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Australian Institute of Family Studies—Report for 2018-19


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ANNUAL REPORT 2018/19

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Visit the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) website at aifs.gov.au to explore our work, publications and events, and to discover our research agenda in more detail.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Annual Report 2018/19

Discovering what works for families

Visit us online aifs.gov.au

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Annual report 2018/19

Australian Institute of Family Studies

Contact officer for Annual Report: Deputy Director (Corporate Services) Australian Institute of Family Studies Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006 Australia

Telephone (0 3) 9214 7888 Facsimile (0 3) 9214 7839 Website aifs.gov.au

Annual reports are available at: aifs.gov.au/annual-reports

© Commonwealth of Australia 2019

With the exception of AIFS branding, the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, content provided by third parties, and any material protected by a trademark, all textual material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (CC BY 4.0). You may copy, distribute and build upon this work for commercial and non-commercial purposes; however, you must attribute the Commonwealth of Australia as the copyright holder of the work. Content that is copyrighted by a third party is subject to the licensing arrangements of the original owner.

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Level 4 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006 Australia

Telephone ( 03) 9214 7888 Facsimile ( 03) 9214 7839 Website aifs.gov.au ABN 6 4 001 053 079

09 September 2019 Senator The Hon Anne Ruston MP Minister for Families and Social Services Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

It is with pleasure that I present to you the thirty-ninth Annual Report of the Australian Institute of Family Studies, for presentation to Parliament in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

This report has been prepared pursuant to the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit.

The report relates to the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019.

Ms Anne Hollonds Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies

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Who we are and what we do

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) is a statutory agency of the Australian Government that conducts, facilitates and communicates research about issues affecting families in Australia.

We aim to increase understanding of factors affecting Australian families by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report iv

Contents One - Director’s review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Research highlights 2018/19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Communicating our research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Governance, performance and risk management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Outlook for 2019/20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Two - Agency overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Role and functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

Organisational structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Outcome and program structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Three - Report on performance . . . . . . . . . 13

Performance statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Research domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Performance criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Analysis of performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Performance against AIFS research directions . 27

Research highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Report on performance - Financial activities . . .34

Balance sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

Four - Management and accountability . 37

Corporate governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

Senior executive members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Senior management groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39

Corporate and statutory reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Risk management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41

Ethical standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

External scrutiny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43

Management of human resources . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Assets management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Commissioning bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Australian National Audit Office access clauses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

Exempt contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

Procurement initiatives to support small business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

Five - Financial statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Six - Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

Appendix A: Other mandatory information . . . .88

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90

Appendix C: AIFS publications, events, webinars, presentations and submissions 2018/19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92

Appendix D: Acronyms and abbreviations . . . . .101

Appendix E: List of requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

Seven - Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

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List of tables

Table 3.1: Performance criteria: Actuals (2017/18 to 2018/19) and forward estimate (2019/20) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Table 3.2: Pillar 1: Create Knowledge, 2018/19 actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

Table 3.3: Pillar 2: Communicate for impact, 2018/19 actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Table 3.4: Pillar 3: Collaborate and connect, 2018/19 actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Table 3.5: Pillar 4: Activate organisational sustainability, 2018/19 actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Table 3.6: AIFS research projects 2018/19 and relevance to research areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Table 3.7: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2018/19, and budgeted expenses, 2019/20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Table 4.1: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Table 4.2: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2018 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46

Table 4.3: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff, by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Table 4.5: Remuneration of key management personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

Table 4.6: Expenditure on consultancy contracts over 2016/17 to 2018/19 (incl. GST) . 49

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2018/19 90

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2018/19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91

Table D1: Acronyms and abbreviations . . . . . . .101

Table E1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103

List of figures

Figure 2.1: AIFS organisational structure as at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Figure 4.1: Employee qualifications as at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications as at 30 June 2019 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report vi

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Director’s review

Director’s review 1

Director’s review

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) started the 2018/19 financial year with a significant highlight - the successful 15th biennial AIFS 2018 Conference, which was held in July with the theme ‘What matters most to families in the 21st century?’.

With record numbers of participants and presentations, the hugely positive response took us by surprise and in many ways created a benchmark of achievement for the rest of the year. It caused us to re-e xamine our stakeholder engagement, how we communicate our stories, and how we plan the activities around our research projects and events.

2018/19 was the third year of our Strategic Directions 2016-2020, a journey of transforming how we work at the Institute and with our partners, to ensure that our internal culture, capabilities and systems align with our aspirations to achieve ‘Excellence for Impact’. We reviewed our Strategic Directions this year and extended them to 2021/22. And there are signs that we’re making great strides towards realising our strategic goals of leading research in to family wellbeing in Australia.

Our focus this year has been to build on earlier foundational work, to ensure our research evidence is useful for policy makers and service deliverers, and ultimately to improve the lives of children, families and communities. We have worked hard to consolidate the gains of the first couple of years of our Strategic Directions and this year we began to see some acknowledgement for our effort in our ability to impact national discussion around key reform areas such as family law and domestic and family violence: the Direct Cross-Examination in Family Law report informed new legislation, and I was invited to participate in the COAG National Summit on Reducing Violence Against Women and their Children, a first for AIFS, recognising the important work we have done over many years in this field.

This report outlines the journey we’ve taken this year towards achieving our 2022 strategic goals.

Anne Hollonds Director

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 2

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Child Care Package Evaluation

The Australian Government Department of Education introduced the Child Care Package on 2 July 2018. In December 2017, AIFS was commissioned by the Department to lead an evaluation of the Child Care Package, with consortium partners the Centre for Social Research and Methods (CSRM) at the Australian National University; the Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC) at the University of New South Wales; and the Social Research Centre (SRC). Extensive evaluation activities took place in the 2018/19 financial year following the implementation of the Package. Key activities for AIFS were:

Research highlights 2018/19

During the past year we worked on 33 projects, including seven new research projects, and continued to extend our expertise and experience to make a significant contribution to practice and policy development in a wide range of family wellbeing areas.

