legislation

Performance measure

The election result for each event is delivered with integrity and withstands scrutiny

Source Outcomes of the Court of Disputed Returns.

Method & frequency Court of Disputed Returns advice (for each electoral event).

Target The AEC will report on the number of Court of Disputed Returns matters that challenge AEC conduct, and whether these challenges are dismissed or upheld in favour of the AEC.

Result Met

Explanation of result: There were no Court of Disputed Returns challenges made in 2020-21.

Intended result 2.3 Accessible and high-quality enrolment and polling services

Performance measure

Percentage of new enrolments and enrolment updates lodged through the Online Enrolment Service

Source Roll data from AEC enrolment systems and extracts.

Method & frequency Rates calculated monthly and reported annually at the end of each financial year.

Target 65%

Result Met at 86.8%

Percentage of enrolment applications lodged via the Online Enrolment System that are system approved

Source Roll data from AEC enrolment systems and extracts.

Method & frequency Rates calculated monthly and reported at the end of each financial year.

Target 55%

Result Met at 58.0%

Explanation of result: The AEC is enhancing and improving its online service to help Australians meet their enrolment obligations. A total of 86.8% of enrolment transactions were received in 2020-21 using the AEC’s online enrolment system. Of these transactions, 58.0% were verified and approved by the system without human intervention.

Intended result 2.3 Accessible and high-quality enrolment and polling services

Performance measure

Voting locations (including early voting centres and polling places) published on the AEC website before polling commences

Source AEC Election Management System data and www.aec.gov.au

Method & frequency Publication on www.aec.gov.au

Target 100% of polling locations are published.

Result Met

Explanation of result: At the two by-elections held during the year, the AEC published 100% of locations before polling commenced and provided updates daily.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 24

Intended result 2.3 Accessible and high-quality enrolment and polling services

Performance measure

After election night, count information is progressively updated on the AEC website

Source AEC Election Management System data and www.aec.gov.au

Method & frequency Publication on www.aec.gov.au

Target Preliminary election results available on election night and progressive count information updated on www.aec.gov.au

Result Met

Explanation of result: Election results for all conducted counts were available at www.aec.gov.au on election night. Results were entered following counts each day of the election count period. The Tally Room provided updated results regularly each day.

Lessons management The AEC prioritises organisational agility and continuous improvement to help meet both the immediate needs of event delivery, and to respond to our operating environment. The AEC adopts a lessons management approach for federal election events to improve the reliability and consistency of our election delivery and services.

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY TWO

Intended result 2.3 Accessible and high-quality enrolment and polling services

Performance measure

Undertake a lessons management approach to delivering the next federal election

Source AEC Lessons Management Framework and AEC Election Readiness Framework.

Method & frequency Agency-wide qualitative analysis.

Target Lessons from the 2019 federal election implemented at the next federal election.

Result On track to be met

Explanation of result: In 2020-21 we continued pursuing the lessons and focus areas identified at the 2019 federal election. We developed a new Lessons Management Framework to support both election and non-election activities. Federal elections are an opportunity to adopt a comprehensive lessons management approach and to continue maturing and strengthening our operations. The AEC’s lessons approach works hand-in-hand with other agency frameworks, including the AEC’s broader Election Readiness Framework.

Industrial elections and ballots The AEC conducts industrial elections and ballots under the provisions of the Fair Work Act 2009 and the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act 2009.

COVID-19 continues to affect the way the AEC conducts industrial elections and protected action ballots. For this reason, the AEC suspended industrial elections from 24 March 2020 to 30 September 2020, except those elections critical to an organisation’s functions.

Acting in accordance with its statutory obligation, the AEC invoked its power to conduct these elections differently from the requirements set out in organisations’ rules.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

25 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

The AEC consulted with the respective organisations and conducted elections to a revised timetable.

The AEC also reviewed its processes and practices for election delivery to ensure that industrial elections could be conducted in a COVID-safe environment. Some outcomes from this review included the following:

• a portal was launched in October 2020 to allow the electronic lodgement of nomination forms

• the AEC ceased attending meetings to call for nominations, moving to electronic lodgement process via the portal

• the AEC stopped in-person ballots, and instead conducted ballots by post

• timelines for ballots were extended to account for changes to Australia Post delivery times

• ballot draws were conducted through Microsoft Teams so that stakeholders could witness the ballot draw remotely

• agile scrutiny practices were applied so that the Returning Officer could oversee the conduct of the scrutinies remotely

• secure ballot paper transportation was established in accordance with the AEC ballot paper handling policy, so the location of scrutinies could be moved in response to short-notice lockdowns.

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY TWO

Intended result 2.4 Industrial election and ballots are designed for the future and delivered with integrity

Performance measure

The AEC meets timeframes for key election delivery targets—issuing of election notices, ballot periods, declared results and post-election reports*

Source AEC Industrial Elections and Ballots management systems and internal records and data.

Method & frequency Data mining.

Target ≥98% of target timeframes are met annually.

Result Partly met

Explanation of result: The AEC conducted 584 industrial elections and ballots during the year — 324 fewer events than the previous annual reporting period. The number of events was directly impacted by the need to temporarily suspend industrial elections because of the pandemic. Election timeframes were renegotiated to commence after October 2020, aside from a small number of critical industrial elections and protected action ballots that were progressed during the suspension period. This performance measure was substantially met, with 97.3% of agreed or revised timeframes were met, which falls very slightly below the target timeframe of ≥98%.

*Note that the reporting has not included assessment of timeframes for issuing of election notices due to changes in business processes under the COVID-19 environment.

Election and ballot results are delivered with integrity and withstand scrutiny

Source Federal Court outcomes.

Method & frequency Federal Court outcomes for the year as at reporting date.

Target The AEC will report on the outcomes and number of events in which the AEC’s conduct is challenged before a court.

Result Met

Explanation of result: The AEC’s conduct of industrial elections was not challenged in the Federal Court during the reporting period.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 26

Key activity 3

Engage with our stakeholders through education and public awareness activities The AEC delivers education, community engagement and communication activities to support an Australian community that is well informed about electoral matters.

Ensuring Australians know and understand how to fully participate in an election requires engagement to ensure all eligible voters have the information and advice they need.

Our education and public awareness activities target all eligible voters and consider Australia’s diverse population. Targeted information, services, tools and strategic partnerships are developed for priority groups, including those who may experience some barriers to electoral participation.

Undertaking public awareness activities Our website www.aec.gov.au always has a range of electoral information focused on supporting informed participation, and building greater understanding, of Australia’s electoral system. The AEC’s digital channels—our website and social media—are used to promote and engage on key participation messages, and to provide updates on electoral activities such as redistribution and funding and disclosure matters.

The AEC also provides information and advice to voters with diverse needs. This includes information tailored for First Nations voters and translated information in a range of languages to support culturally and linguistically diverse communities.

Public awareness resources available on www.aec.gov.au range from videos to fact sheets and are designed to meet the needs of various community groups.

Education and communication initiatives are also in place to meet the needs of Australians with disability, and resources are translated into a range of other languages. Community engagement activities aim to increase electoral knowledge, enrolment, turnout and formality.

The Indigenous Electoral Participation Program delivers culturally appropriate services to Indigenous Australians to support Indigenous electoral participation.

Under section 7(1) (fa) of the Electoral Act, and in close cooperation with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the AEC also helps international electoral management bodies.

Education The National Training and Education Unit (NTEU) leads and coordinates training and professional development for the AEC’s workforce, and delivers electoral education to external audiences. Schools can visit the National Electoral Education Centre (NEEC) in Canberra for electoral education programs. The AEC for Schools website provides free educational resources and programs, including materials to run school elections. Professional learning opportunities are also provided to teachers to encourage electoral education in primary and secondary schools.

27 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Community engagement The AEC is building on several community engagement resources and initiatives, and is supporting the electoral participation of audiences, including:

• Indigenous Australians

• people with disability

• people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

• people experiencing homelessness

• young people

• people who are in prison.

Initiatives and resources are delivered to increase enrolment, turnout and formality, and to build the number of people from our targeted audiences who are available for AEC temporary election employment at electoral events.

Our approach to community engagement is to target these Australians strategically by:

• harnessing existing relationships through partner organisations

• extending the AEC digital reach and footprint

• using evidenced-based activities.

Indigenous Australians The AEC is working to increase electoral participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people through the Indigenous Electoral Participation Program (IEPP). This national community-enabled initiative includes developing and sharing culturally appropriate electoral participation resources, and engaging with local partners to deliver these.

Our community partners have delivered a range of local engagement activities such as education sessions, election information materials and support for community events.

They also help promote election-related employment opportunities and collaborate with the AEC to facilitate community discussions on enrolment and voting.

The AEC has expanded its library of videos developed for the 2019 federal election in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. These resources are used by the AEC and its partners online — including social media channels — and on radio. They aim to encourage the electoral participation of Indigenous peoples in remote, rural and metropolitan locations.

Video resources with culturally significant messages have also been developed to:

• highlight the importance of enrolling and voting during an electoral event

• explain the voting process

• promote the importance of participating in an election, including the opportunity to work.

The AEC is working to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are represented as part of the AEC’s Temporary Election Workforce. The AEC has established hundreds of Indigenous identified polling assistant positions based on population data, to support Indigenous electors at the next election.

The AEC Chairs the Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand (ECANZ) Indigenous Electoral Participation Working Group. This forum allows members to share knowledge and resources, and to collaborate to improve electoral participation by Indigenous Australians at federal, state and local levels. The working group focuses on developing an Indigenous engagement strategy for young people and is collaborating across jurisdictions to promote inclusive elections. The group also works to support Indigenous Australian employment as part of election workforces across jurisdictions.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 28

People with disability Initiatives to enhance services for people with disability are being developed and implemented. This work — which accords with the AEC’s Disability Action Plan 2020- 2023 — includes increasing accessibility at polling places and developing resources to support electoral participation for all voters. The AEC also provides accessible materials, and has implemented disability training to support our people and our temporary election workforce.

The AEC’s Disability Advisory Committee is the primary mechanism to communicate with — and understand the issues for — people with disability. It is promoting greater accessibility, inclusion and participation in the electoral process, and seeks feedback from peak disability organisations on AEC programs and services. The AEC also collaborates with ECANZ to deliver accessible electoral services across jurisdictions.

Electors from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds The AEC is expanding resources to meet the needs of electors from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

The AEC is working with a service provider to produce culturally appropriate in-language electoral participation resources to support people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. This includes developing podcasts, discussions on ethnic radio and community conversations about elections, voting and how to make your vote count.

Easy-read guides explaining how to enrol and how to vote at a federal election have been translated into several languages. A suite of in-language videos covering enrolment, explaining the voting process and promoting temporary election employment opportunities, has also been developed to support electoral participation.

People experiencing homelessness People experiencing homelessness or with no fixed address are also supported to vote. Homelessness service providers and other relevant organisations help distribute AEC resources promoting enrolment and electoral participation.

Youth The AEC supports young people to exercise their democratic rights and responsibilities as eligible voters. Digital and non-digital channels are available to promote electoral participation resources for young people. The AEC is also partnering with youth-led organisations — particularly those with a strong online presence — to deliver electoral education and engagement for Indigenous young people.

People in prison For people in prison who are eligible to vote, the AEC shares targeted information on the electoral process. The AEC produces podcasts that provide electoral information and promote election participation. The AEC works with prison radio stations to play the podcasts.

29 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY THREE

Intended result 3.1 Enable Australians to participate in electoral events and understand electoral matters

Performance measure

Use tracking research to understand if information related to key objectives identified in AEC’s public awareness campaign strategy for the next federal election can be met

Source AEC public information strategy and associated campaign evaluation, benchmarking and tracking reports.

Method & frequency Identified benchmarks are met in accordance with the AEC public information strategy.

Target The public awareness campaign for the 2021-22 federal election (estimated) meets benchmarks.

Result Met

Performance measure

Deliver public awareness and education products that target all Australian citizens aged 18 years and over

Source Research report.

Method & frequency Specific communication activities delivered for mainstream and identified special audience groups.

Target Campaign is delivered in accordance with objectives outlined in the campaign strategy.

Result Met

Explanation of result: Preparations for the Groom and Eden-Monaro by-elections included a new and expanded voter awareness campaign. The Plan Your Vote campaign was a mix of advertising, social media and media relations, and stakeholder and community outreach. The intention was to facilitate electoral participation while delivering integrity requirements and COVID-19 health protection measures to voters. Independent market research undertaken after the campaign will help develop and improve public information for the upcoming federal election.

Non-campaign advertising and communication activities were also delivered during the year to support federal redistributions and to provide a range of electoral information.

Intended result 3.1 Enable Australians to participate in electoral events and understand electoral matters

Performance measure

Percentage of 18 to 24-year-old Australians enrolled (youth enrolment rate)

Source Roll data from AEC enrolment systems and ABS population data.

Method & frequency Rates calculated monthly and published quarterly

Target ≥82%

Result Met

Explanation of result: The national youth enrolment rate is 84.5%. A total of 1.6 million electors aged 18 to 24 were enrolled at 30 June 2021.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 30

Intended result 3.1 Enable Australians to participate in electoral events and understand electoral matters

Performance measure

Expand access to electoral information amongst priority groups by increasing AEC’s digital information presence

Source Digital sources of electoral information (including video and podcasts) for priority groups and data usage.

Method & frequency Digital products and usage as part of community engagement activities.

Target Extent of digital presence. Establish a baseline in 2020-21 for the uptake of digital products among priority groups.

Result Met

Explanation of result: Digital products were produced for each target group, establishing a baseline offering of digital products in 2020-21. Digital products — including a range of videos, factsheets and in-language resources — were published on www.aec.gov.au and provided to partners for further distribution.

Intended result 3.2 Enhance understanding of Australia’s electoral system amongst the public

Performance measure

Annual visitors to the National Electoral Education Centre (NEEC)

Source AEC visitor data captured via the NEEC online booking system.

Method & frequency Visitor attendance.

Target New baseline determined in 2020-21.

Result Met

Explanation of result: The NEEC was significantly affected by travel restrictions and the closure of domestic borders by federal and state governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A considerably reduced number of schools were able to travel to Canberra and attend a NEEC education session.

As a result, a new visitor baseline was established in 2020-21.

In the 2020-21 reporting period, the NEEC delivered 793 education sessions to a total of 27,788 visitors (comprising 23,865 primary school students, 1,632 secondary students and 2,291 adults).

Ongoing uncertainty about COVID-19 - and the resulting impact on NEEC participation, as well as the NEEC refurbishment - resulted in the AEC establishing a new visitor rate baseline for 2022-23.

Intended result 3.2 Enhance understanding of Australia’s electoral system amongst the public

Performance measure

Visitor satisfaction rates at the NEEC Source AEC NEEC visitor data. Method &

frequency Visitor satisfaction surveys captured for each education program.

Target ≥90%

Result Met

Explanation of result: Satisfaction surveys were collected from teachers and students after the NEEC education sessions. Satisfaction rates averaged 98% for teachers and students.

Alternative mechanisms have been introduced to capture visitor satisfaction rates since COVID-19. Surveys were collected from February 2021 onwards for teachers, and May 2021 onwards for students.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

31 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Intended result 3.2 Enhance understanding of Australia’s electoral system amongst the public

Performance measure

Maintain the number of unique online visitors to AEC for Schools website

Source AEC for Schools website.

Method & frequency www.aec.gov.au analytics of unique visits to AEC for Schools website www.education.aec.gov.au

Target 200,000

Result Partly met

Explanation of result: There were 181,745 unique website views of the AEC for Schools website www.education.aec.gov.au during the reporting period, and a total of 266,809 total page views. The AEC for Schools website saw an 18% decline in visits during the second half of the reporting period, falling just short of the performance target of ≥ 200,000. COVID-19 may have had an impact on this measure, as students and teachers moved repeatedly between at-home and classroom-based learning during the year. Consequently, some education providers rationalised the content being delivered, with focus on core learning skills such as literacy and numeracy. The AEC is implementing an annual review for all AEC for Schools education resources beginning in 2021-22. This aims to ensure that resources remain relevant and useful for teachers. It is expected that two newly released resources — Democracy Rules and Media Literacy — may help to improve website numbers over 2021-22.

Intended result 3.2 Enhance understanding of Australia’s electoral system amongst the public

Performance measure

Teacher professional learning participant numbers

Source Record of attendance.

Method & frequency Professional learning participation rates.

Target New baseline determined in 2020-21.

Result Met

Explanation of result: We have observed considerable uncertainty in the easing of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, and the unknown ongoing impact on attendance at in-person programs. As a result, the AEC has established a new visitor rate baseline for the teacher professional learning program for the 2020-21 reporting period. A significant portion of the teacher professional learning program requires in-person training for pre-service or in-service teachers, which has been affected by COVID-19. In total, the program delivered training to 993 in-service and pre-service teachers. This comprised:

• 177 in-service teachers over seven workshops, including the online delivery of a virtual workshop in collaboration with a group of national institutions in Canberra • 401 pre-service teachers at six universities • 415 in-services teachers who completed the online Voting in the Classroom module.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 32

Key activity 4

Maintain a capable and agile organisation and continue to professionalise our workforce Building and maintaining a capable and agile organisation and professional workforce is critical to delivering electoral events.

To ensure we can respond to changing legislation, policy, community expectations and our environment, we must continue to develop our agility and capability.

We do this by refining our organisational structure, focusing on key aspects of governance and assurance, and modernising our enrolment and election systems and processes.

The AEC’s one workforce is unique and multi-tiered. Our talent includes APS employees engaged under the Public Service Act 1999, statutory appointments, contractors, our election surge workforce, and our very large temporary election workforce.

The AEC People Strategy and the AEC Learning and Professional Development Strategy 2020-2025 guides our approach to learning and development, future investment, workforce capability and agility.

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY FOUR

Intended result 4.1 Attract, develop and retain a professional, talented and agile workforce

Performance measure

Percentage of identified APS staff that undertake specific corporate and APS training relevant to their role

Source AEC Learning Management System.

Method & frequency Training completion data.

Target ≥ 95%

Result Met

Percentage of identified APS and TEW staff that complete election training relevant to their role

Source AEC Learning Management System.

Method & frequency Training completion data.

Target ≥ 95%

Result Met

Explanation of result: Mandatory corporate learning was completed by 97% of identified AEC APS employees. A further 99% of the AEC’s temporary election workforce who were required to undertake election-specific training for the Eden-Monaro by-election, completed this successfully. Training was completed by 100% of the AEC’s temporary election workforce for the Groom by-election.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

33 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Intended result 4.1 Attract, develop and retain a professional, talented and agile workforce

Performance measure

Attract and recruit an AEC temporary election workforce for each electoral event to deliver key polling and election activities

Source AEC Employ, Train and Pay system.

Method & frequency Analysis of workforce data.

Target Election workforce in place to support key polling and election activities (pre-polling, polling day and the post-election count).

