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Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority—Report for 2019-20


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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

Annu Al

Repo Rt

Aust RAliAn

s poR ts

Anti-Doping

AuthoR ity 15 ye ARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

ANNUAL REPORT

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS ANTI-DOPING AUTHORITY 15 YEARS

OF CLEAN FAIR SPORT

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

Acknowledgement of Country The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands on which it stands and pays its respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

ASADA recognises the outstanding contribution Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make to sport in Australia and celebrates the power of sport to promote reconciliation and reduce inequality.

Annu Al

Repo Rt

Aust RAliAn

s poR ts

Anti-Doping

AuthoR ity 15 ye ARs

of Clean fair sport

About this report Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Annual Report 2019-20 Canberra

This report provides a detailed account of the operations and performance of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) for the financial year ended 30 June 2020. It has been prepared for the Minister for Youth and Sport to be tabled in both houses of the Parliament of Australia.

Online availability The whole report is available at https://www.sportintegrity.gov.au/about-us/corporate .

Contact information To enquire, provide feedback or reproduce the contents of this report, please contact:

Annual report contact officer Dion McVie, Director Governance Contact phone number 13 000 27232 Contact email governance@sportintegrity.gov.au Entity website (URL) www.sportintegrity.gov.au

Copyright statement

Creative Commons This work by © Commonwealth of Australia 2020 - The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported Licence with the exception of:

♦ the Commonwealth Coat of Arms ♦ ASADA’s logo.

To the extent that copyright subsists in third-party quotations and diagrams, it remains with the original owner and permission may be required to reuse the material. Content from this publication should be attributed as: Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, Annual Report 2019-20.

October 2020

1 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

ilette R of tRA nsmitt Al

15 October 2020

Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians Minister for Youth and Sport Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I am pleased to present the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority’s final annual report for the financial year ended 30 June 2020.

We have prepared this report in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and it meets the requirements for non-corporate Commonwealth entities’ annual reports, as prescribed by the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

This report also contains content required by subsection 74(1) of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006 and is in line with the Department of Finance’s Resource Management Guide (RMG) no. 134 Annual performance statements for Commonwealth entities and RMG no. 135 Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities.

As required by section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I certify:

♦ this agency has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans ♦ this agency has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting mechanisms meeting its specific needs

♦ I have taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the agency.

Yours sincerely,

David Sharpe APM OAM Chief Executive Officer Sport Integrity Australia

Contents

CEO mEss AgE 7

Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................................................7

Our past 15 years of Clean, Fair Sport .........................................................................................................................................7

A new era for sports integrity in Australia ..................................................................................................................................9

Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................................................................................10

Ov ERvi Ew 13

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority overview ............................................................................................................14

Our vision ...............................................................................................................................................................................................14

Our purpose .........................................................................................................................................................................................14

Our outcome and program ........................................................................................................................................................14

Our strategic priorities ...................................................................................................................................................................15

Our structure ........................................................................................................................................................................................18

National Anti-Doping Framework ..................................................................................................................................................18

ASADA ......................................................................................................................................................................................................19

Australian Sports Commission (Sport Australia) .........................................................................................................19

National Integrity of Sport Unit ...............................................................................................................................................19

National sporting organisations ............................................................................................................................................. 20

State and territory governments ............................................................................................................................................ 20

Other Australian Government agencies ............................................................................................................................21

State sporting organisations ......................................................................................................................................................21

Professional associations ............................................................................................................................................................21

International requirements ................................................................................................................................................................ 22

Multilateral arrangements ...........................................................................................................................................................22

Global policies and practices ...................................................................................................................................................23

Portfolio and Minister ............................................................................................................................................................................ 23

2 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

AnnuAl PerformA nce StAt ement 2 5

Statement by the Chief Executive Officer .............................................................................................................................. 26

Our purpose ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 26

Transition to Sport Integrity Australia ................................................................................................................................. 26

Performance overview ......................................................................................................................................................................... 28

Analysis of overall performance ............................................................................................................................................ 30

Results ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 35

Performance measure 1 ....................................... ...................................................................................................................... 35

Performance measure 2 ........................................................................................................................................................... 38

Performance measure 3 ....................................... ...................................................................................................................... 39

Performance measure 4 ............................................................................................................................................................41

Performance measure 5 ....................................... ...................................................................................................................... 46

Performance measure 6 ....................................... ...................................................................................................................... 48

Performance measure 7 ....................................... ...................................................................................................................... 49

Performance measure 8 ....................................... .......................................................................................................................51

Performance measure 9 ....................................... .......................................................................................................................54

Performance measure 10 .......................................................................................................................................................... 56

Performance measure 11 .......................................................................................................................................................... 58

Performance measure 12 .......................................................................................................................................................... 60

Performance measure 13 .......................................................................................................................................................... 65

2019-20 St rAt egic Pr ioritie S 6 7

Engagement and Partnerships ...................................................................................................................................................... 68

Athlete Advisory Group ................................................................................................................................................................ 69

Collaborative partnership agreement with the University of Canberra .......................................................70

Leadership in Sport conference - 20/20 Vision .........................................................................................................70

The ‘first face’ of ASADA .............................................................................................................................................................75

International engagement...........................................................................................................................................................77

Intelligence.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 82

ASADA’s intelligence-informed sport risk assessments ....................................................................................... 85

Education and awareness ................................................................................................................................................................. 86

Education ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 87

Awareness ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88

Innovative education ..................................................................................................................................................................... 89

Clean Sport 101 - An introduction to anti-doping ................................................................................................... 93

Engaging stakeholders to promote ‘clean, fair sport’............................................................................................. 95

Doing things differently - ASADA’s podcast ..................................................................................................................97

3 A nnuAl reP ort 1 9:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

mAnAg ement An d Acco untAb ility 1 01

Corporate governance ....................................................................................................................................................................... 102

Corporate governance practices ........................................................................................................................................ 102

Management .................................................................................................................................................................................... 103

Corporate planning and reporting .................................................................................................................................... 103

Governance committees...........................................................................................................................................................104

Internal audit arrangements ....................................... ........................................................................................................... 108

Compliance reporting .................................................................................................................................................................110

External scrutiny .....................................................................................................................................................................................110

Parliamentary scrutiny ................................................................................................................................................................110

Decisions and reports ................................................................................................................................................................110

Freedom of information (FOI) .................................................................................................................................................111

People ............................................................................................................................................................................................................112

Inclusion and Development Initiative (IDI) .................................................................................................................. 112

Jawun secondment ...................................................................................................................................................................... 114

Integra partnership .......................................................................................................................................................................116

ASADA wellness sessions ........................................................................................................................................................119

Workforce composition ....................................... .......................................................................................................................120

Workforce planning ......................................................................................................................................................................124

Employment arrangements.....................................................................................................................................................126

Workplace Health and Safety ...............................................................................................................................................126

National Disability Strategy .....................................................................................................................................................126

Financial and property management ..................................................................................................................................... 127

Asset management ......................................................................................................................................................................127

Purchasing ......... ................................................................................................................................................................................127

Grants .....................................................................................................................................................................................................129

Executive remuneration .............................................................................................................................................................130

Entity Resource Statement Subset Summary Current Report Period (2019-20) ...........................131

4 AuSt rAl iAn SPo rtS A nti-doPi ng Authority

fiNANCiAL s TATEmENTs 133

Independent Auditor’s Report ..................................................................................................................................................... 134

Statement by the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer .......................................................... 136

Statement of Comprehensive Income Current Report Period (2019-20) ...................................................137

Budget variances commentary ............................................................................................................................................138

Statement of Financial Position Current Report Period (2019-20) ................................................................. 139

Budget variances commentary ............................................................................................................................................140

Statement of Changes in Equity Current Report Period (2019-20) ................................................................141

Accounting policy ..........................................................................................................................................................................142

Budget variances commentary ............................................................................................................................................142

Cash Flow Statement Current Report Period (2019-20) ........................................................................................ 143

Budget variances commentary ............................................................................................................................................144

Notes to and forming part of financial statements ....................................................................................................... 144

Overview ...............................................................................................................................................................................................144

Financial position ...........................................................................................................................................................................154

Funding ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 160

People and relationships ..........................................................................................................................................................161

Other information ...........................................................................................................................................................................164

ANTi-D OPiNg RULE v iOLATiON PANEL 169

Overview .......................................................................................................................................................................................................170

Functions .....................................................................................................................................................................................................170

Members ......................................................................................................................................................................................................170

Chair........................................................................................................................................................................................................170

Members .............................................................................................................................................................................................170

Meetings .......................................................................................................................................................................................................171

Resources ...................................................................................................................................................................................................171

5 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

AUs TRALiAN sPORT s D RUg mEDiCAL ADvis ORy CO mmiTTEE 173

Overview .......................................................................................................................................................................................................174

Functions .....................................................................................................................................................................................................174

ASDMAC Members ..............................................................................................................................................................................175

Chair........................................................................................................................................................................................................175

Members .............................................................................................................................................................................................175

ASDMAC Review Panel .....................................................................................................................................................................176

Members .............................................................................................................................................................................................176

Meetings .......................................................................................................................................................................................................176

Resources ...................................................................................................................................................................................................177

Therapeutic Use Exemption applications ............................................................................................................................177

Therapeutic Use Exemption reviews by the ASDMAC Review Panel ................................................................177

APPENDix Es, AbbRE vi ATiONs, gLO ss ARy 179

A: Doping control statistics .......................................................................................................................................................... 180

B: Disclosure notices .........................................................................................................................................................................181

C: Workplace health and safety ............................................................................................................................................... 182

D: Advertising and market research...................................................................................................................................... 183

E: Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance ............................................ 183

Principles of the legislation .................................................................................................................................................... 183

Measures taken to minimise environmental impact............................................................................................ 183

F: Legal services expenditure .................................................................................................................................................... 184

List of abbreviations ............................................................................................................................................................................ 185

Glossary ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 187

iNDEx Es 193

List of Requirements - non-corporate Commonwealth entities ......................................................................... 194

Index ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................200

6 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

Ceo mess Age

As ADA Ceo, David s harpe A pm o Am

int RoD u Ction

I am honoured to present the final Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) Annual Report. This report comes at a time of significant reform in Australian sport with the cessation of ASADA and the creation of Sport Integrity Australia.

o u R p Ast 15 ye ARs of

CleAn, fA iR s po Rt

Since its launch at the Commonwealth Games in 2006, ASADA has taken a leading role in the fight against doping in Australian sport. For almost 15 years, ASADA has enjoyed countless highlights including contributing anti-doping expertise at every Summer and Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, attendance at 4 Commonwealth Games, implementing the 2009 and 2015 World Anti-Doping Code changes, all the while gaining a reputation as a world-leading National Anti-Doping Organisation.

In 2018, in partnership with the Gold Coast Organising Committee and the Commonwealth Games Federation, ASADA delivered a world leading anti-doping program that was designed to protect clean athletes and the integrity of the Commonwealth Games. The establishment of a pre-Games International Taskforce was a first for the Commonwealth Games and was recognised by the World Anti-Doping Agency as a model for all future games.

Since 2006, ASADA has collected over 95,000 anti-doping tests and provided more than 268,000 athletes with education. Australian athletes have a well-deserved reputation for being clean and their commitment to clean and fair sport cannot be undervalued. Australia is not immune from the risk of doping in sport, and for almost 15 years our detection capability has evolved to be one of the most respected and comprehensive in the world of anti-doping.

7 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

ASADA has set benchmarks for anti-doping programs both domestically and internationally. We are truly world leading and a highly respected National Anti-Doping Organisation. Australia was among the first nations to sign the Copenhagen Declaration under the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). We were a founding member of the Institute of National Anti-Doping Organisations (iNADO), and in a first for anti-doping internationally, ASADA launched a counselling service for athletes and support personnel facing possible anti-doping rule violations. During this time, ASADA has developed and shared innovative education platforms, including online eLearning, the Clean Sport app and the world’s first virtual reality experience taking athletes through the doping control process.

Virtual reality education program with wheelchair basketball athletes and personnel in Townsville (April 2019).

In February 2013, ASADA was the given responsibility to investigate serious anti-doping allegations against clubs in 2 of Australia’s professional sporting codes. The 16-month investigation was unprecedented, complex and wide-ranging and the most challenging period in the agency’s existence. The most important impacts were the changes to Australia’s approach to anti-doping and broader integrity matters including the establishment of integrity units and networks across a number of sports.

ASADA has always strived to take proactive steps in the pursuit of clean, fair sport and 2019-20 was no exception. In readiness for the commencement of Sport Integrity Australia, a key priority was to strengthen Australia’s ability to combat the increasingly complex and sophisticated doping environment. The passage of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Enhancing Australia’s Anti-Doping Capability) Bill 2019 in June represents landmark reforms to Australian sport’s anti-doping rules that will keep the nation at the forefront of efforts to keep

8 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

competition clean long into the future. The reforms are athlete-focused and allow the targeting of third-party facilitators who are not bound by policies, streamlining the anti-doping rule violation process, allowing discretion to recreational and lower level athletes, and ensuring an impartial hearing via the National Sports Tribunal (NST) if required.

ASADA has always fought to uphold the integrity of sport, while ensuring every accused person receives an unbiased hearing and as little disruption to their lives as possible. Athlete welfare and their wellbeing remains a primary concern of ours. To truly understand the doping landscape, we established the ASADA Athlete Advisory Group. Comprised of athletes who understand the environment and pressures of sport, the Athlete Advisory Group has been critical to informing ASADA’s strategic direction and promoting the importance of the ‘athletes’ voice’ in sports administration and anti-doping. The Athlete Advisory Group will continue its role in Sport Integrity Australia and its membership will be expanded.

A new e RA fo R spo Rts

integ Rity in Aust RAliA

ASADA (and its predecessor the Australian Sports Drug Agency (ASDA)) has a long and proud history of serving the nation as its anti-doping agency. This will be continued under Sport Integrity Australia. The opening of Sport Integrity Australia, in addition to enhanced powers, positions it to build on this proud history.

Athlete Advisory Group member, Petria Thomas, at the launch of the group in 2019.

9

15 years of Clean fair sport

Sport Integrity Australia will use the lessons learned from ASADA, ASDA, and domestic and international partners to collectively build the capabilities of sports to effectively manage integrity threats and protect the rights of Australian athletes at whatever level they participate and whatever goals they are striving to achieve.

Sport Integrity Australia will implement the revised World Anti-Doping Code that will come into effect on 1 January 2021. The Code and International Standards are the fundamental and universal documents upon which the world anti-doping program in sport is based. The 2021 Code introduces 2 new International Standards for Education and Results Management.

We look forward to next year’s postponed Tokyo Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games and will continue to work alongside the Australian Olympic Committee and Paralympics Australia to ensure Australian athletes receive anti-doping education and are aware of their rights and responsibilities in relation to anti-doping.

ACknowle Dgements I’d like to acknowledge the significant contribution made by the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel over the past 10 years. The Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel was established on 1 January 2010 to consider whether there had been possible anti-doping rule violations by an athlete or athlete support person and to make assertions in relation to those violations. The Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel’s contribution to the integrity of sport cannot be underestimated and I thank them for their service.

I’d also like to acknowledge and thank our partners and friends who have assisted us in our pursuit of clean, fair sport. As we transition to Sport Integrity Australia, I look forward to continuing these relationships and building new networks.

Finally, and most importantly, I would like to acknowledge and thank former and current staff for their contributions and commitment during the life of the agency. Our recognition as a global leader in anti-doping lies directly with the passion ASADA staff members have for sport and their tireless drive to achieve clean, fair sport for all our athletes.

10 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

ASADA staff at the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

I look forward to the launch of Sport Integrity Australia and building an agency in partnership with sports, to protect sport together.

David Sharpe APM OAM Chief Executive Officer

11 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

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AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

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AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

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of Clean fair sport

As ADA overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

n ational Anti-Doping f ramework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

international requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

p ortfolio and m inister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

o ve Rview

Ov ERvi Ew

Aust RAliAn s poR ts Anti-Doping

AuthoR ity ove Rview

Anti-doping has been part of the Australian sporting landscape for almost 3 decades. Oversight originally lay with the Australian Sports Drug Agency (ASDA, established in 1991), which the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) replaced in 2006.

ASADA was a non-corporate Commonwealth entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and its staff were employed under the Public Service Act 1999. ASADA operated under the ASADA Act and the ASADA Regulations, including the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme. The agency’s activities were also governed by its obligations to implement the World Anti-Doping Code and International Standards in Australia.

our vision

CleAn, fA iR s po Rt

our purpose

t o protect the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport by minimising the risk of doping

o ur outcome and program Outcomes are the Government’s intended results, benefits or consequences for the Australian community. The Australian Government requires entities, such as ASADA, to use outcomes as a basis for budgeting, measuring performance and reporting. Annual departmental funding is appropriated on an outcome basis.

outcome 1 Protection of the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport, including through engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement to minimise the risk of doping.

program 1.1 The Australian Government, through ASADA, aims to protect the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport by providing a leading anti-doping program for Australia. ASADA achieved this through engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement activities all focused on 3 fundamental and mutually supportive pillars: enhanced engagement and partnerships; enhanced intelligence; and enhanced education and awareness.

our strategic priorities ASADA’s work in 2019-20 was driven by 3 fundamental pillars.

eng Agement A n D p ARtneR ships intelligen Ce eDu CAtion A n D AwAR eness

These pillars were mutually supportive - engagement and partnerships lead to better intelligence, which better informs targeted and effective education programs. All 3 pillars were geared towards achieving ASADA’s core business to protect clean athletes.

engagement and partnerships This strategic priority referred to both increased engagement with national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel, and enhanced partnerships with law enforcement bodies, border protection agencies, regulatory agencies, the health sector, academic institutions and international anti-doping organisations. These relationships allowed ASADA to better understand and respond to the doping threats in the sports environment, as well as foster proactive engagement with ASADA to develop a culture of clean sport.

ASADA’s partnerships with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and international anti-doping organisations helped to build the collective capability of the anti-doping organisation community, so Australian athletes could compete on a level playing field, wherever that may be.

In the pursuit of clean sport, ASADA continually strove to enhance its engagement with athletes who understand the pressures of sport better than anyone. The insights gained from a strong and focused engagement program critically informed ASADA’s strategy, including how best to support athletes in making the right decisions and how best to deliver education and prevention programs that work.

Guests from across the sport’s sector gather for the Leadership in Sport conference held in November 2019.

14 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

our strategic priorities ASADA’s work in 2019-20 was driven by 3 fundamental pillars.

eng Agement A n D p ARtneR ships intelligen Ce eDu CAtion A n D AwAR eness

These pillars were mutually supportive - engagement and partnerships lead to better intelligence, which better informs targeted and effective education programs. All 3 pillars were geared towards achieving ASADA’s core business to protect clean athletes.

engagement and partnerships This strategic priority referred to both increased engagement with national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel, and enhanced partnerships with law enforcement bodies, border protection agencies, regulatory agencies, the health sector, academic institutions and international anti-doping organisations. These relationships allowed ASADA to better understand and respond to the doping threats in the sports environment, as well as foster proactive engagement with ASADA to develop a culture of clean sport.

ASADA’s partnerships with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and international anti-doping organisations helped to build the collective capability of the anti-doping organisation community, so Australian athletes could compete on a level playing field, wherever that may be.

In the pursuit of clean sport, ASADA continually strove to enhance its engagement with athletes who understand the pressures of sport better than anyone. The insights gained from a strong and focused engagement program critically informed ASADA’s strategy, including how best to support athletes in making the right decisions and how best to deliver education and prevention programs that work.

Guests from across the sport’s sector gather for the Leadership in Sport conference held in November 2019.

15

15 years of Clean fair sport

Ov ERvi Ew

intelligence A professional and flexible intelligence capability is critical to the future viability of anti-doping agencies and to the enhancement of anti-doping testing in the face of sophisticated and evasive doping techniques.

Enhanced intelligence capability provided ASADA with a comprehensive strategic picture of doping in Australia to inform high-level strategy and policy (including public policy), as well as informed and supported operations such as the delivery of more sophisticated testing, education and awareness programs. A robust intelligence picture guided ASADA in applying its suite of capabilities to those sports, and at those levels, where the highest concentrations of doping risk lie.

Enhanced intelligence served to highlight emerging over-the-horizon risks and opportunities, ensuring ASADA was prepared to act on them. In addition, ASADA used a well-developed domestic and international intelligence network to target the high-level facilitators and suppliers of doping to ensure dangerous substances were kept out of sport and away from athletes.

Enhanced engagement with partners (such as the Australian Border Force, Australian Federal Police, Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) underpinned the successful establishment of a world-leading anti-doping intelligence capability at ASADA, by giving it access to new and valuable sources of information.

Deputy CEO Legal, Education and Corporate (A/g), Emma Johnson and Director Intelligence, Justine Crawford catch up during a Leadership in Sport conference.

16 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

education and awareness Education is key to the prevention of doping. ASADA’s education resources served as an example of the benefits to be derived from a strategy led by intelligence and coordinated across the agency. ASADA successfully brought together all of its functional arms to ensure anti-doping education was planned, developed and delivered. When coupled with engagement, partnerships and intelligence, education allowed ASADA to deliver and target the type and extent of anti-doping awareness needed, where it was needed, and in a way likely to achieve ‘cut through’ within the sporting community.

Innovation and technology connected ASADA with a new generation of athletes in ways they understand. This ensured ASADA’s resources were at the cutting edge of the sector and they could be analysed, measured, reported on and constantly refined, as required.

Given the subject matter expertise held, the interdependence on other functional areas and the crucial stakeholder relationships involved, ASADA was uniquely placed to implement and constantly evolve an education program to be the benchmark for all other anti-doping organisations.

ASADA Director Education and Innovation (A/g), Alexis Cooper talks to the Australian Wallabies team in August 2019.

17 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

Ov ERvi Ew

our structure ASADA’s organisational structure as at 30 June 2020:

Chief exe Cutive o ffiCeR

o pe RAtions Division legAl, eDu CAtion & Co Rpo RAte Division

s cience & results

intelligence investigations s ports o perations &

engagement

field operations

s ports

operations

s ports

engagement

athlete

advisory Group

office of the executive

Media & Communications

legal s ervices

Corporate s ervices

education & innovation

Human r esources

iCt , property & s ecurity

Aust RAliAn s po Rts Anti-Doping Autho Rity

nA tion Al Anti-Doping fRA mewoR k

The purpose of the National Anti-Doping Framework is to align domestic anti-doping efforts in Australia through a set of principles and clearly identified areas for co-operation, agreed between the federal, state and territory governments. To create and maintain a culture hostile to doping, governments must work in close co-operation with a range of partners, including sporting bodies, other government agencies and professional associations.

As ADA

Aust RAliAn s po Rts

Commission ( s poR t

Aust RAliA)

nA tionA l integ Rity

of s po Rt u nit

(nisu)

s t Ate A n D

t eRRito Ry

goveRnments

nAtion Al s po Rting

oR gAnis Ations

(nso) pR ofession Al

Asso CiAtions

(e.g. medical)

o theR Aust RAliAn

goveRnment Agen Cies

s t Ate spo Rting

o RgAnis Ations

nAtion Al

Anti - Doping

fRAmewoR k

18 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

As ADA ASADA’s responsibilities under the framework are described throughout this report.

In addition to ASADA, there were 2 independent committees established by the ASADA legislation - the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel and Australian Sports Drug Medical Advisory Committee.

Australian s ports Commission ( s port Australia)

The role of the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) in the anti-doping framework is to:

♦ require national sporting organisations (NSO), as a condition of ASC recognition and funding, to:

− have an anti-doping policy complying with the World Anti-Doping Code and approved by the ASADA CEO

− acknowledge ASADA’s powers and functions

♦ determine, in consultation with ASADA, whether to withhold recognition or funding from NSOs for non-compliance

♦ require athlete support grant recipients to, as a condition of their grant, comply with the anti-doping policies of the ASC and their NSO and to repay grant funds to the ASC if they breach these policies

♦ assist, cooperate and liaise with ASADA and other anti-doping organisations in relation to the conduct of any investigation or hearing concerning a potential violation.

n ational i ntegrity of s port u nit

The National Integrity of Sport Unit in the Department of Health had primary responsibility for the Australian Government’s obligations under the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Convention. It worked in partnership with other federal, state and territory government bodies to meet these obligations. It had policy responsibility for anti-doping, including representing the Minister for Youth and Sport at the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) Foundation Board and Executive Committee meetings, when the Minister was unavailable.

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n ational sporting organisations Under the framework, all ASC-recognised national sporting organisations - and by extension their affiliated state and regional sporting organisations - must:

♦ have an anti-doping policy complying with the World Anti-Doping Code ♦ implement anti-doping measures to the extent required by their respective international federations

♦ acknowledge ASADA’s functions and powers and facilitate the execution of those functions and powers as reasonably required by ASADA.

s tate and territory governments Under the framework, state and territory governments contribute to meeting Australia’s international obligations under the UNESCO Convention and the World Anti-Doping Code by:

♦ supporting the objectives of the framework ♦ expecting state sporting organisations to demonstrate compliance with their sport’s own ASADA-approved anti-doping policy as a condition of receiving state/territory funding

♦ expecting athletes and their support staff at institutes and academies of sport within their jurisdiction to be subject to a Code-compliant anti-doping policy

♦ supporting anti-doping education, particularly at the sub-elite and community levels, including the education delivered by ASADA

♦ supporting the enforcement of anti-doping sanctions resulting from an anti-doping rule violation, including the withdrawal of funding for an athlete or support person and the denial of access to state/territory government facilities (including institutes and academies of sport) as provided for by the sanction

♦ cooperating with ASADA in investigations of potential violations (for example, by developing information-sharing arrangements with ASADA)

♦ encouraging and assisting state sporting organisations to support the work of NSOs to fulfil their anti-doping roles and responsibilities

♦ encouraging state-based organisations dealing directly with athletes or their support people to promote compliance with the anti-doping policies of their sport

♦ advising ASADA of any possible anti-doping rule violations.

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o ther Australian g overnment agencies The role of other Australian Government agencies under the framework is to:

♦ share intelligence to help ASADA in its investigations (for example, the Australian Federal Police, the Australian Border Force and the Therapeutic Goods Administration)

♦ analyse samples collected from athletes on behalf of ASADA and conduct anti-doping research (the Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory).

s tate sporting organisations The role of these organisations under the framework is to:

♦ implement anti-doping measures to the extent required by their respective international federations and NSOs

♦ support the delivery of education to athletes, particularly junior athletes, about their individual obligations and the dangers of doping.

p rofessional associations Under the framework, some professional associations (such as medical associations, strength and conditioning associations, players associations) have a role in:

♦ developing and implementing codes of conduct, good practices and ethics relating to sport consistent with the principles of the World Anti-Doping Code

♦ working with governments and the sporting community to develop such policies ♦ educating their members on the anti-doping rules or including anti-doping education as an accreditation requirement

♦ making their members aware of the ‘prohibited association’ anti-doping rule violation.

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inte RnA tionA l Requi Rements

ASADA’s work was carried out in a global anti-doping ecosystem.

The Copenhagen Declaration on Anti-Doping in Sport was agreed to by governments at the Second World Conference on Doping in Sport held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in March 2003. The Copenhagen Declaration was the political document through which governments, including Australia, signalled their intention to formally recognise and implement the World Anti-Doping Code. This initiative was the first step taken by governments towards the UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport 2005 (the UNESCO Convention).

The UNESCO Convention requires member countries to harmonise their laws on doping in sport and gives governments a practical tool for aligning their domestic legislation and policies with the World Anti-Doping Code. As a State Party to the UNESCO Convention, Australia implements anti-doping arrangements consistent with the principles of the World Anti-Doping Code. The Australian Government ratified the convention on 17 January 2006.

m ultilateral arrangements

Arrangement Type of arrangement w hat it does

UNESCO Convention (2005)

An international instrument, the State Parties (countries that have ratified, accepted, approved or acceded to it) to which are legally bound by its provisions.

As at 30 June 2020 there were 189 State Parties to the convention.

As the only United Nations agency with a sport mandate, UNESCO leads a comprehensive global anti-doping framework harmonising anti-doping rules and policies worldwide in support of the World Anti-Doping Code.

Convention signatories meet every 2 years. This conference provides an opportunity for discussion and debate on public policies in the fight against doping. The conference also determines the allocation of UNESCO funding to signatories recognised as requiring assistance to develop and implement effective anti-doping programs.

International Anti-Doping Arrangement (IADA) (1991)

A cooperative intergovernmental alliance between 10 nations including Australia.

IADA meets each year to share experiences and gain a global perspective on international anti-doping practices. This helps enhance expertise and knowledge throughout the alliance as its members work towards a best practice anti-doping control framework.

Council of Europe Anti-Doping Convention (1989)

An international instrument open to both member states and non-member states of the Council of Europe.

To date, it has been ratified by 52 states including Australia.

The Council of Europe Convention sets a certain number of common standards and regulations requiring parties to adopt legislative, financial, technical, educational and other measures. Its main objective is to promote national and international harmonisation of measures against doping.

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global policies and practices There are 3 elements encouraging optimal harmonisation and best practice in international and national anti-doping programs:

world Anti - Doping Code The World Anti-Doping Code is the core document setting the framework for harmonised anti-doping policies, rules and regulations among sporting organisations and public

authorities. There are 10 anti-doping violations in the World Anti-Doping Code:

1. Presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers in an athlete’s sample (otherwise known as a positive doping test)

2. Use or attempted use by an athlete of a prohibited substance or a prohibited method

3. Evading, refusing or failing to submit to sample collection

4. Whereabouts failures

5. Tampering or attempted tampering with any part of doping control

6. Possession of a prohibited substance or a prohibited method

7. Trafficking or attempted trafficking in any prohibited substance or prohibited method

8. Administration or attempted administration to any athlete in-competition of any prohibited substance or prohibited method, or administration or attempted administration to any athlete out-of-competition of any prohibited substance or any prohibited method that is prohibited out-of-competition

9. Complicity in a doping violation

10. Association with a prohibited person.

international s tandards There are 6 International Standards for anti-doping: 1. Prohibited list

2. Testing and investigations

3. Laboratories

4. Therapeutic use exemptions

5. Protection of privacy and personal information

6. Code compliance by signatories.

They are aimed at harmonising the practices of organisations responsible for specific technical and operational parts of anti-doping programs. Adherence to the International Standards is mandatory for compliance with the World Anti-Doping Code.

model rules, guidelines and protocols

WADA has developed model rules for national Olympic committees, international federations, major event organisations and national anti-doping organisations to assist these organisations in drafting anti-doping rules in line with the World Anti-Doping Code.

p o Rtfolio A n D m iniste R

ASADA was an operating portfolio agency within the Department of Health portfolio.

For the 2019-20 reporting period, ASADA was accountable to the Minister for Youth and Sport, Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck.

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s tatement by the Chief e xecutive o fficer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

s t Atement by the

Chief e xeC utive o ffiCeR As the accountable authority of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA), I present the 2019-20 annual performance statement of ASADA, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) and (b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

In my opinion, the 2019-20 annual performance statement is based on properly maintained records, accurately presents the performance of ASADA and complies with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

David Sharpe APM OAM Chief Executive Officer

On behalf of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority, transferred by administrative instrument to Sport Integrity Australia on 1 July 2020.

our purpose In the ASADA Corporate Plan 2019-2020, our Purpose is to protect the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport by minimising the risk of doping.

In 2019-20, ASADA focused on 3 mutually supportive pillars - engagement and partnerships, intelligence, and education and awareness - to achieve its outcome under the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

t ransition to s port i ntegrity Australia

On 1 July 2020, the Australian Government established Sport Integrity Australia to cohesively draw together and develop existing sport integrity capabilities, knowledge and expertise and to coordinate all elements of a sport integrity threat response nationally including prevention, monitoring and detection, investigation and enforcement. On this date all ASADA’s staff, functions and responsibilities transferred to Sport Integrity Australia and ASADA ceased.

26 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p o Rtfolio bu Dget

stAtements

out Come 1

p rotection of the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport including through engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement to minimise the risk of doping.

pR og RAm 1.1

t he Australian g overment, through A s ADA, aims to protect

the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport by providing a leading anti - doping program for Australia.

pu Rpose

t o protect the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport by minimising the risk of doping.