ƒ data collection from families, services and other stakeholders (including some survey data and interview data collected by AIFS, as well as data collected by consortium partners with input from and oversight by AIFS)

ƒ analysis and reporting on data collections, and on other information relevant to the evaluation (the key deliverable was the first of the evaluation reports, an Early Monitoring Report, finalised in 2018/19)

ƒ reporting on evaluations of two specific programs, the In Home Care program and the Inclusion Support Programme

ƒ provision of support to the Department of Education on their Post Implementation Reviews

ƒ ongoing liaison with the Department, stakeholders and consortium partners to manage the evaluation project, and participate in briefings and discussions on issues relevant to the Child Care Package.

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3 Director’s review

Australian Gambling Research Centre

Globally, gambling has expanded at a rapid pace, and related harms are an increasing concern. The Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) undertakes policy-relevant research that enhances understanding of the nature and extent of gambling participation and related harms, and advances knowledge of ways to prevent and reduce harm among at-risk populations, their families and communities. The AGRC has conducted several significant research projects in the past year, including:

ƒ the National Consumer Protection Framework for Online Wagering in Australia: Baseline Study, which the Department of Social Services commissioned as part of a larger four-phase evaluation of the National Consumer Protection Framework

ƒ Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers, a study exploring the relationship between alcohol consumption and sports betting among young Australians, see ‘Report on performance’ (page 32) for more information

ƒ The Relationship Between Gambling and Domestic Violence Against Women, a national project investigating the nature of the relationship between gambling and domestic violence, funded by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety

ƒ Identifying lessons from public health policy for interventions to prevent gambling-related harm, a project involving a review of evidence from the fields of tobacco control, alcohol and obesity prevention to recommend ways to adapt successful policies and interventions from these fields to gambling and funded by the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

ƒ Gambling in Suburban Australia, a study investigating environmental factors that contribute to gambling consumption and related harm at the local level.

Building a New Life in Australia

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA) is a long-term research project examining how humanitarian migrants settle into a new life in Australia. Close to 2,400 individuals and families living in communities around Australia, who have been granted permanent humanitarian visas, are taking part in the study. In 2018/19, the fifth wave of data for the study was collected. The study has continued to be well-received by participants, with very high response rates.

Two presentations were given by the BNLA team in July 2018. A presentation about the factors associated with psychological distress among recently arrived humanitarian migrants was presented at the 25th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development (Gold Coast). A presentation on English language proficiency among humanitarian youth was given at the AIFS Conference in Melbourne.

The first four waves of data from the BNLA study are available to approved researchers from government, academic institutions and non-p rofit organisations. Wave 5 data are anticipated for release in late 2019.

Child Family Community Australia

The Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange, funded by the Department of Social Services, provides evidence-informed resources, publications and support for professionals working in the child, family and community welfare sector. In 2018/19, CFCA increased user engagement with its website with over 3.5 million page views. Over 16,450 subscribers receive the fortnightly CFCA News, a 36% increase on 2017/18. CFCA produced 13 publications this financial year and its expanded webinar program attracted large numbers of attendees per session (almost 12,000 participants across 14 webinars; a 50% increase on 2017/18) - playing a significant role in professional development for the sector.

User feedback indicates that CFCA content contributes to the increased use of evidence in policy and practice, and increased knowledge of the latest research.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 4

Family law research

Following the completion of the Children and Young People in Separated Families study and Direct Cross-Examination in Family Law Matters research in June 2018, the Family Law and Family Violence team engaged in significant dissemination activities during this financial year. These activities included giving 19 presentations and preparing three submissions in response to key inquiries and reviews.

In April, the Australian Attorney-G eneral’s Department announced that the Family Law Amendment (Family Violence and Cross-examination of Parties) Act 2018 had commenced. Last year we were commissioned by the Department to explore data relevant to direct cross-examination, involving self-r epresented litigants in family law matters, involving allegations or substantiated instances of family violence. Legislation that was passed in Parliament last December and which has now been enacted drew on our report Direct Cross-E xamination in Family Law Matters: Incidence and Context of Direct Cross-Examination Involving Self-Represented Litigants. From 11 September 2019, personal cross-examination will be banned in family law proceedings in certain circumstances, including when there are allegations of family violence.

The team continued its important research in the area of elder abuse, as the lead research organisation in the Elder Abuse National Research Stage 1: Strengthening the Evidence Base project. This now-concluded research comprised three components, including the development of an Australian definition of abuse of older people for application in research; the development and testing of instruments to measure the prevalence of abuse of older people in Australia; and the analysis of existing datasets. The Attorney-G eneral’s Department has commissioned the Institute to conduct a prevalence study of elder abuse in Australia. This is the first large-scale effort to assess the nature of elder abuse and the extent to which it occurs among those in the Australian population aged 65 and over.

The team is also engaged in research activities for the Singapore Ministry of Family and Social Development aimed at understanding trends of co-parenting in Singapore.

Families and Children Expert Panel

The Expert Panel Project aims to help Families and Children (FaC) Activity service providers to better articulate the evidence underpinning their programs and to build program monitoring and evaluation into their routine. Its ultimate aim is to support evidence-informed programs for parents and children, and help those programs to achieve better outcomes for parents and children. For more information, see ‘Report on performance’ (page 32).

Growing Up in Australia

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) follows the development of 10,000 children and their families in urban and rural areas and continues to provide insights into the paths Australian children and their families take through life.

Wave 8 fieldwork was completed during 2018/19 and the data are planned for release in 2020. For more information about Growing Up in Australia, see ‘Report on performance’ (page 33) for more information.

Ten to Men

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health is the first national longitudinal study in Australia focusing exclusively on male health and wellbeing. The study aims to fill the gaps in knowledge about male health and wellbeing across the life course and to contribute to the development of health programs and policies targeted to the special health needs of men and boys. Activities in 2018/19 included fieldwork for the Wave 3 data collection, refreshing the Ten to Men logo and identity, and upgrading the study website. For more information about Ten to Men, see ‘Report on performance’ (page 33).

Director’s review 5

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Communicating our research

We have continued to improve our methods in communicating research findings to a wide range of audiences, including policy makers, practitioners, other researchers and the general public.