Result Met

Explanation of result: The AEC held two electoral events in the divisions of Eden-Monaro and Groom during the year. In both events, over 90% of positions were filled according to the agreed establishment.

In preparation for the next federal general election, the sourcing and engagement matrix for the temporary election workforce is being implemented across the agency. This informs recruitment methods and timing, and operational workforce planning. Polling place employee allocations were also reviewed.

4.2 Invest in organisational capability and governance

Performance measure

Increase agency-level governance maturity in the areas of risk management, protective security, privacy and information management

Source AEC strategies, surveys and plans including the: • Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking survey • National Archives of Australia’s ‘Check-up PLUS’ survey and reports • Protective Security Policy Framework • AEC Privacy Management Plan.

Method & frequency Survey benchmarking using Commonwealth frameworks and agency maturity assessments for risk, protective security and information management,

privacy management planning against specific, measurable privacy goals and targets.

Target Increase or maintain maturity against identified Commonwealth surveys or plans.

Result Partly met

Explanation of result: The AEC has continued to mature its risk management, protective security, privacy and information management.

Our risk management maturity is assessed through the Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Program, with an overall rating of ‘embedded’, which is above average. The AEC delivered awareness and training to employees and strengthened use of its new risk management system.

We managed the personal information of 16.9 million Australian electors. The AEC’s Privacy Management Plan documents our approach in line with the Australian Privacy Principles. In 2020-21 we implemented procedural changes and conducted a privacy information campaign across the agency. These initiatives aimed to increase privacy awareness and improve responses to breaches.

We protected our people, information and assets in line with the Protective Security Policy Framework. We promoted a stronger security culture through corporate messaging and awareness.

Our information management maturity has improved, as assessed annually against the National Archives of Australia’s Digital Continuity 2020 policy, using the Check-up PLUS survey. In the past year, we successfully implemented an upgrade to the electronic records management system and improved the associated user guides and training to employees. We also continued to reduce paper-based practices and introduce more digital based processes to employees including mail and enrolment scanning.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 34

Intended result 4.2 Invest in organisational capability and governance

Performance measure

Maintain AEC’s average staffing levels

Source AEC Portfolio Budget Statements, annual financial statements and AEC finance and HR reports.

Method & frequency Performance against defined Commonwealth Government measures.

Target Average staffing levels target met annually.

Result Met

Explanation of result: We met our average staffing level (ASL) target, with actual ASL at 678 in 2020-21, below our ASL cap of 791. This is aligned to the AEC's planning for year 2 of the election cycle. However, our ability to recruit employees has also been influenced by COVID-19 and a tight employment market.

Modernising the AEC’s election and enrolment system The AEC is undergoing a business-led transformation following the Australian Government’s announcement of $96.4 million in funding in October 2020.

A modernised electoral management system will improve our capacity to adapt to the ever-changing environment and citizens’ expectations, as well as to effectively manage security risks. Through the modernisation program, the AEC aims to enhance our ability to detect, prevent and respond to external interference in Australia’s elections.

The Elections System Modernisation (Indigo) program is a shift in the AEC’s approach which will deliver a citizen-centric, agile technology platform. The seven-year transformation journey will reposition how we provide electoral services and ensure ongoing integrity of the electoral system.

This work has also enabled the AEC to think well beyond the next election and to expand our capability to meet the needs of all Australians.

The Indigo program will be managed through a series of tranches, with the first delivering:

• new IT platforms to ensure readiness for future planning

• updated supply chain management processes

• streamlined recruitment and management of the AEC’s temporary election workforce

• improved election contact centre operations to better facilitate voter self-service

• agile business processes to drive productivity

• uplift to security capabilities supporting the AEC’s coordination of federal elections.

AEC Command Centre Part of the AEC’s recent government funding will be used to develop a new command centre that will provide a secure, leading-edge, central point of command to deliver our operations. This initiative will also enable the AEC to better monitor elections and supply the overarching visibility required during electoral events.

Our broader strategic direction is to modernise and use available tools, data and skills to better manage emerging risks and the changing operating environment.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

35 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Establishing the command centre aligns with this goal and will help us continue delivering safe and secure elections. Construction for the command centre commenced in 2020-21 and is expected to be completed in 2021-22.

PERFORMANCE STATEMENT - KEY ACTIVITY FOUR

Intended result 4.3 Implement systems and processes that are sustainable, relevant and modern to support election planning and delivery

Performance measure

Progress the modernisation of the AEC’s core election and roll management systems

Source Program documentation and reporting.

Method & frequency Governance reporting mechanisms as guided by program structure and documentation.

Target Meet the key program milestones associated with the procurement, delivery, execution and de-commissioning of these systems.

Result Partly met

Explanation of result: Following the announcement of funding in October 2020, the AEC commenced the first tranche of its Indigo program. The AEC has met key milestones, including formalising the new operating model and foundational program artefacts, such as project plans and technical requirements. Additional priorities include scoping cyber security needs and designing the future state for the AEC. At 30 June 2021, there have been delays with the procurement process. Overall, the AEC is on track to implement and manage key milestones across the three-year program.

Regulator performance framework The Australian Government is committed to reducing the cost of unnecessary and inefficient regulation on individuals, businesses and community organisations. In line with this, the AEC reports annually on its performance in reducing the regulatory burden for electors through more efficient enrolment and voting services. The AEC’s performance is measured against the six mandatory performance indicators set in the regulator performance framework:

1 regulators do not unnecessarily impede the efficient operation of regulated entities

2 communication with regulated entities is clear, targeted and effective

3

actions undertaken by regulators are proportionate to the regulatory risk being managed

4 compliance and monitoring approaches are streamlined and coordinated

5 regulators are open and transparent in their dealings with entities

6

regulators actively contribute to the continuous improvement of regulatory frameworks.

Result key Met On track to be met Partly met Not met

PERFORMANCE REPORT 36

The AEC’s performance for 2020-21 is outlined in Table 2. Results are cross-referenced with the key activities and functions reported earlier in this section.

Table 2: AEC performance against the regulator performance framework

What the AEC does Result Mandatory performance indicator reference

The AEC maintains an up-to-date public register of political parties.  See Key activity 1 We regulate the funding and disclosure scheme, ensuring disclosure returns are published and regulated in accordance with timeframes.

 See Key activity 1

We undertake regular compliance reviews examining a sample of disclosure returns and use a risk-based approach to compliance. The outcomes of compliance activity are published at www.aec.gov.au

 See Key activity 1

We administer the funding and disclosure scheme, political party registrations and electoral authorisations. We provide guidance and information to ensure stakeholders are aware of the need to comply with electoral legislation as well as the ‘how-to’.

 Under the Electoral Act, the funding and disclosure scheme establishes transparency around political donations. The electoral authorisations scheme requires electoral participants to be transparent to voters with the electoral communications they make.

Guidance and information are provided to stakeholders at www.aec.gov.au, and through our public enquiry line and a dedicated phone number for funding and disclosure matters.

Stakeholders with disclosure obligations under the Electoral Act are also provided with written reminders of those obligations at appropriate times.

Also see Key activity 1.

We apply a risk-based proportionate response in addressing multiple voting and non-voter prosecutions, and in administering electoral communications requirements.

 A risk-based approach is taken to address multiple voting and non-voter prosecutions, and in administrating the funding and disclosure, and electoral communication requirements.

Where necessary the AEC provides notices and warnings to regulated individuals and entities to inform them of their obligations.

We continue to improve our risk management maturity to build organisational capability. We are also maturing and embedding our lessons management approach and capability.

 See Key activity 1 and 4.

We manage feedback and complaints in line with the AEC complaints management policy and seek improvements in administration when relevant.

 Our service charter outlines the agency’s role and purpose, and the services the public can expect to receive. The AEC manages complaints in line with AEC Complaints Management Policy.

37 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

2020-21 highlights

Delivering by-elections in a COVID-19 environment COVID-19 has had a profound effect on all of us, including the AEC.

We’re tackling a nation-wide skills shortage and service delivery pressures, while maintaining and rolling out AEC programs and initiatives. Our external environment is changing, and the AEC is responding.

Two by-elections in 2020-21 showed how well we can adapt to COVID-19 conditions. The seats of Eden-Monaro and Groom were contested on 4 July and 28 November, and were delivered safely, efficiently and with integrity.

The AEC launched a range of specific videos and e-learning modules for all election staff, including advice on hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, cleaning polling place surfaces, and managing voter queues safely.

Federal and state stakeholders were consulted to ensure protocols were followed, including chief medical officers, health departments, police, education departments and Australia Post. The National Bushfire Recovery Agency and Services Australia also assisted by providing AEC information to voters affected by bushfires.

The Eden-Monaro by-election was also delivered in an environment severely affected by the 2019-20 bushfires, which was a learning opportunity for staff. The special needs of voters in this electorate showed the importance of consultation, coordination and streamlined communication with stakeholders before and during an election.

These insights were applied to Groom and, together with the changing state rules, were monitored to ensure polling places and procedures complied with local safety requirements.

Strict attention was given to social distancing, venue sanitising, and a range of physical controls in place like protective screens. AEC workers were trained and provided with personal protective equipment.

The costs for these services and additional polling place staff was significantly higher than the average cost of by-elections between 2016 and 2019, however the safety of staff and voters was paramount.

The experience of these two by-elections is informing preparations for the next federal election. We observe and plan for fluctuations in staffing, supply chain, stakeholder engagement and voter preferences, remaining agile and ready to deploy at the scale required for a national event.

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections The Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) is an Australian Government entity. Its Board consists of 20 elected members who are Torres Strait Islander or Aboriginal people living in the region. The election is held every four years.

The AEC delivers TSRA elections in accordance with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Act 2005 and Torres Strait Regional Authority Election Rules 2017 (Cth).

The AEC implemented several COVID-19 measures to protect the health of community members and staff. We developed a work health and safety service plan and guidelines to oversee election delivery, while also ensuring appropriate processes were in place.

Voting for the TSRA Board election was conducted on Saturday 28 November 2020.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 38

Of the 20 TSRA electoral wards, voting took place in 17 contested wards in the 2020 Elections, with three wards uncontested. The AEC delivered mobile and static polling to the wards of Badu Island, Bamaga, Boigu Island, Erub Island, Hammond Island, Iama Island, Kubin, Mabuiag Island, Mer Island, Ngurapai and Muralag, Port Kennedy, Poruma Island, Saibai Island, Seisia, St Pauls, TRAWQ and Warraber Island. The remaining wards of Dauan Island, Masig Island and Ugar Island were uncontested as only one candidate was nominated.

For a non-compulsory election — and given COVID-19 impacts — the turnout of eligible voters was 60.27 per cent, only slightly lower than the 2016 turnout of 63.29 per cent. All temporary election staff were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Of the 51 candidates for the 2020 TSRA election, 19 were women, the highest number on record. Five were elected to the 20-member board.

Key milestones in delivering the TSRA elections in November 2020 included:

• delivering candidate information sessions across all 20 TSRA electoral wards

• conducting the ballot draw on Thursday Island in the Torres Strait — a first for the region — to provide greater transparency to stakeholders

• delivering voter information sessions across all 17 contested electoral wards as part of the AEC’s Indigenous Electoral Participation Program.

The AEC worked with the TSRA to produce a polling schedule that included:

• mobile polling in 13 wards

• static polling at four locations on Thursday Island, Horn Island and the Northern Peninsula Area

• early voting in Cairns and Thursday Island, along with the option of postal voting

• post-election officeholder elections.

International services: building success through agility, creativity and stakeholder engagement The AEC is internationally recognised for its support of emerging democracies.

We help build the technical capability of partner electoral management bodies in the Indo-Pacific, with programs delivered through bilateral and multilateral partnerships. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is a strategic funding partner in these activities.

Agility, creativity and strong stakeholder engagement have been central to providing virtual international support during COVID-19.

Initiatives to support international partners include technical assistance, training and workshops, knowledge exchange and mentoring programs, strategic planning, and advice. We also helped design, print and supply electoral materials.

During the year we supported our neighbouring countries, including in the lead-up to the Autonomous Bougainville Government general election on 20 August.

On 22 July the last of five chartered flights arrived in Buka, completing delivery of 18,000 kilos of AEC-produced ballot materials for the election. Bougainville Electoral Commissioner George Manu publicly acknowledged our work managing this project under unique circumstances.

39 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

By May 2021, attention turned to support for the Papua New Guinea Electoral Commission, which was preparing for a by-election in the seat of Moresby-North during a national outbreak of COVID-19.

Delivering elections in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is a unique challenge. Its electoral commission faces an enormous logistical exercise in a country with vast cultural and linguistic diversity, difficult terrain, and poor transport infrastructure. These factors make PNG’s elections some of the most complicated in the world.

To support PNG’s efforts, the AEC delivered 63,000 units of personal protective equipment to Port Moresby, including disposable masks, face shields, gloves, hand sanitiser, thermometers, disinfectant and paper towels. Polling was held on 4 June 2021 and staff and polling officials used the equipment to protect themselves and others.

The AEC’s Community and International Engagement team adapted several international activities to virtual formats over the last 12 months, in particular through the Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections (BRIDGE) program.

BRIDGE is a modular professional development initiative which focuses on electoral processes. In the 20 years since it was founded, the AEC has played a central role as a partner and host of the BRIDGE Secretariat. The AEC also coordinates the Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand Electoral Administrators (PIANZEA) Network.

PIANZEA has benefited from face-to-face BRIDGE workshops over the years. From 8 to 12 March 2021, the AEC facilitated the first multi-country virtual BRIDGE workshop on voter and civic education for participants from Fiji, Nauru, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Tonga and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

The AEC will continue to adapt practices to meet the needs of our international partners.

Four Countries Conference We participated in a virtual Four Countries Conference during the year along with counterparts from Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand. The conference usually meets physically every second year to discuss shared challenges — such as cyber security — and to promote best practice in electoral administration. Regular contact has continued virtually throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, including to discuss the challenges the pandemic presents to electoral administration.

Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand The Electoral Commissioner attended four meetings of the Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand (ECANZ) in 2020-21, including three extraordinary meetings in August, September and November 2020. These meetings focused on COVID-19 and provided a platform to share information on incorporating health and safety directives into election operations and delivery.

The Deputy Electoral Commissioner engaged with a sub-group reporting to ECANZ. His contribution included developing secondment opportunities between electoral commissions and supporting ECANZ by providing an analysis of key electoral activities.

The AEC participated in the Inter-jurisdictional Working Group on Electoral Integrity and Security, chaired by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 40

We also chaired ECANZ working groups, including the National Enrolment Forum, Election Staffing Community of Practice and the Indigenous Electoral Participation Working Group.

During the year the AEC participated in ECANZ working groups, including:

• Compliance Network

• Materials Management Group.

Spotlight on virtual learning and development Like many agencies, the AEC pays close attention to innovations in learning and development. We are committed to increasing the capability and agility of our workforce and being a learning organisation.

At the start of 2020, our National Training and Education Unit was preparing significant new in-person employee learning programs. When COVID-19 caused nationwide office closures in March 2020, the team expanded the use of e-learning modules and launched virtual platforms so staff could continue their learning.

For the unit’s Director, Belinda Bennett, the about-face was vital to ensure a seamless outcome for staff and to ensure the AEC’s learning targets could be met.

“We had to change from face-to-face learning programs to delivery in a virtual environment, effectively condensing a workplan stretching over three to five years into one year”, she says. “It was an instant change and we had to rewrite major programs and leverage technology that we didn’t know well.”

Beyond the technical hitches, the team also needed to consider how the online format would change the way learning materials would be presented. Managing learning program reviews previously prepared for face-to-face delivery was challenging, especially within a context of competing priorities.

“We were re-writing content and researching new technology at the same time we were developing and delivering content,” Belinda said.

The AEC’s Digital Technology and Communications Branch was able to explore the best virtual platform for their needs. The new solution is already producing lasting results. ‘Thanks to virtual programs, we have content that will be ongoing and will be more accessible and sustainable,’ Belinda said.

The National Induction Program, the Senior Leaders Program and the Operational Leaders Program are among training activities reshaped to ensure participants’ access given the COVID-19 working environment.

Jaime Garrido has worked in the AEC’s Community and International Engagement team since 2018. Last year he participated in the new Senior Leaders Program — a series of virtual events focusing on self-leadership, leadership of others and resilience. Joining sessions from home during COVID-19 lockdown, he felt the virtual format was well suited to the content, particularly for networking with colleagues in other offices around Australia.

“The course demonstrated the AEC’s investment in its people to deliver an innovative and engaging virtual program to support and encourage staff in their leadership journey,” he said.

When people came back to the office, some employees requested a return to face-to-face training. “It has a place in our organisation, but it is not the be-all and end-all,” Belinda says. “This is a shift in mindset and I’m proud that this significant shift in our learning capability has all been achieved in a 12-month period.”

41 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Spotlight on recruitment, wellbeing and the new normal: lessons from Victoria Adapting to COVID-19 has been tough on everyone.

Like most employers in Australia, the AEC was faced with a rapid closure of offices across the country, and the immediate transition to a virtual work environment. At the same time, we could not afford to halt the critical services we provided to the Australian community.

No one felt this disruption for as long in 2020-21 as our colleagues in Victoria, who confronted four lockdowns in the last year. At the helm were Maree Fasoli, Director of Operations, and the now retired Steve Kennedy, who was State Manager during much of this period.

Maree, with her experienced Assistant Director, Operations, led and managed the vast Victorian network of operational staff to overcome obstacles during the pandemic. The team also adapted recruitment processes to deliver a virtual assessment centre — the first of its kind and scale for the agency.

One of the most significant challenges the team faced was a large recruitment round, conducted online for the first time. “Because Victoria was in hard lockdown, we had to look at the process for recruitment to get people into the agency,” she says.

Maree also observed unforeseen advantages to the online interviews. “There are benefits to not being face-to-face with people,” she said. “With a dispersed network like the AEC’s you are rarely face-to-face with your staff. This has given us a lot more confidence around the virtual environment.”

Following appointment, the first step to onboarding the large group was to set up home laptops, mobile phones and connectivity. Once online, the team took

new colleagues through a comprehensive induction and fit-for-purpose orientation program, introducing teams and finding solutions for them to network together. “As well as a peer support system, experienced divisional office managers and team leaders guided new starters in learning about election readiness. The groundwork for these virtual processes is already paying off. “Recently, the fourth lockdown in Victoria coincided with a start date for four new staff members,” said Maree. “No one panicked because we have a solid protocol to induct people now. Feedback shows that staff feel supported and encouraged.”

Another important focus was ensuring health and wellbeing of all staff. Targeted help was offered to all Victorian staff through National Office and a range of business areas. Employees were also supported by our Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services and mental health organisation, Black Dog Institute.

“We were very focused on communication over multiple channels during lockdown,” Maree explained. “We guided people to information through emails, the intranet and a weekly bulletin. We have some staff who work part-time so it was important to send timely messages over many different channels.”