CoR poRA te p lAn

AnnuA l Repo Rt

AnnuA l pe Rfo Rm An Ce s t Atement

Report against performance criteria listed in the p ortfolio b udget s tatement and Corporate p lan.

Figure 1: Reporting alignment

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p eRfo Rm An Ce ove Rview

The performance results for 2019-20 indicate a year of solid performance in ASADA achieving its Purpose, despite the COVID-19 challenges. ASADA maintained the 13 performance measures from 2018-19 into its final year of operation to enable a consistent appraisal of its anti-doping program. The measures were designed to demonstrate how ASADA would achieve its Purpose. These are set out in the PBS and in the 2019-20 ASADA Corporate Plan.

numbe R out Come me AsuR e pe Rfo Rm An Ce t ARget Result

1 Achievement in building the collective capability of the anti-doping community.

ASADA engages and contributes its expertise with international stakeholders at forums, through information sharing and Memorandums of Understanding, so Australian athletes can compete on a level playing field wherever that may be.

Contributes expertise at key international anti- doping forums, such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Symposium.

Provision of assistance to build capability to ≥2 other counterpart international anti-doping organisations, including to adopt proactive joint approach with Drug Free Sport New Zealand to build the anti-doping capacity in the Oceania region.

MET

2 Achievement of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code awareness amongst sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel.

Percentage of sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel aware of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code.

≥80% level of awareness MET

3 Achievement of satisfaction with anti-doping education and awareness raising activities in the sporting community.

Percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who are satisfied with anti -doping education and awareness raising programs.

≥80% level of satisfaction MET

numbe R out Come me AsuR e pe Rfo Rm An Ce t ARget Result

4 Achievement in anti-doping education and awareness-raising.

Delivery of anti-doping education and awareness-raising resources to athletes and support personnel.

Target includes:

a) Core education products1 delivered to 20,000 athletes and support personnel.

b) Tailored online and/or face-to-face anti-doping education products produced for ≥ 3 high-risk sports.

c) ≥3 professional development programs for teachers delivered across Australia that are based on the anti-doping element of the National Health and Physical Education Curriculum.

d) 10,000 downloads or visits of the ASADA app2.

PARTIALLY MET

5 Achievement in compliance with anti-doping requirements.

Percentage of recognised sports assessed under the ASADA Compliance Framework that meet ASADA’s compliance requirements3.

≥80% compliance MET

6 Achievement in delivering effective anti-doping intelligence and investigative functions.

Percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who consider ASADA’s intelligence and investigative functions to be effective in deterring athletes and support personnel from doping.

≥80% level of satisfaction MET

7 Achievement in the demonstrated sharing of anti-doping intelligence with external stakeholders.

Collecting and providing timely, high-quality intelligence and assessments that inform the picture of doping in Australia and overseas.

80% level of client satisfaction with at least 12 intelligence reports provided to external stakeholders.

PARTIALLY MET

8 Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

Number of total referrals4 to the testing program based on intelligence reports5.

600 intelligence reports referred to testing.

NOT MET

9 Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

Number of intelligence-led operational activities6 on high-risk athletes7.

≥90 intelligence-led operational activities carried out on high-risk athletes.

MET

10 Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

Investment in intelligence leads to matters referred to investigations.

15 intelligence-led products8 referred to investigations.

MET

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p eRfo Rm An Ce ove Rview

The performance results for 2019-20 indicate a year of solid performance in ASADA achieving its Purpose, despite the COVID-19 challenges. ASADA maintained the 13 performance measures from 2018-19 into its final year of operation to enable a consistent appraisal of its anti-doping program. The measures were designed to demonstrate how ASADA would achieve its Purpose. These are set out in the PBS and in the 2019-20 ASADA Corporate Plan.

numbe R out Come me AsuR e pe Rfo Rm An Ce t ARget Result

1 Achievement in building the collective capability of the anti-doping community.

ASADA engages and contributes its expertise with international stakeholders at forums, through information sharing and Memorandums of Understanding, so Australian athletes can compete on a level playing field wherever that may be.

Contributes expertise at key international anti- doping forums, such as the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Symposium.

Provision of assistance to build capability to ≥2 other counterpart international anti-doping organisations, including to adopt proactive joint approach with Drug Free Sport New Zealand to build the anti-doping capacity in the Oceania region.

MET

2 Achievement of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code awareness amongst sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel.

Percentage of sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel aware of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code.

≥80% level of awareness MET

3 Achievement of satisfaction with anti-doping education and awareness raising activities in the sporting community.

Percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who are satisfied with anti -doping education and awareness raising programs.

≥80% level of satisfaction MET

numbe R out Come me AsuR e pe Rfo Rm An Ce t ARget Result

4 Achievement in anti-doping education and awareness-raising.

Delivery of anti-doping education and awareness-raising resources to athletes and support personnel.

Target includes:

a) Core education products1 delivered to 20,000 athletes and support personnel.

b) Tailored online and/or face-to-face anti-doping education products produced for ≥ 3 high-risk sports.

c) ≥3 professional development programs for teachers delivered across Australia that are based on the anti-doping element of the National Health and Physical Education Curriculum.

d) 10,000 downloads or visits of the ASADA app2.

PARTIALLY MET

5 Achievement in compliance with anti-doping requirements.

Percentage of recognised sports assessed under the ASADA Compliance Framework that meet ASADA’s compliance requirements3.

≥80% compliance MET

6 Achievement in delivering effective anti-doping intelligence and investigative functions.

Percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who consider ASADA’s intelligence and investigative functions to be effective in deterring athletes and support personnel from doping.

≥80% level of satisfaction MET

7 Achievement in the demonstrated sharing of anti-doping intelligence with external stakeholders.

Collecting and providing timely, high-quality intelligence and assessments that inform the picture of doping in Australia and overseas.

80% level of client satisfaction with at least 12 intelligence reports provided to external stakeholders.

PARTIALLY MET

8 Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

Number of total referrals4 to the testing program based on intelligence reports5.

600 intelligence reports referred to testing.

NOT MET

9 Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

Number of intelligence-led operational activities6 on high-risk athletes7.

≥90 intelligence-led operational activities carried out on high-risk athletes.

MET

10 Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

Investment in intelligence leads to matters referred to investigations.

15 intelligence-led products8 referred to investigations.

MET

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numbe R out Come me AsuR e pe Rfo Rm An Ce t ARget Result

11 Achievement in compliance with investigations standards.

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA that are in compliance with the Australian Government Investigations Standards and International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

≥90% of investigations comply with standards.

MET

12 Achievement of anti- doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA and referred to the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel (ADRVP) that result in a finding of an anti -doping rule violation.

≥80% of ADRVP findings result in an anti-doping rule violation.

MET

13 Achievement of anti- doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

Percentage of cases conducted by ASADA in tribunals that result in a finding of an anti - doping rule violation.

≥80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation.

MET

1 Core education products include ASADA’s online Level 1 and 2 courses and face-to-face workshops.

2 The ASADA app provides athletes with timely anti-doping information and access to online anti-doping education.

3 ASADA’s Compliance Framework is based on a sport being compliant with all aspects of the ASADA Act, ASADA Regulations and World Anti-Doping Code, which jointly establish the requirements all recognised sports must comply with.

4 Total referrals include both high-risk referrals and low-risk referrals.

5 An intelligence report contains information collected, evaluated and disseminated to inform operational decision-making. It may be produced in connection with a tip-off, notification from an external organisation, or be derived from internal sources, such as field staff observations, or the review of analytical results by ASADA’s Science Team. A higher percentage of testing based on intelligence reports is desirable, represents better value for money and is more effective over testing that was simply risk-led, random or based on place-getter strategies.

6 An operational activity can include targeted testing, investigation, targeted education and/or intelligence probe.

7 A high-risk athlete is an athlete who is the subject of ASADA’s Target Athlete Monitoring processes, an intelligence probe or an investigation.

8 An intelligence-led product is a referral to Investigations concerning a person or other entity ASADA held intelligence on, and where that intelligence was responsible for the decision to refer the matter to investigations, or was primarily responsible for the testing of an athlete, which led to a positive test.

Analysis of overall performance In 2019-20, ASADA continued working towards providing Australian sports and athletes with a leading anti-doping program, setting global benchmarks in intelligence, science, investigations and education. These activities contributed to ASADA’s achievements of objectives under Outcome 1 and its Purpose. Of the 13 measures, ASADA met 10, partially met 2 and did not meet one.

Anti-doping organisations work in a challenging operating environment - doping is far more than the stereotypical steroid user looking to get stronger. Doping exists in many forms; it is not contained by age, ability or international borders. Doping involves dangerous substances and methods that are a serious threat to the health of athletes. If left unchecked, doping can affect the willingness of Australians to participate in sport and the health of the community.

ASADA’s progress against its Purpose in 2019-20 was achieved in the context of a complex and global operating environment influenced by the following factors:

30 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

numbe R out Come me AsuR e pe Rfo Rm An Ce t ARget Result

11 Achievement in compliance with investigations standards.

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA that are in compliance with the Australian Government Investigations Standards and International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

≥90% of investigations comply with standards.

MET

12 Achievement of anti- doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA and referred to the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel (ADRVP) that result in a finding of an anti -doping rule violation.

≥80% of ADRVP findings result in an anti-doping rule violation.

MET

13 Achievement of anti- doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

Percentage of cases conducted by ASADA in tribunals that result in a finding of an anti - doping rule violation.

≥80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation.

MET

1 Core education products include ASADA’s online Level 1 and 2 courses and face-to-face workshops.

2 The ASADA app provides athletes with timely anti-doping information and access to online anti-doping education.

3 ASADA’s Compliance Framework is based on a sport being compliant with all aspects of the ASADA Act, ASADA Regulations and World Anti-Doping Code, which jointly establish the requirements all recognised sports must comply with.

4 Total referrals include both high-risk referrals and low-risk referrals.

5 An intelligence report contains information collected, evaluated and disseminated to inform operational decision-making. It may be produced in connection with a tip-off, notification from an external organisation, or be derived from internal sources, such as field staff observations, or the review of analytical results by ASADA’s Science Team. A higher percentage of testing based on intelligence reports is desirable, represents better value for money and is more effective over testing that was simply risk-led, random or based on place-getter strategies.

6 An operational activity can include targeted testing, investigation, targeted education and/or intelligence probe.

7 A high-risk athlete is an athlete who is the subject of ASADA’s Target Athlete Monitoring processes, an intelligence probe or an investigation.

8 An intelligence-led product is a referral to Investigations concerning a person or other entity ASADA held intelligence on, and where that intelligence was responsible for the decision to refer the matter to investigations, or was primarily responsible for the testing of an athlete, which led to a positive test.

Analysis of overall performance In 2019-20, ASADA continued working towards providing Australian sports and athletes with a leading anti-doping program, setting global benchmarks in intelligence, science, investigations and education. These activities contributed to ASADA’s achievements of objectives under Outcome 1 and its Purpose. Of the 13 measures, ASADA met 10, partially met 2 and did not meet one.

Anti-doping organisations work in a challenging operating environment - doping is far more than the stereotypical steroid user looking to get stronger. Doping exists in many forms; it is not contained by age, ability or international borders. Doping involves dangerous substances and methods that are a serious threat to the health of athletes. If left unchecked, doping can affect the willingness of Australians to participate in sport and the health of the community.

ASADA’s progress against its Purpose in 2019-20 was achieved in the context of a complex and global operating environment influenced by the following factors:

t he Wood r eview In response to the Review of Australia’s Sports Integrity Arrangements (the Wood Review), chaired by the Hon James Wood AO QC, the government announced landmark reforms to safeguard the integrity of Australian sport. To combat present, emerging and future threats relating to doping, match-fixing, illegal betting, organised crime and corruption, the government established a new, single national sport integrity agency, Sport Integrity Australia. The new agency commenced on 1 July 2020 and brought together ASADA, the National Integrity of Sport Unit (NISU) and the national integrity functions of Sport Australia.

organisational profile In 2019-20, ASADA continued to increase its public profile to educate all Australians that the organisation is more than a testing agency, while further emphasising the importance of engagement with its key stakeholder - athletes, and not just elite-level athletes but from grassroots to masters level athletes.

ASADA leveraged numerous communications channels - from social media to face-to-face education to conference fora - to strengthen engagement, education and sharing of information to the broader sport community.

The COVID-19 pandemic had an unprecedented effect around the world. This extended into Australian sport with the entire community affected. In the latter part of 2019-20 ASADA’s ability to maintain operational activity was affected by COVID-19 related restrictions resulting in a downturn in field testing, engagement and face-to-face education.

Collaboration To truly understand the doping landscape, ASADA worked in partnership with everyone who holds a piece of the puzzle. In 2019-20, ASADA strengthened engagement and partnerships with stakeholders comprising:

♦ Athletes - who understand their environment, the pressures of sport and importance of remaining competitive better than anyone.

♦ Sporting bodies - who understand commercial implications as well as both the physical and mental demands on their athletes.

♦ Law enforcement and intelligence agencies - to target the facilitators of doping where organised crime is profiting from supplying performance and image enhancing drugs (PIED), both within Australia and internationally.

This engagement is replicated across all stakeholder groups, including the health sector, academic institutions and other National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs). All of this enables ASADA to better understand the broader picture of doping in Australia.

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ASADA Athlete Advisory Group

To follow through on representing the athletes’ voice in organisational governance, in 2018-19 ASADA established the Athlete Advisory Group (AAG). The AAG provides opportunities for the athletes’ voice to contribute meaningfully to the fight against doping. The group consists of current and former high-level athletes, including some who have inadvertently or deliberately engaged in activity contrary to the World Anti-Doping Code.

Over the past year, ASADA welcomed AAG input into ASADA’s strategic direction including to inform education strategies through the provision of insights into the pressures and influences in sport increasing the risk and temptation to dope.

Leadership in Sport Conference

The Leadership in Sport Conference, presented by ASADA, the National Integrity of Sport Unit, Sport Australia and the University of Canberra, highlighted the importance of collaboration in the pursuit of success.

Federal Sports Minister Senator Richard Colbeck officially opened the conference, held at the University of Canberra on 28-29 November 2019.

Titled ‘20/20 Vision’, the conference provided a platform for sporting organisations, sports integrity units, private industry and government to learn from each other and identified the benefits of working together to tackle the threats to sports integrity head-on.

Initially conceived as part of the Collaborative Research partnership between the University of Canberra and ASADA, the Leadership in Sport Conference series aims to bring together leaders in sport, research, enforcement, intelligence and integrity to positively influence Australia’s sports integrity partnerships, systems and governance heading into the future.

More than 120 guests attended the two-day conference.

education first Education was one of ASADA’s 3 key pillars and operated as a part of the agency’s holistic anti-doping program.

More than a tick-the-box exercise, ASADA strived to ensure all education interactions were engaging, interesting and targeted to the audience. Noting the value of face-to-face education in engaging athletes, in 2019-20, ASADA increased its face-to-face education program by 57% on the previous year (from 110 to 173 sessions). ASADA increased the number of face-to-face sessions delivered at the sub-elite level by 138%, (from 29 to 69 sessions) in response to intelligence reports guiding resources to be deployed when and where it mattered most.

In addition, ASADA released 2 new targeted online courses to cater for the full spectrum of Australian athletes. The first was built specifically for elite athletes on the Registered Testing Pool and the other targeted young athletes at the beginning of their sporting careers. To complement this work, ASADA also developed several new education resources focused on the health effects of doping. This included a world first augmented reality app developed in partnership with Drug

32 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

Free Sport New Zealand and a series of videos developed in partnership with the United States Anti-Doping Agency. For the first time, ASADA also developed a video featuring a sanctioned athlete telling their story of testing positive to a supplement, for use in education sessions with athletes at all levels.

ASADA was also able to complete an upgrade to the popular Clean Sport app, which now includes a Therapeutic Use Exemption Checker and provides strict warnings for athletes who search for supplements ASADA is aware list banned ingredients on the label. The number of app downloads also increased by more than 16,000 this year, an increase of 28% on the previous year.

Notably, in recognition of their innovative and engaging approach to Education, ASADA won the 2019 Australian Public Service Innovation Award in the category of Citizen Centred Innovation, for the development of the Clean Sport app and Virtual Reality doping control experience.

o nline presence In 2019-20, ASADA’s social media strategy was designed to directly connect the agency to sports and their audiences through online engagement. This was done through promoting awareness of our brand, building and expanding our network and educating sports and sporting fan bases through social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. ASADA posted 1092 posts across all platforms with an increase in followers on Facebook (13.83%), Twitter (4.5%) and Instagram (193.7%) compared to the previous year.

Figure 2: Breakdown of ASADA social media posts in 2019-20 by platform

Instagram 9%

Facebook 42%

Twitter 49%

33 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

Capability reform As doping practices become more sophisticated and complex, ASADA took proactive steps to keep pace by building its capabilities through the investment in technology and re-modelling the workforce to be more efficient and effective.

Digital business strategy The ASADA Information and Communication Technology (ICT) environment underwent significant changes over the past 2 years to improve the organisation’s security posture against a background of increasingly active threats and to transform the business into a modern, paperless and cloud-first capability.

In 2019-20, ASADA continued to invest significantly in the development of its digital foundation program aligned to the Australian Government’s cloud agenda. As at 30 June 2020, ASADA’s modern, integrated digital office space has carried over into Sport Integrity Australia with a wide range of advanced, secure cloud services that are integrated into a seamless user service.

ASADA leveraged the platforms built through this investment to automate workflows, improve supportability of operations and utilise modern approaches to work practices around collaboration. The benefits of the investments made over the past 2 years were highlighted during the bushfires over the Christmas period and the COVID-19 response, where the agency moved to a work from home situation for all staff with no ICT changes and minimal impact on business operations.

w orkforce capability The skill of its workforce is crucial to ASADA’s ability to respond effectively to the challenges posed by an increasingly sophisticated doping environment. In 2019-20, ASADA continued specialist recruitment to enhance intelligence, science, investigations, testing and legal capabilities.

ASADA has actively encouraged secondments and resource-sharing arrangements with relevant law enforcement and other regulatory agencies to maintain its expertise at the forefront of global anti-doping efforts.

As ADA field o perations m odel

ASADA delivered on its commitment to Field Operations by recruiting key personnel to enhance the coordination, training and accreditation of the Doping Control Officers (DCO) and Chaperones. The recruitment of State Managers saw increased engagement between ASADA, Sports and venue managers, which was crucial given the challenges the COVID-19 pandemic brought to the anti-doping testing environment. The implementation of State Manager positions strengthened the ‘in field’ accreditation process supported by the work of the National Training Coordinator.

These changes, initially recommended in a 2018 review by an independent consultant, have and will continue to yield greater engagement, a more comprehensive training regime and quality assurance framework thereby supporting ASADA’s (and now Sport Integrity Australia’s) strategic direction.

Results

p erformance measure 1

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

enGaGeMent and p artnersH ips CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 12)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in building the collective capability of the anti-doping community.

m eAsuR e

ASADA engages and contributes its expertise with international stakeholders at forums, through information sharing and Memorandums of Understanding, so Australian athletes can compete on a level playing field wherever that may be.

m etho Dology

International meetings and forums and Memorandums of Understanding.

tAR get

Contributes expertise at key international anti-doping forums, such as the WADA Symposium.

Provision of assistance to build capability to ≥2 other counterpart international anti-doping organisations, including to adopt proactive joint approach with Drug Free Sport New Zealand to build the anti-doping capacity in the Oceania region.

performance measure analysis ASADA’s work continued to place Australia’s NADO at the forefront of global anti-doping efforts in sport. Its expertise was sought after, whether it be presenting at international conferences or helping to strengthen the anti-doping capabilities of its international partners.

ASADA contributed expertise at in excess of 15 key international anti-doping fora.

ASADA provided assistance to build capability of 10 other counterpart international anti-doping organisations.

34 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

Results

p erformance measure 1

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

enGaGeMent and p artnersH ips CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 12)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in building the collective capability of the anti-doping community.

m eAsuR e

ASADA engages and contributes its expertise with international stakeholders at forums, through information sharing and Memorandums of Understanding, so Australian athletes can compete on a level playing field wherever that may be.

m etho Dology

International meetings and forums and Memorandums of Understanding.

tAR get

Contributes expertise at key international anti-doping forums, such as the WADA Symposium.

Provision of assistance to build capability to ≥2 other counterpart international anti-doping organisations, including to adopt proactive joint approach with Drug Free Sport New Zealand to build the anti-doping capacity in the Oceania region.

performance measure analysis ASADA’s work continued to place Australia’s NADO at the forefront of global anti-doping efforts in sport. Its expertise was sought after, whether it be presenting at international conferences or helping to strengthen the anti-doping capabilities of its international partners.

ASADA contributed expertise at in excess of 15 key international anti-doping fora.

ASADA provided assistance to build capability of 10 other counterpart international anti-doping organisations.

35 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

Highlights from 2019-20 included:

building international capacity Australia’s anti-doping program operates in an international context as part of a global system of anti-doping regulation. The revised World Anti-Doping Code, to come into effect on 1 January 2021, has seen ASADA engaging with global counterparts to ensure ASADA is able to meet the increasing compliance demands and greater expectations required from NADOs.

While ASADA will always continue to improve its own operations and the strength of the Australian sports integrity landscape, it is crucial the agency learns from others and uses and shares its skills, experience and capabilities to build the capacity of its international anti-doping partners to protect the rights of Australian athletes and all clean athletes on the global stage.

In 2019-20, in partnership with WADA, ASADA delivered programs in the Oceania and Asian regions for coordinating the engagement and development of NADO capabilities through the respective Regional Anti-Doping Organisations (RADO). In supporting Australian athletes being able to compete on a level playing field, wherever that may be, ASADA’s assistance to build capacity and to strengthen regional and global anti-doping efforts extended to:

♦ Drug Free Sport New Zealand (DFSNZ) ♦ Sri Lanka Anti-Doping Agency (SLADA) ♦ India National Anti-Doping Agency (NADA) ♦ Korea Anti-Doping Agency (KADA)

♦ Oceania Regional Anti-Doping Organisation (ORADO) ♦ Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA) ♦ National Anti-Doping Agency Austria (NADA Austria) ♦ Anti-Doping Denmark (ADD)

♦ China Anti-Doping Agency (CHINADA) ♦ United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA)

Partnership with Drug Free Sport New Zealand

Throughout 2019-20, ASADA worked closely with our partners from DFSNZ to initiate new ways to support clean athletes and detect doping in the region, including the month-long secondment of 2 ASADA staff to DFSNZ. Both agencies are focused on a proactive joint approach to build anti-doping capacity in the Oceania region.

In January 2020, ASADA, DFSNZ and the Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory (ASDTL) established a collaborative Athlete Passport Management Unit (APMU). An APMU is responsible for reviewing the athlete biological passport and making recommendations for follow up actions. The Korea Anti-Doping Agency (KADA) and Oceania Regional Anti-Doping Organisation (ORADO) are both clients of the APMU. Through the APMU, collaboration between the agencies has been enhanced including supporting capability development in KADA and ORADO.

36 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

In addition, ASADA and DFSNZ worked closely on several education projects, including the Clean Sport 101 online course targeted to young and emerging athletes and the world first Health Effects of Doping Augmented Reality app. Both these resources are now available to athletes, students and support persons across both Australia and New Zealand.

international fora ASADA took a proactive and strategic approach to building and maintaining global partnerships. During 2019-20, ASADA contributed to global discussions, shared its expertise and showed leadership through participating and hosting several international forums, including:

♦ ORADO Board Meeting ♦ 2019 Samoa Pacific Games ♦ First session of CHINADA International Anti-Doping Symposium ♦ Providing Intelligence training for the SLADA in partnership with the Australian Federal Police

♦ WADA September Executive Committee Meeting ♦ International Anti-Doping Seminar in Asia & Oceania ♦ 18th Annual USADA Symposium on Anti-Doping Science ♦ NADA (India) hosted Regional Symposium on Anti-Doping

♦ IADA October meeting ♦ WADA November Executive Committee Meeting ♦ iNADO CEO Forum ♦ WADA World Conference on Doping in Sport

♦ WADA Foundation Board Meeting ♦ DFSNZ Anti-Doping Leadership Forum ♦ APMU Training by WADA ♦ International Conference on the implementation of the revised World Anti-Doping Code

♦ WADA January Executive Committee Meeting ♦ INTERPOL meeting on the supply of prohibited substances.

Also, during this reporting period, Australia was selected to host the third WADA Global Education Conference (GEC). The GEC will bring together anti-doping education practitioners and researchers from around the world to discuss new education policy, share education resources and highlight emerging trends, as well as examine how Anti-Doping Organisations can enhance their education programs to support athletes and athlete support personnel. Originally scheduled for late 2020, WADA decided to postpone the GEC due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It has been rescheduled to be held in November 2021 in Sydney.

37 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

p erformance measure 2

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

edu Cation and aW areness

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 12)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code awareness amongst sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel aware of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code.

m etho Dology

Annual stakeholder survey1

tAR get

≥80% level of awareness

performance measure analysis Athletes, sporting organisations and support personnel who responded to the 2020 Stakeholder Survey identified:

♦ 96.5% are aware2 of ASADA legislation ♦ 97.9% are aware3 of the World Anti-Doping Code.

trend Figure 3: Awareness of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code

1 ASADA’s 2019-20 stakeholder survey was contracted to a service provider and sent to 18,746 people comprising athletes, support personnel and sporting organisation representatives with 1,303 respondents to the survey.

2 Includes respondents who indicated ‘Mostly Aware’, ‘Partly Aware’ and ‘Somewhat Aware’.

3 Includes respondents who indicated ‘Mostly Aware’, ‘Partly Aware’ and ‘Somewhat Aware’.

75%

80%

85%

90%

95%

100%

Target 80%

Awareness of ASADA legislation

Awareness of World Anti-Doping Code

2018-19 2019-20 2017-18 2016-17

99%

97%

99%

97%

93%

98%

97%

98%

38 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 2

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

edu Cation and aW areness

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 12)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code awareness amongst sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel aware of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code.

m etho Dology

Annual stakeholder survey1

tAR get

≥80% level of awareness

performance measure analysis Athletes, sporting organisations and support personnel who responded to the 2020 Stakeholder Survey identified:

♦ 96.5% are aware2 of ASADA legislation ♦ 97.9% are aware3 of the World Anti-Doping Code.

trend Figure 3: Awareness of ASADA legislation and the World Anti-Doping Code

1 ASADA’s 2019-20 stakeholder survey was contracted to a service provider and sent to 18,746 people comprising athletes, support personnel and sporting organisation representatives with 1,303 respondents to the survey.

2 Includes respondents who indicated ‘Mostly Aware’, ‘Partly Aware’ and ‘Somewhat Aware’.

3 Includes respondents who indicated ‘Mostly Aware’, ‘Partly Aware’ and ‘Somewhat Aware’.

75%

80%

85%

90%

95%

100%

Target 80%

Awareness of ASADA legislation

Awareness of World Anti-Doping Code

2018-19 2019-20 2017-18 2016-17

99%

97%

99%

97%

93%

98%

97%

98%

p erformance measure 3

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

edu Cation and aW areness

CRite Rion s ou RCe

portfolio Bud Get s tate Ments (p. 232) Corporate p lan (p. 12)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of satisfaction with anti-doping education and awareness raising activities in the sporting community.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who are satisfied with anti-doping education and awareness raising programs.

m etho Dology

Education participant feedback survey

tAR get

≥80% level of satisfaction

performance measure analysis Of the national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who completed an education course in 2019-20:

♦ 89% were satisfied with ASADA’s Level 1 Anti-Doping course 4 ♦ 89% were satisfied with ASADA’s Level 2 Anti-Doping course 5 ♦ 99% believed they were more informed about how to avoid inadvertently breaking the anti-doping rules.

4 The Level 1 Anti-Doping course provides information on anti-doping rule violations, prohibited substances and methods, supplements, doping control, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, and intelligence and investigations.

5 The Level 2 Anti-Doping course covers more advanced topics in anti-doping and is updated annually to reflect current trends.

39 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

trend Figure 4: Satisfaction with ASADA anti-doping education and awareness raising activities

70%

75%

80%

85%

90%

95%

100%

2018-19 2019-20 2017-18 2016-17

89% 88% 88%

89%

89%

89%

Satisfaction with ASADA's Level 2 Anti-Doping Course

Satisfaction with ASADA's Level 1 Anti-Doping Course

Target 80%

Trend Data: ASADA’s Level 2 Anti-Doping course6

educational performance ASADA recognises education is critical to protecting athletes and minimising the risk of doping in sport. In 2019-20, ASADA enhanced its education strategy by increasing the number of face-to-face education sessions despite the difficulties encountered during the COVID -19 pandemic and continuing to embrace innovation and technology to deliver a leading anti-doping education program.

Since launching ASADA eLearning in 2010, more than 100,000 people from across the sporting community and educational institutions have accessed a variety of online learning options. In these courses, participants learn about the key areas of anti-doping such as prohibited substances and methods, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, Doping Control and Whereabouts.

In 2019-20, respondents to ASADA’s eLearning Anti-Doping Level 1 course identified the following:

♦ 93% learned new things about anti-doping ♦ 86% of users said the course (all 6 modules) was relevant to their needs ♦ 90% thought the activities within the course helped me learn the material.

In addition, a majority of athletes who attended face-to-face education sessions provided feedback and 99% reported that they felt more informed, and our Clean Sport Educators received an average rating of 9.5/10 from participants.

6 Trend data for previous years is not available due to the course being developed in 2018.

40 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 4

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

edu Cation and aW areness

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 13)

Result partiall Y Met

o ut Come

Achievement in anti-doping education and awareness-raising.

m eAsuR e

Delivery of anti-doping education and awareness-raising resources to athletes and support personnel.

m etho Dology

a) Number of athletes and support personnel reached through core education products

b) Education outputs and education survey results from targeted high-risk sports7

c) Education outputs and survey of teachers

d) App statistics

tAR get

Target includes:

a) Core education products delivered to 20,000 athletes and support personnel

b) Tailored online and/or face-to-face anti-doping education products produced for ≥ 3 high-risk sports

c) ≥3 professional development programs8 for teachers delivered across Australia that are based on the anti-doping element of the National Health and Physical Education Curriculum

d) 10,000 downloads or visits of the ASADA app 9

7 High-risk sports are determined through an ASADA intelligence assessment, including inputs from the ASADA Compliance program.

8 Professional development programs for teachers to teach anti-doping content to students.

9 The ASADA app provides athletes with timely anti-doping information and access to online anti-doping education.

41 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

performance measure analysis In 2019-20:

1. ASADA delivered 31,610 core education products to athletes and support personnel:

♦ 24,185 completions of Level 1 and Level 2 online modules ♦ 173 face-to-face presentations10 to ~7,425 attendees (81% increase on attendees in 2018-19).

2. ASADA tailored online and/or face-to-face anti-doping education products for 16 high-risk sports

3. ASADA delivered one professional development program to Health and Physical Education teachers at the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER) Western Australia Conference

4. More than 16,000 people downloaded the ASADA app.

Figure 5: Trend Data: Completions of Level 1 and Level 2 online education modules

17,500

20,000

22,500

25,000

27,500

30,000

Completions of Level 1 and 2 Online Modules

2018-19 2019-20 2017-18 2016-17

20,190

20,729

25,920

24,185

Target 20,000

Clean s port e ducators

In 2018-19, ASADA hired several elite current and former Australian athletes to form a new team of Clean Sport Educators. All presenters had extensive involvement in sport and are well placed to share their anti-doping experiences with athletes.

During the 2019-20 period, the Clean Sport Educators were critical to ASADA’s increased ability to resource face-to-face sessions and they assisted in the delivery of 161 education sessions and 12 Outreach Education and Awareness stands.

10 Comprises presentations to schools and sports.

42 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

intelligence-informed education Education was a critical part of ASADA’s anti-doping program and ASADA’s education resources were targeted according to internal risk assessments and intelligence reports. In addition, no face-to-face session is the same, with the content of each session informed by intelligence from across the agency.

In 2019-20:

♦ ASADA tailored online and/or face-to-face anti-doping education products for 16 high-risk sports

♦ 74% of sport face-to-face sessions were delivered to those in the high-risk category ♦ ASADA’s 142 face-to-face sessions with sports were delivered across the full spectrum of the athlete pathway, with 41% delivered at the elite level and 49% at the sub-elite level, in response to intelligence reports suggesting the sub-elite level was the greatest risk in

a number of sports.