Communicating our research is a key AIFS function. We do this through releasing research publications, both in short and long form, through our information exchange services, such as CFCA, by researchers presenting at conferences and events, and in our webinars. The Institute’s research is widely reported in the media and promoted through our websites, newsletters and social media.

Events

The Institute increases its public engagement by hosting its conference and other events. As previously mentioned, the biggest event to take place in the 2018/19 financial year was our 15th biennial AIFS 2018 Conference, held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre on 25-27 July 2018. Headlining the conference program were keynote speakers Nora Spinks (Vanier Institute of the Family, Canada), Professor Brigid Featherstone (University of Huddersfield, UK) and Dr David Halpern (Behavioural Insights Team, UK). A total of 211 oral presentations, 41 poster presentations and three plenary panel sessions were presented. The event also attracted a record 22 different sponsors, which highlights that the conference is a highly valued event for networking and brand exposure.

Significant planning was also undertaken in 2018/19 for our next conference to be held from 9-12 June 2020 at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre. Our 2020 Conference theme is: What is a good life for families? And how do we get there?

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 6

Another key event for us this year was a special panel discussion on the Australian Law Reform Commission’s (ALRC) review of the family law system. The event, held on Thursday 6 June 2019, was facilitated by ABC Journalist Damien Carrick, with panellists Angela Lynch AM (Women’s Legal Service, Qld), Wendy Kayler-Thomson (Forte Family Lawyers) and Anne Hollonds (AIFS). The event also featured an introductory speech by the Chief Justice of the Family Court of Australia, The Honourable William Alstegren. The discussion was recorded by the ABC and aired on Radio National’s Law Report the following week. The invitation-only event, which was a full house, was the first of its kind for AIFS in our new building. We plan to host similar events in the future.

We also hosted a Policy Design Masterclass, delivered by Christian Bason, Chief Executive Officer of the Danish Design Centre. This invitation-only workshop gave our senior researchers and key policy advisers from the Department of Social Services and Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet exposure to innovative methods around the co-creation of policy and citizen engagement, and the promotion of ‘professional empathy’ as a skill in government.

Our regular webinars for CFCA, Emerging Minds and the Families and Children Expert Panel have been hugely popular, with more that 12,000 participants tuning in through the year. They are yet another way in which we support family wellbeing through innovative knowledge translation and communication.

Publications

We continued to publish high-quality research into the wellbeing of Australian families, with 68 project reports and papers produced, and more than 4.2 million publications viewed or downloaded from our websites. We also produced a host of short articles, news pieces, infographics, fact sheets, social media posts and practice resources. In the past year, publishing highlights included authoritative reports on:

ƒ empowering migrant and refugee women

ƒ stay-at-home fathers

ƒ foster and relative/kinship carers

ƒ children and young people in separated families

ƒ challenging misconceptions about sexual offending

ƒ low income and childhood poverty dynamics

ƒ the association between family, neighbourhood and school level disadvantage and children’s cognitive and social outcomes.

Governance, performance and risk management

Finances

In the 2018/19 financial year, AIFS operated with $4,412,000 of government appropriation and $9,684,672 of other revenue (primarily from contracted research), as detailed in the 'Financial statements' (page 51). The Institute incurred a budget deficit for the financial year 2018/19 of $405,387. This deficit is primarily due to the depreciation expense for 2018/19 of $448,535. After adjusting for this item, AIFS reported a surplus of $43,148.

Organisational culture and staff engagement

Significantly, in 2018/19, AIFS was shortlisted as a finalist in the Institute of Public Administration Australia (IPAA) ‘Public Sector Innovation’ Awards 2019 in the category of Culture and Capability, in recognition of our internal culture transformation. The concerted effort behind this transformation has seen AIFS ranked in the top 10 agencies in the Australian Public Service in 2018 in the categories of staff wellbeing, engagement and innovation (Source: APS

Director’s review 7

Employee Census). These results are evidence of the large amount of work undertaken to respond to staff concerns. Successful initiatives include:

ƒ building management capability

ƒ improved internal communication

ƒ a more coordinated approach to change management

ƒ a focus on wellbeing initiatives.

Highlights of this transformation were staff co-d esigning the AIFS Values and Behaviours and the highly consultative process underpinning our relocation to smaller and more cost-e ffective premises. At the heart of these two pieces of work were the principles of design thinking. Through a series of creative exercises, we tapped into right-brain thinking to draw on our imagination, creativity and powers of visualisation. The products were the values and behaviours that would create a culture we needed to achieve our goals, and an office space that actively shapes the way we work and collaborate.

There is no doubt that AIFS is now a better place to work, with 81% of staff reporting they would recommend AIFS as a good place to work (up from 36% in 2016). But this is also a story of unlocking our capability so that we can make progress on tackling some of Australia’s biggest challenges, such as family violence, child abuse and neglect, and mental ill-health. We are much more creative, collaborative and agile. By bringing this new mindset into our work, we’re better placed to tackle the complex social issues we address in our work every day.

Outlook for 2019/20

Planning for our 16th AIFS Conference on 9-12 June 2020 was begun in 2018/19, with the bulk of the work to take place in 2019/20. The 16th AIFS Conference coincides with the Institute’s 40th anniversary, and we will celebrate this milestone at the conference by showcasing our research over the years.

The AIFS Conference as well as other events are central to our knowledge translation capability strategy, which we will continue to implement in 2019/20.

The key priorities for 2019/20 include:

ƒ implementing knowledge translation strategies for our research

ƒ planning and implementing the AIFS 2020 Conference

ƒ enhancing our data management strategy for future capability requirements

ƒ planning for the migration of our websites’ content management system

ƒ an end-to-end review of our recruitment strategy

ƒ testing and refining our new performance measures.

We will continue to experiment, learn and adapt, to innovate and build on the research excellence for which we are highly regarded. We will advance our capabilities and our partnerships to ensure that our research evidence is useful for those who need it, in particular policy makers, service providers and the Australian public.

Anne Hollonds Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies 06 September 2019

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 8

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Two —

Agency overview

Agency overview 9

Agency overview

AIFS is a Melbourne-b ased statutory agency of the Australian Government, established in February 1980 under the Australian Family Law Act 1975.