In particular, the weekly bulletin explored ways to ensure wellbeing and support for those in need. “One staff member has four children under nine years of age, so she started a mini network where people could talk about difficulties parents were having working with kids at home.”

Victoria’s example is now viewed as best practice for the agency. “We found a nice balance of COVID normal,” says Maree. “We can convert pretty easily with laptops, headsets and cameras. We have tools at our disposal, and we feel confident that we know what we are doing.”

PERFORMANCE REPORT 42

Spotlight on promoting electoral engagement through Indigenous languages To encourage enrolment of Indigenous Australians, the AEC invests in broad engagement strategies with a multi-pronged approach.

English may not be the first language of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote Australia. Noting the oral nature of Indigenous languages, the AEC commissioned a series of in-language videos, which can be found on our website. Topics cover processes on how to enrol, how to cast a vote and promotion of election workforce opportunities. The videos have been produced in 20 languages and more are planned for the coming year.

The AEC collaborated with Carbon Creative and its Managing Director, Birri Gubba man Wayne Denning to produce the videos. Based in Brisbane, Wayne and his team were able to travel to isolated communities in Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia. They met and filmed people on country talking about the various ways to participate in the electoral system.

The result shows people explaining why it is important for Indigenous voices to be heard through the electoral process. “The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people we met agreed with the process,” Wayne says. “They had a great level of pride in being able to speak language and share this message with their communities.”

Exchanging information and stories in this way will benefit all Australians, Wayne believes. “They see themselves and that translatability is important. It’s about trying to capture a sense of authenticity, respect and warmth in an engaging way, working with real people.”

For Wayne, the videos are a testament to the AEC’s commitment to working closely with Indigenous Australians. “It’s fantastic to work with visionary organisations,” he says. “We have a capacity to capture the voices of many Australians who don’t always have the chance to be heard. Having the connection to country included in the messaging is vital. It shows oneness, connection to community and country, and gives us a sense of empowerment and pride.”

43 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY

SECTION 04

2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT

PERFORMANCE REPORT 44

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Corporate governance - principles and objectives The AEC has the following structures in place to implement the principles and objectives of corporate governance:

• an executive leadership team which monitors performance, ensures accountability and steers the agency

• decision-making management committees - see Table 15, appendix B for a list as well as their functions and membership.

Ethical standards The AEC’s ethical standards are implicit in:

• our values of electoral integrity through professionalism, agility and quality

• the Australian Public Service ICARE values of impartiality, committed to service, accountable, respectful and ethical

• our Enterprise Agreement 2016-2019, which reflects the values and ethical standards of the Australian Public Service Code of Conduct

• the AEC’s strategic planning framework and staff conduct policies.

Internal audit The Audit Committee provides independent advice and assurance to the Electoral Commissioner. Its functions include reviewing the appropriateness of the AEC’s financial reporting, performance reporting, system of

Electoral integrity

Professionalism

Quality

Agility

risk oversight and management, and system of internal control.

The Audit Committee Charter is available on the AEC website at https://www.aec. gov.au/About_AEC/Publications/audit-committee-charter.htm

Audit Committee membership is in appendix B.

External audit The AEC participated in two performance audits during the year, undertaken by the Australian National Audit Office:

• establishment and use of IT-related procurement panels and arrangements

• administration of financial disclosure requirements under the Electoral Act.

45 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Risk management The AEC’s operating environment is complex. It requires a workforce capable of managing uncertainties that may impact the AEC’s ability to achieve its objectives. Considerable actions were undertaken throughout 2020-21 to further mature our risk capability, including:

• continuing to embed enterprise risk management software designed to build the AEC’s capability to manage and report on risk, and provide assurance that objectives are being met

• providing risk management training across the agency

• enhancing business continuity plans to enable timely responses to disruptions, while building organisational resilience to recover and resume business processes in the pandemic environment.

We continue to build capability, enhance and shape our risk culture, and support organisational priorities and objectives. To support these corporate requirements, the AEC manages its risk through the following governance committees:

• Executive Leadership Team

• National Operations and Readiness Committee

• Audit Committee

• Organisational Health, Performance and Risk Committee

• Electoral Integrity Committee

• Investment, Change and People Strategy Committee

• Education and Engagement Committee.

More information on committees is at Table 15.

We assess risk maturity by participating in Comcover’s risk management benchmarking survey, which is conducted every two years.

Fraud control The AEC Fraud Control Plan highlights the agency’s low tolerance of fraud in its operations and services. As required by section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), we have:

• prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans

• appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, recording and reporting mechanisms that meet the AEC’s specific needs

• taken all reasonable measures to deal with fraud appropriately.

The Fraud Control Plan outlines strategies to prevent, detect and respond to fraud, including prevention strategies for both corporate and electoral fraud. The Electoral Integrity Committee (see Table 15, appendix B) is responsible for providing governance and assurance over the AEC’s Fraud Control Plan. The AEC examined all

PERFORMANCE REPORT 46

allegations of suspected fraud during the year, including complaints relating to the Eden-Monaro and Groom by-elections.

Information on reporting suspected fraud is available:

• to staff through the intranet and mandatory fraud awareness training

• for the public at www.aec.gov.au

Internal planning processes The AEC’s corporate planning processes support corporate governance and are undertaken in line with the requirements of the PGPA Act. The corporate plan, available on the AEC website, informs operational planning and performance, and is reflected in the AEC’s business planning documents. Internal reporting and mid-term performance assessments help track progress against performance measures. Information on how the corporate plan contributes to specified outcomes is in our performance statement.

Corporate planning documents, including internal monitoring and reporting mechanisms, are listed in Table 14 of appendix B.

External scrutiny

Significant developments and judicial decisions The AEC was involved in four matters in the Federal Court during 2020-21, two of which are ongoing.

1. Mr Clive Palmer applied to suspend the review of the party registration of the United Australia Party (UAP). The Federal Court enabled the party registration review to continue and the AEC determined that UAP could continue to be registered as a political party. The matter is now finalised.

2. The AEC filed proceedings in the Federal Court against a candidate at the 2019 Federal Election, Mr Wayne Wharton, for failure to submit a candidate election return. On 1 June 2021, the Federal Court found Mr Wharton had contravened two provisions of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Electoral Act). The Court ordered Mr Wharton to pay $10,000 plus costs.

3. The AEC filed proceedings in the Federal Court against a candidate at the 2019 Federal Election, Mr Barry Futter, for failure to submit a candidate election return. This matter is ongoing.

4. A candidate for election to offices in the Manufacturing Division of the Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining And Energy Union, Mr Arturo Menon, applied to the Federal Court to stop the election. He also requested an inquiry into alleged irregularities relating to union membership. On 8 June 2021, the Court agreed to hold an inquiry into the alleged irregularities. The Court did not order the AEC to stop the election. This matter is ongoing.

47 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Administrative Appeals Tribunal decisions No decisions of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal had significant effect on the operations of the AEC during the reporting period.

Australian Information Commissioner decisions The Australian Information Commissioner (AIC) reviewed three matters relating to AEC Freedom of Information (FOI) decisions during the year.

The AIC is still reviewing two of the FOI decisions. In the finalised FOI review, the AIC upheld the AEC’s decision to withhold documents relating to the testing of members prior to the registration of a political party. The AIC cited section 47 of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) as the basis for its ruling.

Australian Privacy Commissioner decisions The Australian Privacy Commissioner received two privacy complaints about internal AEC administration during this reporting period. These two matters are ongoing.

Australian Human Rights Commission decisions The Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) received two complaints during the reporting period. The AHRC dismissed one complaint. The second complaint was resolved by the AHRC, AEC and the applicant.

Auditor-General reports One Auditor-General report was tabled during the reporting period that is specific to the AEC: “Administration of Financial Disclosure Requirements under the Commonwealth Electoral Act”. The report made seven recommendations, six of which were agreed (four with qualification). One was not agreed. The AEC is working on implementation and other relevant enhancements with progress monitored by its Audit Committee.

Parliamentary committee engagement The AEC assisted four parliamentary committees with the conduct of eight inquiries, including five inquiries by the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters (JSCEM). The AEC made submissions, gave evidence at public hearings and responded to Questions on Notice.

In 2020-21, JSCEM held an inquiry into the future conduct of elections operating during emergency situations. The AEC submitted information about the limitations of the Electoral Act which could constrain the AEC’s ability to respond to challenges arising from emergency situations.

For JSCEM’s inquiry into the conduct of the 2019 federal election and matters related to this, we made recommendations to address emerging risks to electoral integrity in a submission titled Improving electoral security and trust in Australia’s electoral system.

Commonwealth Ombudsman investigations The Commonwealth Ombudsman received two complaints during the reporting period. The Ombudsman determined an investigation was not warranted for the first complaint. The other complaint is ongoing.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 48

Freedom of information Under the Freedom of Information Act 1982, the AEC’s Disclosure Log and Information Publication Scheme can be accessed at www.aec.gov.au/information-access

Customer scrutiny The AEC’s service charter — available at www.aec.gov.au — outlines the agency’s role and purpose, and the services the public can expect to receive.

Public engagement policies, procedures and tools are also available for staff. The AEC routinely examines enquiry trends to improve public information and services.

Our people The AEC relies on its highly skilled and professional people to achieve its key activities. We are committed to developing all employees to build capability in our specialised workforce. Our unique workforce is multi-tiered and structured to enhance service and deliver seamless services to the Australian community.

Our people continue to experience significant challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The AEC invests in early intervention health initiatives to ensure the safety and wellbeing of employees.

We value the critical contributions our people make to delivering our core business and nurturing our positive workplace culture. We aim to ensure we can attract and retain the right people, at the right time, with the right skills.

At 30 June 2021 the AEC had a regular workforce of 750 APS employees. This included:

• 677 ongoing APS employees

• 73 non-ongoing APS employees.

A breakdown of the AEC workforce is in Table 3 (below).

The AEC also has:

• a casual APS workforce of 617

• six Statutory Office holders

• 19 APS employees who identify as Indigenous Australians (15 ongoing and four non-ongoing).

Table 3: AEC APS workforce by employment type and classification (excluding statutory office holders), 30 June 2021

Ongoing Non-Ongoing

SES2 3 -

SES1 6 2

EL2 45 2

EL1 123 12

APS6 198 12

APS5 100 11

APS4 70 11

APS3 76 8

APS2 56 15

APS1 - -

TOTAL 677 73

Detailed workforce statistics, including statutory appointments are in appendix H.

49 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Terms and conditions of employment The AEC’s regular workforce is engaged under the Public Service Act 1999 (Public Service Act) and the temporary election workforce under section 35(1) of the Electoral Act.

Employees engaged under the Public Service Act have their employment governed by the AEC’s Enterprise Agreement 2016- 2019 published on the AEC website. Under the enterprise agreement, our people receive a range of non-salary benefits, including paid personal (carers) leave. This supports employees with caring responsibilities as outlined in the Carer Recognition Act 2010.

With agreement from our employees, remuneration adjustments can occur through a section 24(1) Determination made under the Public Service Act, which was signed by the Electoral Commissioner on 30 November 2019.

The Electoral Commissioner may agree to individual flexibility arrangements with employees, which can vary the effect of the terms of the enterprise agreement. The AEC had 22 employees engaged under individual flexibility arrangements at 30 June 2021 (see appendix H, Table 38).

The AEC engages a temporary election workforce for election events. These employees are engaged under section 35(1) of the Electoral Act and their terms and conditions of employment are outlined in a Collective Determination.

Performance management and performance pay The enterprise agreement requires all employees engaged under section 22(2) of the Public Service Act to participate in the AEC’s Performance Management Program. Eligible employees who meet the requirements receive salary advancement. The AEC does not provide performance bonuses. A list of salary ranges by classification is in appendix H, Table 39 .

Remuneration The AEC is required to disclose the remuneration, policy, practices and governance arrangements of executive officials, including:

• key management personnel

• senior executives

• other highly paid employees, whose total remuneration exceeds the threshold amount of $230,000 for the reporting period.

The terms and conditions of the AEC’s statutory office holders are determined by the Remuneration Tribunal and the Governor-General under the Remuneration Tribunal Act 1973. This includes remuneration of the Chairperson of the Commission, Electoral Commissioner, Deputy Electoral Commissioner, and Australian Electoral Officers.

Remuneration for the AEC’s senior executive employees is established through individual determinations made under section 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999 with regard to:

• the APS Executive Remuneration Management Policy

• the Australian Government Workplace Bargaining Policy 2018

• an assessment of the relativities with other APS agencies as indicated in the annual APS Remuneration Report produced by the APSC and released in June each year.

Salary levels for SES employees are generally set at rates within a salary band applicable to each SES classification. A list of salary ranges by classification is in appendix H, Table 39. Details of executive remuneration are published on both the AEC and Remuneration Tribunal websites, and at appendix H Tables 41 and 42.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 50

Disability reporting mechanisms The AEC provides a variety of education and communication initiatives to meet the needs of Australians with disability. These are reported through the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, the State of the Service report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au

The National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 is Australia’s overarching framework for disability reform. It acts to ensure the principles underpinning the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are incorporated into Australia’s policies and programs that affect people with disability, their families and carers.

All levels of government will continue to be held accountable for implementing the strategy through progress reporting to the Council of Australian Governments every second year. Progress reports can be found at dss.gov.au

Workforce planning To improve workforce planning the AEC increasingly uses business intelligence and data to support decision-making and service delivery.

In 2020-21, the AEC established better evidence-based processes to successfully source, train and pay the appropriate number of capable temporary employees — at the right time — to deliver successful elections. Data and metrics were taken from:

• the operation of our staffing help desk

• HR systems

• temporary election workforce surveys.

Underpinned by this data, the AEC works towards applying consistent principles to support workforce and operational planning.

The AEC also chairs the Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand Temporary Election Staff Working Group, which explores opportunities for greater cooperation and harmonisation for temporary election staff employed across federal, state and local elections in Australia.

Secondments to support APS COVID-19 response Over the COVID-19 pandemic period, the AEC responded to the Australian Public Service Commission’s request for a rapid deployment of employees to other APS agencies. The AEC nominated 255 employees for secondment and 47 were seconded to assist.

Work health and safety The AEC takes a proactive approach to workplace health, safety and rehabilitation. As part of its compliance obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 and the Guidelines for Rehabilitation Authorities 2019, the AEC has the following systems to monitor, evaluate and maintain health, safety and welfare:

• our Rehabilitation Management System, which meets Comcare’s Guidelines for Rehabilitation Authorities 2012 under section 41 of the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988

• our work health and safety management system — AECsafety — which was further refined during the year

• the AEC risk management framework.

The AEC has established several initiatives to monitor, evaluate and maintain health, safety and welfare across the agency.

51 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

These include engaging workplace rehabilitation providers to help injured or ill employees to make a safe return to work. We also promote:

• free annual influenza vaccinations for staff

• the AEC’s early intervention program which supports employees injured at work, and helps reduce injury-related absenteeism

• the AEC’s employee assistance program

• ergonomic workstation assessments to prevent injury and to ensure pre-existing injuries are not aggravated.

In 2020-21 the AEC incident management team increased its regular meetings to adjust to COVID-19. It also undertook ongoing external environment reviews to ensure preventative work health and safety controls were reflected in the AEC’s COVID risk assessment.

Australian Public Service Commission guidance was implemented to ensure a COVID-safe transition for employees coming back to the workplace. The AEC also aligned its response to the pandemic with decisions made by the Government for a COVID-safe Australia.

Updated and timely communication informed and supported employees through the pandemic. Wellbeing initiatives such as mental health webinars, our Employee Assistance Program and external support services, were also implemented and made available to employees.

Health and safety incident and claim management In 2020-21, 442 health and safety incidents were reported, compared with 148 in the previous year. This increase is attributed to reporting requirements concerning COVID-19. Employees were required to submit an incident report if they undertook a COVID-19 screening test.

Six incidents were reported to Comcare for investigation, and no liaison inspections were conducted.

Injury and illness claims decreased in 2020-21. At 30 June 2021 there were:

• 11 continuing cases for compensation

• 10 new cases for compensation submitted by APS employees who were employed under the Electoral Act. Of these:

- four claims were accepted by Comcare

- two claims were rejected by Comcare, submitted for reconsideration, and rejected again

- two claims are still pending

- two claims were accepted through the Administrative Appeals Tribunal

- no claims were withdrawn.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 52

The AEC did not conduct any injury or illness investigations and there were no notifiable incidents for serious injury or illness, or for a dangerous occurrence (see table below).

Table 4: New claims for compensable and non-compensable injuries

Case management type 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

Compensable 23 12 14 32 21

Non-compensable 42 41 58 48 81

Early intervention NA 2 14 3 (17)*

TOTAL 65 58 86 83 102

*Early intervention figures are included as non-compensable in the table above.

In 2020-21 the AEC launched three national programs:

• AEC National Induction Program - the first step on the learning pathway for new AEC staff

• Senior Leaders Program - a contemporary program designed to further enhance the leadership capabilities and professionalism of the AEC’s leaders

• Operational Leaders Program - a modular program designed to enhance critical operational and leadership capabilities for AEC staff, and to promote compliance and quality assurance.

These programs were complemented by a suite of learning and development opportunities available to the workforce, along with the annual mandatory learning program.

The AEC also supports staff to apply for study assistance and support for professional memberships.

The development of an AEC Coaching and Mentoring Framework and an AEC Capability Framework is currently underway.

Developing our people The National Training and Education Unit leads and coordinates learning and development for the AEC workforce to build:

• critical operational and leadership capabilities that underpin election readiness and delivery

• essential workplace and public sector specific knowledge and skills

• a focus on electoral integrity, compliance and quality

• a vibrant learning culture.

Learning and development is guided by the AEC Learning and Professional Development Strategy 2020-2025, through five priorities:

• developing a vibrant learning culture

• clarifying accountabilities and responsibilities

• ensuring a capable temporary election workforce

• establishing a learning infrastructure

• building capability.

53 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Assets management

Physical assets The AEC’s operating assets such as office fit-outs, machinery and equipment are managed on an end-of-life or end-of-lease schedule. Office fit-outs are the largest component of this asset base. Asset management is not a significant aspect of the AEC’s strategic business, so service and maintenance agreements are used. The AEC uses outsourced providers to ensure value for money is achieved.

Working through COVID-19 A key part of the agency’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic was ensuring staff could keep working in a safe environment. The AEC installed physical shields in client focused areas, established social distancing protocols and enhanced preventative cleaning regimes.

Information communications and technology — responding to COVID-19 The AEC responded quickly to COVID-19 and established home-based operations for employees. We used agile processes and the AEC’s scalable ICT infrastructure to:

• prepare and deploy laptops across our national and state offices

• introduce digital mail delivery

• boost telephony and remote-access capacity to support the increased demand of network activity

• provide teleconferencing to support an increase in use

• support staff to work from home through the AEC network.