Figure 6: Education face-to-face sessions to sports delivered by athlete level

Recreational/Social 8%

Mixed 3%

Elite 41%

Sub-elite 48%

health effects A key focus for the Education team in 2019-20 was increasing awareness of the health effects of doping. As part of this, ASADA developed a new mobile app titled the ‘Health Effects of Doping’.

Through the app, users create their own avatar who (unfortunately) experiences all the health effects of certain substances. By using the phone’s camera, users can peer inside their avatar to see how performance enhancing drugs change their organs and nervous system.

Specifically, the app looks at the effects of steroids, stimulants, EPO, HGH, SARMs and opioids. Stroke, liver damage, tumours and anxiety are just a few of the side effects of prohibited substances covered in the app.

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

ASADA also developed a student worksheet for high school teachers to use in class, which complements the National, State and Territory Health and Physical Education Curriculums for Stages 5 and 6, as well as a series of videos on the health effects of doping, in partnership with the United States Anti-Doping Agency.

s port integrity in schools In partnership with NISU, ASADA offered free lesson plans for teachers on sport integrity issues, fitting within the Australian National Health and Physical Education Curriculum. These were designed to promote values of fair play, integrity and clean sport at a young age, while attitudes are still being formed.

In 2019-20, ASADA continued its commitment to help promote sport integrity in schools by working directly with high school teachers across Australia to provide professional development training opportunities and by offering free visits to schools teaching sport integrity already.

In the past year, ASADA delivered 31 school sessions to students across Australia. In addition, although aiming to deliver 3 or more, ASADA delivered one professional development program to Health and Physical Education teachers at the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER) Western Australia Conference.

Two other sessions were planned at the ACHPER South Australia Conference and ACHPER New South Wales Conference; however, one was cancelled and the other restructured due to COVID-19.

Regardless, ASADA continued to engage with schools by promoting the new online resource ‘Clean Sport 101’ for school age students and developing a Secondary Schools Resource Kit to be launched in 2020.

As ADA Clean s port app

In 2019-20, ASADA updated its highly successful Clean Sport app to include several new features for the benefit of athletes, with more than 16,000 downloads across the year.

One key change was the introduction of a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) checker to enable athletes to easily determine whether they need an in-advance TUE for a particular medication. This will reduce the administrative burden on athletes and medical practitioners significantly.

In addition, the app also now includes strict warnings if athletes search for supplements ASADA is aware advertised banned ingredients on their nutrition labels.

In the past financial year, more than 16,000 people downloaded the app. This is a 28% increase in the number of app downloads from the previous year.

As at 30 June 2020, the ASADA Clean Sport app has been downloaded more than 31,000 times.

44 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

o nline courses In 2019-20, ASADA released 2 new online courses targeting specific audiences.

♦ Clean Sport 101 In January 2020, ASADA released the world-first Clean Sport 101 course developed to help younger and recreational level athletes understand anti-doping rules applying to them. The course was developed in response to feedback that the Level 1 course was sometimes too technical for younger athletes. In response, Clean Sport 101 was developed, which focuses on supporting athletes at the beginning of their sporting careers and on the ‘why’ behind the anti-doping rules. Importantly, it was written and tested at year 5 comprehension level, making the rules easier to understand for all ages.

The course was also developed with input from Drug Free Sport New Zealand (DFSNZ) and ASADA built and developed the same course for New Zealand athletes, which is now hosted on the DFSNZ Learning Management System.

This course has an 88% satisfaction rating from respondents.

♦ Whereabouts course Another course launched in 2019-20 was the Whereabouts course, developed in partnership with Swimming Australia. This course targets athletes in the Registered and Domestic Testing Pools specifically to help them understand their whereabouts obligations, technical requirements and the consequences of failing to comply. It is now promoted to all athletes across all sports prior to their inclusion on the Whereabouts system.

This course has a 91% satisfaction rating from respondents.

45 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

p erformance measure 5

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

enGaGeMent and p artnersH ips CRite Rion s ou RCe

portfolio Bud Get s tate Ments (p. 231) Corporate p lan (p. 14)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in compliance with anti-doping requirements.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of recognised sports assessed under the ASADA Compliance Framework that meet ASADA’s compliance requirements11.

m etho Dology

Direct sourcing from sports and desk research.

tAR get

≥80% compliance

performance measure analysis ASADA’s operating model struck a balance between remaining independent, maintaining the confidence of sports and working with stakeholders across the sporting community to minimise the risk of doping. Influencing ASADA’s direction is the knowledge doping has become increasingly sophisticated and complex. Its reach spans from grassroots sports to the elite levels. In 2019-20, ASADA continued to deliver a compliance monitoring program focused on achieving positive outcomes through partnerships with all stakeholders.

In 2018-19, 91% of funded and recently funded National Sporting Organisations (NSO) (67) were reported as compliant.

In 2019-20, 86% of funded and recently funded NSOs (68) were reported as compliant12. The NSOs reported as non-compliant were categorised as such due to not meeting ASADA’s anti-doping education requirements. Sport Integrity Australia will continue to work with these NSOs to develop education strategies to ensure compliance in the next reporting period.

11 ASADA’s Compliance Framework is based on a sport being compliant with all aspects of the ASADA Act, ASADA Regulations and World Anti-Doping Code, which jointly establish the requirements all recognised sports must comply with.

12 The rating of ‘compliant’ is based on ASADA’s assessments of whether a sport is fully compliant or adopting procedures in line with anti-doping requirements.

46 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 5

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

enGaGeMent and p artnersH ips CRite Rion s ou RCe

portfolio Bud Get s tate Ments (p. 231) Corporate p lan (p. 14)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in compliance with anti-doping requirements.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of recognised sports assessed under the ASADA Compliance Framework that meet ASADA’s compliance requirements11.

m etho Dology

Direct sourcing from sports and desk research.

tAR get

≥80% compliance

performance measure analysis ASADA’s operating model struck a balance between remaining independent, maintaining the confidence of sports and working with stakeholders across the sporting community to minimise the risk of doping. Influencing ASADA’s direction is the knowledge doping has become increasingly sophisticated and complex. Its reach spans from grassroots sports to the elite levels. In 2019-20, ASADA continued to deliver a compliance monitoring program focused on achieving positive outcomes through partnerships with all stakeholders.

In 2018-19, 91% of funded and recently funded National Sporting Organisations (NSO) (67) were reported as compliant.

In 2019-20, 86% of funded and recently funded NSOs (68) were reported as compliant12. The NSOs reported as non-compliant were categorised as such due to not meeting ASADA’s anti-doping education requirements. Sport Integrity Australia will continue to work with these NSOs to develop education strategies to ensure compliance in the next reporting period.

11 ASADA’s Compliance Framework is based on a sport being compliant with all aspects of the ASADA Act, ASADA Regulations and World Anti-Doping Code, which jointly establish the requirements all recognised sports must comply with.

12 The rating of ‘compliant’ is based on ASADA’s assessments of whether a sport is fully compliant or adopting procedures in line with anti-doping requirements.

implementing the new o perating f ramework and Compliance s tandards

In 2019-20, ASADA implemented its new Sport Engagement Operating Framework and Compliance Standards, which categorises sports more accurately by doping risk. The Operating Framework sets out the specific compliance expectations for sports in each category. Those sports classified as Category 1 (being the sports with the highest doping risk) now require the highest standard of compliance.

ASADA undertook a baseline assessment of all sports with an Anti-Doping Policy against the new Compliance Model and developed Engagement Plans to assist sports with increasing compliance. Sport Integrity Australia will drive the implementation of the Engagement Plans in 2020-21.

In February 2020, ASADA conducted a survey to identify knowledge gaps regarding anti-doping within sporting organisations as well as to help guide the development of resources to assist sports with their anti-doping obligations. 45 NSOs provided a combined 156 responses on various issues. Responses were received from 80% of ASADA Category 1 classed sports and 33% of ASADA Category 2 classed sports.

Key results from the survey were:

♦ NSOs have knowledge gaps in using the ASADA Clean Sport app and Global DRO13 resources ♦ NSOs would benefit from additional information on their role when an athlete or support personnel within their organisation is subject to an ADRV

♦ NSOs are most interested in multi-sport workshops and e-Learning modules to receive education/ information from ASADA

♦ NSOs requested more information about Anti-Doping Education, the Testing Process and NSO Compliance

♦ NSOs promote the anti-doping message mainly through email, their website and social media ♦ NSOs mainly use ASADA online resources and printed resources to promote anti-doping and educate their members

♦ NSOs would most prefer additional support in the form of social media messaging and an ASADA anti-doping webpage that they could use

♦ NSOs perceive the greatest doping risks are inadvertent doping, supplement usage and whereabouts failures

ASADA used this information to provide a tailored compliance model better considering the specific vulnerabilities of individual sports as well as the sector in totality. The survey outcomes continued to inform the approach of ASADA in its engagement with sports.

13 The Global Drug Reference Online (Global DRO) provides athletes and support personnel with information about the prohibited status of specific medications based on the current World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List.

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

p erformance measure 7

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

enGaGeMent and p artnersH ips CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 14)

Result partiall Y Met

o ut Come

Achievement in the demonstrated sharing of anti-doping intelligence with external stakeholders.

m eAsuR e

Collecting and providing timely, high-quality intelligence and undertaking assessments that inform the picture of doping in Australia and overseas.

m etho Dology

Feedback from external stakeholders and stakeholder survey15

tAR get

80% level of client satisfaction with at least 12 intelligence reports provided to external stakeholders

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, for respondents to the 2019 Stakeholder Survey who, as representatives of their respective national sporting organisation, participated in the exchange of information with ASADA:

♦ 94% of the 35 respondents rated the relevance of information received from ASADA as very good or good16 ♦ 91% of the 34 respondents indicated the benefits, in terms of detection, of the information received from ASADA was very good or good17.

In 2019-20, for respondents to the 2020 Stakeholder Survey who, as representatives of their respective national sporting organisation, participated in the exchange of information with ASADA:

♦ 72% of the 25 respondents rated the relevance of information received from ASADA as very good or good18 ♦ 72.7% of the 22 respondents rated the benefits, in terms of detection, of the information received from ASADA was very good or good19.

15 ASADA’s 2019-20 stakeholder survey was contracted to a service provider and sent to 18,746 people comprising athletes, support personnel and sporting organisation representatives with 1,303 respondents to the survey.

16 This does not include the one respondent who rated ‘moderate’.

17 This does not include the 2 respondents who rated ‘moderate’.

18 This does not include the 5 respondents who rated ‘moderate’.

19 This does not include the 4 respondents who rated ‘moderate’.

p erformance measure 6

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

portfolio Bud Get s tate Ments (p. 232) Corporate p lan (p. 14)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in delivering effective anti-doping intelligence and investigative functions.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of national sporting organisations, athletes and support personnel who consider ASADA’s intelligence and investigative functions to be effective at deterring athletes and support personnel from doping.

m etho Dology

Annual stakeholder survey14

tAR get

≥80% level of satisfaction

performance measure analysis Of the 1017 NSO staff, athletes and support personnel who provided a rating in response to the 2020 Stakeholder Survey, 85% rated ASADA’s ‘intelligence’ and ‘investigative’ functions as effective at deterring athletes and support personnel from doping.

trend Figure 7: ASADA’s ‘intelligence’ and ‘investigative’ functions effectiveness at deterring athletes and support personnel from doping

14 ASADA’s 2019-20 stakeholder survey was contracted to a service provider and sent to 18,746 people comprising athletes, support personnel and sporting organisation representatives with 1,303 respondents to the survey.

Target 80%

70%

75%

80%

85%

90%

95%

100%

ASADA’s Intelligence and Investigative functions effective at deterring athletes and support personnel from doping

2018-19 2019-20 2017-18 2016-17

85%

79%

85% 85%

48 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 7

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

enGaGeMent and p artnersH ips CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 14)

Result partiall Y Met

o ut Come

Achievement in the demonstrated sharing of anti-doping intelligence with external stakeholders.

m eAsuR e

Collecting and providing timely, high-quality intelligence and undertaking assessments that inform the picture of doping in Australia and overseas.

m etho Dology

Feedback from external stakeholders and stakeholder survey15

tAR get

80% level of client satisfaction with at least 12 intelligence reports provided to external stakeholders

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, for respondents to the 2019 Stakeholder Survey who, as representatives of their respective national sporting organisation, participated in the exchange of information with ASADA:

♦ 94% of the 35 respondents rated the relevance of information received from ASADA as very good or good16 ♦ 91% of the 34 respondents indicated the benefits, in terms of detection, of the information received from ASADA was very good or good17.

In 2019-20, for respondents to the 2020 Stakeholder Survey who, as representatives of their respective national sporting organisation, participated in the exchange of information with ASADA:

♦ 72% of the 25 respondents rated the relevance of information received from ASADA as very good or good18 ♦ 72.7% of the 22 respondents rated the benefits, in terms of detection, of the information received from ASADA was very good or good19.

15 ASADA’s 2019-20 stakeholder survey was contracted to a service provider and sent to 18,746 people comprising athletes, support personnel and sporting organisation representatives with 1,303 respondents to the survey.

16 This does not include the one respondent who rated ‘moderate’.

17 This does not include the 2 respondents who rated ‘moderate’.

18 This does not include the 5 respondents who rated ‘moderate’.

19 This does not include the 4 respondents who rated ‘moderate’.

49 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

From 2018-19 to 2019-20 there were fewer respondents to the survey questions related to this performance measure, more of whom assessed the rating as ‘moderate’, which has led to a lower percentage of ‘very good’ or ‘good’ ratings. With this lower response rate the rating does not meet ASADA’s target of 80% satisfaction. Sport Integrity Australia will work with the relevant national sporting organisations to understand the background and address any issues.

While the Stakeholder Survey captures the aggregated value of ASADA intelligence provided to external stakeholders, ASADA Intelligence also received specific feedback from some stakeholders who indicated that the dissemination of ASADA’s intelligence was the catalyst for intervention measures they implemented. Specific feedback included 2 sporting administration bodies who disseminated information to their respective members about the anti-doping rule violation ‘prohibited association’ (as per the World Anti-Doping Code).

As ADA intelligence reports In 2019-20, 101 Intelligence Reports were disseminated to external stakeholders, including WADA, NADOs, Sporting Bodies, Law Enforcement and Intelligence Agencies and Government Regulators.

The dissemination of Intelligence Reports has significantly increased in 2019-20 compared to 2018-19. This increased dissemination reflects enhanced investment in the intelligence function at ASADA and relationships with external partners. This collaboration is a key component to achieving ASADA’s objectives.

In addition, in a continued effort to open lines of communication and share information with sporting bodies, ASADA partnered with NISU and Sport Australia to produce and distribute 4 information bulletins titled ‘Sport Integrity Matters’. The bulletins were designed to keep sporting bodies informed about current and emerging sports integrity issues affecting sport. A key goal of the bulletin was to be a conversation starter; a strategy to inform sporting bodies and to demystify the complex world of doping in sport.

intelligence sharing The abuse of performance and image enhancing drugs (PIED) is an issue concerning a range of law enforcement agencies and regulators in Australia and internationally. ASADA has several information sharing agreements in place with organisations to facilitate the inter-agency sharing of information of mutual operational interest.

ASADA is committed to sharing intelligence with international partners to combat the global use, trafficking and supply of PIEDs. This includes law enforcement and other NADOs.

In 2019-20, ASADA continued to focus on strengthening operational partnerships with key stakeholders including:

♦ Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) ♦ Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) ♦ Australian Border Force (ABF) ♦ Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA)

♦ Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) ♦ Australian Federal Police (AFP) and state and territory police ♦ INTERPOL and Europol.

50 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 8

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 14)

Result not M et

o ut Come

Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

m eAsuR e

Number of total referrals20 to the testing program based on intelligence reports21.

m etho Dology

Intelligence referrals

tAR get

600 intelligence reports referred to testing

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, a total of 466 intelligence reports were referred to testing, comprising:

♦ 263 Scientific Analysis Reports 22 ♦ 203 tip-offs, social media reports, and external and internal notifications.

In 2019-20, while the target of 600 intelligence reports referred to testing was not met, a total of 418 intelligence reports informed anti-doping testing and programs, comprising:

♦ 177 Scientific Analysis Reports (SAR) ♦ 241 tip-offs, social media reports, Field Incident Reports, and external and internal notifications.

20 Total referrals include both high-risk referrals and low-risk referrals.

21 An intelligence report contains information collected, evaluated and disseminated to inform operational decision-making. It may be produced in connection with a tip-off, notification from an external organisation, or be derived from internal sources, such as field staff observations, or the review of analytical results by ASADA’s Science Team. A higher percentage of testing based on intelligence reports is desirable, represents better value for money and is more effective over testing that was simply risk-led, random or based on place-getter strategies.

22 Scientific Analysis Reports are derived from assessment of laboratory results and other scientific information.

51 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

Anti-doping programs encompass a range of preventive and detection activities, including education and testing. Effective anti-doping activities rely on information from a broad array of sources and on the analysis of that information to create intelligence, which informs all manner of decision-making in ASADA. Intelligence shapes decisions around:

♦ which athletes to test and when ♦ which sports are most at risk of doping ♦ what emerging substances pose a threat to athlete health and sport integrity.

In 2019-20, ASADA’s intelligence capability continued to inform ASADA’s operational areas and provided advice on:

♦ further targeted testing ♦ re-analysis of samples in long-term storage ♦ further information gathering

♦ assistance with governance ♦ education ♦ investigations.

Over the past year ASADA’s enhanced intelligence capability contributed to ASADA’s testing program through the provision of strategic, operational and tactical intelligence products. The products directly informed the development of ASADA’s test distribution plan by identifying areas of risk and trends within and across sports. At the tactical level, the products also directly inform the specific testing plans for individual athletes.

Although ASADA did not meet the quantitative performance target for this measure, ASADA’s intelligence capability has continued to effectively influence the anti-doping program as demonstrated in performance measure 9.

Anti-doping testing program and C ovi D-19

The COVID-19 pandemic and the Government-imposed restrictions on travel movements and public gathering in the last quarter of 2019-20 caused less sport to be played across Australia, resulting in a reduction of the number of tests conducted.

To combat the ongoing risk of COVID-19, strict procedures were developed for the testing of athletes during this time.

A reduction of the number of SARs in 2019-20 is in part due to the effect of COVID-19 on ASADA’s testing program. The Athlete Biological Passport is built from the analytical data from the laboratory analysis of athlete samples. A decrease in the collection of samples from athletes has direct follow on effects on the amount of data available for review and hence the number of SARs.

Sample collection (also known as doping control or drug testing) is an essential part of detecting doping in sport. ASADA’s testing program includes a combination of Government-funded and User-Pays arrangements23 and is supported by a scientific, intelligence and investigations-driven targeted test distribution plan.

23 An arrangement where sporting bodies, state governments and international federations engage ASADA for a fee to carry out anti-doping testing on their athletes.

52 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

Testing is conducted in-competition and out-of-competition and is based on no-advance notice, which acts as a deterrent to athletes, who are subject to testing anytime, anywhere and without warning.

In 2018-19, ASADA conducted a total of 5,523 tests across 52 sports:

♦ 2,875 Government-funded tests (948 in-competition and 1,927 out-of-competition tests) ♦ 2,648 User-pays tests (832 in-competition and 1,816 out-of-competition tests).

In 2019-20, ASADA conducted a total of 4,414 tests across 57 sports:

♦ 2,224 Government-funded tests (619 in-competition and 1605 out-of-competition tests) ♦ 2,190 User-pays tests (643 in-competition and 1547 out-of-competition tests).

Figure 8: Trend Data: Tests conducted by ASADA

0

1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

6000

Total Govt. funded User-pay

2018-19

2019-20

53 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

p erformance measure 9

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

m eAsuR e

Number of intelligence-led operational activities24 on high-risk athletes25.

m etho Dology

Intelligence data

Testing data

Education data

tAR get

≥90 intelligence-led operational activities carried out on high-risk athletes

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, ASADA carried out 128 intelligence-informed operational activities on high-risk athletes. This included:

♦ 57 tailored face-to-face education sessions completed on identified high-risk sports ♦ 71 Target Athlete Monitoring cases created during the period.

ASADA carried out 133 intelligence-led operational activities on high-risk athletes in 2019-20. This included:

♦ 105 tailored face-to-face education sessions completed on identified high-risk sports ♦ 28 Target Athlete Monitoring (TAM) cases created during the period with 152 testing missions conducted on TAM athletes.

Further, the development of the yearly ASADA Test Distribution Plan (TDP) was informed by intelligence holdings, influencing the allocation of testing numbers to higher risk sports.

24 An operational activity can include targeted testing, investigation, targeted education and/or intelligence probe.

25 A high-risk athlete is an athlete who is the subject of ASADA’s Target Athlete Monitoring processes, an intelligence probe or an investigation.

54 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 9

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

m eAsuR e

Number of intelligence-led operational activities24 on high-risk athletes25.

m etho Dology

Intelligence data

Testing data

Education data

tAR get

≥90 intelligence-led operational activities carried out on high-risk athletes

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, ASADA carried out 128 intelligence-informed operational activities on high-risk athletes. This included:

♦ 57 tailored face-to-face education sessions completed on identified high-risk sports ♦ 71 Target Athlete Monitoring cases created during the period.

ASADA carried out 133 intelligence-led operational activities on high-risk athletes in 2019-20. This included:

♦ 105 tailored face-to-face education sessions completed on identified high-risk sports ♦ 28 Target Athlete Monitoring (TAM) cases created during the period with 152 testing missions conducted on TAM athletes.

Further, the development of the yearly ASADA Test Distribution Plan (TDP) was informed by intelligence holdings, influencing the allocation of testing numbers to higher risk sports.

24 An operational activity can include targeted testing, investigation, targeted education and/or intelligence probe.

25 A high-risk athlete is an athlete who is the subject of ASADA’s Target Athlete Monitoring processes, an intelligence probe or an investigation.

face-to-face education In 2019-20, ASADA delivered 105 face-to-face education sessions to athletes included in ASADA-identified high-risk sports. In preparing each of these presentations, the Education Team sought input from all operational business teams to understand the threats to each individual cohort. This information enabled the Education Team to tailor each presentation to the needs of each audience.

A focus of the face-to-face sessions was to supplement awareness and the rising prevalence of prohibited substances classified as SARMs. The sessions included the use of actual off-the-shelf supplement bottles and the ASADA Clean Sport app to enable greater understanding of the risks athletes face with supplements, as well as imagery and case studies sourced from government and law enforcement partners to show the production environment of SARMs.

On completion of each education session, ASADA sought feedback. In 2019-20, 99% of respondents stated they felt better informed following the face-to-face session.

ASADA also used the experience of Intelligence and Investigations staff in presentations, drawing on the expertise within ASADA to co-present to certain groups.

t arget Athlete m onitoring

Athletes are allocated to the TAM program when assessed to have an increased risk of doping. The assessment may include review of biological variations in their ABP, review of changes in performance or ASADA receiving actionable intelligence.

Further actions in relation to athletes on the TAM may include additional laboratory analysis, additional targeted testing, review by external experts, or other operational responses, as deemed necessary. The risk of doping is reassessed throughout the process.

In 2019-20, 152 testing missions were conducted on athletes on the TAM.

t est Distribution p lan

The TDP is the overarching planning document ASADA used to plan testing missions through the year, allocating a certain proportion of missions to sports according to several factors, which form part of an overall risk assessment of a particular sport.

One of the factors used in the risk assessment is intelligence received and developed in relation to a sport. In 2019-20, ASADA effectively used intelligence holdings to support the development of the TDP, influencing the number of testing missions in sports with higher risks for doping.

55 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

p erformance measure 10

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

m eAsuR e

Investment in intelligence leads to matters referred to investigations.

m etho Dology

Adverse Analytical Findings

Investigations

tAR get

15 intelligence-led products26 referred to investigations

performance measure analysis The selection of athletes for testing uses multiple sources of intelligence.

In 2018-19, there were 15 intelligence-led referrals to investigations comprising:

♦ 11 Adverse Analytical Findings (based on intelligence-led testing) ♦ 4 information/intelligence reports (consisting of 3 external notifications and one tip off).

In 2019-20, there were 16 intelligence-led products referred to investigations, 11 of which related to Adverse Analytical Findings, and 5 which related to non-analytical ADRV matters.

♦ 2 athletes were selected for testing based on specific intelligence received and assessed by the Intelligence Team

♦ 9 athletes were selected for testing based on other risk factors identified by Science and Sports Operations (e.g. based on science recommendation or performance improvement identified by a Sports Operations Officer)

♦ 5 non-analytical ADRV-related matters were referred to investigations, based on specific recommendation from the Intelligence team.

26 An intelligence-led product is a referral to Investigations concerning a person or other entity ASADA held intelligence on, and where that intelligence was responsible for the decision to refer the matter to investigations, or was primarily responsible for the testing of an athlete, which led to a positive test.

56 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 10

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in intelligence-led anti-doping program.

m eAsuR e

Investment in intelligence leads to matters referred to investigations.

m etho Dology

Adverse Analytical Findings

Investigations

tAR get

15 intelligence-led products26 referred to investigations

performance measure analysis The selection of athletes for testing uses multiple sources of intelligence.

In 2018-19, there were 15 intelligence-led referrals to investigations comprising:

♦ 11 Adverse Analytical Findings (based on intelligence-led testing) ♦ 4 information/intelligence reports (consisting of 3 external notifications and one tip off).

In 2019-20, there were 16 intelligence-led products referred to investigations, 11 of which related to Adverse Analytical Findings, and 5 which related to non-analytical ADRV matters.

♦ 2 athletes were selected for testing based on specific intelligence received and assessed by the Intelligence Team

♦ 9 athletes were selected for testing based on other risk factors identified by Science and Sports Operations (e.g. based on science recommendation or performance improvement identified by a Sports Operations Officer)

♦ 5 non-analytical ADRV-related matters were referred to investigations, based on specific recommendation from the Intelligence team.

26 An intelligence-led product is a referral to Investigations concerning a person or other entity ASADA held intelligence on, and where that intelligence was responsible for the decision to refer the matter to investigations, or was primarily responsible for the testing of an athlete, which led to a positive test.

Adverse Analytical f indings Science is a central component to an effective anti-doping program. ASADA’s scientists contribute to inform all aspects of ASADA operations. Scientific expertise is crucial in the detection of athletes who use prohibited substances or methods to enhance their performance. ASADA’s scientists guide research and collaborate with other anti-doping experts to remain aware of the latest research and advances in methods and practices that detect and deter the use of performance-enhancing drugs in sport.

Close collaboration between ASADA’s scientists and WADA-accredited laboratories around the world is important to the implementation of a strong detection program. The detection of a prohibited substance in a sample collected from an athlete is known as an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF).

AAFs related to 16 athletes were progressed to investigations. A further 9 AAFs did not progress to investigations due to the athlete having a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) or having used an allowed route of administration.

The selection of athletes for testing utilises multiple sources of intelligence. Of the 16 athletes with AAFs progressing to investigations, 2 athletes were selected for testing based on specific intelligence received and assessed by the Intelligence Team and a further 9 athletes were selected for testing based on other risk factors.

n on-Analytical ADR vs

Traditionally, doping has been detected by testing athletes to identify the presence of a prohibited substance to establish an AAF. However, the presence of a prohibited substance is only one of the 10 Anti-Doping Rule Violations. To prove the remaining 9 non-analytical ADRVs we need to conduct an appropriately thorough investigation. This, together with the increasing sophistication of doping, means that all ADRVs will increasingly be established through methods other than just testing.

Non-analytical ADRVs may emanate from an array of sources including (but not limited to) referrals from law enforcement and other government agencies, tip-offs from the public and sports, referrals from counterpart national anti-doping agencies, self-generated intelligence from ASADA and identification through associated investigations. In the reporting period 5 non-analytical ADRVs emanating from the Intelligence Team were referred to the Investigation Team.

57 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

p erformance measure 11

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in compliance with investigations standards.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA that are in compliance with the Australian Government Investigations Standards and International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

m etho Dology

Notification of breaches of investigation standards through Tribunal decisions and/or ASADA legal identification

tAR get

≥90% of investigations comply with standards.

performance measure analysis The ASADA Investigations Team conduct investigations in accordance with the ASADA Investigation Manual, which accords with Australian Government Investigation Standards (AGIS) and WADA’s International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI).

In 2018-19, ASADA conducted 35 investigations, all in accordance with investigations standards.

In 2019-20, ASADA conducted 24 investigations, all in accordance with investigations standards.

ASADA received no notifications of breaches of investigation standards through Tribunal decisions and/or ASADA internal legal team identification.

investigations Traditionally, ASADA detected doping by testing blood and urine samples collected from an athlete to identify the presence of a prohibited substance. However, the presence of a prohibited substance is only one of 10 Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRV) listed in the World Anti-Doping Code. To prove the remaining 9 ADRVs, a significant contribution through contemporary investigative methodologies is required. This, together with the increasing sophistication of doping, means all ADRVs will increasingly be established through methods other than testing.

58 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 11

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement in compliance with investigations standards.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA that are in compliance with the Australian Government Investigations Standards and International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

m etho Dology

Notification of breaches of investigation standards through Tribunal decisions and/or ASADA legal identification

tAR get

≥90% of investigations comply with standards.

performance measure analysis The ASADA Investigations Team conduct investigations in accordance with the ASADA Investigation Manual, which accords with Australian Government Investigation Standards (AGIS) and WADA’s International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI).

In 2018-19, ASADA conducted 35 investigations, all in accordance with investigations standards.

In 2019-20, ASADA conducted 24 investigations, all in accordance with investigations standards.

ASADA received no notifications of breaches of investigation standards through Tribunal decisions and/or ASADA internal legal team identification.

investigations Traditionally, ASADA detected doping by testing blood and urine samples collected from an athlete to identify the presence of a prohibited substance. However, the presence of a prohibited substance is only one of 10 Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRV) listed in the World Anti-Doping Code. To prove the remaining 9 ADRVs, a significant contribution through contemporary investigative methodologies is required. This, together with the increasing sophistication of doping, means all ADRVs will increasingly be established through methods other than testing.

ASADA has investigative and intelligence capabilities to:

♦ obtain, assess and process anti-doping intelligence from all available sources to form the basis of an investigation into a possible doping violation

♦ investigate atypical findings and adverse passport findings ♦ investigate any other analytical or non-analytical information or intelligence that indicates a possible doping violation.

Disclosure n otices

Under ASADA legislation, the CEO can issue a Disclosure Notice requiring an individual or entity to assist with an investigation. This notice can require they:

♦ attend an interview to answer questions ♦ give information ♦ produce documents or things.

The CEO can only issue a Disclosure Notice if the CEO believes the person has information, documents or things that may be relevant to the administration of the ASADA Regulations. Three members of the ADRVP must agree in writing that the CEO’s belief is reasonable.

Subsection 74(1) of the ASADA Act requires the CEO to report the following information relating to Disclosure Notices in its annual report.

ASADA’s CEO issued 43 Disclosure Notices to 17 individuals or entities in 2019-20. A number of individuals received more than one Disclosure Notice e.g. one to attend interview, one to give information and/or one to produce documents or things. Four of these Disclosure Notices were not served and a further 2 were later withdrawn due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There were also 2 replacement Disclosure Notices issued due to claims of hardship, which have not been counted in the above.

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p erformance measure 12

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of anti-doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA and referred to the ADRVP that result in a finding of an anti-doping rule violation.

m etho Dology

ADRVP findings

tAR get

≥80% of ADRVP findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, 100% of investigations matters referred to the ADRVP resulted in a finding of an ADRV.

In 2019-20, investigations matters referred to the ADRVP resulted in a finding of an ADRV 95.5% of the time.

Anti-Doping Rule v iolation process

ASADA followed the principles set out under the World Anti-Doping Code and the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme to establish a process for the administration of potential ADRVs. The process generally includes:

♦ the issuing of ‘show cause’ notices ♦ reviews by the independent ADRVP ♦ a hearing before a sports tribunal ♦ the public disclosure of an ADRV.