A non-corporate entity, AIFS is a portfolio body within the Department of Social Services (DSS). We also have close links with the Attorney-G eneral’s Department (AGD), the Department of Education, the Department of Human Services (DHS), the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Department

of Defence, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA), the Department of Health and other Australian Government portfolios, their departments and agencies. Our staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999. At 30 June 2019, 104 people were employed at the Institute, excluding the Director.

Role and functions

We aim to increase understanding of factors affecting the welfare of Australian families by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, researchers and the broader community. We evaluate policies and programs, and we provide advice to inform the design and implementation of policy and services.

AIFS Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22 unveiled the What Works for Families Research Framework (Families Framework) that guides our research agenda, including commissioned projects. The Framework outlines four key research areas:

ƒ Life stages and transitions

ƒ Family relationships

ƒ Social and economic participation

ƒ Challenges for families.

We communicate our research findings to make evidence accessible and useful for decision makers, practitioners and the general public. We do this through our research publications, conferences, websites, information exchanges, information services, presentations, seminars and webinars, representation and through mass media.

The AIFS Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22 outlines our roles and functions for this annual reporting period. The four strategic priorities outlined in the plan are:

ƒ Create knowledge

ƒ Communicate for impact

ƒ Collaborate and connect

ƒ Activate organisational sustainability.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 10

Organisational structure

The Director is responsible for providing the overall leadership of the Institute and is supported by two Deputy Directors: the Deputy Director Research and Deputy Director Corporate Services (see Figure 2.1). This group works together to lead a team of managers responsible for the day-to-day work of AIFS in meeting our strategic objectives.

The Deputy Director Research is responsible for our research program, which includes a wide range of research, evaluation and dissemination projects focusing on policy and practice relevant issues affecting families in Australia.

The Deputy Director Corporate Services is responsible for the management of services to support our research activities, including human,

financial and physical resources, information management and communications technology, communication services and corporate governance.

Research managers oversee teams of research staff who work on a range of commissioned and internally initiated projects. During the reporting period this included two information exchanges - the Australian Gambling Research Centre and the Child Family Community Australia information exchange - and five longitudinal studies.

The Corporate Services area supports our research activities by providing administrative and specialist functions such as library, publishing, finance, information management and technology, communications, human resources and business capability services.

Figure 2.1: AIFS organisational structure as at 30 June 2019

Kelly Hand Deputy Director (Research)

Dr Michael Alexander Deputy Director (Corporate Services)

Malcolm Williamson Chief Financial O*cer

Dr Antonia Quadara Strategy and Business Development Manager

Ian Boor Information Management and Technology Manager

Robin Je*s Business Capability Services Manager

Dr Galina Daraganova Executive Manager Large Scale and Longitudinal Studies

Dr Stewart Muir Senior Research Fellow Family, Policy and Practice

Dr Rebecca Armstrong Executive Manager KTILab

Dr Rebecca Jenkinson Manager Australian Gambling Research Centre

Dr Rae Kaspiew Executive Manager Family Law and Family Violence

Tracey Young Executive Manager Communications

Stephanie Purcell Executive Manager Human Resources

Anne Hollonds Director

Agency overview 11

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Outcome and program structure

In this reporting period, we operated within the Australian Government’s outcome and output framework published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19 (PBS) and the AIFS Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22. The Institute has a single planned outcome: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

All our activities have been directed to achieving this outcome. Key performance criteria, detailed in the 'Report on performance' section (page 13), measure the Institute’s core outputs and deliverables. The Institute’s management accountability performance is described in the 'Management and accountability' section (page 37), and its finances in the 'Financial statements' section (page 51).

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 12

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Three —

Report on performance

Report on performance 13

Report on performance

Performance statement

We have a single planned outcome:

Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

To achieve this outcome, we:

ƒ conduct high-quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding the wellbeing of Australian families

ƒ through collaborative partnerships, expand the national knowledge base of factors affecting families

ƒ increase the effectiveness of communications to foster greater understanding about factors that affect families

ƒ build organisational capacity to achieve research and communication objectives.

We operated within a continuing environment of fiscal restraint in this reporting period. This has primarily affected the ability of other organisations to initiate and fund new projects, which in turn resulted in a decrease in research outputs - see Table 3.1 (page 17) for performance criteria. Despite these constraints, most of the indicators exceeded their targets, demonstrating that we continue to perform at a high level and achieve our stated outcome.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 14

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Research domains

Our research program during the reporting period was structured around our Families Framework, first reported in the AIFS Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22. The Framework outlines four key research areas:

ƒ Life stages and transitions

ƒ Family relationships

ƒ Social and economic participation

ƒ Challenges for families.

Research activities are either initiated by us or commissioned by another organisation. Institute-i nitiated research is funded from the budget appropriation.

Research projects conducted by us range in scale and type, and include:

ƒ research projects that provide evidence relating to social policy issues

ƒ major evaluations and reviews of government policies and programs

ƒ longitudinal studies that provide valuable data on children and their families

ƒ specialist advisory services commissioned by government agencies

ƒ information exchanges that collect, evaluate and synthesise evidence about a subject and communicate that evidence to policy and practice professionals.

Report on performance 15 Report on performance

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In addition, we promote research collaboration by sharing data nationally and internationally, and making presentations at a wide range of local and overseas conferences and other meetings (see Appendix C, page 92, for details).

We communicate our research through a variety of channels, including information exchange activities, publications, conferences, seminars and webinars, podcasts, web-based content, and library help desk and bibliographic services. These communication activities deliver research findings to three broad groups:

ƒ policy makers, to inform the development and review of policies and programs affecting families

ƒ service providers, to improve professional practice that supports families

ƒ the research and general communities, to raise understanding and knowledge of family functioning.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 16

Performance criteria

The report on our performance criteria for 2018/19 (Table 3.1) is divided into the four Strategic Directions outlined in the AIFS Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22:

ƒ Create knowledge

ƒ Communicate for impact

ƒ Collaborate and connect

ƒ Activate organisational sustainability.