Environmental performance and sustainable development In accordance with section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, the AEC is required to report on environmental performance and measures that minimise environmental impact.

Plain cardboard and an increased focus on re-use

A federal election is an intensely manual exercise with an audience of nearly 17 million Australians voting at approximately 8,000 voting venues across Australia. This kind of logistical challenge always involves a lot of materials, but the AEC is continually striving to minimise our environmental impact as part of the broader conduct of the event.

Much of 2020-21 was spent preparing to conduct the next federal election. Part of this preparation has been arranging the use of plain ‘raw’ brown cardboard for the first time at a full federal election - replacing the previous ‘wrapped’ cardboard with AEC branding.

The new raw cardboard products are used in polling places for queuing equipment, ballot paper issuing tables, voting screens, ballot boxes and even recycling bins. Not only are the new products easier to recycle, they are also sturdier. The generic plain cardboard makes them more likely to be shared with state or territory electoral management bodies. This financial year they were used in the 2020 Groom federal by-election and shared with Elections ACT to use at the 2020 ACT Legislative Assembly election. The Northern Territory Electoral Commission also took delivery of products for their 2021 local government elections.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 54

The AEC is investigating ways to donate election equipment that cannot be used again for future elections. Materials such as first aid kits and stationery were donated to communities in need following the 2019 federal election. Planning in 2020-21 explored how this might be realised following the next federal election.

Energy efficiency

Some properties in the agency’s office portfolio maintain a base building rating of 4.5 stars under the National Australian Built Environment Rating System. Some of these buildings contain lighting movement sensors, which turn lighting off in office areas after hours.

The department participates in the Australian Public Service Demand Reduction Initiative - an effort across government agencies to reduce energy consumption. The initiative calls for agencies in the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales to lead by example. This includes reducing electricity demand when called upon during an energy emergency such as a supply shortfall during a heatwave.

In 2020-21, energy used across all AEC premises was 10,111.65 megajoules per person, which was a 24.57 per cent decrease on the previous year. This reduction is a consequence of the AEC’s reduced office hours, as staff worked from home during the response to COVID-19.

Waste management

The AEC provides ready access to segregated waste streams in the office environment. Recycling bins are located throughout all Canberra office buildings in kitchens and common areas. We provide bins for general waste, organic waste and commingled recycling.

During the next federal election, we will monitor the amount of paper and cardboard waste generated. This will help us develop strategies to improve the agency’s waste footprint.

Fleet vehicles

The AEC has 11 vehicles in its fleet. Usage and kilometres travelled are monitored and we plan to replace our vehicles with efficient hybrid vehicles. Drivers are also encouraged to purchase ethanol-blended fuel (E10).

55 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Purchasing The AEC’s approach to procuring goods and services is consistent with the:

• Public Governance Performance and Accountability Act 2013

• Commonwealth Procurement Rules

• Department of the Environment and Energy’s Sustainable Procurement Guide.

The AEC applies these rules through its accountable authority instructions, supporting operational guidelines, and by continuing to develop procurement skills and processes to improve efficiency and value-for-money outcomes.

The AEC has centralised expertise to manage its procurement and contracting framework, including panel arrangements. Tenders are evaluated for:

• value for money

• energy and consumption demand

• unnecessary consumption

• end-of-life disposal arrangements.

Australian National Audit Office access clauses All AEC contract templates include a standard clause to provide Auditor-General access to a contractor’s premises. The AEC did not execute any contracts in 2020-21 without the Australian National Audit Office access provisions.

Small business The AEC supports small business participation in Commonwealth Government procurement. Small and medium enterprises and small enterprise participation statistics are on the Department of Finance website at www.finance.gov.au

The AEC recognises the importance of ensuring small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on Treasury’s website at www.treasury.gov.au

Publication of contracts on AusTender Information on the value of AEC contracts and consultancies—as well as expected procurements—is available on the Austender website at www.tenders.gov.au

In 2020-21:

• one contract or standing offer greater than $10,000 (including GST) was exempt from publication on AusTender on the basis of paragraph 2.6 of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules with a total value of $500,000

• the AEC did not administer any discretionary grant programs

• seven open-tender requests were published.

Consultants Consultants are engaged to provide specialist expertise, independent research, or to review or assess particular elements of electoral events. These decisions are made in accordance with section 35(2) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, the PGPA Act and related Regulations (including the Commonwealth Procurement Rules), and relevant internal policies.

PERFORMANCE REPORT 56

Expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts

Table 5: Reportable consultancy contracts (2020-21)

Reportable consultancy contracts 2020-21 Number Expenditure $

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 3 74,300

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period 3 110,119

Total 6 184,419

Table 6: List of organisations receiving a share of consultancy contracts (2020-21)

Organisations receiving a share of reportable consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 Expenditure $

Wallis Consulting Group Pty Ltd 49,894

Aspect Organisational Psychologists Pty Ltd 44,275

The Architecture Practice Pty Ltd 29,700

CTO Group 28,600

Garnduwa Amboorny Wirnan 16,000

IPAR Rehabilitation 15,950

During 2020-21, three new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $0.7 million. In addition, three ongoing reportable consultancy contracts were active during this period, involving total actual expenditure of $0.11 million.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts Table 7: Reportable non-consultancy contracts (2020-21)

Reportable non-consultancy contracts 2020-21 Number Expenditure $

New contracts entered into during the reporting period 177 37,673,331

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period 114 51,881,918

Total 291 89,555,249

Table 8: List of organisations receiving non-consultancy contract expenditures (2020-21)

Organisations receiving a share of reportable non-consultancy contract expenditure 2020-21 Expenditure $

Fuji Film Data Management Solutions Australia Pty Ltd 11,485,550

Ventia Property Pty Ltd 4,354,896

Veritec 4,063,896

Specialty Packaging Group 3,666,825

Hays Specialist Recruitment (Australia) Pty Ltd 3,411,074

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the reportable non-consultancy contracts’ value is available on the AusTender website.

57 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SECTION 05

2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 58

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The AEC’s 2020-21 financial results were influenced by lower than anticipated expenditures across employees and supplier activities.

The Australian National Audit Office has issued an unmodified audit opinion for the AEC’s 2020-21 financial statements.

The AEC’s financial reporting consists of a financial performance summary, together with the financial statements and supporting notes. The financial performance summary is a snapshot of the AEC’s surplus, deficit, balance sheet and net asset information.

The financial statements include the:

• auditor’s report

• the Electoral Commissioner and Chief Finance Officer statement and

• various financial statements and administered schedules.

Further information on the financial performance of the AEC is provided in the notes section.

Financial performance summary The AEC’s range of electoral activities is subject to external factors which can impact the timing of our expenditure. Consequently, our operating result can fluctuate significantly from year to year. Following an operating loss over the last two years, the AEC’s 2020-21 financial results show an operating surplus of $49.7 million, compared to an operating loss of $21.3 million in 2019-20.

The 2020-21 operating surplus was primarily a result of lower than anticipated employee and supplier expenses associated with delays in recruitment, procurement and supplier activities, and an increase in revenues from government.

The increase in revenues from government was mainly due to additional appropriations received for new government measures as part of the 2020-21 Budget and Additional Estimates process. Funding was also brought forward from the forward estimates into 2020-21 to support election preparation activities.

The statement of financial position at 30 June 2021 held net assets of $143.9 million, largely comprising appropriation receivables, leasehold improvements and computer software.

59 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Total assets increased by $47.4 million mainly due to an increase in appropriation receivables associated with additional funding for new government measures and the bringing forward of funding to support preparation for the next federal election, which was not fully spent during the financial year.

Computer software and leasehold improvements were also higher than anticipated primarily as a result of an increase in software capitalisation and fit-outs relating to new leases. Total liabilities increased by $4.8 million mainly due to the addition of new leases and the timing of payment of suppliers.

The Australian National Audit Office has issued an unmodified audit opinion for the AEC’s 2020-21 financial statements. No significant issues of non-compliance in relation to finance law were reported to the Minister for Finance in 2020-21. This included any failure to comply with the duties of accountable authorities (section 15-19 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013), significant fraudulent activity and other serious breaches (section 25-29 of the PGPA Act).

The AEC’s current funding model presents an ongoing challenge and poses significant risk in managing the increasing complexity of federal elections/by-elections and the ongoing growth in the size of the electoral roll.

We continue to work with the Department of Finance on finalising the overarching funding review, expected to be completed in early 2021-22. The review addresses the AEC’s challenge in phasing of election funding, combined with the inadequate funding received between elections for ongoing operations. This restricts the AEC’s ability to provide long-term election system sustainability and ongoing innovation.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 60

List of financial statements

Certification

Primary Financial Statements Statement of Comprehensive Income Statement of Financial Position Statement of Changes in Equity Cash Flow Statement Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities Administered Reconciliation Schedule Administered Cash Flow Statement

Overview

Notes to the Financial Statements 1. Funding 1.1 Revenue from Government 1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

1.3 Special Accounts 1.4 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 2. Departmental Financial Position and Managing Uncertainties 2.1 Cash and cash equivalents

2.2 Trade and other receivables 2.3 Non-Financial Assets 2.4 Other Payables and Provisions 2.5 Interest Bearing Liabilities 2.6 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 3. People and Relationships

3.1 Employee Benefits 3.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration 3.3 Related Party Disclosures 4. Expenses 4.1 Expenses 5. Financial Instruments 6. Other Information 6.1 Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities

CONTENTS

Australian Electoral Commission

61 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Certification

GPO Box 707, Canberra ACT 2601 38 Sydney Avenue, Forrest ACT 2603 Phone (02) 6203 7300

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Assistant Minister for Electoral Matters

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Electoral Commission (the Entity) for the year ended 30 June 2021:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2021 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2021 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by Electoral Commissioner and Chief Finance Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; • Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income; • Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities; • Administered Reconciliation Schedule; • Administered Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to the financial statements, comprising of a Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and other

explanatory information.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Electoral Commissioner is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Electoral Commissioner is also responsible for such internal control as the Electoral Commissioner determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 62

In preparing the financial statements, the Electoral Commissioner is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Electoral Commissioner is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounti ng unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate .

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material mis statement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office A uditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basi s for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material

misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or t he override of internal control; • obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness o f

the Entity’s internal control; • evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures ma de by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting

and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertaint y exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the fi nancial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Sally Bond

Executive Director

Delegate of the Auditor - General

Canberra

9 September 2021

63 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 64

Primary financial statements

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Original Budget1

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits 3.1 75,724 83,070 86,365

Suppliers 4.1A 83,496 70,892 85,484

Depreciation and amortisation 2.3 25,405 25,238 24,993

Impairment loss allowance on financial instruments 4.1B 97 12 85

Finance costs 4.1C 1,200 740 752

Losses from asset disposals 2.3 1,726 1,339 -

Total expenses 187,648 181,291 197,679

Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2A 13,691 12,027 11,038

Other revenue 1.2B 331 281 -

Total own-source revenue 14,022 12,308 11,038

Gains Other gains 1.2C 1,999 40 85

Total gains 1,999 40 85

Total own-source income 16,021 12,348 11,123

Net (cost of) services (171,627) (168,943) (186,556)

Revenue from Government Revenue from Government 1.1A 219,481 144,468 173,950

Surplus / (Deficit) on continuing operations 47,854 (24,475) (12,606)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation reserve 1,850 3,144 -

Total other comprehensive income 1,850 3,144 -

Total comprehensive profit / (loss) 1.4 49,704 (21,331) (12,606)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. The Original Budget references the published 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Budget Variances Commentary Statement of Comprehensive Income The AEC's total departmental expense of $187.6 million is lower when compared to the original budget. This is primarily due to lower than anticipated employee benefits and supplier expenses, as a result of delays in recruitment, procurement, and supplier activities.

Revenue from Government was higher due to additional funding appropriated to the AEC as part of the 2020-21 Portfolio Additional Estimates which was not fully spent within the financial year. This included funding for government measures to deploy polling place technology, Northern Territory electoral office operations, and to conduct by-elections and electoral redistributions. Additionally, $23.6 million of funding was brought forward from the forward estimates into the 2020-21 financial year to support election preparation activities.

Overall, lower than anticipated total expenses and an increase in Revenue from Government have resulted in the AEC incurring a higher than expected operating surplus.

Australian Electoral Commission

65 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Original Budget2

Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 2.1 1,348 1,490 1,490

Trade and other receivables 2.2 144,850 107,033 107,033

Total financial assets 146,198 108,523 108,523

Non-financial assets Leasehold Improvements1 2.3 74,986 71,577 76,015

Plant and equipment 2.3 7,771 7,020 6,535

Computer software 2.3 21,900 14,832 17,653

Inventories 1,432 2,007 2,007

Prepayments 1,347 2,314 2,314

Total non-financial assets 107,436 97,750 104,524

Total assets 253,634 206,273 213,047

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 5 9,878 6,371 6,768

Other payables 2.4A 3,311 5,278 4,881

Total payables 13,189 11,649 11,649

Interest bearing liabilities Leases 2.5 71,214 67,259 68,539

Total interest bearing liabilities 71,214 67,259 68,539

Provisions Employee leave 21,527 22,505 22,505

Provision for restoration 2.4B 3,770 3,474 3,474

Total provisions 25,297 25,979 25,979

Total liabilities 109,700 104,887 106,167

Net assets 143,934 101,386 106,880

EQUITY Contributed equity 100,023 107,179 125,277

Asset revaluation surplus 28,935 27,085 27,086

Retained earnings 14,976 (32,878) (45,483)

Total equity 143,934 101,386 106,880

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. Right-of-use assets are included in the Leasehold Improvements Assets.

2. The Original Budget references the published 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Budget Variances Commentary Statement of Financial Position The AEC's total assets of $253.6 million is higher when compared to the original budget. This is mainly due to an increase in appropriations receivable and non-financial assets.

Financial Assets - Appropriations receivable is significantly higher due to additional funding appropriated for new measures and the bringing forward of $23.6 million forward years in funding to support preparation for the next federal election, which was not fully spent during the financial year. Non-Financial Assets - Non-financial assets are higher than anticipated mainly due to an unanticipated increase in the development of Computer Software.

The AEC’s total liabilities of $109.7 million is slightly higher when compared to the original budget. This is mainly due to the addition of new leases and the timing of payment of suppliers invoices.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 66

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Original Budget1

$'000 $'000 $'000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 107,179 96,315 107,177

Adjusted opening balance 107,179 96,315 107,177

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Departmental Capital Budget 18,100 10,864 18,100

Repealed Appropriation (25,256) - -

Total transactions with owners (7,156) 10,864 18,100

Closing balance as at 30 June 100,023 107,179 125,277

RETAINED EARNINGS Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period (32,878) (10,818) (32,877)

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 - 2,415 -

Adjusted opening balance (32,878) (8,403) (32,877)

Comprehensive income (Deficit) / surplus for the period 47,854 (24,475) (12,606)

Total comprehensive income 47,854 (24,475) (12,606)

Closing balance as at 30 June 14,976 (32,878) (45,483)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 27,085 23,941 27,086

Adjusted opening balance 27,085 23,941 27,086

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income 1,850 3,144 -

Total comprehensive income 1,850 3,144 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 28,935 27,085 27,086

TOTAL EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 101,386 109,438 101,386

Adjustment to opening balance - 2,415 -

Adjusted opening balance 101,386 111,853 101,386

Comprehensive income (Deficit) / surplus for the period 47,854 (24,475) (12,606)

Other comprehensive income 1,850 3,144 -

Total comprehensive income 49,704 (21,331) (12,606)

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Departmental Capital Budget 18,100 10,864 18,100

Repealed Appropriation (25,256) - -

Total transactions with owners (7,156) 10,864 18,100

Closing balance as at 30 June 143,934 101,386 106,880

1. The Original Budget references the published 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary Statement of Changes in Equity The AEC's equity position of $143.9 million is higher when compared to the original budget. This improved position is mainly due to a higher than expected operating surplus of $47.9 million against a budgeted deficit of $12.6 million in 2020-21, in addition to funding received as part of the 2020-21 Portfolio Additional Estimates to deliver government measures and to support the preparation for the next federal election.

Accounting Policy Contributions by owners Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

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67 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Original Budget1

Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 186,046 203,063 173,950

Rendering of services 12,928 19,287 11,038

Net GST received 7,284 19,463 -

Total cash received 206,258 241,813 184,988

Cash used Employees 76,526 81,466 86,365

Suppliers 86,868 109,035 85,484

Interest payments on lease liabilities 1,026 787 752

Section 74 receipts transferred to the OPA 22,151 39,356 -

Total cash used 186,571 230,644 172,601

Net cash from operating activities 19,687 11,169 12,387

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment 17,554 6,678 18,100

Total cash used 17,554 6,678 18,100

Net cash (used by) investing activities (17,554) (6,678) (18,100)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Departmental Capital Budget 12,202 6,550 18,100

Total cash received 12,202 6,550 18,100

Cash used Principal payments of lease liabilities 14,477 11,953 12,387

Total cash used 14,477 11,953 12,387

Net cash (used by) financing activities (2,275) (5,403) 5,713

Net (decrease) in cash held (142) (912) -

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,490 2,402 1,490

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2.1 1,348 1,490 1,490

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. The Original Budget references the published 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements.

CASH FLOW STATEMENT

Budget Variances Commentary Cash Flow Statement The AEC's operating cash used was lower than anticipated when compared to the original budget. This is primarily due to lower than anticipated employee benefits and supplier expenses, as a result of delays in recruitment, procurement, and supplier activities.

The AEC’s investing cash used to purchase property, plant and equipment and financing cash received from the departmental capital budget are both lower when compared to the original budget. This is mainly due to unanticipated delays in capital works associated with the COVID-19 environment.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 68

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULES

2021 2020

Original Budget

for the period ended 30 June 2021 Notes $’000 $’000 $’000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Political Party / nominations refunds / Non Voter Fines Refunds 505 - -

505 - -

INCOME Revenue Non-taxation revenue Electoral fines/penalties 169 2,847 33

Political Party funding 181 9,017 -

Other 44 5 -

Total non-taxation revenue 394 11,869 33

Total revenue 394 11,869 33

Net contribution by services (111) 11,869 33

(Deficit) / Surplus (111) 11,869 33

as at 30 June 2021

EXPENSES

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income

Total expenses

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

There are no assets and liabilities as at 30 June 2021 (2020: Nil).

Budget Variances Commentary Schedule of Comprehensive Income The AEC's administered expenses and revenue were higher than anticipated due to the two by-elections conducted during the financial year.