Show cause notices

When the ASADA CEO reaches a conclusion a possible ADRV has occurred, the CEO is required under ASADA’s legislative framework to put allegations (via a show cause notice) to an athlete or support person and invite them to respond. Generally, athletes and support people have 10 days to lodge a submission in response to the show cause notice. This information, along with the evidence collected by ASADA, is put to the ADRVP for initial consideration as to whether

60 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 12

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of anti-doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of investigations conducted by ASADA and referred to the ADRVP that result in a finding of an anti-doping rule violation.

m etho Dology

ADRVP findings

tAR get

≥80% of ADRVP findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

performance measure analysis In 2018-19, 100% of investigations matters referred to the ADRVP resulted in a finding of an ADRV.

In 2019-20, investigations matters referred to the ADRVP resulted in a finding of an ADRV 95.5% of the time.

Anti-Doping Rule v iolation process

ASADA followed the principles set out under the World Anti-Doping Code and the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme to establish a process for the administration of potential ADRVs. The process generally includes:

a possible ADRV has occurred. This is only one step in the complete ADRV process for which the timeframes vary on a case-by-case basis.

If the ADRVP determines a possible ADRV occurred, the ASADA CEO writes to the athlete or support person and advises them the ADRVP is proposing to make an assertion of a possible ADRV. The athlete or support person is generally provided with a further 10 days to lodge a submission in relation to the alleged assertion. This information, along with any further evidence collected by ASADA, is put to the ADRVP for a second time for final consideration as to whether to make an assertion against the athlete or support person.

Show Cause Notices Issued

2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

Athletes 33 31 19 20

Support personnel 0 0 0 0

Total 33 31 19 20

Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel

The ADRVP decides whether it is satisfied a possible ADRV was committed and, if so, makes an assertion there was a possible violation by the athlete or support person.

In 2019-20, all but one matter investigated and referred to the Legal Services Team resulted in an anti-doping rule violation finding. In total, 21 athletes were found to have committed an ADRV. All matters went to the ADRVP for initial and final consideration and in all cases, the ADRVP asserted the possibility of an ADRV.

One matter went to the ADRVP for initial and final consideration. The ADRVP asserted the possibility of an ADRV and upheld it at final consideration. The Athlete in this matter appealed the ADRVP assertion to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, who found that the Athlete was not an Athlete who competed in sport for the purposes of the NAD scheme. As a result, this matter did not result in an ADRV.

The ADRV findings for 2019-20 were:

♦ Use

♦ Attempted Use ♦ Presence ♦ Possession

♦ Tampering ♦ Attempted Tampering ♦ Traf ficking ♦ Attempted Trafficking.

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel assertions, by sport in 2019-20

sport 2019-20

Australian Rules Football (AFL) 1

Australian Rules Football (NEAFL) 1

Australian Rules Football (VFL) 1

BMX 1*

Cycling 1

Motor sport / motorcycling 1

Para Powerlifting 1

Powerlifting 1

Rugby League 5

Rugby Union 3

Softball 1

Swimming 1

Weightlifting 2*

Total 20

* Assertions in BMX occurred on 2 July 2020, and an assertion was made in Weightlifting on 6 August 2020.

NB - Para Powerlifting and Powerlifting are counted as 2 separate sports, as are the 3 variations of Australian Rules Football.

Anti-Doping Rule Violations

Where the ADRVP made an assertion a possible ADRV was committed, the ASADA CEO notified the sport and the athlete or support person was given the opportunity to have a hearing before a sports tribunal. For most Australian sports, the relevant tribunal was the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS)27. The tribunal was responsible for finding whether an ADRV was actually committed and for imposing any relevant sanction under the anti-doping policy of the sport. Athletes and support persons can waive their right to a hearing. In these cases, the sport decides the appropriate sanction in accordance with its anti-doping policy. Athletes or support persons, ASADA, WADA, or an athlete’s or support person’s International Federation may have been able to appeal the sports tribunal’s decision to the Appeal Division of CAS.

Every athlete or support person notified of a possible ADRV was offered free access to an independent and confidential counselling service. Initiated by ASADA in 2011, the service is provided by Davidson Trahaire Corpsych, an independent organisation providing wellbeing and performance services to more than 2,000 organisations throughout the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

27 In March 2020, the National Sports Tribunal took on this role. This was a commitment from the Wood Review response to provide a time and cost-effective avenue for appealing all manner of sport disputes, including anti-doping.

62 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

Public disclosures of ADRVs

Generally, ASADA publicly disclosed an anti-doping rule violation once a relevant sporting body or sports tribunal made a final determination and any appeal is concluded.

The following table lists matters publicly disclosed by ASADA in 2019-20. The number of matters does not always equate to the number of sanctions imposed by sports during the reporting period. This is because:

♦ matters may still be under appeal at the end of the reporting period, or ♦ matters may have started in the previous reporting period.

Anti-Doping Rule Violations publicly announced in 2019-20

sport Rule v iolation 1 s ubstance/ method s anction 2

Powerlifting Presence and Use Higenamine 2 years

Rugby Union Presence Benzoylecgonine (metabolite of Cocaine) 2 years

Australian Rules Football (AFL) Presence Benzoylecgonine (metabolite of Cocaine) One

year and 6 months

Australian Rules Football (SANFL) Presence Endogenous AAS 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone

4 years

Triathlon Possession Clomiphene, Anastrozole, Testosterone 4 years

Rowing Presence and Use Di-Hydroxy LGD-4033 4 years

Rugby Union Presence and Use 19-Norandrosterone (metabolite of Nandrolone; Norandrostenedione or Norandro stenediol),Methandienone and its metabolites 6b-hydroxymethandienone; 17-epimethandienone and 17b-hydroxymethyl-17a-methyl-18-nor- androsta-1, 4, 13-trien-3-one, Mestanolone, 17a-methyl-5a-androstane-3a, 17b-diol; 2z-hydroxymethyl-17a-methyl-5a-androstan-3a, 6b, 17b-triol; and 2z, 17b-dihydroxymethyl- 17a-methyl-18-nor-5a-androst-13-en-3a-ol (metabolites of Oxymetholone),Oxandrolone and its metabolites 17b-methyl-17a-hydroxy-2-oxa- 5a-androstan-3-one, 17b-hydroxymethyl-17a- methyl-18-nor-2-oxa-5a-androst-13-en-3-one, 17a-hydroxymethyl-17b-methyl-18-nor-2-oxa-5a- androst-13-en-3-one; 17a-Trenbolone (metabolite of Trenbolone); Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione, or Norandrostenediol; and/or Methandienone, and/or Oxymetholone, and/or Oxandrolone, and Trenbolone

4 years

Baseball Presence and Use Higenamine 2 years

Weightlifting Presence and Use LGD-4033 and its metabolite Di-hydroxy LGD-4033 4 years

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ANNUAL PERfORmANCE sTATE mENT

sport Rule v iolation 1 s ubstance/ method s anction 2

Athletics Presence, Use,

Tampering or Attempted Tampering

Exogenous Testosterone, Androsterone, Etiocholanolone and 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diol 4 years

Football (soccer) Presence Benzoylecgonine (metabolite of Cocaine) 2 years

Mountain Bike/ Cycling Presence, Use, Possession,

Attempted Use

4-chloro-3a-hydroxyandrost-4-en-17-one (metabolite of Clostebol), Oxandrolone and its metabolites (17b-methyl-17a-hydroxy-2-oxa-5a- androstan-3-one and 17a-hydroxymethyl-17b- methyl-18-nor-2-oxa-5a-androst-13-en-3-one), 16b-hydroxystanozolol and 17-epi-stanozolol-N- glucuronide (metabolites of Stanozolol), Thymosin Beta 4, Mechano Growth Factor, Ipamorelin, CJC-1295, GHRP-6, Long R3 IGF-1

4 years

Rugby League Presence and Use Higenamine (Beta-2-agonist) and 1,4-Dimethylpentylamine 2 years

Rugby League Presence and Use Higenamine 2 years

Motor sport / motorcycling Presence, Use, Attempted Use,

Possession, Trafficking and Attempted Traf ficking

19-Norandrosterone, 19-Noretiocholanolone, Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione, Norandrostenediol, IGF-1, CJC-1295, Clenbuterol, Testosterone, Growth Hormone, D-amphetamine

Cycling Presence and Use Higenamine and Oxilofrine (methylsynephrine) 2 years

Australian Rules Football (VFL) Presence Benzoylecgonine 2 years

Rugby League Presence and Use 19-NA and 19-NE (Metabolites of Nandrolone, Norandrostenedione and Norandrostenediol) 4 years

Rugby League Presence and Use Higenamine 2 years

Australian Rules Football (AFL) Presence Benzoylecogonine (metabolite of Cocaine) 12 months

Rugby League Presence Benzoylecogonine (metabolite of Cocaine) 2 years

Rugby League* Presence Benzoylecgonine (metabolite of cocaine) 2 years

Motor sport / motorcycling* Presence and Use Benzoylecgonine (metabolite of cocaine) and Cocaine

2 years

Triathlon* Presence Erythropoietin (EPO) 4 years

1 ‘Use’ means use of a banned substance or method. ‘Presence’ means that a banned substance (or its metabolites or markers) was found in a sample. ‘Possession’ means possession of a banned substance. ‘Trafficking’ means supplying a banned substance. ‘Complicity’ means knowing about or helping to carry out an anti-doping violation.

2 No athlete or other person who has been declared ineligible may participate in any capacity in a competition or activity (other than authorised anti-doping education or rehabilitation programs) authorised by any Signatory or in competitions authorised by any professional league or any international- or national-level event organisation.

* Australian athletes ASADA did not have results management authority over.

p erformance measure 13

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of anti-doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of cases conducted by ASADA in tribunals that result in a finding of an anti-doping rule violation.

m etho Dology

Independent tribunal findings

tAR get

≥80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

performance measure analysis During 2019-20, 2 matters heard before a tribunal were finalised. In both cases, the ADRVs were upheld. The matters were heard in:

♦ AFL Anti-Doping Tribunal ♦ NSWRL Anti-Doping Tribunal.

64 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

p erformance measure 13

link to A s ADA s t RAtegi C p illARs

intelli GenCe

CRite Rion s ou RCe

Corporate p lan (p. 15)

Result Met

o ut Come

Achievement of anti-doping rule violation findings in tribunals.

m eAsuR e

Percentage of cases conducted by ASADA in tribunals that result in a finding of an anti-doping rule violation.

m etho Dology

Independent tribunal findings

tAR get

≥80% of tribunal findings result in an anti-doping rule violation

performance measure analysis During 2019-20, 2 matters heard before a tribunal were finalised. In both cases, the ADRVs were upheld. The matters were heard in:

♦ AFL Anti-Doping Tribunal ♦ NSWRL Anti-Doping Tribunal.

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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

engagement and partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

intelligence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82

education and awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

2019-20 stRA tegi C p Rio Rities

68 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

n ational

s porting

o rganisations compliant with anti-doping requirements

86%

83%  Satisfaction with ASADA’s programs and services

67.2% Sports agree ASADA staff are professional in their dealings with them

58.1% Sports agree ASADA is responsive to their queries and concerns

58.6% Sports agree ASADA has established a relationship of trust with them

73.9% Sports agree ASADA cares about

protecting the sport from doping

88.1% Sports have a good or very good understanding of their roles and responsibilities under current anti-doping requirements

70.4% ASADA effective in assisting sports meet their anti-doping requirements

79%  ASADA effective in ensuring anti-doping policies are up-to-date and reflect the Code and ASADA’s legislative framework

70.4% ASADA effective in explaining changes in policies, procedures and processes to sport

eng Agement An D pAR tneR ships

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Athlete Advisory g roup

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority’s (ASADA) shared mission was to build trust with athletes, sporting bodies and fans alike to allow everyone the opportunity to compete on a level playing field. It was identified that this mission would benefit from listening directly to the ‘athlete’s voice’ and so came the Athlete Advisory Group (AAG).

The AAG informed ASADA’s strategic direction through the provision of insights into the pressures and influences in sport increasing the risk and temptation to dope.

The AAG provided opportunities for athletes to contribute meaningfully to the fight against doping. It comprised clean athletes and those who committed an anti-doping rule violation. Each member offered valuable information and experiences about how they responded to their environment and how athletes in similar circumstances can be helped to avoid the risk and/or temptation to dope.

The AAG was made up of the following current and former athletes:

♦ Alicia Quirk OAM: Olympic gold medalist in 7s rugby at the Rio Olympics ♦ Bronwyn Thompson: Commonwealth Games gold medalist in long jump, Commonwealth and Australian record holder28

♦ Chloe Esposito OAM: Olympic gold medalist in the modern pentathlon ♦ Chris Bond: 2-time Paralympic gold medalist in wheelchair rugby ♦ Katrina Fanning: 26 tests for the Australian Women’s Rugby League Team, Chair of the Australian Rugby League (ARL) Indigenous Council and Canberra Raiders board member

♦ Cassie Fien: 2-time winner of Sydney’s City2Surf - tested positive to higenamine from a contaminated supplement, sanctioned for 9 months29

♦ Michael Gallagher OAM: Paralympic gold medalist at the 2008 and 2012 games - tested positive to EPO in Italy in July 2016 and was disqualified from competing at the Rio Paralympics

♦ Petria Thomas OAM: 3-time Olympic swimming gold medalist, Gymnastics Australia General Manager, High Performance

♦ Tom Symonds: Former Sydney Roosters and Manly Sea Eagles National Rugby League (NRL) player.

The AAG had 2 face-to-face meetings in 2019-20. In addition, they took part in a number of phone and video meetings as well as received monthly communications in regards to significant ASADA updates.

28 Membership ceased December 2019

29 Membership commenced February 2020

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Collaborative partnership agreement with the u niversity of Canberra A Collaborative Partnership Agreement (the partnership), announced in 2018-19 between ASADA and the University of Canberra (UC), saw opportunities for both organisations to work on a range of projects related to science, education, innovation, technology, intelligence, communications and leadership.

Under the partnership, ASADA coordinated a national conference themed around leadership in sport and a series of complementary workshops. UC hosted the conference. The conference saw leaders in sport, research, law enforcement, intelligence and integrity come together with the intent to positively influence Australia’s sports integrity partnerships, systems and governance, now and into the future.

ASADA has a strong focus on working with athletes and sporting bodies through partnerships and education programs. The partnership with UC (with its sporting presence and health-aligned courses) is a further example of ASADA’s commitment to partnerships for the ultimate benefit of Australia’s sporting community.

u C student placement - a partnership with mutual benefits The collaboration with UC, through professional placement of UC Students in ASADA, continued this year. Two third-year Applied Science in Forensic Studies students were given the opportunity to undertake a professional placement with ASADA’s Science Team. The placement allowed ASADA to leverage UC’s desire to advance a priority project, while providing the students exposure to ASADA’s operating environment, Australia’s sports integrity landscape and broader experience within government.

They also gained insight into the application of science to the range of ASADA’s operations and key issues involved in anti-doping science. While undertaking their placements, the students continued building a substance database for ASADA. Students applied their research skills to develop an information piece about substances of interest and develop their skills in communicating science to non-scientists.

leadership in s port conference - 20/20 v ision

The Leadership in Sport conference, presented by ASADA, the National Integrity of Sport Unit (NISU), Sport Australia and UC, highlighted the importance of collaboration in the pursuit of success.

Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck, the Minister for Youth and Sport, officially opened the Leadership in Sport conference at UC on 28 November 2019.

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2019-20 sTRATEgiC PRiORiTiEs

Titled 20/20 Vision, the conference provided a platform for sporting organisations, sports integrity units, private industry and government to learn from each other, and identified the benefits of working together to tackle the threats to sports integrity head on.

Minister Colbeck discussed the changes in sports integrity arrangements resulting from the Wood Review, in particular the National Sports Tribunal and the role Sport Integrity Australia can and will play for sports.

Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck, Minister for Youth and Sport, officially opens the conference.

Andrew Traver, the former Director of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) in the United States (US), was the keynote speaker on day one. Mr Traver discussed accountability and transparency, as well as effective collaboration with non-traditional partners and how to overcome resistance to change. He also emphasised the value of utilising subject matter experts to deliver quality information and knowledge.

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Keynote speaker Andrew Traver, former Director of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

A panel, headed by Swimming Australia CEO, Leigh Russell, Rowing Australia CEO, Ian Robson, Leading Teams co-founder, Ray McLean and specialist consultant, Danielle Fraillon, discussed how to embed ethical practices and frameworks through change management. They spoke of the need to be fully engaged in every aspect of the organisation in which you lead. They also emphasised the need to learn, grow and embrace the tough times so as ‘not to waste a crisis’.

Panel with Swimming Australia CEO, Leigh Russell, Rowing Australia CEO, Ian Robson, Leading Teams co-founder, Ray McLean, and specialist consultant, Danielle Fraillon.

72 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

A legal presentation, titled Court of Public Opinion, featuring sports lawyer, Brianna Quinn, the Head of Canberra Law School, Benedict Sheehy, and Director of Sports Law Studies at the University of Melbourne, Professor Jack Anderson, wrapped up day one. This presentation discussed the role of the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland, the place the law has in sport and how perception is often different to reality when it comes to sport and the law.

The day concluded with an emphasis on the heightened risk to cyber security in the current environment with all participants encouraged to collaborate, share experiences and ensure data security as much as possible.

Australian Olympic Committee CEO, Matt Carroll, was the keynote speaker on day 2. Mr Carroll provided an overview of the preparations underway in Tokyo ahead of the 2020 (2021) Olympic Games and the preparedness of the Australian team.

Australian Olympic Committee CEO, Matt Carroll.

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He was followed by a Major Event Security workshop, run by the Australian Federal Police (AFP), which looked at the steps sports needed to have in place when travelling overseas, with the AFP offering to guide sports through a checklist of requirements.

The second workshop on day 2 examined how public-private partnerships operate in intelligence, in particular when it comes to maintaining integrity. Presentations were made by AUSTRAC’s Acting Manager, Intelligence Partnerships, Leilani Moffat, TABCORP’s General Manager, Financial Crime Risk, Armina Antoniou, and Basketball Australia Head of Integrity, Simon Bishop.

AUSTRAC Acting Manager, Intelligence Partnerships, Leilani Moffat.

74 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

2019-20 sTRATEgiC PRiORiTiEs

TABCORP General Manager, Financial Crime Risk, Armina Antoniou.

The conference concluded with the screening of the Media Stockade documentary Power Meri, which examined the barriers faced by women in Papua New Guinea to play rugby league, with the game seen as the domain of men in that country. The women, through perseverance, eventually formed a team and played in the women’s Rugby League World Cup in Australia in 2017.

It was a fitting conclusion to the conference which highlighted the importance of ethical leadership, the value of culture, how sport can be used to tackle societal issues, and the benefits of breaking down barriers not only across sports, but between sports and government, in order to see sports grow and prosper with integrity.

t he ‘first face’ of A s ADA

ASADA field staff were crucial in establishing and consolidating anti-doping behaviours and awareness in athletes across Australia. They were the ‘first face’ of ASADA and were imperative in shaping ASADA’s reputation. 2019-20 promised a new and enhanced structure for field staff and this was delivered by recruiting key personnel to enhance the coordination, training and accreditation of the Doping Control Officers (DCO) and Chaperones. The recruitment of State Managers saw increased engagement between ASADA and sports and venue managers, which was crucial given the challenges the COVID-19 pandemic brought to the anti-doping testing environment. The introduction of a National Training Coordinator saw the delivery of an enhanced accreditation process and a refinement of key ASADA documentation.

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ASADA field staff during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The National Training Coordinator was located in the Australian Capital Territory with the State Managers located in:

♦ Queensland ♦ New South Wales ♦ Victoria ♦ Australian Capital Territory (also managing Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia).

In October 2019, the annual Doping Control Officer (DCO) conference was held in Canberra bringing together the DCOs from across Australia. The conference reiterated their importance to all areas of the anti-doping environment including investigations and intelligence. Further, Chaperone conferences were conducted in Western Australia and Queensland.

Key achievements of 2019-20 include:

♦ The delivery of new uniforms which were well received by both field staff and athletes ♦ The transition to electronic timesheets ♦ A number of ASADA DCOs were successful in their applications to work at the Tokyo 2020 (2021) Summer Olympics, which confirms the high regard the ASADA field staff

have internationally.

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international engagement ASADA, in line with Australian Government policy, was committed to capacity building to strengthen regional and global anti-doping efforts aimed at ‘closing the gap’ between varying international capabilities. ASADA strove to ensure Australian athletes can compete on a more level playing field around the globe.

In partnership with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), ASADA actively pursued programs in the Oceania and Asia regions to coordinate the engagement and development of National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs) capabilities, either bilaterally or through the respective Regional Anti-Doping Organisations (RADOs). ASADA’s international engagement plan aligned with the vision of Sports Diplomacy 2030, which is to strengthen Australian sport and opportunities for athletes globally to enable their full potential. This supports our national interests.

The Institute of National Anti-Doping Organisations (iNADOs) collaborated with ASADA on a concept to develop a NADOs capability register. The aim of the register is to inform the iNADOs membership of the skills and qualifications of the group and to help us all understand the collective capabilities of the iNADOs members. The register is a tool to deliver information about particular skill sets among NADOs, which could be called upon:

♦ to build anti-doping capabilities, share expertise and specialist information ♦ to prevent duplication of effort and to enhance coordination of effort ♦ to strengthen capacity and support to other NADOs at times of need or staff shortages ♦ to raise awareness among members by mapping developments to coordinate effort and

remove duplication.

ASADA also collaborated with iNADO to provide subject expertise to its inaugural ‘IT Security Discussion Group’, the aim being to identify cyber risks and prevention methods for NADOs. This was in response to an increased global threat to anti-doping organisations who are responsible for ensuring the protection of sensitive athlete data.

ASADA contributed to the International Criminal Police Organisation (INTERPOL) Anti-Doping working group meeting in Lyon, France, titled Project Energia. This project helps countries to understand and combat the trafficking of performance-enhancing drugs by providing relevant and up-to-date criminal analysis. The workshop evaluated the first pilot phase of the project, discussing the findings and insights on the supply of and demand for performance-enhancing drugs.

WADA approved a joint Athlete Passport Management Unit (APMU) hosted by the Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory and including ASADA and Drug Free Sport New Zealand (DFSNZ). This joint APMU actively supported the Oceania Regional Anti-Doping Organisation (ORADO) to utilise the capability.

In the lead up to the postponed Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games, a taskforce was established consisting of representatives from several NADOs, including ASADA. The taskforce will continue to make recommendations for testing to sample collections agencies with testing authority (other NADOs and international federations) over athletes as part of pre-Olympic testing.

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International co-operation and engagement are integral to the pursuit of clean sport globally and was a key element of ASADA’s strategic vision. In 2019-20, ASADA engaged with a number of countries and anti-doping bodies to further the anti-doping cause for Australian athletes and the broader sporting community:

Austria ♦ The National Anti-Doping Agency Austria (NADA Austria) and ASADA have an agreement in place to enhance each organisations’ online anti-doping education. The objective of the agreement is to share existing education resources, collaborate on

the development of new or revised education resources and conduct meetings aimed at sharing experience and knowledge in the field of anti-doping education.

ASADA CEO, David Sharpe, and NADA Austria CEO, Michael Cepic, at the signing of the  Memorandum of Understanding.

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Denmark ♦ ASADA signed an agreement with Anti-Doping Denmark which includes sharing existing education resources, collaborating on the development of new or revised education resources and conducting meetings aimed at sharing experience and knowledge in

the field of anti-doping education.

india ♦ ASADA continued to assist the Indian National Anti-Doping Agency to bolster its anti-doping capabilities. ASADA provided a subject expert to speak at the Regional Symposium on Anti-Doping in Asia, in New Delhi, to present about matters relating to risk assessment

analysis for test distribution planning leading into the Olympics.

n ew Zealand ♦ ASADA and DFSNZ have an ongoing informal agreement to continue working collaboratively on a range of anti-doping issues.

♦ ASADA collaborated with DFSNZ and the US Anti-Doping Agency on education and innovation projects.

s outh k orea

♦ ASADA partnered with the Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory (ASDTL) and DFSNZ to work together as a new APMU, with ASDTL being the lead organisation. Korea Anti-Doping Agency (KADA) has joined this APMU.

sri l anka

♦ ASADA was part way through a 4-year Memorandum of Understanding with Sri Lanka to develop the Sri Lankan Anti-Doping Agency’s (SLADA) capabilities by sharing knowledge and experience in relation to its functions. Sport Integrity Australia will continue this work.

♦ ASADA worked in collaboration with the Australian Federal Police to deliver foundation intelligence training to SLADA through a 2-day workshop in Sri Lanka.

China ♦ ASADA contributed to global discussions by sending a representative to the first session of the China Anti-Doping Agency International Anti-Doping Symposium.

us A

♦ ASADA contributed to global discussions by attending the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) Science Symposium and collaborated with USADA on education, health effects videos, testing missions and broader anti-doping capabilities.

ASADA’s multilateral collaborations have provided a significant benefit to the organisation by increasing its influence on the world anti-doping stage. In addition, these collaborations allowed ASADA to enhance its own capabilities through exposure to a broader range of anti-doping strategies.

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an example of strengthening global anti-doping capabilities

As ADA partners with Austria to help spread the anti-doping message In November 2019, ASADA signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with NADA Austria during the World Conference on Doping in Sport to enhance each organisations’ online anti-doping education.

The objective of this MoU is to share existing education resources, collaborate on the development of new or revised education resources, and conduct meetings aimed at sharing experience and knowledge in the field of anti-doping education.

ASADA CEO, David Sharpe, said collaborations such as this are key to strengthening the anti-doping message around the world.

‘Protecting clean athletes from the threat of doping is at the core of everything ASADA does,’ Mr Sharpe said.

‘Since all athletes are equal under the World Anti-Doping Code, it is imperative that they all have access to the same information and education. For this reason, ASADA is committed to working internationally with its national anti-doping partners to close any gaps and strengthen our own programs. Collaboration such as this is mutually beneficial and only serves to benefit the clean sport movement worldwide.’

In particular, ASADA will be sharing its award-winning Level 1 course, which has been completed by more than 70,000 Australian athletes to date, and working collaboratively with NADA Austria on revised courses for coaches, medical practitioners and others.

NADA Austria CEO, Michael Cepic is convinced that the MoU will help promote health, fairness and equality for athletes worldwide.

‘It’s a great opportunity to share experience and ensure the effectiveness of our programs in preventing doping in sport,’ Mr Cepic said.

‘The upcoming ‘International Standard for Education’ is very important to protect clean athletes. The new developments in our digital learning strategy will help federations and sport organisations to comply with the obligations of this new standard.’

partners in science ASADA’s partnerships in anti-doping science were enhanced through the establishment of a collaborative APMU by the ASDTL (within the National Measurement Institute), DFSNZ and ASADA. The APMU is responsible for reviewing Athlete Biological Passports (ABPs) and making recommendations for follow-up actions. Through the joint venture, scientists from each organisation can review ABPs in collaboration, taking advantage of the different expertise each member brings to the table. The APMU recognises the importance of strong partnerships between laboratories and anti-doping organisations in order to deliver the most effective anti-doping system.

KADA and ORADO both utlised the APMU as clients. Through the APMU, collaboration included supporting capability development in KADA and ORADO and promoting efforts to level the international playing field.

In November 2019, scientists from ASDTL and ASADA travelled to Montreal to undertake APMU training with WADA. In December 2019, scientists from ASDTL, DFSNZ, ASADA and KADA gathered at ASDTL to share the outcomes from the WADA training, collaborate on the APMU processes and to continue sharing knowledge and experiences across the organisations.

ASADA Science Officer, Edwin Castillo (second from right), attending APMU training in Montreal, Canada.

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KADA and ORADO both utlised the APMU as clients. Through the APMU, collaboration included supporting capability development in KADA and ORADO and promoting efforts to level the international playing field.

In November 2019, scientists from ASDTL and ASADA travelled to Montreal to undertake APMU training with WADA. In December 2019, scientists from ASDTL, DFSNZ, ASADA and KADA gathered at ASDTL to share the outcomes from the WADA training, collaborate on the APMU processes and to continue sharing knowledge and experiences across the organisations.

ASADA Science Officer, Edwin Castillo (second from right), attending APMU training in Montreal, Canada.

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4,414 57

t ot Al Anti- Doping

tests

ACRoss spoR ts

82.7% Satisfaction with ASADA’s programs and services 66.3% ASADA’s intelligence and investigative functions are effective at deterring athletes and support personnel from the threats of doping

77.7% Sports confident that ASADA’s activities maximise doping detection 66.7% Sports exchanging information with ASADA rate the relevance of information received from ASADA as good or very good

59.3% Sports exchanging information with ASADA rate the benefits , in terms of detection, of information received as good or very good 96.9% Athletes and support personnel would definitely , probably or possibly report doping behaviour 80.7% Sports agree ASADA’s processes, actions and decisions are underpinned by evidence

2,190 User-pays tests across 35 sports ( 643 in-competition + 1,547 out-of-competition tests)

2,224 Government-funded tests across 46 sports

125  tests by ASADA on foreign athletes training and competing in Australia

intelligen Ce

619 in-competition + 1,605 out-of-competition tests

246 Government-funded tests conducted overseas

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intelligen Ce

Intelligence-informed operational activities on high-risk athletes and sports

100 samples were selected for IRMS analysis

(3 resulted in an Adverse Analytical Finding )

84 long-term storage samples were re-analysed

(8 athletes were covered by a TUE, or used an allowed route of administration + 16 athletes were progressed  as possible violations ) 24

athletes tested by ASADA

returned an Adverse Analytical Finding

341 Total samples added to long-term storage facility

(318 urine samples + 23   blood samples)

105 anti-doping education sessions delivered, and 152 tests conducted.

101 intelligence products disseminated by ASADA to external stakeholders

418 4 joint agency information bulletins distributed to external stakeholders intelligence reports

(177 Scientific Analysis Reports tip-offs, social media reports and external and internal notifications )

241 +

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intelligen Ce

* Four of these Disclosure Notices were not served and a further 2 were later withdrawn due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There were also 2 replacement Disclosure Notices issued due to claims of hardship, which have not been counted in the above.

** For 3 matters, ASADA did not have Results Management Authority.

14 investigation cases remained active at 30 June 2020

(17 came from an Adverse Analytical Finding) 24

investigations commenced by ASADA

16 Intelligence-led products referred to investigations

43 Disclosure Notices issued to 17 individuals or entities*

20 show cause notices issued

20 matters where the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel made assertions

21 sanctions imposed

24  sport bans publicly disclosed

across 11 sports

across 12 sports**

As ADA’s intelligence-informed sport risk assessments The World Anti-Doping Code (Article 5.8) requires anti-doping organisations to have an intelligence capability to obtain, assess and process anti-doping intelligence from all available sources, which can then be used to help deter and detect doping.

In support of the World Anti-Doping Code, ASADA continued to recognise intelligence as critical to enhancing the effectiveness of anti-doping efforts and entrenched this function as a fundamental strategic priority for ASADA’s operations. By working mutually with ASADA’s other strategic priorities, a world-leading anti-doping intelligence capability could better inform the full spectrum of ASADA capabilities, from testing and investigations to education, policy and strategic direction.

The role of intelligence was critical in providing insights into emerging threats and opportunities, overriding trends and patterns of behaviours relating to doping in sport and enhancing understanding of doping threats from facilitators and suppliers of prohibited substances. These ‘value-add’ observations feed into strategic priorities for prevention initiatives (such as anti-doping education and outreach and anti-doping policy and sports engagement), prioritisation of detection efforts (such as testing planning/targeting and intelligence probes) and compliance (investigation). ASADA operated in a constantly changing, varied environment making prioritisation of anti-doping resources essential to optimising the effectiveness of anti-doping activities. Intelligence and risk analysis have become key tools and strategies to prioritise these.

ASADA also continued to build effective information-sharing partnerships with domestic and international stakeholders to ensure a holistic, comprehensive picture of doping threats domestically and overseas. This supported the design of integrated, coordinated intervention measures in addressing doping in sport with key partners.

The government restrictions imposed to address the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of sport being played across Australia, and in the number of anti-doping tests able to be conducted. During such unprecedented times, ASADA intelligence continued to support the operational priorities of ASADA through continual environmental scanning, and identify opportunities to optimise efforts in the prevention, detection and disruption of doping in sport.