Table 3.1: Performance criteria: Actuals (2017/18 to 2018/19) and forward estimate (2019/20)

Criteria

Actual 2017/18

Target 2018/19

Actual 2018/19

Forward estimate 2019/20

Create knowledge

Number of bodies commissioning work by AIFS 18 22 21 22

Number of research projects at AIFS 36 47 33 47

Number of longitudinal studies at AIFS 5 5 5 5

Communicate for impact

Number of publications disseminated or downloaded from AIFS website

3.3m 3.2m 4.2m 3.3m

Total media mentions of AIFS research 5,185 7,500 4,255 7,000

Number of publications released by AIFS 71 80 66 80

Number of presentations given by AIFS staff 62 120 68 120

Number of bibliographic records generated at AIFS 1,782 2,300 2,115 2,400

Collaborate and connect

Total attendance at AIFS conferences, webinars and forums 5,688 3,500 8,930 3,500

Number of partnerships, MOUs and collaborations in place 27 32 33 32

Numbers of conferences, seminars and forums hosted 13 20 22 20

Government submissions 0 8 8 10

Activate organisational sustainability

Percentage of research staff with postgraduate qualifications 63.5% 65% 69.7% 70%

Reduction in operational costs 5.4% 5% 5.2% Steady

Percentage of clients satisfied with AIFS’ services 78% 85% N/A N/A

Percentage of stakeholders satisfied with AIFS’ services 93.5% 85% see note N/A

Note: During the reporting period, we changed our performance measurement framework and we are no longer reporting on stakeholder satisfaction . We are now measuring whether our research is easy to access and whether our stakeholders use our research . This has been recorded in our Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22 .

Report on performance 17

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Analysis of performance

Create knowledge

Performance criteria

The number of commissioning bodies is indicative of the spread of research undertaken at the Institute. The measure also highlights that we are not reliant on a single source of income. In 2018/19, we were commissioned by 21 organisations to undertake research projects.

In 2018/19, 33 research projects were active at some stage during the reporting period, which was below the performance target. This was mainly due to our decision to seek to undertake larger-scale projects that can continue for several years in place of a larger number of small projects.

We were involved in five longitudinal studies during the reporting period:

ƒ Australian Temperament Project

ƒ Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study of Leaving Care

ƒ Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants

ƒ Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

ƒ Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study of Male Health.

The number of longitudinal studies has been included as a performance measure because these studies are useful for analysing trends in the changing nature of families over time. Such studies require a longer-term commitment of resources by funding and partner bodies, often over a number of years.

Table 3.2 highlights progress against our objectives and actions for Pillar 1 of our Strategic Directions relating to creating knowledge in our Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 18

Table 3.2: Pillar 1: Create Knowledge, 2018/19 actions

Pillar 1: Create Knowledge Status

Implement a national strategic research agenda

Implementation plan for the research roadmap The purpose of a research roadmap is to articulate the work we want to undertake to achieve our purpose. To guide us in this we

developed a theory of change to help us to identify the outcomes we are seeking and the optimal activities to achieve these outcomes. This resulted in a roadmap for our research agenda going forward. This provides a foundation for developing research proposals and for responding to funding proposals.

Develop partnership strategy The Institute was granted Deductible Gift Recipient Status during the reporting period. This is a foundational piece of our partnership strategy, which also includes working towards a major research partnership with a university.

Formalise major research partnership We continue to work towards developing a major research partnership with an Australian university.

Deliver on existing research projects while seeking new opportunities that reflect our research agenda

We continue to advance projects that reflect our theory of change and contribute to our purpose of positive change for children, families and communities. New projects include an evaluation of a revised strategy for the NT Child and Family Centres program, an evaluation of the Third Action Plan to reduce violence against women, and the Elder Abuse Prevalence Study.

Report on performance 19

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Communicate for impact

Performance criteria

The number of AIFS publications viewed and downloaded indicates the uptake of our published findings. In 2018/19, we had 4.2 million views of our publications, which was well above target. This was mainly due to the launch of new Growing Up in Australia and Ten to Men websites, as well as increasingly effective social media and stakeholder engagement strategies. A complete list of our research outputs and publications for 2018/19 is available in Appendix C (page 92).

The number of media mentions highlights our commitment to communicating our research to a wider audience. The 4,255 media mentions were below target mainly due to the reduction in research publications produced throughout the year.

We produced 66 research products in 2018/19, which was below the target. The lower than predicted output can be attributed to a greater focus on other methods of knowledge translation such as the delivery of workshops and webinars. We published six research reports and five commissioned reports.

Our staff made 68 presentations in this reporting period, which was below the target. This was mainly because the Institute has focused on larger-scale projects and therefore there was not as many opportunities to present findings from smaller projects.

Bibliographic records provide a description of material related to family studies that have been published by AIFS or others, and help to provide a valuable reference resource for researchers in this field. The 2,115 records generated in the reporting period was slightly below the target.

Table 3.3 highlights progress against our actions for Pillar 2 of our Strategic Directions, relating to communicating for impact in our Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 20

Table 3.3: Pillar 2: Communicate for impact, 2018/19 actions

Pillar 2: Communicate for impact Status

Implement the website strategy 2018 to make it user-centred, providing content relevant to our audiences, and offering a seamless experience of AIFS

Our website strategy put in place a framework for managing our web content through its lifecycle, ensuring that all content served on our websites is up-to-date and relevant. Other achievements included: redesigning our publication landing pages to make them more streamlined and user-friendly; and refreshing our news and webinar landing pages.

Website content audit and governance A content audit of the website was completed in March 2019. Result: 579 publications and 200 corporate pages reviewed; 285 publications archived,

36 flagged for updating, 258 unchanged; all corporate pages updated.

Stakeholder research and analysis Early in 2019, we undertook a mid-point review of our Strategic Directions 2016-2021. This work focused on:

ƒ developing an explicit articulation or ‘theory’ of AIFS’ impact pathway; that is, mapping how what we do (activity) leads to positive outcomes for children and families (impact)

ƒ reviewing the Strategic Directions and yearly initiatives against this theory

ƒ reviewing our performance and impact measures, specifically whether current performance measures were fit for purpose.