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69 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULES (continued)

2021 2020

Administered Reconciliation Schedule Notes $’000 $’000

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July - (24,704)

Net cost of/(contribution by) services:

Income 394 11,869

Less: Expenses 505 -

Transfers (to)/from the Australian Government:

Appropriation transfers from Official Public Account Special appropriations (limited) 505 15,984

Appropriation transfers to OPA Transfers to OPA (394) (3,149)

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June - -

1. Lapsed on 1 July

Administered Cash Flow Statement 2021 2020

for the period ended 30 June 2021 Notes $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Electoral fines/penalties 169 2,847

Political Party funding 181 -

Other 44 5

Total cash received 394 2,852

Cash used Political Party / nominations refunds 505 15,689

Total cash used 505 15,689

Net cash flows (used by) / from operating activities (111) (12,837)

Cash from Official Public Account Appropriations 505 15,984

Total cash from official public account 505 15,984

Cash to Official Public Account Appropriations (394) (3,149)

Total cash to official public account (394) (3,149)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period - 2

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period - -

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account Revenue collected by the AEC for use by the Government rather than the AEC is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the entity on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the schedule of administered cash flows and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 70

Overview

Departmental

Events After the Reporting Period

There are no events after the reporting date that will materially affect the financial statements.

There are no events after the reporting date that will materially affect the financial statements.

Except where otherwise stated, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Administered

Taxation

The AEC is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Reporting of Administered activities Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the administered schedules and related notes.

New Accounting Standards

There are no new accounting standards applicable to the AEC for this financial year.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

There are no new accounting standards applicable to the AEC for this financial year.

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 .

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with: (a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and (b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

Objectives of the Australian Electoral Commission

The Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of the AEC is to maintain an impartial and independent electoral system for eligible voters through active electoral roll management, efficient delivery of polling services and targeted education and public awareness programs.

Overview

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71 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

1.1 Revenue from Government

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government

Notes 2021 2020

$’000 $’000

1.1A: Revenue From Government Appropriations

Departmental appropriation - operating 1.1B 204,581 129,568

Departmental special appropriations 1.1D 14,900 14,900

Total Revenue from Government 219,481 144,468

1.1B: Annual Appropriations ("recoverable GST exclusive")

Ordinary annual services Annual appropriation Operating Operating 204,581 129,568

Section 74 receipts 22,151 39,189

Total operating appropriation 226,732 168,757

Capital Budget 18,100 10,864

Total 244,832 179,621

Appropriation applied Operating (171,287) (242,253)

Capital Departmental Capital Budget (12,202) (6,550)

Total capital appropriation applied (12,202) (6,550)

Total appropriation applied (183,489) (248,803)

Variance 1,2 61,343 (69,182)

1. The 2020-21 variance relates to the additional funding appropriated for new measures and the bringing forward of $23.6m in funding to support preparation for the next federal election which was not fully spent during the year. 2. The 2019-20 variance relates to the timing of the federal election and associated receipt/payment of invoices. Expenses were incurred in 2018-19 but the associated drawdowns occurred early in the 2019-20 financial year from remaining 2018-19 appropriation.

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the AEC gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Funding This section identifies the AEC's funding structure and the funds available to the AEC.

Australian Electoral Commission

Notes to the financial statements Funding

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 72

1.1C: Unspent Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive') 2021 2020

$’000 $’000

Departmental Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents 1,348 1,490

Total Cash and cash equivalents 1,348 1,490

Appropriations Receivable Appropriation Act 1 - 2020-21 71,659 -

Appropriation Act 1 - 2020-21 - Departmental Capital Budget 11,925 -

Appropriation Act 3 - 2020-21 45,531 -

Supply Act 1 - 2020-21 - Departmental Capital Budget 6,175 -

Appropriation Act 1 - 2019-20 - 2,552

Appropriation Act 3 - 2019-20 - 1,719

Appropriation Act 1 - 2019-20 - Departmental Capital Budget 5,683 6,337

Supply Act 1 - 2019-20 - 50,782

Supply Act 1 - 2019-20 - Departmental Capital Budget - 4,527

Special Appropriation - 2019-201 - 14,900

Appropriation Act 1 - 2018-19 - 6,550

Appropriation Act 1 - 2018-19 - Departmental Capital Budget - 7,022

Appropriation Act 1 - 2017-18 2 - 4,000

Appropriation Act 3 - 2017-18- Departmental Capital Budget 2 - 6,356

Total Appropriations Receivable 140,973 104,745

Total departmental 142,321 106,235

1.1D: Special Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

14,900 -

306 15,984

Total special appropriations applied 15,206 15,984

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Departmental) special appropriation is limited to $14.900m. Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Administered) special appropriation is not limited.

1. Lapsed on 1 July 2020 due to the nature of Special Appropriation.

No entities spent money from the Consolidated Revenue Fund on behalf of the AEC.

Appropriation applied

Authority Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Departmental) Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Administered)

2. Since 2015, Annual Appropriation Acts are automatically repealed three years after they are passed by parliament. These balances as at 30 June 2020 were repealed on 1 July 2020.

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73 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

1.2 Own-Source Revenue and Gains

2021 2020 $’000 $’000

Own-Source Revenue

1.2A: Revenue from contracts with customers

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers Type of customer:

Australian Government entities (related parties) 3,083 1,705

State and Territory Governments 10,595 10,234

Non-government entities 13 88

Total rendering of services 13,691 12,027

Accounting Policy

1.2B: Other Revenue Other 331 281

Total other revenue 331 281

Accounting Policy Resources Received Free of Charge

1.2C: Gains Makegood Gains 1,627 40

Gains from sale of assets 372 -

Total gains 1,999 40

Revenue from contracts with customers are for services rendered, primarily for the management and provision of the electoral roll.

Other revenue includes resources received free of charge for audit services of $0.100 million (2020: $0.100 million).

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

AEC classifies goods and service based agreements as within the scope of AASB 15 when all the following conditions are satisfied: • There is an agreement that has been approved by all parties to the agreement; • The obligations of each party under the agreement can be identi�ied;

• A pattern of transfer of services can be identi�ied; • The agreement has commercial substance; • It is highly probable that AEC will collect the payments.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

AEC recognises goods and services revenue within the scope of AASB 15 either at a point in time when the performance obligation has been completed or over time with proportionate recognition over the period of the agreement. Consideration can be received in advance of the performance obligation being fufilled in which case an unearned revenue liability is raised in relation to those performance obligations (refer note 2.4A).

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 74

1.3 Special Accounts

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Services for other Entities and Trust Monies (SOETM)

Balance brought forward from previous period 2,913 4,273

Increases 15 48

Available for payments 2,928 4,321

Less: Decreases 18 1,408

Total balance carried to the next period 2,910 2,913

Balance represented by:

Cash held in the Official Public Account 2,910 2,913

Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 section 78. Purpose: For the expenditure of monies held in trust or otherwise for the benefit of a person other than the Commonwealth, for example, political candidate deposits.

The special account balance are held in trust.

AEC has a SOETM Special Account established under section 20(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 Determination 2012/04 which will sunset on 1 October 2022.

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75 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

1.4 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

Total comprehensive Income/(Loss) - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 49,704 (21,331)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation 8,197 12,424 Plus: depreciation right-of-use assets 17,208 12,814

Less: principal repayments - operating leases (14,477) (11,953)

Net Cash Operating Surplus / (Deficit) 60,632 (8,046)

From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses of non-corporate Commonwealth entities and selected corporate Commonwealth entities were replaced with a separate capital budget provided through equity injections. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

The AEC's ongoing annual funding model presumes a federal election is conducted solely within a financial year and does not consider the variable nature of the timing of an event e.g. the 2019 Federal Election was held in May 2019 where election expenses were incurred both in the 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial year. As a result the AEC may report an operating loss due to the timing of expenditure relating to electoral events.

The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principal repayment amount reflects the impact of AASB 16 Leases, which does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 76

2.1 -2.2 Financial Assets

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

2.1: Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents 1,348 1,490

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,348 1,490

Accounting Policy Cash is recognised at its nominal amount.

2.2: Trade and other receivables Goods and services receivables Goods and services 1,082 891

Total goods and services receivables 1,082 891

Appropriation receivables Appropriation receivable 140,973 104,745

Total appropriation receivables 140,973 104,745

Other receivables Statutory receivables 2,804 1,396

Comcare Payments 22 12

Total other receivables 2,826 1,408

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 144,881 107,044

Less impairment loss allowance (31) (11)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 144,850 107,033

Accounting Policy Financial assets Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2020: 30 days). Refer to note 5.1 for accounting policy.

Impairment allowance for the period has increased to $0.031 million (2020: $0.011 million) has been recognised in relation to loans and receivables and included in the net cost of service. $0.097 million (2020: $0.012 million) has been written off.

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write - off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the Financial assets included in this category need to meet

Departmental Financial Position This section analyses the AEC's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result and how the AEC manages financial risks related to these and its operating environment. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

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77 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

2.3 Non-Financial Assets

Leasehold Improvements

Plant & Equipment

Computer Software1 Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2020

Gross book value 85,272 12,882 68,901 167,055

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (13,695) (5,862) (54,069) (73,626)

Total as at 1 July 2020 71,577 7,020 14,832 93,429

Adjusted total as at 1 July 2020 71,577 7,020 14,832 93,429

Additions Purchase 4,702 2,438 10,627 17,767

Lease 18,742 - - 18,742

Right-of-use Assets Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 663 1,187 - 1,850

Depreciation and amortisation (3,038) (3,075) (2,084) (8,197)

Depreciation of right-of-use assets (17,208) - - (17,208)

Other movements Gross Value - Asset transfer (169) 169 - -

Accumulated depreciation - Asset transfer (32) 32 - -

Disposals

(251) - (1,475) (1,726)

Total as at 30 June 2021 74,986 7,771 21,900 104,657

Total as at 30 June 2021 represented by Gross book value 106,102 13,876 79,522 199,500

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (31,116) (6,105) (57,622) (94,843)

Total as at 30 June 2021 74,986 7,771 21,900 104,657

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets (included in table above) 67,132 - - 67,132

s Revaluations of non-financial assets

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangible assets

1. Computer Software is comprised of Purchased Software ($12.166m) and Internally Generated Software ($9.734m).

No property, plant and equipment and intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated in this note. On 30 June 2021, an independent valuer conducted the revaluations.

2.3: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Intangibles

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment and intangibles (2020: nil).

Fair Value Measurement1,2,3

A revaluation increment of $0.663m for leasehold improvements (2020: $0.543m increment) and $1.187m for plant and equipment (2020: $0.340m increment) was credited to the asset revaluation surplus by asset class and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position.

At 30 June 2021 there were no significant contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangible assets.

At 30 June 2021, Leasehold Improvement and Property, Plant and Equipment Assets were measured at fair value. All Right Of Use Lease Assets and Intangibles are measured at cost.

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 78

Accounting Policy

Asset Recognition Threshold

Revaluations

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Following initial recognition at cost, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 the AEC has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in the AEC's financial statements.

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘makegood’ provisions in property leases taken up by the AEC where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the AEC’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for 'make good' recognised.

Purchases of plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

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Depreciation

2021 2020

Leasehold improvements Plant and equipment 5 to 10 years 5 to 10 years

IT Equipment 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years

ROU assets

All intangible assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2021.

Lesser of lease term (including Lesser of lease term (including

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Depreciable plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the AEC, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Impairment

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2021. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

Lesser of lease term/useful life Lesser of lease term/useful life

Intangible assets are amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the AEC's software are 1 to 10 years (2020: 1 to 10 years)

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the AEC were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

The AEC's intangibles comprise internally developed software and purchased software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Intangibles

An item of plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Derecognition

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 80

2.4 Other Payables and Provisions

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

2.4A: Other Payables Unearned Revenue 1,889 4,033

Salaries and wages 1,213 1,245

Superannuation 209 -

Total other payables 3,311 5,278

Accounting Policy Unearned revenue

Parental Leave Payments Scheme

Employee Benefits Refer to Note 3.1.

2.4B: Provision for restoration

$’000

As at 1 July 2020 3,474

Additional provisions made 1,765

Amounts used (16)

Amounts reversed (1,627)

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 174

Total as at 30 June 2021 3,770

AEC expects to recognise as income any liability for unsatisfied obligations associated with revenue from contracts with customers within the next 12 months.

Amounts received under the Parental Leave Payments Scheme by the AEC not yet paid to employees were presented as cash and a liability (payable). The total amount received under this scheme was $0.140 million (2020: $0.082 million).

Accounting Judgements and Estimates For the property leases where the AEC has an obligation to restore the premises to their original condition, AEC assesses the value of the provision for restoration in line with the relevant clauses of the lease, based on estimated costs per square metre provided by the Australian Government property manager. The AEC revalues the provision at the end of each financial year to reflect the present value of this obligation.

Australian Electoral Commission

81 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

2.5 Interest Bearing Liabilities

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

2.5: Leases Lease Liabilities 71,214 67,259

Total leases 71,214 67,259

Maturity analysis - contractual undiscounted cash flows Within 1 year 15,973 13,008

Between 1 to 5 years 35,700 30,641

More than 5 years 20,831 25,837

Total leases 72,504 69,486

The AEC in its capacity as lessee has office space and fleet motor vehicles leases

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 2.3 and 4.1C.

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2021 was $15.503m (2020: $12.693 million)

Accounting Policy For all new contracts entered into, the AEC considers whether the contract is, or contains a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate is readily determinable, or the department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased for interest. It is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease liability is remeasured, the corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right-of-use asset or profit and loss depending on the nature of the reassessment or modification.

Australian Electoral Commission

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 82

2.6 Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2.6A Departmental - Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Quantifiable Contingencies

Unquantifiable Contingencies

Significant Remote Contingencies

2.6B Administered - Contingent Assets and Liabilities

There are no administered contingencies, remote or quantifiable, for the AEC (2020: nil).

Accounting Policy Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

At 30 June 2021, the AEC had no unquantifiable contingencies (2020: nil).

The AEC has no significant remote contingencies (2020: nil).

At 30 June 2021, the AEC had no contingent assets (2020: $0.170m) and no contingent liabilities (2020: nil).

Australian Electoral Commission

83 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

3.1 Employee Benefits

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

Wages and salaries 57,768 58,176

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 5,118 7,079

Defined benefit plans 5,818 7,487

Leave and other entitlements 6,687 9,815

Separation and redundancies 333 513

Total employee benefits 75,724 83,070

Accounting policy

Superannuation

Liabilities for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

The AEC makes employer contributions to the employees' defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The AEC accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the shorthand method as at 30 June 2021. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

The AEC's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the entity's superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

People and relationships This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

Australian Electoral Commission

People and relationships

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 84

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

Short-term benefits 1,578 1,389

Post-employment benefits 247 230

Other long-term benefits 41 35

Termination benefits - 280

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 1,866 1,934

3.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the AEC, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the AEC. The AEC has determined the key management personnel to be the Electoral Commissioner, Deputy Electoral Commissioner and the three First Assistant Commissioners. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table is 5 (2020: 5).

1. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the AEC.

Australian Electoral Commission

85 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Transactions with related parties

3.3 Related Party Disclosures

The AEC is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the AEC are Key Management Personnel, the Portfolio Minister and Executive, and other Australian Government entities.

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Related party relationships:

Australian Electoral Commission

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 86

4.1A Expenses

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

4.1A: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Consultants 184 185

Contractors 38,146 24,291

Travel 1,579 1,699

IT services 13,076 13,214

Employee Related Expenses 2,577 1,699

Inventory 1,940 201

Furniture and venue hire 380 1,672

Property 7,369 13,779

Mail and Freight 5,713 8,714

Office Supplies 6,573 265

Advertising 3,820 3,560

Other 1,422 1,335

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 82,779 70,614

Goods and services split:

Goods supplied 16,248 4,097

Services rendered 66,531 66,517

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 82,779 70,614

Other suppliers Low value leases 52 29

Workers compensation expenses 665 249

Total other suppliers 717 278

Total suppliers 83,496 70,892

Accounting Policy

4.1B: Impairment loss allowance on financial instruments Impairment on trade and other receivables 97 12

Total impairment on financial instruments 97 12

4.1C: Finance costs Interest on lease liabilities 1,026 740

Unwinding of discount 174 -

Total finance costs 1,200 740

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets AEC has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The entity recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

Expenses This section includes additional financial information that is either required by AAS or the PGPA FRR or is relevant to assist users in understanding the financial statements.

Australian Electoral Commission

Expenses

87 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

5. Financial Instruments

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

5: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Financial assets at amortised cost Cash and cash equivalents 1,348 1,490

Receivables 1,051 880

Total financial assets at amortised cost 2,399 2,370

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Supplier payables 9,878 6,371

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 9,878 6,371

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2020: 30 days). Settlement of suppliers payable is usually made within 20 days.

Financial Instruments This section analyses how the AEC manages financial risks related to these and its operating environment.

Australian Electoral Commission

Financial Instruments

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 88

6. Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities

2021 2020

$’000 $’000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months Cash and cash equivalents 1,348 1,490

Trade and other receivables 1,051 880

Appropriations receivable 140,973 104,745

Other receivables 2,826 1,408

Inventories 1,432 -

Prepayment 1,277 2,314

Total no more than 12 months 148,907 110,837

More than 12 months Leasehold Improvements 74,986 71,577

Plant and equipment 7,771 7,020

Computer software 21,900 14,832

Inventories - 2,007

Prepayments 70 -

Total more than 12 months 104,727 95,436

Total assets 253,634 206,273

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months Suppliers 9,878 6,371

Other payables 3,311 5,278

Leases 15,604 13,336

Employee provisions 7,015 5,817

Makegood provisions 1,263 1,636

Total no more than 12 months 37,071 32,438

More than 12 months Leases 55,610 53,923

Employee provisions 14,512 16,688

Makegood provisions 2,507 1,838

Total more than 12 months 72,629 72,449

Total liabilities 109,700 104,887

6.1: Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities

Other information

Australian Electoral Commission

Other information

89 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

APPENDICES SECTION 06 2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT

APPENDICES 90

APPENDICES

Table 9 - Agency resource statement summary

Actual

appropriation for 2020-21 $’000

Payments made for 2020-21 $’000

Balance remaining 2020-21 $’000

Ordinary annual services a

Prior Year Departmental appropriation 104,745 99,062 5,683

Departmental appropriation b 222,681 87,391 135,290

Section 74 relevant agency receipts 22,151 22,151 -

Total ordinary annual services A 349,577 208,604 140,973

Special appropriations

Special appropriations limited by criteria/entitlement

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Administered) 502 306 196

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (Departmental) 14,900 14,900 -

Total special appropriations B 15,402 15,206 196

Special accounts c

Opening balance 2,913 -

Non-appropriation receipts to special accounts 15 -

Payments made - 18

Total special accounts C 2,928 18 2,910

Total resourcing (A + B + C ) 367,907 223,828

Total net resourcing for agency 367,907 223,828

a. Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2020-21 and Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 2020-21. This also includes prior year departmental appropriation and section 74 relevant agency receipts. b. Includes an amount of $23.783 million for the Departmental Capital Budget. For accounting purposes this amount has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’. c. Includes ‘Special Public Money’ held in accounts like Other Trust Monies (OTM) accounts, Services for other Government and Non agency

Bodies accounts (SOG) or Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts (SOETM).