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eDu CAtion An D A w AReness

85.8% Effectiveness of ASADA’s education programs and materials in helping to deter athletes and support personnel from the threats of doping

99% Participants felt better informed about anti-doping and how to avoid inadvertent doping

93% Level 1 course respondents learnt new things about anti-doping

86% Level 1 course respondents found content relevant to their needs

90% Level 1 course respondents found activities aided their learning

91.7% Awareness (fully

and mostly aware) of participants’ anti-doping rights and responsibilities

93% Satisfaction with the Global Dro resource 86.5% Athletes agree that education minimised their risk of accidental doping

89% Satisfaction with the

ASADA Clean Sport app

86.4%  Satisfaction that the

ASADA Clean Sport app provides good advice on the use of supplements

88.8%  Satisfaction that the

ASADA Clean Sport app is an effective tool

As ADA CleAn s po Rt

App 96%  Satisfaction with the accessibility

of ASADA’s e-Learning courses

96.1% Satisfaction that ASADA

e-Learning highlights harms and risks of doping

93.7% Satisfaction that ASADA

e-Learning courses were delivered efficiently

95.5% Satisfaction that ASADA

e-Learning courses provided correct and current information

87 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

eDu CAtion

161 Education sessions delivered by Clean Sport Educators

* Core products include Level 1 and Level 2 completions, and face-to-face education attendance.

(81% increase on 2018-19)

Face-to-face presentations to more than 7,400 attendees

31 Face-to-face presentations delivered to students across Australia

173

31,610 Core education products delivered*

13  Outreach Education and Awareness stands (19% decrease on 2018-19)

1 Professional development program delivered to 30 teachers

128,000 People accessed online anti-doping learning since 201010,637 completions of Level 2 online course 24,185  Completions of the Level 1 and Level 2 online modules

(6.7% decrease on 2018-19)

407,058 Global Dro online substance searches

16,846 downloads of the ASADA Clean Sport app in 2019-20 (28% increase on 2018-19)

57 Tailored education resources created for 24 sports (16 produced for high-risk sports)

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Aw AReness

882,878 

90.7% Satisfaction with the ASADA website 87.4% Satisfaction with the ease of understanding the information on the website 86.8% Satisfaction with the relevance of website content 84.4% Satisfaction with the ease of finding specific information on the website

84% Satisfaction that the social media platforms are informative

75% Satisfaction that the social media platforms are engaging

83.5% Satisfaction that the social media platforms provide correct and current information 82.1% Satisfaction with ASADA’s social media platforms

504 Newspaper items

1,435 Online media mentions

303 TV mentions

554 Radio mentions

473 Instagram followers

5,508 Facebook page likes 728  New Facebook followers 463 

Facebook posts

6,192 Twitter followers 531 Tweets with 1,042,200  impressions

Website page views from 269,602 users

innovative education ASADA’s education program was always aimed to be engaging and informative but, in recent years, ASADA had a strong focus on the integration of new tools, approaches and technologies to enhance its effectiveness.

This included the development of an athlete-centred app, the use of virtual reality, the integration of theatre sports and the recruitment and training of elite athletes as presenters.

These innovations, coupled with additional resources for education, led to significantly increased demand for anti-doping education across Australia.

In 2019-20, the number of face-to-face education sessions increased by 57%, from 110 to 173, even with 3 months where face-to-face sessions were ceased due to COVID-19. Each session was tailored to the threats in each cohort and their previous level of education.

In addition, the team launched 3 new courses, including:

♦ Level 2 2020 ♦ Clean Sport 101 ♦ Whereabouts

A Tokyo 2020 course was also created in collaboration with the Australian Olympic Committee, Paralympics Australia, USADA and DFSNZ, but the release was delayed due to COVID-19.

In addition, the Education team also released the world’s first augmented reality Health Effects of Doping app, developed in partnership with DFSNZ.

ASADA Education presenter, Bronwen Knox with students from Boonah State High School.

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ASADA Education with members of its ASADA/NRL presenter team in October 2019 (L to R: Sam Tagataese, Cheryl Kalthofen, Luke Archer, Alexis Cooper, Chris Heighington and Luke Kensey).

r ecognition In 2019-20, ASADA won a number of awards for their education resources, including the prestigious 2019 Public Sector Innovation Award for Citizen Centred Innovation.

Hosted by the Institute of Public Administration Australia, the Public Sector Innovation Awards were created to better recognise and celebrate the innovative work occurring in the public service.

ASADA received the award for the dual nomination of its virtual reality (VR) doping control experience and the ASADA Clean Sport app.

Up against other strong nominations from across the public sector, ASADA’s submission was recognised for the award partially for its creative approach to education and partially for the strong impact the innovations had on the Australian sporting community, and the global anti-doping community more broadly.

Implementation of the 2 innovations combined led to a boom in anti-doping education with the number of people engaging with ASADA tripling in one year.

In addition, the virtual reality product was featured at 6 international events in an 8-month period, helping athletes around the world.

ASADA also received a LearnX Silver Award for Best eLearning Project - eLearning on a Budget, for its online Parent’s Course to Clean Sport.

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asada Clean s port app Contaminated supplements are a significant cause of inadvertent doping in Australia. The ASADA Clean Sport app is one of the best tools athletes have to reduce their risk of inadvertently testing positively.

In 2019-20, the ASADA Clean Sport app was upgraded to include a number of new functionalities to enhance user experience, including a new Therapeutic Use Exemption Checker and warnings on all supplements ASADA was aware contained banned ingredients on their label.

The app was downloaded more than 16,000 times in 2019-20, with around 1,000 active users each month and more than 600 supplement searches each month.

ASADA Clean Sport app.

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u sing i nnovation to educate - n ew anti-doping Health e ffects app As part of ASADA’s ongoing commitment to deliver anti-doping education in engaging, innovative ways, the agency launched a new augmented reality (AR) app showing what happens to an athlete’s body when they take prohibited substances.

ASADA’s main purpose was to protect the health of athletes and its new AR Health Effects app, developed in partnership with DFSNZ, helped to do just that.

So how does it work? Through the app, users create their own avatar who (unfortunately) experiences all the health effects of certain substances.

By using the phone’s camera, users can peer inside their avatar to see how performance-enhancing drugs change their organs and nervous system.

Specifically, the app looks at the effects of steroids, stimulants, Epogen (EPO), Human Growth Hormone (HGH), selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and opioids. Stroke, liver damage, tumours and anxiety are just a few of the side effects of prohibited substances that are covered in the app.

But it’s not all doom and gloom for the avatar. After looking at all the negative effects, users literally get to take some ‘good’ performance enhancers and hear about the benefits of being a ‘Clean Freak’. The app concludes with a quiz on everything users have learned.

Looking into the future, the app is another tool to be incorporated into face-to-face education sessions and outreach events to engage athletes on the risk of performance-enhancing drugs.

ASADA has also developed a student worksheet for high school teachers to use in class, which complements the National, State and Territory Health and Physical Education Curriculums for Stages 5 and 6.

ASADA’s assessments indicate some athletes are not seeing the full picture when it comes to performance-enhancing substances.

Some of the substances that we are seeing athletes use in sport are incredibly dangerous, including some that are Schedule 10 poisons, and others that have not even been approved for human use.

Ensuring athletes are aware of the health risks, especially at a young age, is critical if we want to protect their health and wellbeing.

The ASADA augmented reality Health Effects app shows ASADA’s continued commitment to developing new technologies in anti-doping education, which allows us to spread the message of integrity in sport to all levels and all ages.

The app is available in both Google Play and Apple stores, just search for Health Effects of Doping.

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Clean s port 101 - An introduction to anti-doping ASADA has built a strong trilateral partnership with DFSNZ and USADA. Leveraging this, and in response to calls from sports, parents and athletes to offer a simpler anti-doping course for younger and lower-level athletes, ASADA collaborated with DFSNZ and USADA to develop Clean Sport 101.

ASADA’s Director of Education and Innovation (A/g), Alexis Cooper, said Clean Sport 101 was built for younger athletes who are not yet being tested but who are signed up to their anti-doping policy and need to be aware of the risks and rules.

‘In conversations with sports, parents and athletes, the feedback we received was that the Level 1 course was a bit challenging for young athletes. We have listened to that and produced a simple course targeted at younger and lower-level athletes so they can understand the rules that they have signed up to. This means we now have online education for athletes at every level-from grassroots athletes right through to athletes representing Australia on the world stage,’ Cooper said.

ASADA’s Senior Education Officer, Cheryl Kalthofen, stated Clean Sport 101 is intended to give athletes a quick snapshot of anti-doping.

‘You’re never too young for anti-doping education,’ she said. ‘Research shows that we need to reach athletes early while they’re still forming their beliefs, as early as 13 years old.’

‘All sports have rules. Anti-doping is no different,’ Kalthofen said.

‘This course breaks down the anti-doping rules. It highlights some of the potential risks to athletes, such as supplement use, and gives examples of how athletes can fuel their bodies the right way and shows what being banned from sport actually means.

‘This course is simple, it’s easy to understand and takes only 15 minutes.’

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The course, developed as part of an ongoing global partnership designed to enhance anti-doping education worldwide, also complements the National Health and Physical Education curriculum. It will be a key resource for teachers who adopt sport integrity units.

On completion, learners will:

♦ have a basic understanding of clean, fair sport and why it’s important ♦ know what resources are available to help support clean, fair sport.

It is available on ASADA’s e-Learning website for the entire Australian sporting community.

Clean Sport 101 partners Sian Clancy (DFSNZ Education Manager), Alexis Cooper (ASADA A/g Director Education and Innovation), Tammy Hanson (USADA Elite Education Manager) and Scott Davern (DFSNZ Education Program Development Coordinator).

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engaging stakeholders to promote ‘clean, fair sport’ Targeted social media activity helped reach and engage with Australian athletes. In 2019-20, ASADA actively promoted its ‘clean, fair sport’ message through a range of awareness-raising channels including Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube.

During the reporting period, ASADA increased its presence on social media by targeting audiences across Australia, while they followed their sport and specific sporting events. Internal research showed the tweets and posts that received the most engagement were specific ones (such as messages on supplement warnings) and those aligned with sporting codes, events and athletes.

The aim of ASADA’s social media strategy was to directly connect to sports and their audiences, driving awareness of athletes’ clean sport obligations and the dangers of using drugs and supplements, as well as educating sporting fan bases. The benefits resulting from ASADA’s social media engagement for athletes and their sports are knowledge and awareness of:

♦ anti-doping regulations ♦ individual anti-doping responsibilities ♦ the health impacts of drugs ♦ the avenues to report doping

♦ the clean sport message.

To maximise the reach of messages, ASADA encouraged sports to actively and widely promote and/or share social media messages in the interests of ‘clean, fair sport’. By working closely with sports in this way, ASADA increased awareness which has a positive impact on minimising the risk of doping and protecting the health of all Australian athletes.

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Social media posts by topic 2019-20

2019 2020

TOTAL July

Aug

sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

feb

mar

Apr

may

Jun

Supplements 7 9 7 7 9 10 7 6 9 7 7 4 89

APP 2 4 2 4 3 4 2 3 2 2 1 0 29

Food First 4 3 3 2 4 2 1 0 3 3 2 2 29

Global Dro 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

DRUGS

LGD-4033/SARMs 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 17

Higenamine 2 2 2 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 21

Steroids 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 14

EPO

Dehydrochlormethylt estosterone 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

D-Methamphetamine 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

GW1516 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 11

Anastrozole 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Opioids 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Furosemide 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Clenbuterol 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4

Peptide supplements 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 6

Boldenone 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 5

DMBA 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

OTHER

Educational1 5 7 4 5 4 6 8 7 5 4 7 5 67

Whereabouts 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 3 2 1 3 22

Report doping 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 0 15

Ethical course 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

Promotional2 12 12 12 14 18 4 6 11 8 5 6 15 123

Level 2 course 1 1 2 0 1 3 1 1 1 0 1 0 12

Parents course 2 2 1 1 0 1 3 2 0 1 1 0 14

Clean Freak 2 2 2 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 15

CleanSport 101 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 1 5 12

1 Educational = rights and obligations, penalties for refusing a sample, general e-Learning course, anti-doping rules and athletes responsible for any substance in their body.

2 Promotional = outreach, education success stories, AAG, athlete educators, athlete videos, awards and podcast.

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Doing things differently - A s ADA’s podcast

ASADA’s podcast ‘On Side’, which was launched on 22 July 2019, went behind the scenes of ASADA and met the people associated with the sporting community, answered questions relating to anti-doping and educated the audience about clean, fair sport.

The podcast featured a wide variety of guests from the national and international sporting world including Olympic gold medalist Petria Thomas, USADA CEO Travis Tygart, Australian Institute of Sport Chief Medical Officer Dr David Hughes, World Championship bronze medalist Kurt Herzog and Dr Susan White, who celebrated 20 years on the Australian Sports Drug Medical Advisory Committee.

Topics included the rights of athletes and sports in the anti-doping process, the collective commitment worldwide to clean, fair sport, what factors contributed to athletes taking performance-enhancing drugs, transgender athletes, and the impact of COVID-19 on sports’ survival.

Recorded on site at the ASADA office in Canberra, the podcast is free and available on all major streaming platforms and services, making it an easily accessible and efficient form of communication for all.

In 19 episodes (2 seasons), the podcast received over 3,000 listens in 11 countries.

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USADA CEO, Travis Tygart, with ASADA CEO, David Sharpe.

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USADA CEO, Travis Tygart, with ASADA CEO, David Sharpe.

n otable quotes

‘ i think my story, and people meeting me in person, probably makes doping seem a lot less black and white. t hat you can be a good person, an honest person, but head down the wrong way.’ - 2008 and 2012 Paralympic

cycling gold medalist Michael Gallagher

‘ nobody ever likes to have to hold a global icon accountable or take away 5 medals from a m arion

Jones… t hose are tough

moments and you wish those athletes hadn’t made the decision to cheat.’ - USADA CEO Travis Tygart

‘ y ou don’t need to

cheat to be good.’ - Olympic gold medalist Petria Thomas

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

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Corporate governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

external scrutiny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110

p eople . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112

financial and property management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

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mAnA gement An D

ACCount Ability

Co Rpo RAte gove Rn An Ce

ASADA’s system of governance and accountability for public resources was shaped by the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and associated legislative instruments. ASADA’s corporate governance framework includes:

♦ committees ♦ business planning ♦ risk and fraud management ♦ audit and assurance activities

♦ Accountable Authority Instructions (issued by the CEO)

♦ policies and guidelines.

Corporate governance practices ASADA employed 4 main areas of corporate governance practices.

Management structure Senior management responsibilities, organisational structure and committees operating with suitable terms of reference enabled the implementation of appropriate controls and the sound monitoring of activities and performance.

Management environment A coherent corporate-planning-framework-aligned vision, mission, strategies, planning processes and performance measures to meet clearly articulated goals. This was enhanced through leadership protocols, investing in people and culture, a learning environment and workforce planning.

Consistency and compliance Management and staff adhered to the Australian Public Service (APS) Values and Code of Conduct when undertaking their duties and functions. This was underpinned by the ongoing development and maintenance of policies and systems, including the review and redevelopment of Accountable Authority Instructions and financial rules to provide guidance on policies, procedures and expected behaviours.

Monitoring and reporting ASADA focused on compliance with the enhanced Commonwealth Performance Framework and Regulator Performance Framework and reporting performance in accordance with legislative and regulatory requirements.

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mANAgEmENT AND ACCOUNTAbiLiTy

m anagement

executive ASADA’s Executive Team as at 30 June 2020:

♦ Mr David Sharpe APM OAM - Chief Executive Officer ♦ Ms Emma Johnson OLY - Deputy Chief Executive Officer Operations (A/g) ♦ Mr Darren Mullaly - Deputy Chief Executive Officer Legal, Education and Corporate

s enior leaders ASADA’s business unit Directors as at 30 June 2020:

♦ Ms Alexis Cooper - Director Education and Innovation (A/g) ♦ Mr Andrew Collins - Chief Information Officer ♦ Mr Chris Butler - Integrity Review Taskforce ♦ Mr Darrell Jeffrey - Director Investigations

♦ Mr Dion McVie - Director Office of the Executive ♦ Mr David Johnston - Director Sports Operations and Engagement (A/g) ♦ Ms Justine Crawford - Director Intelligence ♦ Dr Naomi Speers - Chief Science Officer

♦ Ms Rebecca Tyler - Chief Financial Officer ♦ Ms Regina Weiss - Director Legal Services

s enior leadership Group The Senior Leadership Group comprised the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Deputy CEOs and business unit Directors. It was responsible for:

♦ developing strategic directions, priorities and policies ♦ monitoring the achievement of objectives ♦ ensuring the efficient, effective, economical and ethical use of resources ♦ monitoring accountability and compliance obligations.

Corporate planning and reporting In August 2019, ASADA published its 2019-2020 Corporate Plan. The corporate plan was ASADA’s overarching planning document. It set out ASADA’s purpose and performance measures and was an important tool in articulating the agency’s strategic direction to staff and external audiences.

ASADA’s Senior Leadership Group oversaw its corporate planning and the monitoring of organisational risks.

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governance committees

audit Committee The CEO established the ASADA Audit Committee in compliance with section 45 of the PGPA Act and section 17 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule). The Committee’s role was to review the appropriateness of, and provide independent assurance and advice to the CEO on, ASADA’s financial and performance reporting responsibilities, risk oversight and management and system of internal control.

The Committee comprised 3 independent members:

♦ Ms Jennifer Clark (Chair) ♦ Ms Carol Lilley ♦ Mr David Lawler ♦ Mr Peter Kennedy30

30 Mr Kennedy’s appointment as a member of the ASADA Audit Committee concluded on 30 September 2019.

ASADA CEO, David Sharpe, presents Peter Kennedy with a certificate in recognition of his service on the ASADA Audit Committee.

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Representatives from the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) and ASADA’s internal audit provider (Protiviti), the Deputy CEO Legal, Education and Corporate and the Chief Financial Officer attended all Audit Committee meetings as observers.

The functions of the Audit Committee, as described under its charter, included independently reviewing the appropriateness of ASADA’s:

♦ financial reporting ♦ performance reporting ♦ systems of risk oversight and management

♦ system of internal control ♦ legislative and policy compliance.

The Audit Committee’s work included:

♦ engaging with the ANAO on ASADA’s financial statement and performance audit coverage ♦ reviewing the proposed internal audit coverage to ensure the scope and priorities of audit activity were appropriately targeted to meet ASADA’s assurance needs and reflected any changes in its operating environment

♦ ensuring the audit program takes into account ASADA’s key risks ♦ providing recommendations to the ASADA CEO for endorsement.

member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended/total number of meetings Total annual

remuneration

Jennifer Clark (Chair)

Ms Clark has an extensive background in business, finance and governance through a career as an investment banker and as a non-executive director.

Ms Clark is an independent board director and she has been the chair or member of over 20 audit, risk and finance committees in the Commonwealth and private sectors over the past 30 years. Ms Clark is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and has substantial experience in performance reporting, audit and risk management.

5 / 5 $25,407.10

Carol Lilley (Member)

Ms Lilley is an independent board director and chair or member of a number of Commonwealth Government audit committees. She was a partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers and has over 20 years’ experience in financial statement audit, internal audit and project and risk management, with a particular focus on government.

Ms Lilley holds a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Western Australia. She is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a Fellow of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand, a certified internal auditor and was a registered company auditor.

5 / 5 $10,606.07

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member name

Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended/total number of meetings Total annual

remuneration

David Lawler (Member)

Mr Lawler has an extensive career in financial services holding executive positions in the Commonwealth Bank of Australia as Executive General Manager, Finance - Premium Financial Services, Financial Controller - Institutional Banking and Group Auditor. He is the past Chairman on the National Board, Institute of Internal Auditors; past member of the International Internal Auditing Standards Board of the Institute of Internal Auditors; past President, NSW Board of Governors, Institute of Internal Auditors; and Fellow of the Australian Society of Certified Practising Accountants. Mr Lawler has also had non-executive roles as a chair or member of numerous Audit Committees in private and Commonwealth sectors over the past 19 years.

5 / 5 $11,000.00

Peter Kennedy (Member)

Mr Kennedy PSM has an extensive background in Commonwealth public administration. He held various positions at the Deputy Secretary level and was the Deputy Public Service Commissioner for a number of years. He has also had non-executive roles as a chair or member of a number of Commonwealth audit committees over the last 20 years. He has been Integrity Adviser at the Australian Taxation Office and Centrelink.

He is a graduate in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney and is a Fellow of the Institute of Public Administration Australia.

2 / 2 $4,000.00

Workplace Health and s afety Committee The Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) Committee provided management and employees with a consultative forum to discuss and resolve WHS issues in the workplace. The Committee comprised ASADA’s:

♦ Deputy CEO Legal, Education and Corporate ♦ Deputy CEO Operations ♦ Chief Financial Officer ♦ Assistant Director, Human Resources

♦ elected health and safety representatives (representing both office-based and field staff).

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Workplace Consultative Committee The Workplace Consultative Committee (WCC) was the formal consultative body established under the ASADA Enterprise Agreement 2017-20. It provided employees with a mechanism to facilitate communication, consultation and co-operation and consider input from employees on workplace-related matters. The WCC comprised:

♦ Deputy CEO Legal, Education and Corporate (Chair)

♦ Chief Financial Officer

♦ Assistant Director, Human Resources ♦ 3 elected employee representatives.

risk Management Committee The CEO established the ASADA Risk Management Committee as part of the oversight and management of ASADA’s obligations in accordance with section 16 of the PGPA Act. The overall responsibility for ASADA’s Risk Management Framework, including fraud risks, was allocated to the ASADA Risk Management Committee. All ASADA officials were responsible for the day-to-day management of risk in the performance of their duties.

The Risk Management Committee was responsible for:

♦ regular consideration and monitoring of ASADA’s risks, including those associated with fraud, individual projects, program implementation and activities

♦ monitoring the controls and assurance activities against ASADA’s risks ♦ identifying new and changing risks to ASADA’s business ♦ maintaining the ASADA Risk Register and the ASADA Assurance Map, which identifies the key controls and assurance arrangements in place

♦ monitoring the currency, relevance and development of internal policies and procedures ♦ considering whether appropriate policies were in place for the management and exercise of ASADA’s business

♦ reviewing the outcomes of the audits conducted by the internal audit service provider ♦ monitoring the implementation of internal audit recommendations ♦ monitoring the action taken on significant issues raised in relevant ANAO reports.

The Committee comprised ASADA’s Executive Team, Directors and Governance Officer.

information Governance Committee The Information Governance Committee provided ASADA with a mechanism to develop a consistent, systematic and whole-of-agency approach to managing its information and ensure authorised staff had the right information at the right time in the place they needed it.

The Committee’s primary focus was to deliver business value to ASADA from current and future information sources and work with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) to ensure systems and processes were in place to capture, manage and disseminate relevant information.

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The Committee comprised ASADA’s:

♦ Deputy CEO Legal, Education and Corporate (Chair)

♦ Deputy CEO Operations ♦ Chief Information Officer ♦ Director Sports Operations and Engagement ♦ Director Education and Innovation

♦ Director Investigations ♦ Director Legal ♦ Director Office of the Executive ♦ Director Intelligence

♦ other subject matter experts as required by the Committee.

internal audit arrangements

internal audits Protiviti provided ASADA’s internal audit services in line with its Internal Audit Program for 2019-20. This program outlined the broad strategic direction of internal audit activities over the medium term, taking into consideration ASADA’s Risk Management and Fraud Control Framework. Protiviti drafted the program in consultation with the ASADA Executive and the ASADA Audit Committee. ASADA reviewed and updated the program each year to ensure it continued to meet assurance needs and reflected the operating environment. Internal audits conducted in 2019-20 were:

♦ Stakeholder engagement ♦ Deterrence strategy design and implementation ♦ Intelligence analysis.

r isk management The Commonwealth Risk Management Policy supports the requirements of section 16 of the PGPA Act, which requires the CEO to establish and maintain systems and appropriate internal controls for the oversight and management of risk. Both section 10 of the PGPA Act and the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework set out the core requirements of fraud control for all Commonwealth entities and provide the statutory basis for the Commonwealth’s response to fraud.

Risk management and fraud control at ASADA were governed by the agency’s Risk Management and Fraud Control Framework, which includes:

♦ fraud control processes ♦ internal audit functions ♦ business continuity processes

♦ corporate planning ♦ budgeting processes.

The ASADA Risk Management and Fraud Control Policy gave practical guidance on implementing the framework. It was based on the principles set out in the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy, ISO 31000 Risk Management, section 10 of the PGPA Rule and the Commonwealth Fraud Control Framework.

All staff were required each year to complete the online whole-of-government Fraud Awareness e-Learning Training Package. This training helps staff to understand their responsibilities and obligations regarding the prevention, detection and reporting of, and response to, fraud.

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The PGPA Act and section 10 of the PGPA Rule require all non-corporate Commonwealth entities to provide the Australian Institute of Criminology with fraud control information. In accordance with these requirements, ASADA submitted annual fraud data in 2019-20.

o perational risk ASADA identified and monitored operational risk through:

♦ meetings of the Risk Management Committee and Senior Leadership Group ♦ monitoring of workgroup operational risks by business unit directors ♦ ASADA’s quarterly reports to the Audit Committee on risk management.

The agency had risk mitigation plans in place for all risks identified as requiring active management. Insurable risks are covered by Comcover and Comcare.

financial risks ASADA managed financial risk through:

♦ Accountable Authority Instructions and associated policies and procedures giving effect to PGPA Act requirements. Available to all staff, they set out responsibilities and procedures to provide an overarching framework for transparent and accountable financial management

♦ They also covered topics relating specifically to risk management and internal accountability ♦ A system of financial delegations to ensure commitment and spending authorities rest with appropriate staff who are informed of their responsibilities

♦ The Internal Audit Plan, which identified services and functions for auditing. This plan addressed issues raised in the ANAO financial audits of ASADA, policy evaluations, previous internal audits, strategic risk management assessments and, where appropriate, the ANAO reports on cross-agency matters

♦ Regular discussion on financial matters, including financial risk and monitoring of financial performance through formal governance structures

♦ Actively managing contractual relationships with clients and maintaining a high standard of service provision to ensure that future revenue streams were maintained.

ethical standards ASADA was committed to promoting and supporting the APS Values and Code of Conduct, as set out in the Public Service Act 1999.

ASADA had policies in place for:

♦ ethical behaviour and integrity ♦ outside employment ♦ betting and gambling

♦ managing offers of a gift or benefit ♦ managing conflicts of interest.

All ASADA employees and contractors engaged by ASADA were required to comply with these policies.

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Compliance reporting ASADA had no significant issues of non-compliance with finance law during 2019-20 requiring notification to the Finance Minister. During the reporting period, ASADA complied with the provisions and requirements of the:

♦ PGPA Act ♦ PGPA Rule ♦ Commonwealth Procurement Rules

♦ Appropriation Acts ♦ other instruments defined as finance law, including relevant ministerial directions.

exte RnA l s CRutiny

p arliamentary scrutiny

s enate s tanding Committee on Community a ffairs ASADA appeared before the Community Affairs Legislation Committee on 3 occasions in 2019-20:

♦ Supplementary Budget Estimates - 23 October 2019 ♦ Public Hearing: Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Enhancing Australia’s Anti-Doping Capability) Bill 2019 - 14 February 2020

♦ Additional Estimates - 4 March 2020.

Decisions and reports

Judicial decisions ASADA was not the subject of any judicial decisions in 2019-20.

decisions of a dministrative t ribunals An application for review was lodged with the Administrative Appeals Tribunal challenging an assertion by the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel of possible anti-doping rule violations in 2018-19. On 19 December 2019, the Administrative Appeals Tribunal handed down its decision in this matter, setting aside the assertions.

Another application for review was lodged with the Administrative Appeals Tribunal challenging an assertion by the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel of possible anti-doping rule violations in 2019-20. The application was lodged out of time. On 17 June 2020, the Administrative Appeals Tribunal handed down its decision, refusing to extend the time within which the applicant could make an application for review.

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Also, in 2019-20, 4 freedom of information (FOI) request decisions were lodged with the Administrative Appeals Tribunal for review. As of 30 June 2020, all 4 matters remain in the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

decisions by the a ustralian i nformation Commissioner At the commencement of 2019-20, there were 9 applications for review with the Australian Information Commissioner. One further application for review was lodged during 2019-20.

Three applications were finalised pursuant to section 54W(a)(ii) of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) (FOI Act) and a further 6 applications were finalised pursuant to section 54W(b) of the FOI Act. One matter remains with the Australian Information Commissioner.

parliamentary Committee reports ASADA was not the subject of any parliamentary committee reports in 2019-20.

Commonwealth o mbudsman reports ASADA was not subject to any complaints to the Commonwealth Ombudsman in 2019-20.

Commonwealth a uditor-General reports ASADA received an unmodified audit report on its 2019-20 financial statements. The agency did not receive any audit findings related to its 2019-20 financial statement processes. The previous year’s 2 C findings were minor in nature and both were closed in 2019-20 with notable improvements to ASADA’s controls framework.

In 2018-19, ASADA was included in the ANAO performance audit of the implementation of the Australian Government’s workplace bargaining framework. The Auditor-General report noted that ASADA, as with all agencies included in the audit, should strengthen governance around the bargaining process, specifically communications planning and risk management. Sport Integrity Australia is drafting a new enterprise agreement to replace the ASADA Enterprise Agreement 2017-20 and is focused on implementing these recommendations during the bargaining process.

freedom of information ( foi )

In 2019-20, ASADA received 21 FOI applications.

Entities subject to the FOI Act are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). On its website, Sport Integrity Australia displays a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements.

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p eople The Australian Government invested heavily in human resources for ASADA, increasing capacity by 50% in 2018-19, which continued into 2019-20. This provided ASADA with the necessary skills and capabilities to deliver on its key priorities and respond effectively to the challenges posed by an increasingly sophisticated doping environment.

A key challenge faced by ASADA’s workforce in 2019-20 was the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. The significant investment in IT capability during 2019-20 allowed our people to quickly adapt to a changed work environment with all staff having remote working access, which placed us at the forefront of government when it came to remaining agile and responsive in such an unprecedented situation. During this time, our people were focused on key priorities and were able to redeploy to other areas of the business or parts of government as necessary. ASADA made available 8 ongoing/non-ongoing staff and 51 casual staff to assist the government in its response to the pandemic, with 6 casual staff redeployed to Services Australia.

inclusion and Development i nitiative (i Di)

ASADA committed to reflecting the diversity of the Australian community in its workforce by building an inclusive culture to respect and celebrate differences. Diversity in experiences, backgrounds, skills, talents and views enriched ASADA’s working environment and capacity to deliver outcomes for the Australian sporting community.

ASADA recognised the benefits of fostering an inclusive environment where people from diverse backgrounds can thrive. ASADA supported staff to feel included regardless of gender, impairment, cultural background, sexual orientation or ethnicity. In addition, the agency committed to helping staff develop skills and expertise to reach their career goals, thus ensuring ASADA continued to improve its operations and succeeded in achieving its vision of ‘clean, fair sport’.

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The Inclusion and Development Initiative (IDI) was established during 2018-19 to support organisational change. In 2019-20, the IDI:

♦ surveyed staff to gain insights into views on how ASADA supports inclusion and development, and what can be done to improve it, as well as understanding what staff want from their IDI

♦ established a Workplace Champions group to bring together individuals with relevant expertise and experience to promote employee engagement, demonstrate dedication to improving areas within ASADA and advocate a voice for all staff

♦ introduced story-telling sessions in recognition of the diverse experiences and perspectives within the working group. Sessions included a faith and celebration talk about Ramadan and personal perspectives based on gender and sexual orientation

♦ promoted opportunities to attend forums such as the Women in Sport Summit in Melbourne and International Women’s Day events

♦ provided staff with access to memberships of a number of networks and committees, including the International Network of Doping Research, Pharmaceutical Society of Australia, Australian and New Zealand Sports Law Association and Australian Institute of Professional Investigators

♦ promoted ASADA as an employer of choice for Indigenous Australians by signing up to the 2020-21 Indigenous Australian Government Development Program.

Dr David Hughes presents ‘Transgender in Sport’ to ASADA staff in July 2019.

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Jawun secondment ASADA was successful in having its first employee selected for a 6-week secondment in February/March 2020 to the Jawun Program.