As a result, we deferred our plans to undertake stakeholder research and analysis.

Expand our suite of ‘resources’ to include new channels with higher engagement factors, such as seminars, webinars, policy round tables, events and blog posts

In line with our approach to ensuring that our research is easy to understand and accessible to our key audiences, we have broadened our resources beyond traditional long-form research reports.

Animation/video

In 2018/19 we have experimented with animations and video to help increase engagement with research findings. These include animation/video for:

ƒ listening to children’s voices from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Project

ƒ Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Annual Statistical Report 2017

ƒ the trend of young people delaying leaving home.

Podcast

We created the podcast series ‘Evidently’. This series interviews AIFS researchers to give listeners an overview of the issues behind the data. The first two episodes looked at issues from the Growing Up in Australia Annual Statistical Report 2017:

ƒ Eating problems in mid-adolescence

ƒ Children’s housing experiences

Events and webinars

We are expanding the number of events to reach our audiences. See Appendix C, page 92, for a full list of our AIFS events and webinars held throughout the year.

Report on performance 21

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Collaborate and connect

Performance criteria

The 8,390 participants that attended our events throughout the year were substantially higher (139%) than the target of 3,500 participants. This is due to a number of factors. A continued focus on producing regular webinars in the Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) and Emerging Minds projects has been the main contributor to the higher attendance figures. In addition, the AIFS 2018 Conference, which was held in the reporting period, was successful in attracting a higher number of participants than in previous years. Appendix C (page 92) provides a complete list of these events.

The number of conferences, seminars, webinars and other events hosted by us was above the targeted forecast, with the Institute hosting 22 events. Our events included 14 webinars, three workshops, four seminars and the conference.

Partnerships, MOUs and collaborations enable us to widen the scope of our research capabilities, which further helps to reach our yearly research and dissemination goals. We had 33 partnerships, MOUs and collaborations in place during 2018/19, which was above the target.

Government submissions are a performance measure as they are an important avenue for AIFS to use its research to inform government policy. In 2018/19, we made eight submissions to government inquiries, which met the target. A list of submissions made by AIFS can be found in Appendix D (page 101).

Table 3.4 highlights progress against our actions for Pillar 3 of our Strategic Directions relating to collaboration in our Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22.

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Table 3.4: Pillar 3: Collaborate and connect, 2018/19 actions

Pillar 3: Collaborate and connect Status

At research initiation stage, establish a knowledge translation (KT) plan that identifies the target audience and dissemination methods

A template for KT planning has been developed in collaboration with the Communications team. Knowledge translation planning is now underway with new and ongoing projects. This includes Ten to Men, CFCA and Emerging Minds.

AIFS 2018 Conference execution and evaluation The AIFS 2018 Conference was held in the reporting period with record registration and sponsorship numbers. A full evaluation was conducted.

AIFS Conference 2020 planning A significant amount of work has been put into planning for the next AIFS Conference, to be held in June 2020.

Develop events strategy While a detailed events strategy was not finalised in the reporting period, the Institute hosted several significant events in the reporting period. As well as the 2018 Conference, the Institute hosted a family law panel discussion at AIFS and co-hosted a policy forum on the voices of children and young people in family law proceedings in Hobart, Tasmania.

Develop a national media strategy which broadens our focus from research outputs and seeks opportunities to influence national conversations on key family wellbeing issues

We developed a national media strategy in July 2018, and this drove our approach to media activities throughout 2018/19. The media is a key audience for disseminating research relevant to family wellbeing in a way that is accessible. We translate our research in easy to understand news packages for the media, to reach the general public and decision makers.

Our role as a trusted spokesperson helps to ensure that public debate is balanced with evidence, and informs issues with the findings from our vast body of research.

Increase opportunities for cross-s ector dialogue and exchange

The AIFS Conference 2018, held 25-27 July, was a major event in our calendar focusing on cross-sector dialogue and exchange. This high-p rofile event had more than 650 participants from a range of different sectors, including:

ƒ Child protection (2.5%)

ƒ Community services (26%)

ƒ Early childhood (6%)

ƒ Education and training (18%)

ƒ Family services (12%)

ƒ Government (36%)

ƒ Health (1.5%)

ƒ Law and justice (7%).

In addition, we ran two focused events during the year on issues relating to different aspects of family law. See Appendix C on page 92 for further details.

Implement KT strategy across the organisation A KT strategy was drafted in the reporting period. A revision of this strategy is underway post the development of the AIFS Theory of

Change. This project more clearly articulates the impact of AIFS work. The implementation of the KT strategy has included internal capacity building, development of a KT planning template and facilitating the development of program-level impact stories.

Report on performance 23

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Activate organisational sustainability

Performance criteria

An indication of our capability and readiness to undertake high-quality research is the proportion of researchers with postgraduate qualifications. In 2018/19, 69.7% of our staff held postgraduate qualifications, which is significantly higher than the target of 65%.

The reduction in operational costs is a measure to determine whether we are delivering services efficiently. In 2018/19, we achieved a 5.2% reduction in our corporate operational cost by decreasing expenditure from $5.916 million in 2017/18 to $5.611 million in 2018/19.

The percentage of clients satisfied with our services was not captured in the reporting period. This was because the information gathered in previous reports was not deemed useful for our purposes as the sample size was too small and it was difficult for some clients to respond to questions if the project was in an early stage of development.

The percentage of stakeholders satisfied with our services was not recorded in the reporting period as we changed our performance measurement framework. We are now measuring whether our research is easy to access and easy to read. Baseline results from our stakeholder survey highlighted that of 660 survey participants, 80% agreed or strongly agreed that AIFS research and resources were easy to locate and 89% agreed or strongly agreed that AIFS resources and publications are written in plain accessible language. In terms of whether our research is used was 74% of respondents highlighted that they had used AIFS research in the previous 12 months.

Table 3.5 highlights progress against our objectives and actions for Pillar 4 of our Strategic Directions relating to activation in our Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22.