This appendix provides details of the AEC’s resources and expenses in 2020-21, as required by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit Requirements for annual reports for departments, executive agencies and other non corporate Commonwealth entities, 25 June 2015. The tables in this appendix correspond to tables in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2020-21 and staff statistics, namely:

• the Agency Resource Statement, which provides information about the various funding sources that the AEC was able to draw on during the year (Table 9)

• expenses and resources by outcome, showing the detail of Budget appropriations and total resourcing for Outcome 1 (Table 10)

• average staffing levels from 2018-19 to 2020-21 (Table 11).

Appendix A: Resources

91 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Table 10 - Expenses and resources for Outcome 1

Budgeta 2020-21 $’000

Actual expenses 2020-21 $’000

Variation $’000

Program 1.1

Administered expenses

Special appropriations 502 306 196

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriationb 226,732 164,551 62,181

Special appropriations 14,900 14,900 0

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 12,691 8,197 4,494

Total for Program 1.1 254,825 187,954 66,871

Total expenses for Outcome 1 254,825 187,954 66,871

a. Full year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2020-21 Budget at Additional Estimates b. Departmental appropriation combines ordinary annual services (Appropriation Act Nos. 1 and 3, Supply Act 1) and retained revenue receipts under section 74 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

Table 11 - Average staffing levels 2018-19 to 2020-21

2018-19 2019-20 2020-21

Average staffing level (number) 788 742 678

APPENDICES 92

Appendix B: Governance

Accountable authority

Table 12: Details of accountable authority during current report period (2020-21)

Name Position title/position held

Date of commencement Date of cessation

Mr Tom Rogers Electoral Commissioner Australian Electoral Commission 15/12/2014 n/a

Audit committee details Table 13: Audit committee

Member name Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended/total number of

meetings

Total annual remuneration (GST inc.) Additional

information

Jenny Morison Jennifer Morison FCA, BEc (Sydney University) has 39 years of broad professional experience across

commerce and government. She was a national board member of the Chartered Accountants of Australia and New Zealand for four years, chief financial officer of a public company, and held senior positions in major international accounting firms. She founded Morison Consulting in 1996, specialising in government financial reforms, governance and consulting. She was awarded a Centenary Medal in 2000 for services to women and accounting. Mrs Morison has been an independent member and chair of Commonwealth audit and risk committees, and financial statement sub-committees for large and small government entities for the past 18 years.

5/5 $30,800 Independent

member and Chair

Jeff Pope

Jeff Pope is the Deputy Electoral Commissioner at the Australian Electoral Commission, a position he has held since December 2016. He has a Bachelor of Arts, a Bachelor of Laws and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. He has also completed a residential executive management course at Insead International Business School in Singapore. Mr Pope was previously an Assistant Commissioner with Victoria Police, where he was a member of a range of senior executive governance committees and project boards. He was awarded an Australian Police Medal in 2013 for his contribution to law enforcement for 23 years.

5/5 $0* Deputy Chair

93 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Member name Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended/total number of

meetings

Total annual remuneration (GST inc.) Additional

information

Mark Ridley

Mark Ridley is a Fellow of the Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (FCA) and a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. He has bachelor degrees in commerce and accounting. He has served as an independent member and chair of audit and risk committees for several large and medium-sized Commonwealth agencies since 2011, and helps entities oversee ICT projects. Mr Ridley was formerly a senior partner of PwC Australia and has held leadership roles in risk advisory, internal audit and ICT project assurance. This includes for large companies in manufacturing and financial services, as well as state and federal governments.

5/5 $19,800 Independent

member

Donna Moody

Donna Moody Bachelor of Business (Accountancy) is a recently retired senior Commonwealth public servant and was a CPA for more than 25 years. She has a background in finance, governance and change management. Ms Moody was Chief Financial Officer of the Australian Taxation Office and held program and grant management positions in the Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Department of Health. She was also the Chief Information Officer of DSS. She has been involved in, or responsible for, major organisational changes.

4/5 $19,800 Independent

member. Joined the committee in September

2020

*Not applicable as not separately remunerated as an audit committee member

APPENDICES 94

Business planning documents

Table 14: Business planning documents

Document Purpose Reviewed

AEC Corporate Plan 2021-22 The AEC’s central planning document. Sets the strategic direction for the next four years through the agency’s key

activities. Includes analysis of our operating context (addressing environment, capabilities, risk oversight and management and cooperation) and planned performance of the agency.

Annually

Assurance Plan Outlines assurance framework and the operational application in the AEC context Annually

Business Continuity Plans

Improves resilience to enable continuation of identified time critical business processes during and following a significant disruption to business operations

Annually and as required

Business Planning and Performance Reporting Framework

Supports staff to deliver outcomes in the AEC corporate plan, manage resources and finances, and supports requirements of the PGPA Act.

Annually

Business Plans (branch/state and territory)

Aligns branch and state and territory activities with business planning and reporting. Annually

Disability Inclusion Strategy Identifies relevant target outcomes from the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020

Annually

Election Readiness Framework Sets out and monitors the program of activity required to maintain election readiness

Every election cycle

Fraud Control Plan Prevents, detects and responds to fraud in accordance with Commonwealth law, fraud control policies and memorandums of understanding

Every two years (or if significant organisational change occurs)

Information Technology Strategic Plan 2018-2022

Sets the AEC’s desired information technology vision to 2022 and is supported by the IT Architecture Plan Every four years

Internal Audit Plan Sets the internal audit program for the financial year Annually

Property Plan Direction on long-term management of leased property Annually

Reconciliation Action Plan Sets activities to recognise and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in internal and external arrangements and

activities

Annually

Security Plan Strategies to protect staff, visitors, information, equipment and premises against harm, loss, interference and compromise Twice a year

Workforce Plans (division, branch/state and territory)

Details the continuous process of identifying and mitigating potential workforce risks and planning future workforce strategies

Twice a year

95 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

AEC management committees

Table 15: AEC management committees

Committee Function Members*

Meeting frequency

Executive Leadership Team

Senior management team helping to deliver strategic leadership and operational management

• EC • DEC • FAC Enabling and Regulation • FAC Service Delivery/National

Election Manager • FAC Organisational Transformation

Weekly

Organisational Health, Performance and Risk Committee

Monitors performance, risk management, compliance and controls. Provides advice and recommendations to the Executive Leadership Team

• DEC • FAC Enabling and Regulation • FAC Service Delivery • FAC Organisational

Transformation • AC People and Property • AC Disclosure, Assurance and

Engagement • AC Digital Technology and Communication • CFO • Director, Governance and

Performance Advisory section as an adviser

Bimonthly

Investment, Change and People Strategy Committee

To drive and govern the agency’s performance against the Corporate Plan 2020-21 key activity four, ‘Maintain a capable and agile organisation and continue to professionalise our workforce’

• FAC Organisational Transformation • AC Enterprise Strategy and Modernisation • AC Modernisation Delivery and

Assurance • AC Design and Improvement • AC Digital Technology and

Communications • CFO • State Manager, South Australia • Chief Financial Officer • Director, National Training and

Education Unit Observer • Director, Operations Queensland • Director, Enabling and Support Adviser • Chief People Officer

Every four weeks

Audit Committee

Provides independent advice to the Electoral Commissioner on the appropriateness of the AEC’s financial reporting, performance reporting, risk oversight and management, and systems of internal control

• Three or more members appointed by EC (the majority external). See Table 13 for membership details

• Additional AEC advisers are permitted to attend

Five times a year

APPENDICES 96

Committee Function Members*

Meeting frequency

Electoral Integrity Committee

Responsible for AEC cyber, physical and personnel security, implementation and effectiveness. This committee also oversees fraud control and related risks, privacy, and maturing of our information and knowledge management.

• FAC Enabling and Regulation • FAC Service Delivery • AC Disclosure Assurance and Engagement

• AC Digital Communications and Technology • AC Enterprise Strategy and Modernisation • CFO • Chief Legal Officer • Director, Service Operations • State Manager, Queensland • Director, Service Strategy and

Design • Director Operations, NSW • Advisers from Cyber Security,

Governance and Assurance Section

Every second month, with more meetings as required (i.e. in run-up to and during an electoral event)

National Operations and Readiness Committee (NOR) and National Election Delivery Committee (NEDC)

Supports the National Election Manager (NEM) to oversee and monitor preparations for — and successful conduct of — federal electoral events (including by-elections, plebiscites and referendums). NEM reports regularly on behalf of the NOR to the Executive Leadership Team and the Electoral Commissioner. The committee becomes the NEDC during an election event.

• FAC Service Delivery Division/ National Election Manager • All state managers • ACs

Monthly, weekly or daily as required (i.e. in run-up to and during an electoral event)

Education and Engagement Committee

Provides oversight to ensure sustained improvement in voter awareness, education, engagement and experience.

• DEC • AC Design and Improvement • State manager SA • Director, National Training and

Education Unit • Director, Community and International Engagement • Director, Communications • Director, Operations QLD and

WA

Every six weeks

Work Health and Safety Committees

A consultative forum to address health and safety at a national and strategic level, with reference to the requirements of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and the Work Health and Safety Regulations 2011

• FAC Enabling and Regulation • Management representatives • Employee representatives • Advisers from People and

Property Branch

Quarterly and out-of-session as required

*Key: Electoral Commissioner (EC); Deputy Electoral Commissioner (DEC); First Assistant Commissioner (FAC); Assistant Commissioner (AC); Chief Finance Officer (CFO)

97 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Appendix C: Commonwealth Electoral Roll information

Enrolment rate and enrolled population

Figure 2: Enrolment rate trend from 30 June 2007 to 30 June 2021

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

30/06/21

30/06/20

30/06/19

18/05/19

30/06/18

30/06/17

02/07/16

30/06/15

30/06/14

07/09/13

30/06/13

30/06/12

30/06/11

21/08/10

30/06/10

30/06/09

30/06/08

24/11/07

30/06/07

82%

84%

86%

88%

90%

92%

94%

96%

98%

100%

Federal election 2019*

Federal election 2016

Federal election 2013

Federal election 2010

Federal election 2007

PROPORTION OF ELIGIBLE AUSTRALIANS ENROLLED

NUMBER OF PEOPLE ENROLLED (MILLION)

PEOPLE ENROLLED PROPORTION OF ELIGIBLE AUSTRALIANS ENROLLED TARGET PARTICIPATION

APPENDICES 98

Commonwealth Electoral roll extracts and recipients Table 16: Recipients of electoral roll extracts 2020-21*

Name Electorate/state Roll data provided Date provided

Ms Alicia Payne MP Member for Canberra Division of Canberra Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Mr Andrew Wilkie MP Member for Clark Division of Clark Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Hon Michael Sukkar MP Member for Deakin Division of Deakin Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Mr Bert van Manen MP Member for Forde Division of Forde Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Mr Craig Kelly MP Member for Hughes Division of Hughes Mar 2021 - Jun 2021

Dr Helen Haines MP Member for Indi Division of Indi Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Hon Bob Katter MP Member for Kennedy Division of Kennedy Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Mr Jason Falinski MP Member for Mackellar Division of Mackellar Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Ms Rebekha Sharkie MP Member for Mayo Division of Mayo Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Mr Adam Bandt MP Member for Melbourne Division of Melbourne Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Ms Zali Steggall MP Member for Warringah Division of Warringah Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Andrew Bragg Senator for New South Wales State of New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Concetta Fierravanti-Wells Senator for New South Wales State of New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Hollie Hughes Senator for New South Wales State of New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Marise Payne

Senator for New South Wales State of New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Matthew Canavan Senator for Queensland State of Queensland Aug 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Pauline Hanson Senator for Queensland State of Queensland Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Amanda Stoker Senator for Queensland State of Queensland Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Larissa Waters Senator for Queensland State of Queensland Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Alex Antic Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Mar 2021 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Stirling Griff Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Sarah Hanson-Young Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Oct 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Andrew McLachlan

Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Rex Patrick Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Anne Ruston

Senator for South Australia State of South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck Senator for Tasmania State of Tasmania Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Jacqui Lambie Senator for Tasmania State of Tasmania Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Nick McKim Senator for Tasmania State of Tasmania Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Peter Whish-Wilson

Senator for Tasmania State of Tasmania Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Raff Ciccone Senator for Victoria State of Victoria Jul 2020

Senator James Paterson Senator for Victoria State of Victoria Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

99 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Name Electorate/state Roll data provided Date provided

Senator the Hon Mathias Cormann Senator for Western Australia State of Western Australia Jul 2020 - Nov 2020

Senator the Hon Linda Reynolds Senator for Western Australia State of Western Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Dean Smith Senator for Western Australia State of Western Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Senator Jordon Steele-John Senator for Western Australia State of Western Australia May 2021 - Jun 2021

*Between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021

Table 17: Registered political parties provided with electoral roll extracts 2020-21

Registered political party Roll data provided Date provided

Australian Labor Party National Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Liberal Party of Australia National Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Australian Greens National Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Australian Federation Party National Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

National Party of Australia Australian Capital Territory, New South

Wales, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia

Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

National Party of Australia - NSW New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Republican Party of Australia New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Reason Australia New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Australia First Party (NSW) Inc. New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Science Party New South Wales Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Pauline Hanson’s One Nation Queensland Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Queensland Greens Queensland Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Centre Alliance South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Child Protection Party South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

National Party of Australia (SA) Inc. South Australia Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Australian Greens Tasmania Branch Tasmania Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Jacqui Lambie Network Tasmania Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Australian Christians New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria

and Western Australia

Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Australian Citizens Party Victoria Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Liberal Democratic Party Australian Capital Territory, New South

Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia

Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Democratic Labour Party New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria

and Western Australia

Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

National Party of Australia - Victoria Victoria Jul 2020 - Jun 2021

Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party Victoria Jul 2020

*Between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021

APPENDICES 100

Table 18: Government departments and agencies provided with electoral roll extracts 2020-21*

Government departments and agencies are entitled to receive electoral roll information if they are a ‘prescribed authority’, under item 4 of subsection 90B(4) of the Electoral Act. Each department and agency must justify access through its statutory functions and the Privacy Act 1988.

Institution Data provided

Aug 2020 Nov 2020 Feb 2021 May 2021

Australian Bureau of Statistics Yes

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission

Yes

Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission Yes Yes

Australian Federal Police Yes Yes Yes Yes

Australian Financial Security Authority Yes Yes Yes Yes

Australian Securities and Investments Commission

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Australian Security Intelligence Organisation Yes Yes Yes Yes

Australian Taxation Office Yes Yes Yes Yes

Commonwealth Superannuation Commission Yes Yes Yes Yes

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade - Australian Passport Office Yes Yes Yes Yes

Federal Court of Australia Yes

Home Affairs Yes Yes Yes Yes

Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor General

Yes

Services Australia Yes Yes Yes Yes

Sport Integrity Australia (formerly ASADA) Yes Yes

*Between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021

Table 19: Provision of electoral roll information to organisations verifying identity for financial purposes 2020-21*

Under subsection 90B(4) of the Electoral Act, private sector organisations may receive roll information for identity verification processes related to the Financial Transactions Reports Act 1988 and the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006.

Institution Data provided

Aug 2020 Nov 2020 Feb 2021 May 2021

Equifax (Veda Advantage Information Services and Solutions Ltd) Yes Yes Yes Yes

illion (Perceptive Communications Pty Ltd) Yes Yes Yes Yes

*Between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021

101 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Appendix D: Electoral events data

Table 20: By-elections conducted during 2020-21

By-election Polling day Result declared

No. of candidates Former member Elected member

Eden-Monaro Saturday 4 July Monday 20 July

14 Hon Dr Mike Kelly

AM MP

Ms Kristy McBain MP (ALP)

Groom Saturday

28 November

Wednesday 2 December

4 Hon Dr John

McVeigh MP

Mr Garth Hamilton MP (LNP)

Table 21: Key voting data for each by-election 2020-21

Vote type Ordinary Absent Provisional

Declaration pre-poll Postal Total

Division Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %

Eden-Monaro 86 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)

Formal 81,656 92.73 0 0.00 201 92.63 150 96.15 12,928 96.91 94,935 93.29

Informal 6,398 7.27 0 0.00 16 7.37 6 3.85 412 3.09 6,832 6.71

Total votes

88,054 86.53 0 0.00 217 0.21 156 0.15 13,340 13.11 101,767 89.13*

Groom 56 polling places (including pre-poll voting places, special hospital teams and divisional office)

Formal 65,667 96.74 0 0.00 130 96.30 109 98.20 20,235 98.62 86,141 97.18

Informal 2,214 3.26 0 0.00 5 3.70 2 1.80 283 1.38 2,504 2.82

Total votes

67,881 76.58 0 0.00 135 0.15 111 0.13 20,518 23.15 88,645 81.66*

* Total percentage figures reflect the turnout (total votes as a percentage of enrolment).

APPENDICES 102

Appendix E: Public awareness data

Advertising and market research Research was undertaken during the year to inform the AEC’s communication strategy for the new electoral cycle. We also began preparations for advertising and other communication activities in advance of the 2021-22 federal election. Further, we conducted an advertising campaign for the 2020 Groom by-election.

More information on advertising campaigns is available at www.aec.gov.au and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

Table 22 shows payments of $14,300 or more (GST inclusive) to advertising agencies and market research, polling, direct mail and media advertising organisations, as required under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918. Figures reflect payments above the threshold unless otherwise specified.

Table 22: Advertising and media placement payments, $14,300 or more

Services Agency name Details Amount (GST

inclusive)

Advertising creative development

BMF Creation of by-election campaign advertising materials and preparation and production of materials for the next federal election campaign.

$1,120,621.65

Carbon Creative Creation of Indigenous/translated advertising materials for the next federal election campaign. $149,600.00

Market research Wallis Benchmarking and tracking research for by-elections and commencement of survey design for federal election campaign benchmark and tracking research.

$87,619.50

ORIMA Developmental communications market research and concept testing. $151,958.18

Post Eden-Monaro by-election survey with temporary election workforce staff. $18,500

Advertising placement

Universal McCann

Campaign advertising placement for federal by-election and advertising services associated with federal election campaign.

Non-campaign advertising placement for recruitment, industrial and commercial elections, electoral redistributions, and party registrations.

$779,758.69

TOTAL $2,308,058.02

103 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Appendix F: Electoral redistribution data

Table 23: Summary of electoral redistributions conducted in 2020-21

Electoral redistributions Victoria Western Australia

Basis for AEC’s determination triggering a redistribution

On 3 July 2020, the Electoral Commissioner determined that the number of members of the House of Representatives to be chosen by Victoria at a general election had increased from 38 to 39.

On 3 July 2020, the Electoral Commissioner determined that the number of members of the House of Representatives to be chosen by Western Australia at a general election had decreased from 16 to 15.

Direction to commence redistribution 15 July 2020 15 July 2020

Public input relating to the redistribution There were 102 written suggestions received between 16 September and 16

October 2020.