Established in 2001, Jawun partners with Indigenous communities in place-based capacity building to empower Indigenous-led change and foster meaningful connections between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Jawun placed skilled people from Australia’s leading companies and government agencies into Indigenous organisations. Indigenous leaders have clear development goals and strategies so, in this 2-way learning model, secondees bring skills and knowledge to turbo change powerful vision into necessary reform.

ASADA’s placement was in Broome, WA with Nirrumbuk Aboriginal Corporation (NAC) - NAC’s vision is ‘to end hardship, suffering, and helplessness in Indigenous people within the Kimberley region by building capacity and fostering self-sufficiency’.

This is an excerpt of the secondee’s experience:

‘… A bit about my Jawun family up here, which is fitting seeing as ‘Jawun’ means ‘family or friend’. Our ‘team leader’ is Corinne who is the Regional Director for West Kimberley. She’s been in the role for about 3 years and is amazing for her positive energy, passion for the community and her local networks. The team comprises 7 of us as secondees - 2 males and 5 females; from Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane and Perth; skill sets include a lawyer, civil engineer and social worker; and other home organisations are National Australia Bank, KPMG, Defence, RAC Insurance and Woodside.

‘Induction week was a cultural baptism of fire, mostly in the sense of facing up to the challenges to our Indigenous community; locally, regional and nationally. My take on these challenges includes youth suicide; translating government initiative and funding into more impactful reform programs ‘on the ground’ i.e. having a seat at the table; finding economic stability through regional Indigenous business ventures; and preservation and growing of culture (including language and identity).

‘The influx of knowledge and growth of deeper understanding, as well as climatising, was enjoyed through visits to Kimberley Stolen Generation Aboriginal Corporation; Kimberley Land Council; a day trip to ‘Country’ at Eco Beach (Karajarri Country) for spear fishing, dragnetting, boomerang making and many chats about tradition and culture; a creative art workshop during which we designed and printed our own tea towels; 3 Welcomes to Country, 2 of which included a ‘smoking ceremony’; a private dinner meeting with 3 impressive young leaders to chat ‘unfiltered’ about perceptions, bias and stereotypes; adventures through the mangroves and semi-swamp whilst mud crabbing; a 4WD drive course across coastal rock and inland on the deep red dirt which is so typical of the region; and learning the more complete pearling history of Broome, which involves pretty awful and untold elements of slavery and abuse.

‘Working with the Nirrumbuk Employment Services (NES) folk has inducted me into the mindset of service delivery roles and in this instance the fantastic nuance of all staff being crystal clear of the objective for every ‘client’ who walks in the door - help them on the pathway to finding a job. In developing the NES business plan, this clarity has been a key point to pivot around as we’ve discussed aspects of NES culture, governance, leadership, communication and capability.

ASADA Director, Dion McVie, receives a welcome to Karajarri Country.

‘My dealings with broader Nirrumbuk staff (outside of NES), from the CEO down, has stimulated much thought around the impact of my Jawun role, different leadership styles, work-life balance, time management and staff engagement. I’ve learnt the weight of influence that comes with being a Jawun secondee and to respect and manage that cautiously, as well as pondering what will characterise the small imprint I leave with Nirrumbuk- right now I’d chose that to be (1) people are most important, (2) communication is critical, (3) find positivity in everything you do/say.

‘So far as deliverables, the comprehensive business plan has come together really well, guided by a methodology I’ve learnt up here and which I look forward to bringing back to ASADA. The remainder of my time will be divided between review of risk, shaping future Jawun project briefs and the Nirrumbuk strategic plan.’

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ASADA Director, Dion McVie, receives a welcome to Karajarri Country.

‘My dealings with broader Nirrumbuk staff (outside of NES), from the CEO down, has stimulated much thought around the impact of my Jawun role, different leadership styles, work-life balance, time management and staff engagement. I’ve learnt the weight of influence that comes with being a Jawun secondee and to respect and manage that cautiously, as well as pondering what will characterise the small imprint I leave with Nirrumbuk- right now I’d chose that to be (1) people are most important, (2) communication is critical, (3) find positivity in everything you do/say.

‘So far as deliverables, the comprehensive business plan has come together really well, guided by a methodology I’ve learnt up here and which I look forward to bringing back to ASADA. The remainder of my time will be divided between review of risk, shaping future Jawun project briefs and the Nirrumbuk strategic plan.’

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The Jawun ‘family’ meet as part of the induction to the program.

integra partnership ASADA was a strong supporter for positive mental wellbeing with initiatives during 2019-20 including:

♦ the Employee Assistance Program ♦ the Inclusion and Diversity Initiative providing a number of avenues that promote wellbeing (diversity, inclusion, networking, learning and development, employment opportunity for staff with disabilities)

♦ training staff in mental health first aid ♦ counselling services for athletes under investigation of doping ♦ the Athlete Advisory Group to understand the impacts of our work on athletes ♦ incorporating mental health into our education programs.

As an integral part of this strategy, ASADA partnered with Integra Service Dogs Australia (Integra), a not-for-profit organisation with a mission to train highly effective service dogs as a support for veterans and first responders who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

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The service dogs help provide security, assistance, friendship, confidence and a renewed purpose for those individuals suffering from PTSD. Research suggests interaction with animals can assist with positive mental wellbeing. While the objective of the partnership between Integra and ASADA was initially to have Integra service dogs socialised in the workplace to help increase mental health wellbeing, this was not the only objective. The partnership was an opportunity for government to support a small registered charity focused primarily on helping others and promoting mental wellbeing and creating a template for other government agencies to follow.

Through supporting Integra, ASADA provided foster carers and a place where service dogs could continue the final stage of their training before being introduced and transferred to those suffering from PTSD and other mental health issues.

Further, the partnership created a welcoming workplace environment to individuals suffering from PTSD and other mental health issues, demonstrated ASADA’s commitment to making them feel supported and provided the hope of being able to consider their return to the workplace.

Foster carer and ASADA Director Legal, Regina Weiss, with her son Eddie and service dog Vixen.

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For our staff engaging in the foster program, the experience Integra provided was first class. The fostering period can last anywhere between 2 to 6 weeks while Integra provide support every step of the way. Every foster carer loved the experience and are putting their hand up for the next opportunity. It is an experience that will stay with them for life in the knowledge they are supporting the imperative work Integra does in the community and those veterans and first responders who represent us and worked for us.

Deputy CEO Legal, Education & Corporate, Darren Mullaly (centre), with members of the Integra team in August 2019.

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As ADA wellness sessions One of the key activities on ASADA’s 2019-20 mental health and wellbeing program was delivered through the pandemic. Staff and their families were able to take valuable skills and practically apply them during this time.

The Skills and Talent group worked closely with the Wellbeing Science Institute to survey staff and determine preferred topics for the workshops. The series of 6 workshops explored the latest research on neuroscience and how it relates to effectiveness at work and in life with a general focus on wellbeing.

The first face-to-face session was successfully delivered in February 2020 and then, due to the pandemic, the remaining 5 workshops were delivered via a virtual session to staff in their homes. Each session was recorded and saved on the intranet for future access. The topics and the key learnings of each of session were:

1. Our Brain at Work - This workshop delivered greater understanding of the key functions of the brain and how it impacts effectiveness at work (and in life) including judgement, decision making, communication, emotions, relationships, learning, engagement and performance.

2. Getting a Good Night’s Sleep - particularly in challenging times. With the pandemic, this was a perfectly timed workshop which focused on the latest research on sleep, the benefits and the practices that enhance sleep. The workshop provided participants tools, including a Good Night’s Sleep Action Plan, and methods to focus on putting good sleep practices into place during challenging times.

3. The Art of Focus - This workshop looked at the reality of today’s world of work and the challenges faced in maintaining focus on priorities, value-adding behaviours and tasks. Participants were shown strategies and techniques for building new habits of focus and ways to improve their working environment to minimise the distractions and challenges to focused attention.

4. Creating your Customised Wellbeing Plan - This workshop provided participants the opportunity to create a customised wellbeing plan using tools that help identify areas that are most important to each individual. Participants also explored their values and strengths to help identify the wellbeing goals that matter most to them.

5. Positive Relationships - An evidence-based framework on relationship management was shared to build an enhanced understanding of the characteristics of positive relationships and the process and skills required for building and maintaining positive relationships. Participants were able to assess their approach to relationship management and the opportunities for improvement. With a focus on communication skills to help identify those skills that will most positively impact their key relationships both at work and personally.

6. Life Design Approach to Careers - A holistic and 21st-century approach to career management was introduced - the Life Design Approach. In this practical workshop, participants were able to utilise this holistic career management approach to review and enhance their current career plan.

It was great to have a mix of participants from across the states and in the field. Those who attended provided positive feedback on the content, and the value and the learnings from the sessions.

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w orkforce composition

All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2019-20)

male female indeterminate

Total

full - time

Part - time Total

full - time

Part - time Total

full - time

Part - time Total

NSW 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

Qld 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1

SA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Tas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Vic 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

WA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ACT 26 3 29 27 6 33 0 0 0 62

NT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

External Territories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 27 3 30 29 6 35 0 0 0 65

All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2019-20)

male female indeterminate

Total full - time

Part - time

Casual

Total

full - time

Part - time

Casual

Total

full - time

Part - time

Casual

Total

NSW 0 0 30 30 0 0 23 23 0 0 0 0 53

Qld 0 0 27 27 0 0 20 20 0 0 0 0 47

SA 0 0 10 10 0 0 9 9 0 0 0 0 19

Tas 0 0 10 10 0 0 6 6 0 0 0 0 16

Vic 0 0 26 26 0 0 17 17 0 0 0 0 43

WA 0 0 14 14 0 0 12 12 0 0 0 0 26

ACT 3 1 8 12 3 1 12 16 0 0 1 1 29

NT 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

External Territories

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 3 1 125 129 3 1 99 103 0 0 1 1 233

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Australian Public Service Act Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2019-20)

male female indeterminate

Total full - time Part - time Total full - time Part - time Total full - time Part - time Total

SES 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

EL 2 6 0 6 5 0 5 0 0 0 11

EL 1 9 2 11 5 2 7 0 0 0 18

APS 6 6 1 7 14 3 17 0 0 0 24

APS 5 3 0 3 3 1 4 0 0 0 7

APS 4 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 27 3 30 29 6 35 0 0 0 65

Australian Public Service Act Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2019-20)

male female indeterminate

Total

full - time

Part - time Casual Total

full - time

Part - time Casual Total

full - time

Part - time Casual Total

SES 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

EL 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

APS 6 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

APS 5 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

APS 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 0 0 19 19 0 0 28 28 0 0 0 0 47

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 106 106 0 0 71 71 0 0 1 1 178

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 3 1 125 129 3 1 99 103 0 0 1 1 233

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Australian Public Service Act Indigenous Employment Current Report Period (2019-20)

Total

Ongoing 0

Non-ongoing 0

Casuals 1

Total 1

Australian Public Service Act Employment Salary Ranges by Classification Level (Minimum/Maximum) Current Report Period (2019-20)

minimum salary maximum salary

SES 3 $319,750 $319,750

SES 2 0 0

SES 1 $206,040 $247,248

EL 2 $121,410 $162,792

EL 1 $107,395 $117,047

APS 6 $93,473 $102,012

APS 5 $83,138 $90,262

APS 4 $73,701 $81,043

APS 3 $62,197 $69,766

APS 2 $50,989 $60,209

APS 1 $42,084 $48,395

Other 0 0

Minimum/Maximum range $42,084 $319,750

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Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full-time and Part-time Status Current Report Period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Total full-time Part-time Total full-time Part-time Casual Total

SES 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 2

EL 2 11 0 11 0 0 0 0 11

EL 1 14 4 18 0 1 0 1 19

APS 6 20 4 24 2 1 0 3 27

APS 5 6 1 7 4 0 0 4 11

APS 4 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 2

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 47 47 47

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 178 178 178

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 56 9 65 6 2 225 233 298

Australian Public Service Act Employees by Full-time and Part-time Status Previous Report Period (2018-19)

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Total full-time Part-time Total full-time Part-time Casual Total

SES 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SES 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SES 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 2

EL 2 8 0 8 0 0 0 0 8

EL 1 18 0 18 1 1 0 2 20

APS 6 14 3 17 3 0 0 3 20

APS 5 3 1 4 8 0 0 8 12

APS 4 5 0 5 0 1 0 1 6

APS 3 0 0 0 0 0 55 55 55

APS 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS 1 0 0 0 0 0 216 216 216

Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 51 4 55 12 2 271 285 340

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Australian Public Service Act Employment Type by location Current Report Period (2019-20)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 1 53 54

Qld 1 47 48

SA 0 19 19

Tas 0 16 16

Vic 1 43 44

WA 0 26 26

ACT 62 29 91

NT 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 65 233 298

Australian Public Service Act Employment Type by location Previous Report Period (2018-19)

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total

NSW 1 70 71

Qld 0 68 68

SA 0 18 18

Tas 0 18 18

Vic 1 44 45

WA 0 30 30

ACT 53 37 90

NT 0 0 0

External Territories 0 0 0

Overseas 0 0 0

Total 55 285 340

w orkforce planning During 2019-20, ASADA continued with its strategic workforce planning to support delivery of a leading anti-doping program while maintaining consistency with government policy on average staffing levels.

During this time, the agency prepared for its future role in Sport Integrity Australia and developed a recruitment strategy aimed at complementing existing skillsets and acquiring new skills to address future sport integrity matters.

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ASADA actively encouraged secondments and resource-sharing arrangements with relevant government departments and law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

The agency utilised recruitment practices that encouraged diversity among its workforce, including participation in the Indigenous Australian Government Development Program.

learning and development To build a capable workforce, the agency focused on utilising different training methods and provided learning opportunities to address future challenges staff in the agency may face. In addition, ASADA implemented secondment opportunities for its staff at other government agencies, as well as approving flexible work arrangements for staff members.

In 2019-20, ASADA commenced an ongoing secondment arrangement with the Department of Home Affairs Legal Division. A Home Affairs lawyer joined the ASADA Legal team on a 6-month rotational basis, an arrangement which is set to continue into the new agency, Sport Integrity Australia.

The COVID-19 pandemic provided challenges when it came to planned delivery methods; however, the agency was quick to adapt and continued many of the learning and development opportunities via online mediums. A major initiative rolled out during 2019-20 of particular assistance to staff during the pandemic was a 6-month wellbeing education program including topics chosen by staff, such as physical wellbeing, our brain at work and the art of focus.

Australian Olympic Committee Head of Public Affairs and Communication, Strath Gordon, talks to ASADA staff in November 2019 on the importance of communications in a crisis.

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employment arrangements

sE s Non-s Es Total

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Enterprise Agreement 2017-20 0 295 295

Section 24(1) Determination 2 0 2

Total 2 295 297

This information excludes the ASADA CEO, whose terms and conditions of employment are set by the Remuneration Tribunal.

enterprise agreement The ASADA enterprise agreement came into effect on 1 February 2018 and expires in February 2021.

The ASADA Enterprise Agreement 2017-20 sets out the terms and conditions of ASADA’s non-Senior Executive Service (SES) staff.

s ection 24(1) determinations In 2019-20, the terms and conditions of employment of the SES employees were set by determination under section 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

performance pay Performance pay was not available to ASADA staff. In accordance with the ASADA Enterprise Agreement 2017-20, the Performance and Career Enrichment Scheme enabled incremental salary advancements. Employees receiving a rating of fully effective or higher were eligible for incremental salary advancement where they were below the maximum salary range for their classification.

w orkplace health and s afety

Information regarding WHS is included in the appendices.

n ational Disability s trategy

The National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, is a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level, 2-yearly report will track progress against each of the 6 outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these progress reports was published in 2014 and can be found at www.dss.gov.au.

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finAn CiAl An D

p Rope Rty m An Agement

ASADA’s financial accountability responsibilities are set out in the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and subordinate legislation, and the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, collectively known as finance law. In support of the finance law, ASADA’s Accountable Authority Instructions were issued in accordance with section 20A of the PGPA Act. The finance law, supporting instructions and rules, provided a framework to ensure the efficient, effective, economical and ethical use of public resources. The finance law also mandates the production of audited financial statements prepared in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards. The complete set of financial statements for the agency is provided in the Financial Statements section.

Asset management Categories of non-financial assets for ASADA mainly comprised leasehold improvements on rental accommodation and ICT infrastructure.

Under the Australian Government’s net cash funding reforms, the funding of ongoing capital is through the provision of approved departmental capital budgets based on agreed capital requirements.

During 2019-20, ASADA invested $5.29 million in capital expenditure. This included an office fitout to accommodate an extended staff for Sport Integrity Australia on 1 July 2020 and significant investment in the agency’s ICT environment.

p urchasing

procurement ASADA complied with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules issued by the Minister for Finance under section 105B(1) of the PGPA Act.

ASADA had a range of purchaser and provider arrangements, including:

♦ international sample collection and analysis services ♦ domestic blood collection services ♦ transport services ♦ the supply of collection and testing equipment

♦ contracted ICT gateway, internet, online education and equipment hosting arrangements

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♦ Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) arrangements for the provision of portfolio-based shared services encompassing human resources, payroll and financial transaction processing, management of property and security requirements

♦ MoU arrangements for the provision of laboratory sample testing services ♦ MoU with the University of Canberra, partnering to collaborate on certain research, innovation and professional education projects

♦ contracts for legal, investigative, educational and training services.

ASADA’s procurement framework guided staff in considering value for money, encouraging competition and using resources efficiently and effectively. To achieve this, the agency’s procurement policies mandated the use of Department of Health procurement arrangements, or whole-of-government panels or standing offers, where available and fit for purpose.

initiatives to support small business ASADA supported small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

ASADA achieved this through the adoption of simplified processes and credit card settlements for purchases below $10,000, combined with the use of existing panel and standing order arrangements, where available.

Consultants In appointing consultants, ASADA took into account the skills and resources required for the task, the skills available internally and the cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise. Decisions to engage consultants were made in accordance with the PGPA Act and related regulations, including the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and other internal policies.

During 2019-20, 2 new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $0.072 million, compared to 7 involving total actual expenditure of $0.049 million in 2018-19. There were no ongoing consultancy contracts from prior years active during the period, compared to 8 involving total actual expenditure of $0.328 million in 2018-19.

Of the 2 consultancies active during the period, both had expired by 30 June 2020.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website at www.tenders.gov.au.

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Number and Expenditure on Consultants Current Report Period (2019-20)

Total

Number of new contracts entered into during the period 2

Total actual expenditure during the period on new contracts (inc. $GST) 72,080

Number of ongoing contracts engaging consultants that were entered into during a previous period 0

Total actual expenditure during the period on ongoing contracts (inc. $GST) 0

exempt contracts There were no current contracts or standing offers that were exempted from publication in AusTender on the basis that they would disclose exempt matters under the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

australian n ational audit o ffice access clauses ASADA did not enter into any contracts that excluded the Auditor-General from having access to its contractors.

grants ASADA did not issue any grants in 2019-20.

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executive remuneration Information About Remuneration for Key Management Personnel

short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title

base salary bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances

s uperannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other

long-term benefit David Sharpe Chief Executive Officer $328,990 0 0 $47,552 $7,511 0 0 $384,053

Darren Mullaly Deputy CEO $221,484 0 0 $34,283 $6,059 0 0 $261,825

Brian McDonald Deputy CEO $114,411 0 0 $23,459 $6,083 0 0 $143,953

Emma Johnson Acting Deputy CEO $129,274 0 $1,609 $14,917 $2,568 0 0 $148,368

Total $794,158 0 $1,609 $120,211 $22,221 0 0 $938,199

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entity Resource s tatement s ubset s ummary

Current Report p eriod (2019-20)

Actual Available appropriation - current year (a) $’000

Payments made (b) $’000

balance remaining (a)-(b) $’000

Departmental

Annual appropriations - ordinary annual services 20,609 20,495 114

Annual appropriations - other services - non-operating 1,577 1,393 184

Total departmental annual appropriations 22,186 21,887 299

Total departmental resourcing (A) 22,186 21,887 299

Administered

Total administered resourcing (B) 0 0 0

Total resourcing and payments for entity X (A + B) 22,186 21,887 299

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finAn CiAl st Atements

in Depen Dent Au Dito R’s Repo Rt

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 38 Sydney Avenue FORREST ACT 2603 Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

OFFICIAL

OFFICIAL

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Youth and Sport

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Sports Anti‐Doping Authority (the Entity) for the year  ended 30 June 2020:  

(a) comply  with  Australian  Accounting  Standards  -  Reduced  Disclosure  Requirements  and  the  Public  Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and 

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2020 and its financial performance and cash  flows for the year then ended. 

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2020 and for  the year then ended:  

 Statement by the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer;    Statement of Comprehensive Income;    Statement of Financial Position;    Statement of Changes in Equity;    Cash Flow Statement; and   Notes to and forming part of the financial statements, comprising a summary of significant accounting 

policies and other explanatory information. 

Basis for opinion

I  conducted  my  audit  in  accordance  with  the  Australian  National  Audit  Office  Auditing  Standards,  which  incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described  in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent  of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by  the  Auditor‐General  and  his  delegates.  These  include  the  relevant  independence  requirements  of  the  Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants  (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor‐ General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the  audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. 

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Chief Executive of Sports Integrity Australia is responsible under  the  Public  Governance,  Performance  and  Accountability  Act  2013  (the  Act)  for the  preparation  and fair  presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced  Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Chief Executive is also responsible for such  internal control as the Chief Executive determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements  that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.  

In preparing the financial statements, the Chief Executive is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to  continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an  administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Chief Executive is also responsible for disclosing, as  applicable,  matters  related  to  going  concern  and  using  the  going  concern  basis  of  accounting  unless  the  assessment indicates that it is not appropriate. 

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OFFICIAL

OFFICIAL

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from  material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion.  Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance  with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it  exists.  Misstatements  can  arise  from  fraud  or  error  and  are considered  material  if,  individually or  in  the  aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis  of the financial statements. 

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise  professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:  

 identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or  error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is  sufficient  and  appropriate  to  provide  a  basis  for  my  opinion.  The  risk  of  not  detecting  a  material  misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion,  forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;    obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are 

appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of  the Entity’s internal control;   evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates  and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;    conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting 

and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or  conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude  that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related  disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My  conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future  events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and    evaluate  the  overall  presentation,  structure  and  content  of  the  financial  statements,  including  the 

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a  manner that achieves fair presentation.  

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing  of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify  during my audit. 

Australian National Audit Office 

 

 

 

Peter Kerr 

Executive Director 

Delegate of the Auditor‐General 

Canberra 

8 September 2020 

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s t Atement by the Chief exeC utive o ffiCeR An D

Chief fin AnC iAl offi CeR

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s t Atement of Comp Rehensive

in Come Cu RRent Repo Rt

p eRioD (2019-20)

Notes

30 June 2020 $’000 30 June 2019 $’000

Original budget

30 June 2020 $’000

Net cost of services

Expenses

Employee benefits 1.1 A 11,218 9,898 11,719

Suppliers 1.1 B 8,808 10,817 6,040

Depreciation and amortisation 2.2 A 998 417 340

Impairment loss on financial instruments 1.1 C 0 15 0

Write-down and impairment of other assets 1.1 D 2 8 0

Total Expenses 21,026 21,155 18,099

Own-source i ncome

Own-source revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2 A 1,577 2,165 1,876

Other revenue 1.2 B 568 248 325

Total Own-Source revenue 2,145 2,413 2,201

Gains

Gain on lease disposal 1.2 C 69 0 0

Resources received free of charge 1.2 C 2,895 2,891 34

Total gains 2,964 2,891 34

Total Own-Source income 5,109 5,304 2,235

Net cost of services

Net cost of services (15,917) (15,851) (15,864)

Revenue from g overnment

Revenue from Government 1.2 D 15,524 15,540 15,524

s urplus/(Deficit) on continuing operations

Deficit on continuing operations (393) (311) (340)

Total comprehensive loss (393) (311) (340)

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The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

budget variances commentary

s tatement of Comprehensive i ncome 1. Employee benefits were less than budget due to the impact of COVID-19 on the agency as sample collection activity was reduced from March to June 2020.

2. Suppliers expense was higher than budget as Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency (ASADA) received sample analysis services free of charge, which weren’t considered in the original budget, allowing the agency to procure additional suppliers goods and services to assist in meeting its objectives.

3. Depreciation and amortisation was higher than budget due to the capitalisation of the new office fitout, significant investment in IT assets and the effect of implementing AASB 16 Leases, not included in the original budget.

4. Revenue from contracts with customers was below budget due to the impact of COVID-19 on sport test plans, along with a reduction in sample collection fees charged to sports that commenced on 1 January 2019.

5. Other revenue was greater than budget due to rent abatement’s provided by the landlord for the new office space lease, and contributions from the Department of Health to ASADA in preparation for the commencement of Sport Integrity Australia.

6. Gains are higher than budget due to the accounting treatment required under AASB 16 for the unwinding of the old lease, and as noted in supplier expenses, the sample analysis services provided free of charge to ASADA were not included in the original budget.

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s t Atement of fin AnC iAl p osition

Cu RRent Repo Rt p eRio D (2019-20)

Notes

30 June 2020 $’000 30 June 2019 $’000

Original budget

30 June 2020 $’000

Assets

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 2.1A 0 707 2,455

Trade and other receivables 2.1B 1,111 3,893 4,163

Total financial assets 1,111 4,600 6,618

Non-financial assets

Buildings 2.2A 15,448 2,749 1,144

Plant and equipment 2.2A 435 395 439

Computer software 2.2A 2,073 495 1,364

Inventories 2.2B 213 136 102

Other non-financial assets 2.2C 120 243 45

Total non-financial assets 18,289 4,018 3,094

Total assets 19,400 8,618 9,712

Liabilities

Payables

Suppliers 2.3A 990 1,026 1,930

Other payables 2.3B 215 285 235

Lease liabilites(1) 9,739 0 0

Total payables 10,944 1,311 2,165

Provisions

Employee provisions 4.1A 2,870 2,688 2,165

Total provisions 2,870 2,688 2,165

Total liabilities 13,814 3,999 4,330

Net assets 5,586 4,619 5,382

Equity

Contributed equity 5,920 4,788 5,920

Reserves 461 253 253

Accumulated deficit (795) (422) (791)

Total equity 5,586 4,619 5,382

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Right-of-use assets are included in Buildings. (1) ASADA applied AASB 16 Leases using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

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budget variances commentary

s tatement of f inancial position 1. Cash on hand at the end of the financial year was lower than budget due to the closing of the ASADA bank accounts on 30 June, with balances transferred to the Consolidated Revenue Fund until opening of Sport Integrity Australia bank accounts on 1 July 2020. The balance of

the account is reflected in the appropriation note.

2. Due to the reduced activity of the agency and the sporting industry as a result of COVID-19, receivables were lower than budget.

3. The variance from budget in non-financial assets relates to the cost of the new office fitout, significant investment in IT assets, and the effect of bringing to account the 10 year accommodation lease onto the balance sheet as a result of implementing AASB16 Leases. These items were not included in the original budget.

4. Supplier payables was lower than budget due to reduced activity associated with COVID-19, particularly travel suppliers.

5. Lease liabilities were higher than budget due to the impact of implementing AASB 16 Leases with recognition of the 10 year lease liability on the balance sheet.

6. Employee provisions were higher than budget due to leave and salaries costs for additional staff not included in the budget, along with the impact of movements in the 10 year Government bond rate.

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s t Atement of Ch Anges in equity

Cu RRent Repo Rt p eRio D (2019-20)

30 June 2020 $’000 30 June 2019 $’000

Original budget

30 June 2020 $’000

Contributed equity

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 4,788 4,658 4,590

Contributions by owners

Equity injection - appropriations 1,000 0 1,000

Departmental capital budget 132 130 132

Total transactions with owners 1,132 130 1,132

Closing balance as at 30 June 5,920 4,788 5,722

Retained earnings

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period (422) (111) 0

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 20 0 0

Adjusted opening balance (402) (111) 0

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (393) (311) (340)

Total comprehensive income (393) (311) (340)

Closing balance as at 30 June (795) (422) (340)

Asset revaluation reserve

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 253 253 0

Other comprehensive income 208 0 0

Closing balance as at 30 June 461 253 0

Total equity

Closing balance as at 30 June 5,586 4,619 5,382

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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Accounting policy

equity injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

budget variances commentary

s tatement of Changes in e quity ASADA undertook a valuation of property, plant and equipment at 30 June 2020, with the outcome providing an adjustment increment to the asset revaluation reserve.

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CAsh f low s t Atement Cu RRent

RepoR t p eRioD (2019-20)

Notes

30 June 2020 $’000 30 June 2019 $’000

Original budget

30 June 2020 $’000

Operating activities

Cash received

Appropriations 18,399 16,258 15,524

Sale of goods and rendering of services 1,560 2,419 2,389

GST received 661 715 418

Other 629 358 0

Total cash received 21,249 19,750 18,331

Cash used

Employees 11,558 9,870 11,719

Suppliers 6,369 9,295 6,612

Total cash used 17,928 19,165 18,331

Net cash from operating activities 3,321 585 0

investing activities

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 3,584 3,132 1,132

Purchase of intangibles 1,706 314 0

Total cash use 5,290 3,446 1,132

Net cash used by investing activities (5,290) (3,446) (1,132)

financing activities

Cash received

Contributed equity 1,262 1,113 1,132

Total cash received 1,262 1,113 1,132

Net cash from financing activities 1,262 1,113 1,132

Net decrease in cash held (707) (1,748) 0

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 707 2,455 2,455

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2.1A 0 707 2,455

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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budget variances commentary

Cash f low s tatement 1. Cash received through appropriations was higher than budget primarily as a result of ASADA’s use of prior year available appropriations to fund the office fitout.

2. Sale of goods and rendering of services was lower than budget due to the effect of COVID-19 on sport test plans, and the impact of a reduction in sample collection fees charged to sports as of 1 January 2019.

3. Other cash received was higher than expected primarily due to un-budgeted funding received from the Department of Health to assist with implementation of Sport Integrity Australia.

4. The variance in total cash used by investing activities was due to investment in the new office fitout and IT assets.

n otes to A n D fo Rming p ARt

of fin AnC iAl st Atements

o verview

objectives of the a ustralian s ports a nti- doping authority The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) was an Australian Government controlled entity and was a not-for-profit entity. ASADA’s role and functions were set out in the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006, the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Regulations 2006 and the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme.

ASADA was structured to meet the following outcomes:

Outcome 1: Protection of the health of athletes and the integrity of Australian sport including through engagement, deterrence, detection and enforcement to minimise the risk of doping.

Entity activities contributing toward these outcomes are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by the entity in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by the entity, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or incurred by the Government. ASADA activities contributing towards this outcome were classified as departmental. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by ASADA in its own right.

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In Budget 2019-20, the Government announced the establishment of a new, single national sport integrity agency, Sport Integrity Australia. The new agency brings together all functions of ASADA, the National Integrity of Sport Unit from the Department of Health, and the national sport integrity functions of Sport Australia. With the passing of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Sport Integrity Australia) Act 2020, the new entity commenced operation on 1 July 2020.

The continued existence of Sport Integrity Australia is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the entity’s administration and programs.

Basis of preparation The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

1. Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR)

2. Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

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new accounting standards

Adoption of new Australian accounting standard requirements No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

The following new standards were issued prior to the signing of the statement by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Chief Financial Officer, were applicable to the current reporting period and had the following effect on the ASADA’s financial statements:

s tandard/ interpretation

Nature of change in accounting policy, transitional provisions, and adjustment to financial statements

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards-Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities and AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July 2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue, AASB 111 Construction Contracts and Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes. The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the entity to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

There was no impact to the financial statements on implementation of the standard as ASADA recognised revenue from contracts with its customers to depict the transfer of services at the consideration expected.

AASB 16 Leases AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019.

This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretation 115 Operating Leases - Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

All other new standards that were issued prior to the sign-off date and applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on ASADA’s financial statements.

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Application of AA sb 15 Revenue The nature of ASADA’s operations focused on recording non-appropriation revenue upon provision of services, which aligns to the intent of the revised standards. Given that the nature of arrangements whereby ASADA received revenue were performance based in relation to provision or performance of services with sufficiently specific performance obligations, the recognition of revenue under the revised standard continued to be deferred until the performance obligation was met. There was no impact to the financial statements on implementation of the standard.