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Table 3.5: Pillar 4: Activate organisational sustainability, 2018/19 actions

Pillar 4: Activate organisational sustainability Status

Conduct mid-cycle review of our Strategic Directions, including goals and performance measures

In the second quarter of 2018/19 we undertook a review of the Strategic Directions. This review built on the previous year’s initiatives, specifically the development of our Families Framework, AIFS Values and Behaviours and our Governance and Management Framework.

We now have a comprehensive Strategic Planning Framework that integrates and aligns our understanding of families, our purpose, strategic goals, our pathway to impact, and operational planning and management.

We have completely reviewed our Performance Management Framework. The new framework aims to better identify and report on outcome and impact measures and to move beyond simple output-based metrics.

Review recruitment practices A review of our recruitment practices commenced during the reporting period. The review is scheduled to be completed July 2019.

Leadership development program for managers Over 40 managers participated in our inaugural leadership development program in 2018/19. The program was designed to enable managers to

understand and adapt their leadership style to meet different needs, coach team members to achieve goals, and build high performance through effective feedback.

Refresh policies and plans for workplace diversity Refreshing our policies and plans for workplace diversity began in 2019. The refresh is expected to be completed by the end of 2019.

Improve capability of managers to recruit people with disabilities

Over 30 managers participated in training to assist them to confidently recruit and manage people with disabilities within their teams and facilitate an inclusive and enabling workplace.

Finalise transition to shared services and determine best approach for improving project management

In July 2018 AIFS commenced using the TechOne finance system, in line with the new financial year. Our payroll arrangements transitioned in September 2018. Both transitions have been challenging. While the transition is now complete for payroll arrangements, there are still issues with the configuration of TechOne to ensure it meets our needs.

Other competing priorities in 2018/19 has meant determining the best approach for improving project management within the Institute has not had the focus it needed until late in the reporting year. That said, we have commenced exploratory investigations of a simplified and more pragmatic approach to this issue based loosely on the framework adopted by our portfolio department, which we are hopeful will provide a more fit-for-purpose solution for the Institute.

Review and strengthen risk management framework In 2018/19 we identified different ways in which other organisations, including other Australian Government agencies, structured and implemented their

frameworks. In 2019/20 we will use this information to substantially redesign our own framework. For further detail on our risk management strategies see page 41.

Continued on next page

Report on performance 25

Pillar 4: Activate organisational sustainability Status

Implement new privacy management plan, and enhance our data management policies and processes

AIFS implemented its Privacy Management Plan in August 2018, and we have subsequently undertaken the following activities:

ƒ appointed Privacy Officers and a Privacy Champion who has responsibility for providing leadership across the organisation on privacy strategic matters

ƒ provided mandatory privacy training for all staff and all new staff must complete a privacy module as a part of their induction

ƒ developed an internal framework on handling privacy enquiries, complaints and requests for access to and correction of personal information

ƒ updated our Privacy Management Policy, which will be communicated to all staff shortly. It includes requirements that high-risk projects have a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA), and that a register of PIAs be maintained.

These activities have significantly increased the privacy maturity across the agency. We will continue to undertake the remaining activities in the Privacy Management Plan in 2019/20 and report as required to the OAIC.

In 2018/19 we have significantly increased our focus on our data management policies and processes in an environment in which the analysis and maintenance of data across the Commonwealth is becoming ever more important. Apart from the implementation of a Privacy Management Plan, the Institute has updated its Privacy Management Policy and has developed a number of others to assist with handling confidentialised and sensitive data.

As one of six Data Integrating Authorities in Australia, in the last year AIFS has invested significant time and resources in the proposed data sharing and release framework that is being guided by the new Office of the National Data Commissioner.

We have also identified the need for the Institute to develop a data management strategy, which will be one of our activation initiatives in 2019/20. The strategy will address what data management policies the Institute needs in the new environment and how we manage the metadata.

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Performance against AIFS research directions

This section reviews the major projects undertaken by AIFS during the reporting period, within the framework of our Families Framework research areas.

The majority of our research projects relate to more than one research area. A summary of the projects is provided in Table 3.6.

A full list of publications and presentations produced by us during the reporting period is included in Appendix C (page 92).

More details about major work being conducted by the Institute are available on the AIFS website at aifs.gov.au/about-us.

Table 3.6: AIFS research projects 2018/19 and relevance to research areas

Project title Term

Project funder (partner)

Families Framework Research Areas

Family relationships

Social & economic participation Life stages

& transitions Challenges for families

LSAC Waves 5-9 project management and data collection

2009- 2022

DSS/ABS X X X X

CFCA information exchange 2011-2019 DSS X X X X

Beyond 18 2012-2018 DHHS X X X X

Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA): data collection & management

2012-2018 DSS X X X X

Families and Children Expert Panel 2014-2019 DSS X X X

Weighing up the odds: Grants for gambling research

2015-2018 VRGF X X

Wagering marketing on vulnerable adults 2016-2018 CQU X X X

VRGF Preventing Gambling-Related Harm: services to Monash University

2016-2018 Monash University

X X

Young people with sexually abusive behaviours: Perpetrator interventions

2017-2019 ANROWS X X

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Report on performance 27

Project title Term

Project funder (partner)

Families Framework Research Areas

Family relationships

Social & economic participation Life stages

& transitions Challenges for families

DVA Coordinated Client Support program (CCS)

2017-2018 SPRC UNSW X X X X

Women’s Safety Package: Local support coordinator evaluation

2017-2019 DSS X

Emerging Minds 2017-2019 DoH X X X

Ten to Men 2017-2021 DoH X X X X

Elder Abuse Research: Strengthening the evidence base stage 1

2017-2019 AGD X X X

Relationship between domestic violence and gambling

2018-2020 CQU X X

Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers 2018- Appropriation X X

Partners of Vietnam Veterans: Further analysis of the Vietnam Veterans Family Study

2018-2019 DVA X X X

Stronger Outcomes for Families Reform: Evaluation model

2018 DSS X X X X

LSAC: Production of a technical paper 2018 QFCC X X

Child Care Package Evaluation 2018 2017-2021 Dept of Education

X X

Families as First Teachers

2018-2019 NT Govt X X X

Analysis of HILDA dataset 2018-2019 VRGF X

Baseline study - National Consumer Protection Framework for online wagering

2018-2019 DSS X

Emerging Minds - LSAC analysis 2018-2019 PRC X X X

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 28

Project title Term

Project funder (partner)