There were 27 written suggestions received between 23 September and 23 October 2020.

There were 48 written comments on suggestions received between 19 October and 30 October 2020.

There were 17 written comments on suggestions received between 26 October and 6 November 2020.

Release of Redistribution Committee’s proposed redistribution

19 March 2021 19 March 2021

Public input relating to augmented Electoral Commission’s proposed redistribution

There were 67 written objections received between 19 March and 16 April 2021. There were 31 written objections received between 19 March and 16 April 2021.

There were 53 written comments on objections received between 19 April and 30 April 2021.

There were two written comments on objections received between 19 April and 30 April 2021.

Augmented Electoral Commission activities Inquiries held: 22 submissions were made at the inquiry held online.

Decision: adopt the proposed redistribution, with changes.

Announcement of decision: 29 June 2021.

Inquiries held: six submissions were made at the inquiry held in Perth.

Decision: adopt the proposed redistribution, with changes.

Announcement of decision: 4 June 2021.

APPENDICES 104

Appendix G: Political party registrations and financial disclosure data

Election funding payments in 2020-21 Election funding entitlements are calculated as at the 20th day after polling day, and an automatic payment is made to eligible candidates and political parties. For the 2020 Eden-Monaro and Groom by-elections, the automatic payment amount was $10,344.252.

To receive election funding greater than the automatic payment, the agent of the eligible political party, candidate or Senate group must lodge a claim with the AEC setting out the electoral expenditure incurred.

During the year, the AEC received eight election funding claims, five for the Eden-Monaro by-election and three for the Groom by-election. Details of the amounts paid are published on the Transparency Register as claims are determined.

Eden Monaro by-election Election funding claims for the Eden-Monaro by-election could be lodged from 24 July 2020 to 3 January 2021. The total amount of funding paid for the Eden-Monaro by-election was $245,990.04. This includes $51,721.25 in automatic payments and $194,268.79 in claims accepted.

Groom by-election Election funding claims for the Groom by-election could be lodged from 18 December 2020 to 27 May 2021. The total amount of election funding paid for the by-election was $235,037.58. This includes $41,377.00 in automatic payments and $193,660.58 in claims accepted.

Total election funding paid in 2020-21 was $481,027.62.

Annual financial disclosure returns 2020-21 Annual financial disclosure returns and amendments received in 2020-21 include:

• 589 annual financial disclosure returns and amendments

• 475 returns and 27 amendments for the 2019-20 financial year

• 30 returns and 28 amendments for the 2018-19 financial year

• two returns and 20 amendments for the 2017-18 financial year

• three returns and three amendments for the 2016-17 financial year

• one amendment for the 2015-16 financial year

• 30 election returns from the 2019 federal election, Eden-Monaro and Groom by elections.

105 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Appendix H: Workforce statistics

Table 24: All ongoing employees current report period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

NSW 28 3 31 58 30 88 0 0 0 119

QLD 15 4 19 51 15 66 0 0 0 85

SA 11 0 11 15 4 19 0 0 0 30

TAS 3 0 3 10 1 11 0 0 0 14

VIC 32 1 33 62 12 74 0 0 0 107

WA 4 0 4 29 7 36 0 0 0 40

ACT 112 4 116 142 20 162 0 0 0 278

NT 3 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

External Territories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 208 12 220 368 89 457 0 0 0 677

Table 25: All non-ongoing employees by location current report period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

NSW 2 1 3 5 3 8 0 0 0 11

QLD 2 0 2 5 7 12 0 0 0 14

SA 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

TAS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

VIC 1 1 2 2 1 3 0 0 0 5

WA 0 0 0 3 3 6 0 0 0 6

ACT 13 1 14 23 3 26 0 0 0 40

NT 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

External Territories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 21 3 24 39 17 56 0 0 0 80

APPENDICES 106

Table 26: All ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

NSW 31 2 33 68 34 102 0 0 0 135

Qld 16 3 19 52 17 69 0 0 0 88

SA 9 0 9 16 5 21 0 0 0 30

Tas 3 0 3 8 2 10 0 0 0 13

Vic 27 1 28 57 19 76 0 0 0 104

WA 4 0 4 32 12 44 0 0 0 48

ACT 106 4 110 127 21 148 0 0 0 258

NT 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

External Territories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 198 10 208 360 110 470 0 0 0 678

Table 27: All non-ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

NSW 2 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 4

Qld 1 1 2 0 4 4 0 0 0 6

SA 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Tas 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

Vic 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

WA 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

ACT 12 0 12 13 1 14 0 0 0 26

NT 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

External Territories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 19 1 20 19 5 24 0 0 0 44

107 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Table 28: Australian Public Service Act 1999 (Public Service Act) ongoing employees current report period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

SES 1 2 0 2 4 0 4 0 0 0 6

EL 2 15 0 15 29 1 30 0 0 0 45

EL 1 51 1 52 62 9 71 0 0 0 123

APS 6 63 2 65 128 5 133 0 0 0 198

APS 5 45 4 49 47 4 51 0 0 0 100

APS 4 16 0 16 41 13 54 0 0 0 70

APS 3 13 1 14 50 12 62 0 0 0 76

APS 2 1 4 5 6 45 51 0 0 0 56

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 208 12 220 368 89 457 0 0 0 677

Table 29: Australian Public Service Act non-ongoing employees current report period (2020-21)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

EL 1 4 1 5 7 0 7 0 0 0 12

APS 6 5 1 6 5 1 6 0 0 0 12

APS 5 4 0 4 7 0 7 0 0 0 11

APS 4 3 0 3 6 2 8 0 0 0 11

APS 3 1 0 1 7 0 7 0 0 0 8

APS 2 0 1 1 0 14 14 0 0 0 15

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 17 3 20 36 17 53 0 0 0 73

APPENDICES 108

Table 30: Australian Public Service Act ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

SES 1 5 0 5 2 0 2 0 0 0 7

EL 2 13 0 13 28 0 28 0 0 0 41

EL 1 50 1 51 56 4 60 0 0 0 111

APS 6 61 2 63 105 12 117 0 0 0 180

APS 5 36 3 39 50 2 52 0 0 0 91

APS 4 12 0 12 51 12 63 0 0 0 75

APS 3 18 0 18 60 16 76 0 0 0 94

APS 2 2 4 6 7 64 71 0 0 0 77

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 198 10 208 360 110 470 0 0 0 678

Table 31: Australian Public Service Act non-ongoing employees previous report period (2019-20)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total

Indeterminate

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 1 0 1 3 0 3 0 0 0 4

APS 6 1 1 2 4 0 4 0 0 0 6

APS 5 5 0 5 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

APS 4 1 0 1 6 1 7 0 0 0 8

APS 3 2 0 2 3 0 3 0 0 0 5

APS 2 0 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 0 4

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 10 1 11 17 5 22 0 0 0 33

109 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Table 32: Australian Public Service Act employees by full-time and part-time status current report period (2020-21)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

Full-time Part-time Total ongoing Full-time Part-time Total non-ongoing

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 3 0 3 0 0 0 3

SES 1 6 0 6 2 0 2 8

EL 2 44 1 45 2 0 2 47

EL 1 113 10 123 11 1 12 135

APS 6 191 7 198 10 2 12 210

APS 5 92 8 100 11 0 11 111

APS 4 57 13 70 9 2 11 81

APS 3 63 13 76 8 0 8 84

APS 2 7 49 56 0 15 15 71

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 576 101 677 53 20 73 750

Table 33: Australian Public Service Act employees by full-time and part-time status previous report period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

Full-time Part-time Total ongoing Full-time Part-time Total non-ongoing

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 2

SES 1 7 0 7 0 0 0 7

EL 2 41 0 41 0 0 0 41

EL 1 106 5 111 4 0 4 115

APS 6 166 14 180 5 1 6 186

APS 5 86 5 91 6 0 6 97

APS 4 63 12 75 7 1 8 83

APS 3 78 16 94 5 0 5 99

APS 2 9 68 77 0 4 4 81

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

TOTAL 558 120 678 27 6 33 711

APPENDICES 110

Table 34: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location, current report period (2020-21)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 119 10 129

Qld 85 13 98

SA 30 1 31

Tas 14 0 14

Vic 107 4 111

WA 40 5 45

ACT 278 38 316

NT 4 2 6

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

TOTAL 677 73 750

Table 35: Australian Public Service Act Employment type by location, previous report period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 135 3 138

Qld 88 5 93

SA 30 0 30

Tas 13 1 14

Vic 104 0 104

WA 48 0 48

ACT 258 23 281

NT 2 1 3

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

TOTAL 678 33 711

111 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Table 36: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment current report period (2020-21)

Total

Ongoing 15

Non-ongoing 4

TOTAL 19

Table 37: Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment previous report period (2019-20)

Total

Ongoing 11

Non-ongoing 3

TOTAL 14

Table 38: Australian Public Service Act Employment arrangements current report period (2020-21)

SES Non-SES Total

Enterprise Agreement 4 1335 1339

Section 24 8 0 8

Individual Flexibility Arrangement 0 22 22

TOTAL 12 1357 1369

Table 39: Australian Public Service Act employment salary ranges by classification level (minimum/ maximum) current report period (2020-21)

Minimum Salary Maximum Salary

SES 3 - -

SES 2 $256,487.00 $278,668.00

SES 1 $188,977.00 $221,080.00

EL 2 $123,280.00 $218,581.00

EL 1 $104,275.00 $132,955.00

APS 6 $83,497.00 $96,894.00

APS 5 $75,430.00 $90,095.00

APS 4 $67,630.00 $74,111.00

APS 3 $60,678.00 $66,497.00

APS 2 $53,272.00 $59,076.00

APS 1 $47,071.00 $52,026.00

Other - -

Minimum/Maximum range $47,071.00 $278,668.00

APPENDICES 112

Table 40: Statutory appointments under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 as of 30 June 2021

Position

Legislative provision for existence of role Current occupant Current term

Electoral Commissioner Australian Electoral Commission Subsection 18(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

Tom Rogers 5 years from 15/12/2019

Deputy Electoral Commissioner Subsection 19(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Jeff Pope APM 5 years from 19/12/2016

Australian Electoral Officer NSW Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Vacant* Vacant.

Term not to exceed 7 years

Australian Electoral Officer Vic Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Nye Coffey 5 years from

01/04/2021

Australian Electoral Officer Qld Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Stephanie Attard

5 years from 8/02/2021

Australian Electoral Officer WA Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Gina Dario 5 years from

01/04/2021

Australian Electoral Officer SA Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Cameron Stokes

5 years from 4/02/2021

Australian Electoral Officer Tas Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Vacant** Vacant.

Term not to exceed 7 years

Australian Electoral Officer NT Subsection 20(1) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 Vacant*** Vacant.

Term not to exceed 7 years

Chairperson Australian Electoral Commission Subsection 6(2)(a) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

The Hon. Justice Susan Kenny AM

5 years from 23/09/2020

Non-judicial member Australian Electoral Commission Subsection 6(2)(c) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

Dr David Gruen Until 10 December 2024

*These duties were being performed by Michaela Humphries (June 2020 - January 2021) and Kath Gleeson (February - June 2021)

**These duties were being performed by Joanne Reid.

***These duties were being performed by Geoffrey Bloom.

113 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Table 41: Information about remuneration for key management personnel

Executive remuneration reporting (KMP) Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position Title Base salary ($) Bonuses ($)

Other

benefits and allowances ($) Superannuation contributions ($)

Long service leave ($)

Other

long-term benefits ($) ($) ($)

Tom Rogers

Electoral Commissioner 513,118 - - 72,937 12,257 - - 598,312

Jeff Pope

Deputy Electoral Commissioner 308,103 - - 45,641 7,315 - - 361,059

Tim Courtney First Assistant Commissioner 289,430 - - 52,389 6,940 - - 348,759

Lynn White

First Assistant Commissioner 258,824 - - 43,270 7,585 - - 309,680

Thomas Ryan

First Assistant Commissioner 208,919 - - 32,726 6,460 - - 248,104

TOTAL 1,578,394 - - 246,963 40,557 - - 1,865,914

APPENDICES 114

Table 42: Information about remuneration for Senior Executives (SES)

Executive remuneration reporting (KMP) Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Remuneration band ($)

Number of senior executives Average base

salary ($)

Average bonuses ($)

Average other benefits and allowances ($)

Average

superannuation contributions ($)

Average long service leave ($)

Average other long-term benefits ($)

Average termination benefits ($)

Average total remuneration ($)

0- 220,000

21 96,583 - 13,479 3,646 - - 113,708

220,001-245,000

4 190,837 - - 26,652 9,129 - - 226,618

245,001-270,000

1 217,415 - - 29,273 16,610 - - 263,298

TOTAL 26 115,731 - - 16,113 4,988 - - 136,832

115 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

2020-21 ANNUAL REPORT READER GUIDES SECTION 07

READER GUIDES 116

READER GUIDES

Term Description

EL Executive level

ELT Executive Leadership Team

EPLP Election Planning and Learning Program

ERRM Election Ready Road Map

FOI Freedom of Information

FRR Financial Reporting Rule

ICARE APS values—impartial, committed to service, accountable, respectful, ethical

ICT Information and Communications Technology

IEPP Indigenous Electoral Participation Program

IFES International Foundation for Electoral Systems

International IDEA International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance

IPS Information Publication Scheme

JSCEM Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters

NEDC National Election Delivery Committee

NEEC National Electoral Education Centre

NEM National Election Manager

NOR National Operations and Readiness Committee

NRS National Relay Service

NTEU National Training and Education Unit

OTM Other Trust Monies accounts

Abbreviations and acronyms

Term Description

AAS Australian Accounting Standards

AAT Administrative Appeals Tribunal

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

ACSC Australian Cyber Security Centre

ACT Australian Capital Territory

AEC Australian Electoral Commission

AEO Australian Electoral Officer

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

APS Australian Public Service

APSC Australian Public Service Commission

AHRC Australian Human Rights Commission

ARIR Annual Roll Integrity Review

ASL Average Staffing Level

BRIDGE Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections

CALD Culturally and linguistically diverse

CSOC Cyber Security Operations Centre

DAC Disability Advisory Committee

DFAT Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

DLER Directed Level of Election Readiness

EA Enterprise Agreement

ECANZ Electoral Council

of Australia and New Zealand

ECL Electronic Certified List

117 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Term Description

OHPRC Organisational Health, Performance and Risk Committee

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PIANZEA Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand Electoral Administrators

PMP Privacy Management Plan

PSPF Protective Security Policy Framework

SES Senior Executive Service

SOETM Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts

SOG Non agency bodies accounts

TEW Temporary Election Workforce

TRAWQ Tamwoy, Rosehill, Aplin, Waiben and Quarantine suburbs of Thursday Island

TRSA Torres Strait Regional Authority

UNDP United Nations Development Programme

UNEAD United Nations Electoral Assistance Division

WHS Work health and safety

READER GUIDES 118

Glossary

Term Description

Amortisation Reductions in the value of assets to reflect their reduced worth over time.

Ballot A secret vote, normally written.

Ballot box The sealed container into which a voter places a completed ballot paper.

Ballot paper A paper that shows the questions to be put or the names of the candidates who are standing for election and on which voters mark their vote.

By-election An election held to fill a single vacancy in the House of Representatives.

Candidate A person standing for

election to the House of Representatives or Senate.

Certified list The official electoral roll used to mark off voters at an election.

Claims for enrolment

Application form to enrol to vote or update enrolment.

Close of rolls The date the electoral roll closes for the federal election, which is 8.00pm local Australian time on the seventh calendar day after the writs are issued.

Compulsory voting

The requirement for Australian citizens aged 18 years and over to enrol to vote and to vote at each election.

Constitution (Australian)

The document that sets out the structure under which the Australian Government operates. It can only be amended through a referendum.

Court of Disputed Returns A court (in Australia, the High Court) that determines disputes

about elections.

Declaration vote Any vote where, instead of the voter being marked off the certified list, the vote is sealed in an envelope and signed by the voter and admitted to the count only after further checks are completed.

Term Description

Declaration of nominations Formal announcement of registered candidates, whose

names will appear on a ballot paper in an election.

Depreciation A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life.

Elector A person whose name appears

on an electoral roll.

Electoral cycle The period from one federal election to the next, usually three years.

Electoral division The voting area, containing approximately equal numbers of voters, for which one member is elected to the House of Representatives. Australia is divided into 150 electoral divisions.

Electoral roll The list of people entitled to vote in an election or referendum.

Electorate See ‘electoral division’ above.

Electronic certified list

An electronic list of eligible electors which is accessed through an electronic device to allow polling officials to efficiently search the list of eligible electors and record that an elector has been handed a ballot paper.

Employee Member of staff that is ongoing, non-ongoing, intermittent or irregular.

Enrolment form Application form to enrol to vote or update enrolment.

Federal election A general election for the House of Representatives and Senate.

Fee-for-service election An election or ballot conducted on a full cost recovery basis.

Financial disclosure return A document detailing information on the receipts and

expenditure of participants in the political process.

119 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Term Description

Formality or formal vote

A vote in an election or referendum where the ballot paper has been marked correctly and is counted towards the result. A ballot paper incorrectly marked is called informal.

Franchise The right to vote.

Funding and disclosure

Public funding of election campaigns and disclosure of certain financial details by candidates, political parties and others.

General postal voter A voter who is registered to have postal ballot papers sent

automatically.

House of Representatives The house of Parliament in which the government is

formed. Under a preferential voting system, each electoral division elects one member of the House of Representatives.

Inventory balance The worth of held goods and materials.

Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters

The parliamentary committee that reports on, and refers inquiries into, matters relating to electoral laws, practices and administration.

Member Any person elected to

Parliament, but commonly used for the House of Representatives.

Mobile polling team Polling officials who bring polling to hospitals, nursing

homes and remote locations.

Nomination Submission for candidacy for election to the Senate or House of Representatives.

Ordinary vote A vote cast on or before election day within the electoral division in which the voter is enrolled.

Out-posted centre

Temporary premises established to house key election activities such as scrutinies and despatch, and return of materials to and from polling places.

Term Description

Poll An election - a count of votes

or opinions.

Polling day The day fixed for the election.

Polling place A location for people to vote.

Postal vote Ballot papers and certificate sent to a voter and posted back.

Preferential voting

A system of voting where a voter shows an order of preference for candidates by numbering their choices.

Pre-poll vote A vote cast before election day.

Protected action ballot A workplace voting system whereby employees participate

in a fair and secret ballot to determine whether industrial action should proceed in their workplace.

Provisional vote Vote cast at a polling place where the elector’s name cannot be found on the roll, the name has been marked off, or the voter has a silent enrolment.

Redistribution A redrawing of electoral boundaries to ensure (as closely as possible) the same number of voters in each electoral division.

Referendum A vote to change the Constitution.

Returned candidate

Candidate who is officially declared elected by a returning officer.