Application of AA sb 16 Leases ASADA adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2018 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

ASADA elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed. The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

AASB 16 provides for certain optional practical expedients, including those related to the initial adoption of the standard.

ASADA applied the following practical expedients when applying AASB 16 to leases previously classified as operating leases under AASB 117:

♦ Apply a single discount rate to a portfolio of leases with reasonably similar characteristics ♦ Exclude initial direct costs from the measurement of right-of-use assets at the date of initial application for leases where the right-of-use asset was determined as if AASB 16 had been applied since the commencement date

♦ Rely on previous assessments on whether leases are onerous as opposed to preparing an impairment review under AASB 136 Impairment of assets as at the date of initial application

Apply the exemption not to recognise right-of-use assets and liabilities for leases with less than 12 months of lease term remaining as of the date of initial application.

As a lessee, ASADA previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. On adoption of AASB 16, ASADA recognised right-of-use assets and lease liabilities in relation to leases of office space, which had previously been classified as operating leases.

The lease liabilities were measured at the present value of the remaining lease payments, discounted using ASADA’s incremental borrowing rate as at 1 July 2019. ASADA’s incremental borrowing rate was the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an independent creditor under comparable terms and conditions. The weighted-average rate applied was 0.10%.

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The right-of-use assets were measured as follows:

♦ Office space: measured at an amount equal to the lease liability, adjusted by the amount of any prepaid or accrued lease payments.

On transition to AASB 16, ASADA recognised additional right-of-use assets and additional lease liabilities, recognising the difference in retained earnings. The impact on transition is summarised below:

1 July 2019

Right-of-use assets - Buildings 3,793,827

Lease liabilities 3,793,827

Retained earnings 19,664

The following table reconciles the minimum lease commitments disclosed in ASADA’s 30 June 2020 annual financial statements to the amount of lease liabilities recognised on 1 July 2019:

1 July 2019

Minimum operating lease commitment at 30 June 2019 3,621,481

Undiscounted lease payments 3,621,481

Less: effect of discounting using the incremental borrowing rate as at the date of initial application 172,346

Lease liabilities recognised at 1 July 2019 3,793,827

t axation ASADA was exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

s ignificant e vents

The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on ASADA’s anti-doping activities, most notably from March to June 2020, with sample collection processes reducing during this time. Additionally, the agency was unable to travel domestically or internationally which was a significant part of its engagement strategy. However, during the pandemic, impacted staff were engaged in areas of the business that were experiencing high workload as a result of the pandemic, or redeployed to other Government agencies to assist with payment and claims processing. The impact on the financial statements is a clear decline in revenue from user pays clients, and lower than expected spend on activities associated with testing and engagement. Management has assessed there was no significant impact on the financial statements, including the potential for movements in the fair value of non-financial assets and recoverability of receivables.

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m anaging u ncertainties

There is uncertainty around the ongoing impact that the pandemic will have, however it is expected that activity across a number of sectors of the economy will not return to normal levels for some months into the 2020-21 financial year, which will directly impact the activities of Sport Integrity Australia.

events after the reporting period On 1 July 2020, the assets and liabilities of ASADA were transferred to Sport Integrity Australia.

breach of s ection 83 of the Constitution After conducting an appropriate risk assessment, ASADA determined that there was low risk of breach of Section 83 of the Constitution, and there were no actual breaches during 2019-20 (2018-19: Nil).

budget variances commentary The primary statements include a comparison of the original budget as presented in the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements to ASADA’s 2019-20 financial outcome in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards. The budget has not been subject to audit.

The notes to each of the primary statements provide a high level commentary of the major variances. Major variances are those deemed relevant to an analysis of ASADA’s performance by management and are not focused merely on numerical differences between the budget and the actual amounts.

q uantifiable and unquantifiable Contingent Assets and l iabilities

At 30 June 2020, ASADA had one quantifiable contingent asset and no quantifiable liabilities (2018-19 Nil). The asset was a recovery of legal fees of up to AUD $6,884 which at 30 June 2020 was contingent on ASADA receiving a termination order from the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

At 30 June 2020 ASADA had one ongoing legal matter that may eventuate in ASADA either having to pay or being awarded associated costs. The amount is unable to be quantified, or estimated as either an asset or liability (2018-19:1).

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financial performance This section analyses the financial performance of ASADA for the year ended 30 June 2020.

1.1 expenses 1.1A: Employee benefits

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Wages and salaries 8,273 7,287

s uperannuation

Defined contribution plans 946 755

Defined benefit plans 482 487

Leave and other entitlements 1,223 1,369

Separation and redundancies 294 0

Total employee benefits 11,218 9,898

Total average staffing levels in 2020 were 75.9 (2018-19: 68).

Accounting policy Accounting policies for employee related expenses are contained in the people and relationships section.

1.1B: Suppliers

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 71 343

Contractors 1,661 2,358

Committee expenses 344 289

Freight and postage 181 172

HR - recruitment and training 318 448

Legal 196 291

Testing - sample analysis, storage and external collection expenses 3,559 3,921

Travel 740 1,068

IT services 856 803

Other suppliers 671 620

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 8,597 10,313

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2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Goods supplied 396 230

Services rendered 8,201 10,083

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 8,597 10,313

Other suppliers

Workers compensation expenses 52 27

Operating lease rentals and property operating expenses 159 477

Total other suppliers 211 504

Total suppliers 8,808 10,817

Accounting policy ASADA applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

ASADA had no short-term lease commitments as at 30 June 2020.

All borrowing costs were expensed as incurred.

1.1C: Impairment loss on financial instruments

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Impairment on trade and other receivables 0 15

Total impairment on financial instruments 0 15

1.1D: Write down of impairment and other assets

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Impairment of property, plant and equipment 2 8

Total write-down and impairment of other assets 2 8

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1.2 own-source revenue and gains

o wn-source revenue 1.2A: Revenue from contracts with customers

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Sample collection and testing services 1,577 2,165

Total revenue from contracts with customers 1,577 2,165

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Service line:

Service delivery 1,577 2,165

1,577 2,165

Type of customer:

Non-government entities 1,577 2,165

1,577 2,165

Timing of transfer of goods and services:

Point in time 1,577 2,165

1,577 2,165

Accounting policy Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

ASADA recognised revenue at an amount that reflects the consideration entitled in exchange for transferring goods or services to a customer under AASB 15. In relation to AASB 1058, transactions where consideration to acquire the asset, good or services was less than its fair value, ASADA recognised revenue as the difference between the consideration for the asset and the asset’s fair value, after recognising any other related amounts.

The following is a description of principal activities from which ASADA generated revenue:

ASADA had contracts in place with Professional Sporting Bodies to undertake an agreed level of collections and type of analysis. The contracts for testing were for varying periods. Some contracts covered specific events and may have only be in place for several months as opposed to a full calendar or financial year. Similarly, other contracts covered a 12-month period but did not align to either a calendar or financial year depending on the ‘season’ that the Body adheres to.

Each contract contained essentially the same elements which determine the application of AASB 15 for the recognition of the associated revenue. The essential elements determining this are an enforceable contract being in place; distinct undertakings or performance obligations; a defined transaction price i.e. cost per test and an ability to allocate that transaction price to a performance obligation. The treatment of revenue is either, when services are provided (monthly

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invoice) or at agreed dates within the contract period again post services being provided. The treatment of the revenue associated with these contracts remains compliant with the requirements of AASB 15.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30-day terms, were recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts was reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances were made when collectability of the debt was no longer probable.

1.2B: Other revenue

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Other revenue 568 248

Total other revenue 568 248

1.2C: Other gains

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Resources received free of charge - Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory 2,849 2,860

Resources received free of charge - remuneration of auditors 46 31

Gain on lease disposal 69 0

Total other gains 2,964 2,891

1.2D: Revenue from government

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Appropriations

Departmental appropriations 15,524 15,540

Total revenue from government 15,524 15,540

Accounting policy

Revenue from government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) were recognised as revenue from government when ASADA gained control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that related to activities that were reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue was recognised only when it had been earned.

Appropriations receivable were recognised at their nominal amounts.

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financial position This section analyses ASADA’s assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result.

Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section

2.1 financial assets 2.1A: Cash and cash equivalents

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Cash on hand 0 707

Total cash and cash equivalents 0 707

Accounting policy Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand.

2.1B: Trade and other receivables

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

goods and services receivables

Goods and services 794 597

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 76 50

Total goods and services receivables 870 647

Appropriations receivables

Appropriation receivable 241 3,246

Total appropriations receivables 241 3,246

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 1,111 3,893

Less impairment loss allowance 0 0

Total trade and other receivables (net) 1,111 3,893

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2018-19: 30 days).

Accounting policy

Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that were held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, were subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

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2.2 non-financial assets 2.2A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment and intangibles

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of property, plant and equipment for 2020

buildings $’000

Plant and equipment $’000

Computer s oftware (1)

$’000

Total $’000

As at 1 July 2019

Gross book value 2,919 768 1,122 4,809

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (170) (373) (627) (1,170)

Total as at 1 July 2019 2,749 395 495 3,639

Recognition of right-of-use asset on initial application of AASB 16 3,794 0 0 3,794

Adjusted total as at 1 July 2019 6,542 395 495 7,432

Additions

Purchase 3,416 168 1,706 5,290

Right-of-use assets 5,749 0 0 5,749

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income

165 43 0 208

Impairments recognised in net cost of services 0 (2) 0 (2)

Depreciation and amortisation (292) (169) (128) (589)

Depreciation on right-of-use asset (409) 0 0 (409)

Other movements

Revaluation write back of accumulated depreciation 739 527 0 1,266

Disposals

Other (462) (527) 0 (989)

Total as at 30 June 2020 15,448 435 2,073 17,956

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by

Gross book value 15,580 450 2,829 18,859

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (132) (15) (756) (903)

Total as at 30 June 2020 15,448 435 2,073 17,956

Carrying amount of right-of-use asset 9,134 0 0 9,134

1. The carrying amount of computer software included $25,000 of purchased software and $2,048,000 of internally generated software.

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During the assessment of property, plant and equipment, two assets were identified as obsolete and were written off. The value of impaired assets at 30 June 2020 was $2,343 (2018-19: $8,462). During the assessment of intangible assets, there were no indicators of impairment found.

It is not expected that any property, plant and equipment and intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Revaluations of non-financial assets

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy. On 30 June 2020, Jones Lange LaSalle, an independent valuer conducted the revaluations.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangible assets

There are no significant contractual commitments required to be disclosed for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangible assets.

Accounting policy

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment are carried at fair value. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the asset’s fair value as at the reporting date.

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset class fair value measures at:

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and equipment Market selling price

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Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000 for plant and equipment and $5,000 for leasehold improvements, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

Lease Right-of-Use (ROU) assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 ASADA adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value) less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/ deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

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Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the entity using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate. Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2020 2019

Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Plant and equipment and furniture and fittings 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the entity were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

ASADA’s intangibles comprised off-the-shelf and internally developed software and associated enhancement costs. These assets were carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software was amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful life of ASADA’s software was 3 to 5 years (2018-19: 3 to 5 years).

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2.2B: Inventories

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Inventories held for distribution - education materials 76 28

Inventories held for use - sample collection 137 108

Total inventories 213 136

During 2020, $27,000 worth of education inventories were recognised as an expense.

During 2020, $157,000 worth of sample collection inventories were recognised as an expense.

All inventories are expected to be used or distributed in the next 12 months.

Accounting policy Inventories held for sale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

Inventories held for distribution are valued at cost, adjusted for any loss of service potential.

Costs incurred in bringing each item of inventory to its present location and condition are assigned as follows:

1. raw materials and stores - purchase cost on a first-in-first-out basis

2. finished goods and work-in-progress - cost of direct materials and labour plus attributable costs that can be allocated on a reasonable basis.

Inventories acquired at no cost or nominal consideration are initially measured at current replacement cost at the date of acquisition.

2.2C: Other non-financial assets

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Prepayments 120 243

Total other non-financial assets 120 243

Other non-financial assets expected to be recovered

No more than 12 months 120 243

More than 12 months 0 0

Total other non-financial assets 120 243

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

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2.3 payables 2.3A: Suppliers

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Trade creditors and accruals 990 1,026

Total suppliers 990 1,026

2.3B: Other Payables

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Salaries and wages 180 144

Superannuation 29 22

Other 6 119

Total other payables 215 285

funding This section identifies ASADA’s funding structure.

3.1 appropriations 3.1A: Annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

Annual appropriations for 2020

Annual

appropriation 1 $’000

Adjustments to appropriation 2 $’000

Total

appropriation $’000

Appropriation applied in 2020 (current and prior years)

$’000

v ariance3 $’000

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 15,524 2,188 17,712 17,928 (216)

Capital budget4 132 0 132 262 (130)

Equity injections 1,000 0 1,000 1,000 0

Total departmental 16,656 2,188 18,844 19,190 (346)

1 No amounts were withheld under Section 51 of the PGPA Act.

2 Adjustments represent PGPA Act Section 74 receipts.

3 The variance in appropriations and appropriations applied in 2019-20 is a result of a combination of fit-out works utilising prior year appropriations, and the net movement in receivables, employee provisions and other revenue amounts.

4 Departmental capital budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

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Annual appropriations for 2019

Annual

appropriation 1 $’000

Adjustments to appropriation 2 $’000

Total

appropriation $’000

Appropriation applied in 2019 v ariance3

$’000

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 15,540 2,777 18,317 19,165 (848)

Capital budget4 130 0 130 1,113 (983)

Total departmental 15,670 2,777 18,447 20,278 (1,831)

1 No amounts were withheld under Section 51 of the PGPA Act.

2 Adjustments represent PGPA Act Section 74 receipts.

3 The variance in appropriations and appropriations applied in 2018-19 is a result of a combination of fitout works utilising prior year appropriations, and the net movement in receivables, employee provisions and other revenue amounts.

4 DCBs are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

3.1B: Unspent annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Departmental

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 0 3,116

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018-19 (DCB) 0 130

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2019-20 299 0

Cash and cash equivalents 0 707

Total departmental 299 3,953

p eople and relationships This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

4.1 employee provisions 4.1A: Employee provisions

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Leave 2,870 2,688

Total employee provisions 2,870 2,688

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Accounting policy Liabilities for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including ASADA’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the Financial Reporting Rule using the shorthand method. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Separation and redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The entity recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

Superannuation

ASADA’s staff were members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other superannuation funds held outside the Australian government.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian government and is settled by the Australian government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

ASADA made employer contributions to the employees’ defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The entity accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2020 represented outstanding contributions.

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4.2 Key management personnel remuneration Key management personnel were those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of ASADA, directly or indirectly. ASADA determined the key management personnel to be the CEO, and officers that directly report to the CEO with substantial decision making responsibilities. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Short-term employee benefits 796 765

Post-employment benefits 120 112

Other long-term employee benefits 22 20

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses1 938 897

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are 4 (2018-19: 3), and includes acting arrangements where it is determined the individual meets the key management personnel definition.

1 The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister’s remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and were not paid by ASADA.

4.3 r elated party disclosures

Related party partnerships: ASADA was an Australian government controlled entity. ASADA’s related parties were its Key Management Personnel (KMP) including the Portfolio Minister, close family members of KMP, other entities controlled by KMP and/or close family members, and other Australian government entities.

t ransactions with related parties: Given the breadth of government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of a Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

ASADA transacted with other Australian government-controlled entities consistent with normal day-to-day business operations provided under normal terms and conditions, including the payment of workers compensation, insurance premiums, purchase of corporate, analytical and legal services. These are not considered individually significant to warrant separate disclosure as related party transactions.

Refer to Note 4.1 Employee provisions for details on superannuation arrangements with the CSS, the PSS, and the PSSap.

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o ther information

4.4 aggregate assets and liabilities

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 1,444 4,979

More than 12 months 17,956 3,639

Total assets 19,400 8,618

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 2,728 2,147

More than 12 months 11,086 1,852

Total liabilities 13,814 3,999

5.1 fair value measurement Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value) less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses.

The following table provides an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The remaining assets and liabilities disclosed in the statement of financial position do not apply the fair value hierarchy.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

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5.1A Fair value measurement

fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

Non-financial assets 1

Buildings 6,037 2,749

Plant and equipment 435 395

1 A reconciliation of movement of non- financial assets measured at fair value is included in Note 2.2A.

Accounting policy

Valuation of buildings - Leasehold improvements, plant and equipment

Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets, however these classes of assets are valued on average every 3 years.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

All assets are assessed for impairment on an annual basis. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the entity were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

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5.2 financial instruments 5.2A Categories of Financial instruments

2020 $’000

2019 $’000

financial assets

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash and cash equivalents 0 707

Trade receivables 794 597

Total financial assets at amortised cost 794 1,304

Total financial assets 794 1,304

financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Supplier payables 990 1,026

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 990 1,026

Total financial liabilities 990 1,026

Accounting policy

Financial assets

Financial assets at amortised cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet 2 criteria:

♦ the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows ♦ the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on expected credit losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

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Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

Anti-Doping Rule v iol Ation pA nel

o verview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

m embers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170

m eetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

o ve Rview

The Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel (ADRVP) was established on 1 January 2010 under section 40 of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006 (ASADA Act).

funC tions

Section 41 of the ASADA Act set out the ADRVP’s functions. Section 13A(1A) authorised ADRVP members to perform functions associated with disclosure notices.

Clauses 4.08, 4.09, 4.09A and 4.10 of the National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme (in Schedule 1 to the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Regulations 2006 (ASADA Regulations)) authorised the ADRVP to consider whether there has been possible anti-doping rule violations by participants, and to make assertions in relation to those participants.

membe Rs

Chair ♦ Professor Andrew McLachlan AM

m embers ♦ Mr Paul Carey ♦ Professor Peter Fricker OAM ♦ Dr Diana Robinson

♦ Ms Venetia Bennett ♦ Mr Stuart Thorn PSM

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ANTi-D OPiNg RULE v iOLATiON PANEL

m eetings The ADRVP held 22 meetings during 2019-20.

Position Name Appointment expires meetings attended

Chair Professor Andrew McLachlan AM 7 December 2020 20

Member Paul Carey 14 July 2020* 21

Member Professor Peter Fricker OAM 7 July 2020* 19

Member Dr Diana Robinson 8 October 2021 18

Member Venetia Bennett 8 October 2021 16

Member Stuart Thorn PSM 14 July 2020* 21

* appointment expiry dates at 30 June 2020.

Resou RCes

The ADRVP was funded from the ASADA appropriation.

ADRVP expenses 2019-20

ADRv P expenses ($) 000’s

Members’ and professional fees 98

Meetings 4

Administration and communication 0

Total 102

171 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

Aust RAliAn s po Rts

DRug m eDiCAl ADviso Ry Committee

o verview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174

functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174

As Dm AC m embers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

As Dm AC Review p anel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

m eetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176

Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

t herapeutic u se e xemption applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

t herapeutic u se e xemption reviews by the

As Dm AC Review p anel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

o ve Rview

The Australian Sports Drug Medical Advisory Committee (ASDMAC) is established under section 51 of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006 (ASADA Act).

ASDMAC members meeting Canberra in November 2019 joined by inaugural ASDMAC members Prof. Ken Fitch (far right) and Dr Peter Harcourt (third from right).

funC tions

Part 3 of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Regulations 2006 (ASADA Regulations) and Part 5 of the National Anti-Doping scheme (Schedule 1 to the ASADA Regulations) sets out ASDMAC’s functions. The Committee performs those functions in accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code, the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions and the ASADA Act.

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As Dm AC membe Rs

Chair ♦ Dr Susan White AM MBBS (Hons), FACSEP AM, Fellow Monash

m embers ♦ Associate Professor Carolyn Broderick MBBS (Hons), FACSEP, PhD ♦ Dr David Humphries MB BS (Hons), FACSEP, FFSEM (UK) ♦ Dr Andrew Potter MBBS, DRCOG, FACSEP, FASMF

♦ Dr Anik Shawdon MBBS, FACSEP, Diploma Sports Medicine (London) ♦ Dr Larissa Trease BMedSci (Hons), MBBS (Hons) FACSEP ♦ Dr Mark Young MBBS, FACSEP, DRCOG

Senator the Hon Richard Colbeck, the Minister for Youth and Sport and Dr Susan White at a ceremony celebrating her 20 years of service to ASDMAC.

15 years of Clean fair sport

175

As Dm AC Review pA nel

The ASDMAC Review Panel, established in 2015 under the revised World Anti-Doping Code, provides a process for athletes to appeal ASDMAC’s decision to reject their Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) application. The panel reviews these TUE decisions in accordance with the criteria set out in the World Anti-Doping Code and the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions.

m embers ♦ Dr Grace Bryant OAM MBBS, Grad Dip Sports Sc, FASMF, FACSEP, FFESM (UK) ♦ Dr Kylie Shaw MBChB, M.Sp.Med., FACSP ♦ Dr Geoffrey Thompson MBBS, FACSEP

m eetings In addition to the 4 face-to-face meetings in the financial year, ASDMAC holds weekly electronic meetings to assess any TUE applications received.

Meetings of ASDMAC members

Position Name Appointment ends meetings attended

Chair Dr Susan White 24 March 2022 4

Member Associate Professor Carolyn Broderick 26 July 2021 4

Member Dr David Humphries 25 October 2020 4

Member Dr Andrew Potter 26 July 2021 4

Member Dr Anik Shawdon 24 March 2022 4

Member Dr Larissa Trease 26 July 2021 4

Member Dr Mark Young 24 March 2022 4

Meetings of ASDMAC Review Panel members

Position Name Appointment ends meetings attended

Member Dr Grace Bryant OAM 30 July 2021 1

Member Dr Kylie Shaw 26 July 2020 1

Member Dr Geoffrey Thompson 24 March 2022 1

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Resou RCes

ASDMAC is funded from ASADA appropriation.

ASDMAC expenses 2019-20

As DmAC expenses ($) 000’s

Members’ and professional fees 205

Meetings and conferences 18

Administration and communication 108

Total 331

t heRApeuti C u se

exemption  Appli CAtions

Therapeutic Use Exemption applications

TUE applications 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

Approved 133 169 145 117

Closed 25 30 26 24

Pending 4 7 6 4

Rejected 3 2 1 3

Approval not required 50 43 33 34

Planned retroactive 44 39 35 43

Total 259 290 246 225

t heRApeuti C u se e xemption R eviews

by the A s Dm AC Review pA nel

TUE reviews

2019-20

ASDMAC decision upheld 0

ASDMAC decision overturned 0

Total TUE appeals 0

177 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

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of Clean fair sport

A: Doping control statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180

b: Disclosure notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181

C: w orkplace health and safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182

D: Advertising and market research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

e: ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

f: legal services expenditure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184

list of abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185

glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187

Appen Dixes,

AbbReviA tions, glossAR y

A: Doping C ont Rol st Atisti Cs

Doping control statistics since 2001-02

year in-comp Out-of-comp Total User-pays govt-funded

No. % No. % No. No. % No. %

2001-02 2,486 36% 4,383 64% 6,869 3,020 44% 3,849 56%

2002-03 1,960 31% 4,303 69% 6,263 2,707 43% 3,556 57%

2003-04 2,443 37% 4,172 63% 6,615 2,819 43% 3,796 57%

2004-05 1,741 28% 4,393 72% 6,134 2,285 37% 3,849 63%

2005-06 2,814 37% 4,771 63% 7,585 3,038^ 40% 4,547^^ 60%

2006-07 2,916 42% 4,037 58% 6,953 2,376^^^ 38% 4,264 62%

2007-08 3,168 48% 3,469 52% 6,637 2,395 36% 4,242 64%

2008-09 3,122 42% 4,376 58% 7,498 3,286 44% 4,212 56%

2009-10 2,591 39% 4,113 61% 6,704 2,876 43% 3,828 57%

2010-11 2,749 39% 4,341 61% 7,090 3,225 45% 3,865 55%

2011-12 2,640 37% 4,556 63% 7,196 3,200 44% 3,996 56%

2012-13 2,421 33% 4,955 67% 7,376 3,209 44% 4,167 56%

2013-14 2,215 34% 4,325 66% 6,540 3,037 47% 3,503 53%

2014-15 1,673 33% 3,468 67% 5,141 2,404 47% 2,737 53%

2015-16 1,965 33% 4,057 67% 6,022 2,969 49% 3,053 51%

2016-17 1,779 31% 3,879 69% 5,658 2,629 46% 3,029 54%

2017-18 1,635 31% 3,570 69% 5,205 2,232 43% 2,973 57%

2018-19 1,780 32% 3,743 68% 5,523 2,648 48% 2,875 52%

2019-20 1,262 29% 3,152 71% 4,414 2,190 49.6% 2,224 50.4%

^ Includes 1,005 user-pays tests conducted at the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games. ^^ Government-funded tests for 2005-06 included 282 tests conducted under a specific Australian

Government-funded testing program in connection with the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games. ^^^ Excludes 313 samples collected during the Melbourne 2007 FINA World Swimming Championships.

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b: Dis Closu Re noti Ces

Description 2019-20 outcome

Number of disclosure notices given in the financial year.

43 Disclosure Notices issued for 17 individuals or entities in 2019-20. Four of these Disclosure Notices were not served and a further 2 were later withdrawn due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

There were also 2 replacement Disclosure Notices issued due to claims of hardship, which have not been counted in the above statistics.

The number of proceedings for contraventions of section 13C of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) Act (failure to comply with disclosure notice) that were commenced or concluded in the financial year

No proceedings commenced or concluded.

The number of proceedings concluded in the financial year in which a person was ordered to pay a civil penalty for contravening section 13C of the ASADA Act

No proceeding concluded.

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C: w o Rkpl ACe heAlth A n D s Afety ASADA was strongly committed to the health, safety and wellbeing of all its staff.

ASADA’s workplace health and safety (WHS) management arrangements, along with a comprehensive suite of WHS policies and guidelines, were accessible to its staff and formed a key component of the employee induction program.

The agency’s WHS Committee met quarterly, ensuring a proactive approach to the health and safety of all staff.

ASADA implemented early intervention strategies to provide staff with the best possible opportunity to recover and effectively participate in the work environment.

The agency provided programs promoting health and wellbeing to ongoing and non-ongoing staff, including influenza vaccinations and access to an employee assistance program.

During 2019-20, the following WHS actions were taken:

♦ Comcare presentation - to Staff on WHS - creating a positive working environment and how it related to them.

♦ ASADA Fatigue Management Policy and hand-washing procedure modification - developed and implemented the ASADA Fatigue Management Policy and modified the hand-washing procedure for athletes who use catheters following feedback received through the Australian Sports Drug Medical Advisory Committee.

♦ Employee Assistance Provider (EAP) - contract renewal for EAP provider was finalised. ♦ Pandemic - a Pandemic Policy was developed, approved by the WHS Committee and implemented.

♦ Air Quality - An Air Quality Policy was developed in response to the ongoing bushfire season. ♦ Influenza vaccinations - were offered to staff via in-house clinic in the Canberra office, or a voucher to take to Priceline Pharmacies across Australia.

♦ Workstation assessments - were performed on all staff moving into the new Canberra office, along with assessments conducted for remote staff working from home.

♦ A defibrillator - was purchased and training organised for a number of Canberra office staff. ♦ Return to work rehabilitation plan - has been implemented for staff on workers compensation, along with Field Staff required to go through return-to-work procedures before returning to work after sickness or injury.

There was one notifiable incident and no investigations conducted during the reporting period under part 10 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. No Provisional Improvement Notices were issued.

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D: ADve Rtising An D

m ARket R ese ARCh Under section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918, ASADA is required to disclose payments for advertising and market research over the reporting threshold of $13,800 (GST inclusive).

In 2019-20, ASADA’s total reportable expenditure for advertising and market research was $27,310 (GST inclusive).

ASADA did not undertake any advertising campaigns, polling or direct mail activities.

e: eCologi CAlly sust Ain Able

Development A n D

envi Ronment Al pe RfoR m AnC e

The following information is supplied in accordance with section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

p rinciples of the legislation The principles of ecologically sustainable development are set out in section 3A of the EPBC Act. ASADA considered these principles in relation to its activities and administration, and took action as appropriate.

The effect of the pandemic changed ASADA’s environmental footprint considerably during the period at which staff were required to work from home. This changed work practice allowed the agency to review its existing environmental impact and consider ways of further improving our footprint.

m easures taken to minimise environmental impact In May 2020, ASADA entered into a new 10 year lease at its existing leased premises in preparation for the accommodation requirements of Sport Integrity Australia. The lease and fit-out approvals were in accordance with commonwealth lease density requirements and incorporate measures designed to minimise ASADA’s environmental impact.

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ASADA continued to minimise its environmental impact through the use of the new office fitout and ICT capability, with much consideration given to how the agency can further support environmental sustainability. Measures included:

♦ reducing paper use through increased electronic document management ♦ the use of energy-efficient fixtures and fittings, using individual sensors, power savers and auto switch-off features

♦ providing access to recycling bins for all staff ♦ turning off computer monitors when they are not in use ♦ adopting a Whole-of-Australian-Government electricity contract that includes the use of renewable energy

♦ reducing the use of printer ink toner cartridges ♦ recycling printer ink toner cartridges ♦ use of internet based conferencing, reducing the need to issue staff with mobile phones or desk phones.

f: legAl se Rvi Ces expen Ditu Re

Legal services expenditure, 2019-20

Type of expenditure $

Disbursements 40,292

Professional fees paid 107,593

External legal services expenditure 185,435

Total (external and internal) expenditure 333,320

Number and value of briefs to counsel, 2019-20

Type of brief Number $

Direct briefs to male junior counsel 3 5,144

Direct briefs to female junior counsel 4 32,406

Total 7 37,550

Professional fees, 2019-20

Legal service provider $

Overseas legal services providers Overseas firms (single total figure, individual firm names not required) 1,523

Domestic legal services providers Australian Government Solicitor 106,070

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list of A bbRevi Ations AAF Adverse Analytical Finding

AAG Athlete Advisory Group

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

ABF Australian Border Force

ABP Athlete Biological Passport

ARL Australian Rugby League

ACIC Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission

ADRV Anti-Doping Rule Violation

ADRVP Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel

AFP Australian Federal Police

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

APMU Athlete Passport Management Unit

APS Australian Public Service

ASADA Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority

ASADA Act Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006

ASADA Regulations Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Regulations 2006

ASC Australian Sports Commission

ASDMAC Australian Sports Drug Medical Advisory Committee

ASDTL Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory

CSS Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme

CEO Chief Executive Officer

DCB Departmental Capital Budgets

DCO Doping Control Officer

DFSNZ Drug Free Sport New Zealand

EAP Employee Assistance Provider

EPO Epogen

FOI Freedom of Information

GST Goods and Services Tax

HGH Human Growth Hormone

IADA International Anti-Doping Arrangement

ICT Information and Communications Technology

IDI Inclusion and Development Initiative

iNADO Institute of National Anti-Doping Organisations

INTERPOL The International Criminal Police Organisation

IPS Information Publication Scheme

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ISTI International Standard for Testing and Investigations

KADA Korea Anti-Doping Agency

KMP Key Management Personnel

MOU Memorandum of Understanding

N/A Not applicable

NAC Nirrumbuk Aboriginal Corporation

NAD National Anti-Doping

NADA Austria National Anti-Doping Agency Austria

NADO National Anti-Doping Organisation

NCIS Naval Criminal Investigative Service

NES Nirrumbuk Employment Services

NISU National Integrity of Sport Unit (Department of Health)

NRL National Rugby League

NSO National Sporting Organisation

NST National Sports Tribunal

ORADO Oceania Regional Anti-Doping Organisation

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PGPA Rule Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

PIEDS Performance and image enhancing drugs

PSS Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

PSSap PSS accumulation plan

PTSD Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

RADO Regional Anti-Doping Organisation

ROU Right-of-Use

RTP Registered Testing Pool

SARM Selective androgen receptor modulators

SAR Scientific Analysis Report

SES Senior Executive Service

SLADA Sri Lanka Anti-Doping Agency

TUE Therapeutic Use Exemption

UC University of Canberra

UNESCO The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation

US United States

USADA United States Anti-Doping Agency

WADA World Anti-Doping Agency

WCC Workplace Consultative Committee

WHS Workplace health and safety

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glossAR y

ADAms The Anti-Doping Administration and Management System - a web-based database management tool for data entry, storage, sharing and reporting, designed to assist stakeholders and World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in their anti-doping operations.