Returning officer The person responsible for conducting an election in a particular area. A divisional returning officer is responsible for conducting the House of Representatives election in their electoral division. An Australian electoral officer is the returning officer for the Senate election in their state or territory.

Registered political party A party registered with the AEC under Part XI of the

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

READER GUIDES 120

Term Description

Revenue appropriations Federal funds set aside each year for specific government

programs.

Roll The list of people entitled

to vote in an election or referendum.

Scrutineer Someone nominated by a candidate to watch the counting or scrutiny of votes.

Scrutiny The counting of votes is also

known as the scrutiny.

Secret ballot A vote made in secret.

Senate The house of Parliament

representing the states. A total of 76 senators are elected - 12 from each state and two from each territory - under a proportional representation system.

Silent elector A voter whose address does not appear on the electoral roll for reasons of personal safety.

Turnout The percentage of people who

voted in the election (formal and informal votes as a percentage of eligible enrolled electors).

Vote To choose a representative,

or indicate a preference, in an election.

Writ A document commanding

an electoral officer to hold an election, containing dates for the close of rolls, the close of nominations, the election day and the return of the writ.

121 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Index to list of annual report requirements

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI viii A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated

by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) iii-iv Table of contents. Mandatory

17AJ(b) 127-133 Alphabetical index. Mandatory

17AJ(c) 118-120 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory

17AJ(d) 121-126 List of requirements. Mandatory

17AJ(e) ii Details of contact officer. Mandatory

17AJ(f) ii Entity’s website address. Mandatory

17AJ(g) ii Electronic address of report. Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) 2-4 A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) 6 A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) 6 A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) 6 A description of the outcomes and programmes

administered by the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) 6 A description of the purposes of the entity as included in

corporate plan.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) 12, 112 Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) 12, 112 Position of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) 112 Period as the accountable authority or member of the

accountable authority within the reporting period. Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) N/A An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio

departments - mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by

the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

READER GUIDES 122

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(c) Report on the performance of the entity

Annual performance statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F 15-35 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on financial performance

17AF(1)(a) 58-88 A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial

performance.

Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) 90 A table summarising the total resources and total

payments of the entity.

Mandatory

17AF(2) 64-67 If there may be significant changes in the financial

results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory.

17AD(d) Management and accountability

Corporate governance

17AG(2)(a) 44-45 Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud

systems).

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) 44-45 A certification by accountable authority that fraud

risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii) 44-45 A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) 44-45 A certification by accountable authority that all

reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) 44-45 An outline of structures and processes in place for

the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(d) - (e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister

under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

Audit committee

17AG(2A)(a) 44 A direct electronic address of the charter determining

the functions of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) 92-93 The name of each member of the entity’s audit

committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) 92-93 The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of

each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

123 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(2A)(d) 92-93 Information about the attendance of each member of

the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) 92-93 The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit

committee.

Mandatory

External scrutiny

17AG(3) 46-48 Information on the most significant developments

in external scrutiny and the entity's response to the scrutiny.

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) 47 Information on judicial decisions and decisions of

administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b) 47 Information on any reports on operations of the entity

by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that

were released during the period.

If applicable, Mandatory

Management of human resources

17AG(4)(a) 48-52 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing

and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) 48, 105-111 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender; (d) statistics on staff location.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(b) 48, 105-111 Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following:

Statistics on staffing classification level;

Statistics on full-time employees;

Statistics on part-time employees;

Statistics on gender;

Statistics on staff location;

Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) 111 Information on any enterprise agreements, individual

flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) 111 Information on the number of SES and non-SES

employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) 111 The salary ranges available for APS employees by

classification level.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) 113

49-50

A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

READER GUIDES 124

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A (see page 49) Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay

at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of performance

payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance

payments.

If applicable, Mandatory

Assets management

17AG(5) N/A An assessment of effectiveness of assets management

where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities.

If applicable, Mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) 55 An assessment of entity performance against the

Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Mandatory

Reportable consultancy contracts

17AG(7)(a) 56 A summary statement detailing the number of new

contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7)(b) 56 A statement that“During [reporting period], [specified

number] new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing reportable consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) 55 A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting

and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) 56 A statement that “Annual reports contain information

about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AG(7A)(a) 56 A summary statement detailing the number of new

reportable non-consultancy contracts entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on such contracts (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing reportable non-consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting period on those ongoing contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

125 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(7A)(b) 56 A statement that “Annual reports contain information

about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory

17AD(daa) Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AGA 56 Additional information, in accordance with section

17AGA, about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts.

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more

than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, Mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) 55 If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing

offer with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) 55 A statement that “[Name of entity] supports small

business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) 55 An outline of the ways in which the procurement

practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises.

Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department

administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

READER GUIDES 126

PGPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

Financial statements

17AD(e) 58-88 Inclusion of the annual financial statements in

accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory

Executive remuneration

17AD(da) 113

49-50

Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule. Mandatory

17AD(f) Other mandatory information

17AH(1)(a)(i) 102 If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a

statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) N/A If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns,

a statement to that effect.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that “Information on grants awarded by

[name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(c) 50 Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including

reference to website for further information. Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) 48 Website reference to where the entity’s Information

Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable,

mandatory

17AH(2) 90-91

92-96

97-100

101

103

104

Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

127 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

GENERAL INDEX

A Aboriginal Australians, see Indigenous Australians

accountability and management, 44-56

accountable authority, 92

accuracy of electoral roll, 15

Administrative Appeals Tribunal, 47, 51

advertising and market research, 29, 102

AEC for Schools website, 26, 31

agency resource statement, 90

annual disclosure returns, 19

annual performance statements, 12-35

Annual Roll Integrity Review, 15

Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing Act 2006, 14

assets and assets management, 53-4, 58-9

Attorney-General's Department, 21

Audit Committee, 44, 47, 92-3, 95

audits, 44, 47, 59

augmented Electoral Commission, 16, 103

AusTender, 55

Australia Post, 25, 37

Australian Capital Territory, 16

Legislative Assembly elections, 53

Australian Federal Police, 21

Australian Human Rights Commission decisions, 47

Australian Information Commissioner decisions, 47

Australian National Audit Office (Auditor-General), 44, 47, 55, 59

Australian Privacy Commissioner decisions, 47

Australian Public Service Commission, 51

Australian Public Service Demand Reduction Initiative, 54

average staffing levels, 34, 91

B Black Dog Institute, 41

Bougainville, 38

Building Resources in Democracy, Governance and Elections (BRIDGE), 39

bushfires, 37

by-elections, see Eden-Monaro by-election; Groom by-election

C Canada, 39

Carbon Creative, 42

cardboard, 53

carers leave, 49

casual workforce, 48

see also temporary election workforce

classification of staff, 48, 107-9, 111

Comcare, 50, 51

Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Program, 33

Command Centre, 34-5

Commission members, 6, 49, 112

Commissioner, see Electoral Commissioner

Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, 6, 55

advertising and market research payments, 102

electoral roll data and extracts, 14

funding and disclosure scheme, 46

international services, 26

judicial decisions, 46

redistributions, 16

staff engaged under, 49

statutory appointments under, 112

Commonwealth Electoral Roll, see electoral roll

Commonwealth Ombudsman investigations, 47

GENERAL INDEX 128

Community and International Engagement team, 39, 40

community engagement, 26-31, 42

compensation claims, 51

complaints, 36, 46, 47

compliance review program, 20

Construction Forestry Maritime Mining and Energy Union, 46

consultants, 55-6

contracts, see purchasing

corporate governance, 33-4, 44-6, 92-6

corporate plan, 46

performance criteria, 10-11

Court of Disputed Returns, 23

COVID-19, affects of, 39, 48, 51, 53

by-elections, 37

compliance review program, 20

electoral education activities, 4, 30, 31

international services, 38, 39

recruitment, 34, 41

staff learning and development, 40

staff secondments, 50

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections, 37, 38

work from home arrangements, 53

culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background, people from, 28

customer scrutiny, 48

cyber security, 22

D Department of Finance, 21, 59

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 26, 38

Department of Home Affairs, 21

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications, 21

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 21, 39

Deputy Electoral Commissioner, 6, 39, 112, 113

digital products, 30

Digital Technology and Communications Branch, 40

Directed Level of Election Readiness (DLER), 11, 22

disability, people with, 28

reporting mechanisms, 50

Disability Action Plan, 28

Disability Advisory Committee, 28

disclosure returns, publication of, 19

disinformation, 2-3

E E10 petrol, 54

early intervention program, 51, 52

Eden-Monaro by-election, 21, 37, 46, 101

disclosure returns published, 19

election funding payments, 104

informality rate, 15

polling locations, publication of, 23

results, availability of, 24

temporary election workforce, 33; training, 32, 37

turnout, 15

voter awareness campaign, 29

writ issued, 22

education activities, 4, 26, 30-1

see also staff learning and development

Education and Engagement Committee, 96

election candidates, financial disclosure by, 19-20

election readiness, 11, 22

Lessons Management Framework, 24

Election Ready Road Map, 11

election writs, 22

elections and election events, 21-5, 37-9

Federal Court proceedings, 46

May 2019 federal election, 46, 47

public awareness campaign, 26, 27-30

see also Eden-Monaro by-election; Groom by-election

Elections System Modernisation (Indigo) program, 34, 35

Electoral Act, see Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

Electoral and Referendum Regulation 2016, 14

Electoral Commission members, 6, 49, 112

Electoral Commissioner, 6, 39, 112

accountable authority, 92; statement presenting annual performance statements, 12

remuneration, 49, 113

review of year, 2-4

staffing powers, 49

129 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

Electoral Council of Australia and New Zealand (ECANZ), 27, 28, 39-40, 50

electoral cycle, 11

electoral divisions (electorates), 16-18

redistributions, 16-17, 29, 103

see also Eden-Monaro by-election; Groom by-election

electoral education, 4, 26, 30-1

electoral integrity, 2-3, 13-20

Electoral Integrity Assurance Taskforce, 21

Electoral Integrity Committee, 96

electoral roll, 13-15, 29, 97-100

Online Enrolment Service, 13, 23

electricity demand, 54

electronic records management, 33

employee assistance program, 51

employees, see staff

energy efficiency, 54

Enterprise Agreement, 49, 111

environmental performance and sustainable development, 53-4

ethanol, 54

ethical standards, 44

Executive Leadership Team, 6, 95

external audit, 44

external scrutiny, 46-8

F Fair Work Act 2009, 24

Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Act 2009, 24

Federal Court, 25, 46

federal elections, see elections and election events

females, see women

Fiji, 39

finance, 58-88, 90-1

purchasing, 55-6; advertising and market research, 102

remuneration and salaries, 49, 111, 113-14

financial disclosure, 19-20, 36, 46, 47, 104

Financial Transactions Reports Act 1988, 14

First Assistant Commissioners, 6, 113

fleet vehicles, 54

flu vaccinations, 51

Four Countries Conference, 39

franchise, 3, 15

fraud control, 45-6

freedom of information, 47, 48

full-time staff, 105-9

functions and role, 6

funding and disclosure scheme, 19-20, 36, 46, 47, 104

Futter, Barry, 46

G gender of staff, 105-8

governance, 33-4, 44-6, 92-6

government agencies provided with roll data or extracts, 14, 100

Groom by-election, 21, 37, 46, 101

cardboard products used, 53

disclosure returns published, 19

election funding payments, 104

informality rate, 15

polling locations, publication of, 23

results, availability of, 24

temporary election workforce, 33; training, 32, 37

turnout, 15

voter awareness campaign, 29

writ issued, 22

H health and safety, see work health and safety

high school students, 30

home-based operations for employees, 53, 54

homelessness, people experiencing, 28

human resources, see staff

Human Rights Commission decisions, 47

I incident management team, 51

incidents reported, 51, 52

Indigenous Australians, 27, 28, 42

enrolment rate, 14

staff identifying as, 111; temporary election workforce, 27

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections, 37-8

Indigenous Electoral Participation Program, 27, 38

Indigenous Electoral Participation Working Group, 27

GENERAL INDEX 130

Indigenous languages, 42

Indigo Program, 34

individual flexibility arrangements, 49, 111

industrial elections and ballots, 24-5, 46

influenza vaccinations, 51

information communications and technology, 33-5, 44

home-based operations, support for, 53

security, 22

see also websites and online services

information management, 33

Information Publication Scheme, 48

injury and illness claims, 51-2

integrity of electoral and regulatory processes, 2-3, 13-20

Inter-Jurisdictional Working Group on Electoral Integrity and Security, 39

internal audit, 44

international services, 26, 38-9

Investment, Change and People Strategy Committee, 95

J judicial decisions, 46

K key activities, 10-11, 13-35

L learning and development, see electoral education; staff learning and development

Learning and Professional Development Strategy, 52

legal decisions, 46

legislation

electoral roll data and extracts, 14

employment terms and conditions under, 49

environmental performance and sustainable development report, 53-4

freedom of information, 47, 48

industrial elections and ballots, 24

purchasing obligations, 55

work health and safety obligations, 50

see also Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918; Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

Lessons Management Framework, 24

liabilities, 59

Lingiari, 16

location, employees by, 105-6, 110

M male staff, 105-8

management and accountability, 44-56

management committees, 95-6

market research and advertising, 29, 102

Marshall Islands, 39

May 2019 federal election, 46, 47

Menon, Arturo, 46

mental health, 41

Microsoft Teams, 25

misinformation, 2-3

modernisation program, 34, 35

motor vehicles, 54

Museum of Australian Democracy, 4

N National Archives of Australia, 33

National Bushfire Recovery Agency, 37

National Election Delivery Committee, 96

National Electoral Education Centre (NEEC), 4, 30

National Induction Program, 40, 52

National Operations and Readiness Committee, 96

National Training and Education Unit, 40, 52

Nauru, 39

New South Wales, see Eden-Monaro by-election

New Zealand, 39-40

non-ongoing employees, 48, 105-11

non-salary benefits, 49

Northern Territory, 16

Northern Territory Electoral Commission, 53

O Ombudsman investigations, 47

ongoing employees, 48, 105-11

online services, see websites and online services

operating environment, 2, 12

operating result, 58-9

Operational Leaders Program, 40, 52

Organisational Health, Performance and Risk Committee, 95

131 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

organisational structure, 6-7

outcome and program, 6, 11, 91

P Pacific Islands, Australia and New Zealand Electoral Administrators (PIANZEA) Network, 39

Pacific nations, 38-9

Palmer, Clive, 46

pandemic, see COVID-19, affects of

Papua New Guinea, 39

parliamentarians

roll data and extracts provided to, 14, 98-9

parliamentary committees, 47

part-time staff, 105-9

People Strategy, 32

performance cycles, 11

see also election readiness

performance management and performance pay, 49

performance report, 10-42

personal information, see privacy

Plan your Vote campaign, 29

plans and planning, 46, 94

business continuity, 45

disability action, 28

fraud control, 45

privacy management, 33

workforce, 32, 50

see also election readiness

podcasts, 28

political parties

financial disclosure, 19-20, 36, 47, 104

registrations, 19, 46

roll data and extracts provided to, 14, 99

polling locations, 23

accessibility, 28

cardboard and other equipment used, 53-4

Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS), 90

key activities, 10-11, 13-35

primary school students, 30

prison, people in, 28

privacy, 14, 33

Australian Privacy Commissioner decisions, 47

Privacy Management Plan, 33

private sector organisations entitled to receive roll

information, 14, 100

procurement, see purchasing

program and outcome, 6, 11, 91

prosecutions, 20, 36

protective security, 33

industrial elections and ballots, 25

information communications and technology, 22

see also COVID-19

Protective Security Policy Framework, 33

public awareness activities, 26, 27-9, 42, 102

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), 6, 59

fraud control, 45

performance cycle, 11

statement by Electoral Commissioner, 12

purchasing, 55-6

advertising and market research, 102

IT, 35, 44

purpose, 6, 11

Q Queensland, see Groom by-election

R radio, 27, 28

records management, 33

recruitment, 33, 34, 41

recycling, 54

Redistribution Committee, 16, 103

redistributions, 16-17, 29, 103

Register of Political Parties, 19, 46

regulator performance framework, 35-6

rehabilitation management, 50, 51

remuneration and salaries, 49, 111, 113-14

Republic of the Marshall Islands, 39

resources, 90-1

see also finance; information communications and technology; staff

risk management, 33, 36, 45

role and functions, 6

GENERAL INDEX 132

S safety, see work health and safety

salaries and remuneration, 49, 111, 113-14

satisfaction of NEEC visitors, 30

school electoral education programs, 4, 26, 30-1

secondary school students, 30

security, see protective security

senior executive service (SES) employees, 49, 114

Senior Leaders Program, 40, 52

service charter, 36

Services Australia, 37

small business support, 55

social media, 27, 29

Solomon, 16

Solomon Islands, 39

staff, 32-3, 48-52, 105-14

average staffing levels, 34, 91

recruitment, 33, 34, 41

working from home, 53, 54

see also temporary election workforce

staff learning and development, 32, 40, 52

about COVID-19 safety, 37

cyber security awareness, 22

electronic records management, 33

fraud awareness, 46

risk management, 33

stakeholder engagement, 26-31, 42

statutory appointments, 112

Statutory Office holders, 48

submissions to augmented Electoral Commission, 103

submissions to parliamentary committees, 47

sustainable development, 53-4

T teachers, 30

professional learning participants, 31

temporary election workforce, 32-3, 49

compensation claims, 51

election training, 32, 37

Indigenous identified positions, 27

tenders, see purchasing

timeliness

disclosure returns, 19

election writs, 22

industrial elections and ballots, 25

redistribution determinations, 17

Tonga, 39

Torres Strait Islanders, see Indigenous Australians

Torres Strait Regional Authority elections, 37-8

tracking research, 29

training, see electoral education; staff learning and development

tribunal decisions, 47

trust, 2-3

Tuvalu, 39

U United Australia Party, 46

United Kingdom, 39

V vehicles, 54

Victoria, 16, 41, 103

videos, 28, 42

vision, 6

visitor satisfaction rates, 30

W waste management, 54

websites and online services, 26, 30

AusTender, 55

election results, 24

electoral education, 26, 31

enrolment, 13, 23

financial disclosure information, 19, 20

home-based operations, support for, 53

industrial elections and ballots, 25

polling locations, 23

staff learning and development, 40

Western Australia, 16, 103

Wharton, Wayne, 46

women

staff, 105-8

Torres Strait Regional Authority election candidates, 38

133 Australian Electoral Commission Annual Report 2020-21

work health and safety, 48, 50-2

election staff, 37

mental health, 41

see also COVID-19, affects of

Work Health and Safety Committees, 96

workforce, see staff

workforce planning, 32, 50

working from home arrangements, 53, 54

workstation assessments, 51

writs, 22

Y youth, 28

enrolment rate, 29

school electoral education programs, 4, 26, 30-1