Adverse Analytical f inding A report from a WADA-accredited or other WADA-approved laboratory that, consistent with the International Standard for Laboratories and related technical documents, identifies in a sample the presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers (including elevated quantities of endogenous substances) or evidence of the use of a prohibited method.

Aps employee

A person engaged under section 22 of the Public Service Act 1999 or a person who is engaged as an Australian Public Service (APS) employee under section 72 of the same Act.

Anti-doping organisation A signatory is responsible for adopting rules for initiating, implementing or enforcing any part of the doping control process. This includes the International Olympic Committee, the International Paralympic Committee, other major event organisations that conduct testing at their events, WADA, International Federations, and national anti-doping organisations.

Athlete For the purposes of doping control - a person participating in sport at international level or national level or at a lower level if designated by a national anti-doping organisation. For the purposes of anti-doping information and education - a person participating in sport under the authority of any organisation that has signed or accepts the World Anti-Doping Code.

Athlete b iological p assport An electronic record of an athlete’s biological values that is developed over time from multiple collections of blood or urine samples.

Athlete support person Any coach, trainer, manager, agent, team staff member, official, medical staff member, paramedic, parent or any other person working with, treating or assisting an athlete participating in or preparing for sports competition.

Assertion A finding by the Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel that it is satisfied that there has been a possible anti-doping rule violation by an athlete or athlete support person.

Atypical finding A report from a WADA-accredited or other WADA-approved laboratory that requires further investigation as provided by the International Standard for Laboratories or related technical documents before the determination of an Adverse Analytical Finding.

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Contaminated product A product that contains a prohibited substance that is not disclosed on the product label or in information available through a reasonable internet search.

Corporate governance The process by which entities are directed and controlled. It is generally understood to encompass authority, accountability, stewardship, leadership, direction and control.

Doping control All steps and processes from test distribution planning through to the conclusion of any appeal, including all steps and processes in between, such as provision of whereabouts information, sample collection and handling, laboratory analysis, Therapeutic Use Exemptions, results management and hearings.

financial results The results shown in the financial statements of an entity.

grant Commonwealth financial assistance covered by the Commonwealth Grants Rules and Guidelines.

in-competition The period from 12 hours before a competition in which an athlete is scheduled to participate through to the end of that competition and the related sample collection process (unless provided otherwise in the rules of an international federation or the ruling body of the event in question).

An international federation or ruling body for an event may establish an in-competition period that is different from the normal time frame.

international-level athlete An athlete who competes in sport at the international level, as defined by each international federation, consistent with the International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

international s tandards

Six standards adopted by WADA in support of the World Anti-Doping Code: the Prohibited List, the International Standard for Testing and Investigations, the International Standard for Laboratories, the International Standard for Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs), the International Standard for the Protection of Privacy and Personal Information, and the International Standard for Code Compliance by Signatories.

materiality Takes into account the planned outcome and the relative significance of the resources consumed in contributing to the achievement of that outcome.

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APPENDix Es, AbbRE vi ATiONs, gLO ss ARy

n ational Anti-Doping o rganisation The entity (or entities) designated by each

country as possessing the primary authority and responsibility to adopt and implement anti-doping rules and direct the collection of samples, the management of test results, and the conduct of hearings.

n ational-level athlete An athlete who competes in sport at the national level, as defined by each national anti-doping organisation, consistent with the International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

n o-advance notice test A doping control test that takes place with no previous warning to the athlete. The athlete is continuously chaperoned from the moment of notification through to sample provision.

n on-analytical positive Proof of an anti-doping rule violation other than the presence of a prohibited substance, or its metabolites or markers, in an athlete’s sample.

n on-ongoing A ps employee

A person engaged as an APS employee under subsection 22(2)(b) or 22(2)(c) of the Public Service Act 1999.

ongoing A ps employee

A person engaged as an ongoing APS employee under subsection 22(2)(a) of the Public Service Act 1999.

out-of-competition Any time other than the in-competition period.

o perations Functions, services and processes performed in pursuing the objectives or discharging the functions of an entity.

outcomes The results, impacts or consequences of actions by the Commonwealth on the Australian community. These should be consistent with those listed in the entity’s Portfolio Budget Statements and Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements.

p erformance information Evidence about performance that is collected and used systematically and may relate to appropriateness, effectiveness and efficiency and the extent to which an outcome can be attributed to an intervention. Performance information may be quantitative (numerical) or qualitative (descriptive) and it should be verifiable.

programs An activity or group of activities that deliver benefits, services or transfer payments to individuals, industry/business or the community as a whole and are the primary vehicles for Commonwealth entities to achieve the intended results of their outcome statements.

p rohibited l ist WADA’s list of the substances and methods prohibited in sport.

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p rohibited method Any method on the Prohibited List.

p rohibited substance Any substance or class of substances on the Prohibited List.

p urchaser-provider arrangements Arrangements under which the services of one entity are purchased by another entity to contribute to outcomes. These arrangements can occur between Commonwealth entities or between Commonwealth entities and state/territory governments or private sector bodies.

Registered t esting p ool

The group of highest priority athletes established separately at the international level by international federations and at the national level by national anti-doping organisations. Athletes in the pool are subject to focused in-competition and out-of-competition testing as part of the international federation or national anti-doping organisation’s test distribution plan and must, therefore, provide whereabouts information.

s ample collection The process of collecting a sample, including notifying the athlete, taking the sample, securing the sample and finalising the paperwork.

s ample/specimen Any biological material collected for the purposes of doping control.

s ervice charters It is Australian Government policy that entities that provide services directly to the public have service charters in place. A service charter is a public statement which outlines the service an entity will provide and details what customers can expect from the entity. In particular, the service charter advises what the entity does, how to contact and communicate with the entity, the standard of service that customers can expect, customers’ basic rights and responsibilities, and how to provide feedback or make a complaint.

s trict liability The World Anti-Doping Code rule that it is not necessary for the anti-doping organisation to establish intent, fault, negligence or knowing use on the athlete’s part in order to establish an anti-doping rule violation.

t arget testing Selection of specific athletes for testing based on criteria in the International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

t est distribution plan A document written by an anti-doping organisation that plans testing on athletes over whom it has testing authority, in accordance with the requirements of Article 4 of the International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

t esting The parts of the doping control process involving test distribution planning, sample collection, sample handling and sample transport to the laboratory.

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APPENDix Es, AbbRE vi ATiONs, gLO ss ARy

t herapeutic u se e xemption

An exemption for the medical use of a Prohibited Substance or Method granted by a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) Committee when specific criteria are met.

tue Checker A tool/questionnaire to guide athletes and support people through the process of assessing whether an athlete requires a TUE and whether that TUE should be applied for in-advance or retroactively.

unes Co international

Convention against Doping in s port

An international legal instrument enabling governments to align domestic policy with the World Anti-Doping Code.

user-pays testing An arrangement where sports, state governments and international federations engage the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) for a fee to carry out anti-doping testing on their athletes.

v iolations list A list kept by the ASADA CEO of individual doping violation cases. It includes details about the person and the nature and consequences of the violation.

w hereabouts Location details from athletes who are part of a Registered Testing Pool (RTP) and are, therefore, required to let their anti-doping organisation know where they will be at specific times so they can be tested with no-advance notice. Australian RTP athletes provide their whereabouts information on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s Administration and Management System.

w orld Anti-Doping Code The document that harmonises regulations regarding anti-doping in sport across all sports and all countries. It provides a framework for anti-doping policies, rules and regulations for sport organisations and public authorities.

w orld Anti-Doping p rohibited

list ( w ADA p rohibited l ist)

The World Anti-Doping Agency’s list of prohibited substances and methods.

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AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AustrAliAn sports Anti-doping Authority

2008:09 AnnuAl RepoRt

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity

Celebrating 15 yeARs of Clean fair sport

AnnuAl RepoRt

AustRAliAn spoRts Anti-Doping AuthoRity 15 yeARs

of Clean fair sport

list of Requirements - non-corporate Commonwealth entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194

index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200

in Dexes

list of Requi Rements

- non- CoR poRA te

Commonwe Alth entities

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI Letter of transmittal A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) N/A Table of contents. Mandatory

17AJ(b) Indexes Alphabetical index. Mandatory

17AJ(c) Appendixes, Abbreviations, Glossary

Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory

17AJ(d) List of Requirements - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

List of requirements. Mandatory

17AJ(e) About this report Details of contact officer. Mandatory

17AJ(f) About this report Entity’s website address. Mandatory

17AJ(g) About this report Electronic address of report. Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) CEO Message A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) Overview A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) Our structure A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) Our outcome and program A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) Our Purpose A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) Management Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) Management Position of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority.

Mandatory

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) Management Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) Portfolio and Minister An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio departments - mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F Statement by the CEO Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on f inancial Performance

17AF(1)(a) Financial and Property management A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) Financial Performance A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity.

Mandatory

17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial results

during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory.

17AD(d) management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) Letter of Transmittal Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) Letter of Transmittal A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

Mandatory

194 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

iNDEx Es

list of Requi Rements

- non- CoR poRA te

Commonwe Alth entities

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI Letter of transmittal A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) N/A Table of contents. Mandatory

17AJ(b) Indexes Alphabetical index. Mandatory

17AJ(c) Appendixes, Abbreviations, Glossary

Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory

17AJ(d) List of Requirements - non-corporate Commonwealth entities

List of requirements. Mandatory

17AJ(e) About this report Details of contact officer. Mandatory

17AJ(f) About this report Entity’s website address. Mandatory

17AJ(g) About this report Electronic address of report. Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) CEO Message A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) Overview A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) Our structure A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) Our outcome and program A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) Our Purpose A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) Management Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) Management Position of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority.

Mandatory

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) Management Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) Portfolio and Minister An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio departments - mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F Statement by the CEO Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on f inancial Performance

17AF(1)(a) Financial and Property management A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) Financial Performance A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity.

Mandatory

17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial results

during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory.

17AD(d) management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) Letter of Transmittal Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) Letter of Transmittal A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

Mandatory

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17AG(2)(b)(ii) Letter of Transmittal A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) Letter of Transmittal A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) Corporate Governance practices An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(d)-(e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) Audit Committee A direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) Audit Committee The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) Audit Committee The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(d) Audit Committee Information about the attendance of each member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) Audit Committee The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) External Scrutiny Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny.

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period.

If applicable, Mandatory

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) People An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) Workforce composition Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender; (d) statistics on staff location.

Mandatory

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(b) Workforce composition Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following:

(a) statistics on staffing classification level; (b) statistics on full-time employees; (c) statistics on part-time employees; (d) statistics on gender; (e) statistics on staff location; (f) statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) Enterprise Agreement Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) Workforce composition Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) Workforce composition The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) Performance Pay A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, Mandatory

Assets Management

17AG(5) Asset Management An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities.

If applicable, Mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) Purchasing An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Mandatory

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) Consultants A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

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17AG(2)(b)(ii) Letter of Transmittal A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) Letter of Transmittal A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) Corporate Governance practices An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(d)-(e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) Audit Committee A direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) Audit Committee The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) Audit Committee The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(d) Audit Committee Information about the attendance of each member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) Audit Committee The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) External Scrutiny Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny.

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period.

If applicable, Mandatory

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) People An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) Workforce composition Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees; (b) statistics on part-time employees; (c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location.

Mandatory

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(b) Workforce composition Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following:

(a) statistics on staffing classification level; (b) statistics on full-time employees; (c) statistics on part-time employees; (d) statistics on gender; (e) statistics on staff location; (f) statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) Enterprise Agreement Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) Workforce composition Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) Workforce composition The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) Performance Pay A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, Mandatory

Assets Management

17AG(5) Asset Management An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities.

If applicable, Mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) Purchasing An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

Mandatory

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) Consultants A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

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PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(7)(b) Consultants A statement that

“During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) Consultants A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) Consultants A statement that

“Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than

$100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, Mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer

with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) Purchasing A statement that

“[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) Purchasing An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises.

Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

Financial Statements

17AD(e) Statement of financial position current report period (2019-20)

Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act.

Mandatory

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) Executive remuneration

Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(f) Other m andatory i nformation

17AH(1)(a)(i) N/A If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) N/A If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that

“Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(c) National Disability Strategy Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) External Scrutiny Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable,

Mandatory

17AH(2) External Scrutiny Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

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PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(7)(b) Consultants A statement that

“During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) Consultants A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) Consultants A statement that

“Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than

$100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, Mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer

with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) Purchasing A statement that

“[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) Purchasing An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises.

Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

PgPA Rule Reference Part of Report Description Requirement

Financial Statements

17AD(e) Statement of financial position current report period (2019-20)

Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act.

Mandatory

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) Executive remuneration

Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(f) Other m andatory i nformation

17AH(1)(a)(i) N/A If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) N/A If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that

“Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(c) National Disability Strategy Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) External Scrutiny Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable,

Mandatory

17AH(2) External Scrutiny Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

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in Dex 2019 Public Sector Innovation Award for Citizen Centred Innovation  90

2019 Samoa Pacific Games  37

2019 Stakeholder Survey  49

20/20 Vision  32, 70-5

2020 (2021) Olympic Games  73, 76, 77, 89

2020 Stakeholder Survey  38, 49-50

A abbreviations list  185-6

accountable authority

statement of preparation  26

accounting standards  146-9

adoption of new Australian accounting standard requirements  146

Administrative Appeals Tribunal  110

Administrative Tribunal decisions  110-11

Adverse Analytical Findings (AAF)  56, 57

advertising  183

Anderson, Professor Jack  73

annual report  27

anti-doping  7-8, 9

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Enhancing Australia’s Anti-Doping Capability) Bill 2019  8-9

survey results  47

testing program and COVID-19  52-3

Anti-Doping Denmark (ADD)  36, 79

Anti-Doping Rule Violation Panel (ADRVP)  10, 19, 30, 61-2, 110, 170-1

assertions  62

Disclosure Notices  59

findings  60, 61

functions  170

meetings  171

members  170

resources  171

Anti-Doping Rule Violation process  60-4

show cause notices  60-1

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Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs)  23, 58, 62

counselling service  62

non-analytical  57

public disclosures  63-4

anti-doping testing program and COVID-19  52-3

Antoniou, Armina  74

Archer, Luke  90

ASADA Act

operation under  14

ASADA Athlete Advisory Group see Athlete Advisory Group (AAG)

ASADA Corporate Plan 2019-2020  26, 28

ASADA Investigation Manual  58

ASADA Regulations

operation under  14

Asia, delivery of programs to  36

asset management  127

Athlete Advisory Group (AAG)  9, 32, 69

athletes’ voice  32, 69

establishment  32, 69

meetings  69

members  32, 69

purpose  32, 69

Athlete Biological Passport (ABP)  52, 80

Athlete Passport Management Unit (APMU)  77, 80-1

athletes, engagement with  15, 32

athletes’ voice  32, 69

athletics

ADRV public disclosures  64

audit arrangements

Audit Committee  104-6

Australian National Audit Office access clauses  129

independent auditor’s report  134-5

internal audit arrangements  108-9

risk management  108-9

Audit Committee  104-6

functions  105

members  104

work  105

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augmented reality Health Effects of Doping app  89, 92-3

Australian Border Force (ABF)

engagement with  16, 50

Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER)

conferences  44

Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC)

engagement with  50

Australian Federal Police (AFP)

engagement with  16, 50

Major Event Security workshop  74

Australian Government agencies

anti-doping framework, role in  21

cooperation with  18

Australian Government Investigation Standards (AGIS)  58

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)

engagement with  16, 50

Australian Information Commissioner reviews  111

Australian Rules Football

ADRV public disclosures  63, 64

ADRVP assertions  62

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act 2006 (ASADA Act)  174

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Enhancing Australia’s Anti-Doping Capability) Bill 2019  8-9

Australian Sports Commission

anti-doping framework, role in  19

cooperation with  18

Australian Sports Drug Agency

ASADA, replacement by  14

original oversight by  14

Australian Sports Drug Medical Advisory Committee (ASDMAC)  19, 174-7

functions  174

meetings  176

members  175

resources  177

Review Panel  176

Australian Sports Drug Testing Laboratory (ASDTL)  21, 80-1

Australian Wallabies  17

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Austria

engagement with  78

Memorandum of Understanding  78, 80

National Anti-Doping Agency Austria (NADA Austria)  36, 78

awards  90

awareness see education and awareness

b baseball

ADRV public disclosures  63

Bennett, Venetia  170

Bishop, Simon  74

BMX

ADRVP assertions  62

Bond, Chris

AAG member  69

Broderick, Associate Professor Carolyn  175

Bryant, Dr Grace  176

budget variances commentary  138

bulletins  50

Butler, Chris  103

C capability reform  34

Carey, Paul  170

Carroll, Matt  73

cash flow statement  143-4

budget variances commentary  144

Castillo, Edwin  81

Cepic, Michael  78, 80

Chaperones  34, 75

conferences  76

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

Disclosure Notice, issue of  59

message  7-11

statement  26-7, 136

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

statement  136

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China Anti-Doping Agency (CHINADA)  36

International Anti-Doping Symposium  79

Clancy, Sian  94

Clark, Jennifer  104, 105

clean, fair sport  14, 95-6

Clean Sport 101  44, 45, 89, 93-4

Clean Sport app  8, 33, 44, 55, 86, 87, 90, 91

Clean Sport Educators  40, 42, 87

Colbeck, Honourable Richard  23, 32, 70, 71, 175

collaboration  31-2

Collins, Andrew  103

Commonwealth Auditor-General reports  111

Commonwealth disability strategy  126

Commonwealth Ombudsman reports  111

compliance  68

reporting  110

Compliance Standards  47

comprehensive income statement  137-8

budget variances commentary  138

consultants  128-9

expenditure on  129

Cooper, Alexis  90

ASADA Director Education and Innovation (A/g)  17, 93, 94, 103

Copenhagen Declaration on Anti-Doping in Sport  22

World Anti-Doping Code, implementation of  22

corporate governance  102-10

consistency and compliance  102

governance committees  104-8

management environment  102

management structure  102

monitoring and reporting  102

practices  102

corporate plan  27

corporate planning and reporting  103

Council of Europe Anti-Doping Convention (1989)

arrangement with  22

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Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS)  62

findings  62

COVID-19  34, 37, 40, 44, 85, 89, 97, 123

anti-doping testing program and  52-3

Disclosure Notices  59

field staff  75, 76

Crawford, Justine

Director Intelligence  16, 103

cycling

ADRV public disclosures  64

ADRVP assertions  62

D Davern, Scott  94

Davidson Trahaire Corpsych

counselling service  62

Denmark

Anti-Doping Denmark (ADD)  36, 79

Department of Health

operating within  23

digital business strategy  34

Disclosure Notices  59, 181

CEO, issue by  59

number issued  59

requirements  59

dogs

Integra partnership  116-18

Doping Control Officers (DCOs)  34

accreditation  75

doping control statistics  180

doping investigations  58-9

Drug Free Sport New Zealand

Education Manager  94

Education Program Development Coordinator  94

joint Athlete Passport Management Unit (APMU)  77

partnership with  28, 33-4, 36-7, 77, 79, 80, 89, 93

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e ecologically sustainable development  183-4

education and awareness  8, 15, 17, 32-3, 38-45, 86-99

awards  90

‘clean, fair sport’ promotion  95-6

Clean Sport Educators  87

innovative education  89-90

intelligence-informed education  43

online presence  33, 40

overview  86-8

Parents’ Course to Clean Sport  90

performance target  28-30, 38, 40, 41, 42

professional development programs  44

results  38-45

sport integrity in schools  44

statistics  86-8

workforce planning  124-5

eLearning  40

LearnX Silver Award for Best eLearning Project - eLearning on a Budget  90

employment arrangements  126, 161-2

enterprise agreement  126

performance pay  126

Public Service Act 1999 s 24(1) determinations  126

engagement and partnerships  15, 31, 35, 36-7, 46-7, 49-50, 68-81

Athlete Advisory Group  69

field staff  75-6

global anti-doping capabilities  80

international engagement  36-7, 77-81

Leadership in Sport conference  70-5

online courses  45

overview  68

results  35-7, 46-7, 49-50

science, partners in  80-1

University of Canberra, partnership with  70

workforce planning  124-5

Entity Resource Statement  131

environmental performance  183-4

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equity change statement  141-2

accounting policy  142

budget variances commentary  142

equity injections  142

Esposito, Chloe

AAG member  69

ethical standards  109

Europol  50

Executive  103

remuneration  130

external scrutiny  110-11

decisions and reports  110-11

parliamentary scrutiny  110

f face-to-face education  55

Fanning, Katrina

AAG member  69

Field Operations Model  34

field staff

accreditation  75

achievements  76

Chaperones  34, 75, 76

COVID-19  75, 76

DCOs see Doping Control Officers (DCOs)

importance  75

National Training Coordinator  75, 76

role  75

State Managers  75, 76

structure enhancement  75

Fien, Cassie

AAG member  69

financial and property management  127-31

independent auditor’s report  134-5

financial position  154-60

financial position statement  139-40

budget variances commentary  140

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financial statements  133-67

accounting standards, new  146-9

aggregate assets and liabilities  164

ASADA objectives  144-5

basis of preparation  145

cash flow statement  143-4

CEO and CFO’s statement  136

comprehensive income statement  137-8

equity change statement  141-2

fair value measurement  164-5

financial instruments  166-7

financial performance  150-1

financial position  154-60

financial position statement  139-40

funding  160-1

independent auditor’s report  134-5

own-source revenue and gains  152-3

people and relationships  161-3

football

ADRV public disclosures  62, 63

ADRVP assertions  62

forums  37

Fraillon, Danielle  72

Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Cth) (FOI Act)  111, 129

freedom of information (FOI) requests  111

Fricker, Professor Peter  170

g Gallagher, Michael  99

AAG member  69

global anti-doping capabilities

strengthening  80

global policies and practices  23

glossary  187-91

Gordon, Strath  125

grants  129

208 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

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h Hanson, Tammy  94

health and physical education teachers

professional development programs  44

health effects  43-4

Health Effects of Doping app  89, 92-3

Heighington, Chris  90

Herzog, Kurt  97

high-risk sports

face-to-face education sessions  55

history  14

Hughes, Dr David  97, 113

Humphries, Dr David  175

i Inclusion and Development Initiative (IDI)  112-13

independent auditor’s report  134-5

India National Anti Doping Agency (NADA)

partnership with  36, 79

Information Governance Committee  107-8

innovation and technology  17

innovative education  89-90

Institute of National Anti-Doping Organisations (iNADO)

CEO Forum  37

IT Security Discussion Group  77

NADOs capability register  77

Integra partnership  116-18

intelligence capability  15, 16, 48, 51-65, 82-5

anti-doping tests, number of  85

bulletins  50

enforcement  84

face-to-face education  55

intelligence-informed referrals  56

intelligence-informed sport risk assessments  85

intelligence sharing  50

investigation standards  58

209 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

investigations  84

overview  82-4

performance target  48

results  48, 51-65

science  83

scientific expertise  57

sport risk assessments  85

target athlete monitoring  54, 55

testing  82

intelligence-informed education  43

intelligence-led anti-doping program

investment in intelligence leads  29

operational activities on high-risk athletes  29

referrals  29

intelligence reports  50

intelligence sharing  50

internal audits  108

Protiviti  105, 108

International Anti-Doping Arrangement (IADA)

arrangement with  22

October meeting  37

International Criminal Police Organisation (INTERPOL)  50

anti-doping working group  77

Project Energia  77

international engagement  35-7, 77-81

international forums  37

international requirements  22

International Standards for anti-doping  23

International Women’s Day  113

investigation standards

compliance  30

J Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA)  36

International Anti-Doping Seminar in Asia and Oceania  37

Jawun secondment  114-16

Jeffrey, Darrell  103

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Johnson, Emma

Deputy CEO Legal, Education and Corporate (A/g)  16, 103

Johnston, David  103

k Kalthofen, Cheryl  90

Senior Education Officer  93

Kennedy, Peter  104, 106

Kensey, Luke  90

Knox, Bronwen  89

Korea Anti-Doping Agency (KADA)  36

partnership with  36, 79, 81

l Lawler, David  104, 106

Leadership in Sport conference  15, 16, 32, 70-5

20/20 Vision  32, 70-5

Anderson, Jack  73

Antoniou, Armina  74

Bishop, Simon  74

Carroll, Matt  73

Fraillon, Danielle  72

keynote speakers  71, 72, 73

Major Event Security workshop  74

McLean, Ray  72

Moffat, Leilani  73

panel  72

Power Meri  75

Quinn, Brianna  73

Robson, Ian  72

Russell, Leigh  72

Sheehy, Benedict  73

sports integrity  71

Traver, Andrew  71

workshops  74

LearnX Silver Award for Best eLearning Project

eLearning on a Budget  90

legal services expenditure  184

211 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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letter of transmittal  1

Lilley, Carol  104, 105

m management  103

environment  102

key management personnel remuneration  163

structure  102

management and accountability  101-31

corporate governance  102-10

external scrutiny  110-11

financial and property management  127-31

people  112-26

staff  112-26

market research  183

McLachlan, Professor Andrew  170

McLean, Ray  72

McVie, Dion  103, 115

Minister for Youth and Sport

accountable to  23

Moffat, Leilani  73

motor sport/motorcycling

ADRV public disclosure  64

ADRVP assertions  62

mountain bike riding

ADRV public disclosures  64

Mullaly, Darren  103, 118

multilateral arrangements  22

n National Anti-Doping Agency Austria (NADA Austria)  36, 78

Memorandum of Understanding  78, 80

National Anti-Doping Framework

purpose  18

National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs)  31

ASADA  7, 8

capability register  77

development  77

212 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

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National Anti-Doping (NAD) scheme

operation under  14

National Disability Strategy 2010-2020  126

National Integrity of Sport Unit (NISU)

anti-doping framework, role in  19

partnership with  18

National Sporting Organisations (NSO)

anti-doping framework, role in  19, 20

compliance  68

cooperation with  18

knowledge gaps  47

New Zealand

Drug Free Sport New Zealand (DFSNZ)  28, 33-4, 36-7, 77, 79, 81, 89, 93, 94

partnership with  28, 36-7, 77, 79

non-corporate Commonwealth entities

requirements list  192-7

o objectives  144-5

Oceania Regional Anti-Doping Organisation (ORADO)  36, 77

Board Meeting  37

joint Athlete Passport Management Unit (APMU)  77

‘On Side’  97

online presence  33

Operating Framework  47

organisational profile  31-3

organisational structure  18

outcomes  15

p Paralympic Games  10, 77, 89

Parents’ Course to Clean Sport  90

Parliamentary Committee reports  111

parliamentary scrutiny  110

partnerships see engagement and partnerships

people see staff

performance and image enhancing drugs (PIED)  31, 50

performance measures  35, 38, 39, 41, 46, 48, 49, 51, 54, 56, 60, 65

analysis  35-7, 38, 39-40, 42-5, 46-7, 48, 49-50, 51-3, 54, 55, 56-7, 60-4, 65

213 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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performance overview  28-30

analysis  30-4

personnel see staff

podcast  97

portfolio  23

portfolio budget statements  27

Potter, Dr Andrew  175

powerlifting

ADRV public disclosures  63

ADRVP assertions  62

para  62

professional associations

anti-doping framework, role in  21

cooperation with  18

programs  15

Protiviti  105, 108

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act)  14, 26, 104, 110

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule)  104, 110

public profile  31

Public Sector Innovation Awards  90

Public Service Act 1999  14

purchasing  127-9

Australian National Audit Office access clauses  129

consultants  128-9

exempt contracts  129

procurement  127-8

small business support initiatives  128

purpose  14, 26

q Quinn, Brianna  73

Quirk, Alicia

AAG member  69

R recognition  90

recruitment of key specialists  34

Regional Anti-Doping Organisations (RADO)  36, 77

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related party disclosures  163

reporting alignment  27

resource-sharing arrangements  34

Review of Australia’s Sports Integrity Arrangements (Wood Review)  31

risk management  108-9

financial risks  109

operational risk  109

Risk Management Committee  107

Robinson, Dr Diana  170

Robson, Ian  72

rowing

ADRV public disclosures  63

rugby league

ADRV public disclosures  64

ADRVP assertions  62

rugby union

ADRV public disclosures  63

ADRVP assertions  62

Russell, Leigh  72

s science partnerships  80-1

Scientific Analysis Reports (SAR)  51

scientific expertise  57

secondments  34

Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs  110

senior leaders  103

Senior Leadership Group  103

Sharpe, David  7-11, 26, 78, 80, 98, 103, 104

Shaw, Dr Kylie  176

Shawdon, Dr Anik  175

Sheehy, Benedict  73

show cause notices  60-1

small business initiatives  128

soccer

ADRV public disclosures  64

social media posts  33, 86, 95, 96

215 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

softball  62

South Korea

engagement with  79

Speers, Dr Naomi  103

Sport Australia

partnership with  19

Sport Engagement Operating Framework and Compliance Standards  47

Sport Integrity Australia  9, 10, 31

ASADA’s transition to  9, 10, 26

Leadership in Sport conference  71

sport integrity in schools  44

‘Sport Integrity Matters’  50

sport risk assessments  85

sporting bodies

engagement with  31

Sports Diplomacy 2030  77

Sri Lanka

partnership with  79

Sri Lanka Anti-Doping Agency (SLADA)  36, 79

staff  112-26

Chaperones see Chaperones

DCOs see Doping Control Officers (DCO)

employment arrangements  126, 161-2

field staff see field staff

Inclusion and Development Initiative (IDI)  112-13

Integra partnership  116-18

Jawun secondment  114-16

learning and development  125

performance pay  126

salary ranges  122

wellness sessions  119

workforce composition  120-4

workforce planning  124-5

state and territory governments

anti-doping framework, role in  20

cooperation with  18

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state sporting organisations

anti-doping framework, role in  21

cooperation with  18

strategic priorities  15-17

structure  18

student placements  70

supplements  44, 91

swimming

ADRVP assertions  62

Symonds, Tom

AAG member  69

t Tagataese, Sam  90

Target Athlete Monitoring (TAM)  54, 55

technology

digital business strategy  34

investment in  34

Test Distribution Plan (TDP)  55

testing, selection for  57

Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA)  21, 50

Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE)  40, 44, 57

applications  177

ASDMAC Review Panel reviews  177

Checker  33, 91

Thomas, Petria  97, 99

AAG member  9, 69

Thompson, Bronwyn

AAG member  69

Thompson, Dr Geoffrey  176

Thorn, Stuart  170

Traver, Andrew  71

Trease, Dr Larissa  175

triathlon

ADRV public disclosure  63, 64

tribunal findings  65

Tygart, Travis  97, 98, 99

Tyler, Rebecca  103

217 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

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u UNESCO International Convention against Doping in Sport 2005  20, 22

arrangement with  22

ratification  22

United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA)  36, 89, 93

Elite Education Manager  94

engagement with  79

Science Symposium  37, 79

University of Canberra

formal partnership with  70

student placement  70

v virtual reality doping control experience  33, 90

virtual reality education program  8

vision  14

w weightlifting  62

ADRV public disclosures  63

ADRVP assertions  63

Weiss, Regina  103, 117

wellness sessions  119

wheelchair basketball  8

Whereabouts course  45

White, Dr Susan  97, 175

Women in Sport Summit  113

Wood Review  31, 71

Work Health and Safety Act 2011  182

workforce capability  34

workforce planning  124-5

learning and development  125

Workplace Consultative Committee  107

Workplace Health and Safety  126, 182

Workplace Health and Safety Committee  106

218 AUs TRALiAN sPORT s A NTi-D OPiNg AUThORiTy

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World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)

Executive Committee Meeting  37

Foundation Board Meeting  37

Global Education Conference  37

International Standard for Testing and Investigations (ISTI)  58

model rules, development of  23

partnership with  14, 15

World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Symposium  28

World Anti-Doping Code

anti-doping rule violations  23, 58

awareness  28

implementation  7, 22, 37

revised  36, 37

y Young, Dr Mark  175

219 ANNUAL REPORT 19:20

15 years of Clean fair sport

As ADA.gov. Au