Families Framework Research Areas

Family relationships

Social & economic participation Life stages

& transitions Challenges for families

Evaluation of Third Action Plan to Reduce Violence

2018-2019 DSS X X

Elder Abuse National Research - Prevalence Study

2019-2020 AGD X X X

Permanency outcomes - Evidence Scoping Review

2019-2020 DSS X X

Study on co-p arenting styles and arrangements

2019-2020 Singapore Ministry of Social and Family Development

X X

Evaluation of Child and Family Centres 2019-2020 NT Dept of Education

X X

Australian Gambling Research Centre Ongoing Appropriation X X X

Data Linkage Integration Authority Ongoing Appropriation X X X X

Family Law Research Ongoing Appropriation X X

Sexual Violence Research

Ongoing Appropriation X

Work and Family Interactions Ongoing Appropriation X X X X

Abbreviations ABS: Australian Bureau of Statistics AGD: Attorney-G eneral’s Department ANROWS: Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety BNLA: Building a New Life in Australia CCS: Coordinated Client Support CQU: Central Queensland University DET: Department of Education and Training DHHS: Victorian Department of Health and Human Services DoH: Department of Health DSS: Department of Social Services DVA: Department of Veterans’ Affairs HILDA: The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey LSAC: Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudial Study of Australian Children PRC: The Parenting Research Centre QFCC: Queensland Family and Child Commission SPRC UNSW: Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales VRGF: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation .

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Research highlights

Beyond 18

Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study of Leaving Care ran between 2012 and 2018. The study was commissioned by the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) with the aim of improving understanding of the factors associated with different pathways when leaving out-o f-h ome care (OOHC).

The Beyond 18 study aimed to do this by exploring young people’s preparations for leaving care, their experiences of transition from care and their post-care outcomes.

The Beyond 18 study had four components:

• Survey of Young People from OOHC

• three waves of qualitative interviews with participants in the Survey of Young People

• two online surveys of carers and caseworkers

• analysis of a data extract from the DHHS Client Relationship Information System database.

The Survey of Young People was Beyond 18’s central component. It comprised three waves of an online survey of young people who had spent time in statutory OOHC in Victoria after their 15th birthday. The surveys were undertaken in 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18. Qualitative interviews with a subset of participants in the Survey of Young People was Beyond 18’s other main data source. The interviews took place concurrently with the online surveys and finished mid-2018. The interview data provided a nuanced understanding of young people’s experiences and allowed them to share their perspectives on the support they had received when leaving care and what they needed.

Fieldwork for Beyond 18 finished mid-2018 and the final research report (on the results of the Wave 3 survey and interviews) was submitted to DHHS in October 2018.

The research reports on Wave 2 and Wave 3 of the Survey of Young People were published on the AIFS website on 25 June 2019.

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Families and Children Expert Panel

The Expert Panel Project aims to help Families and Children (FaC) Activity service providers to better articulate the evidence underpinning their programs and to build program monitoring and evaluation into their routine.

Its ultimate aim is to support evidence-informed programs for parents and children, and help those programs to achieve better outcomes for parents and children.

We do this by providing advice, resources and support to build service providers’ capacity to plan, implement and evaluate programs, adopt evidence-based programs when appropriate and relevant to clients’ needs, and/or strengthen existing programs.

Activities in 2018/19 included:

• continuing to work with Communities for Children service providers to assess over 130 programs in relation to the evidence-based criteria

• providing direct support to FaC Activity service providers in relation to program planning activities

• continued redevelopment of website content to better integrate Expert Panel, Communities for Children Facilitating Partners (CfC FP) and CFCA content for the benefit of users

• continued administration and management of the Industry List process and projects

• initiation and implementation of the ‘Building effective partnerships between non-Indigenous FaC providers and Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations (ACCOs)’ project, in partnership with SNAICC

• development and publication of new planning and evaluation resources, including a Needs

Assessment resource and an Implementation Practice Guide

• delivering presentations and workshops at several sector meetings, conferences and forums

• analysing data for the Evaluation of the Expert Panel project and finalising the interim evaluation report and web summary

• refining the plan and data collection instruments for phase 2 of the Evaluation of the Expert Panel project.

Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers

Despite increasing community concern regarding the normalisation of sports betting and risky drinking among populations of young people, we have limited understanding of the relationship between these behaviours, the contexts in which they co-occur, and how co-consumption contributes to health-r elated harms.

Researchers from the Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC) are seeking to address some of these gaps in knowledge via the Pints, Punts ‘n’ Peers project. Using an online survey and follow-up interviews with young Australians aged 18-35, this study explored topics such as patterns, settings and contexts of simultaneous sports betting and alcohol consumption, and impacts on health and wellbeing.

Findings from this project will help to inform the development of appropriately nuanced and targeted public health prevention strategies, and policy and regulatory responses to address the widespread marketing and availability of sports betting products.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 32

Growing Up in Australia

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) follows the development of 10,000 children and their families in urban and rural areas of Australia and continues to provide insights into the paths Australian children and their families take through life.

Wave 8 fieldwork was completed during 2018/19 and the data is planned for release in 2020. This release will include a number of exciting new measures, including:

• young people’s drug use

• risk taking

• work, study and training

• financial support and financial literacy

• gender and sexual identity

• sexual behaviour

• romantic relationships

• experiences and perpetration of abuse, bullying and sexual harassment

• social networks and online activities.

Fieldwork for Wave 9 began in June 2019 and is expected to conclude by August 2021. The LSAC Annual Statistical Report 2017, which reported on the first six waves of LSAC data, was released in December 2018. The report highlights the effects of experiences and environments on the prospects and progress of the study children as they move into adolescence. It features chapters on several areas of child and adolescent development and wellbeing, including eating problems in mid-a dolescence, adolescent help-seeking, children’s housing experiences, use of technology in the classroom and children’s use of health services.

Ten to Men

Ten to Men: The Longitudinal Study on Male Health was commissioned by the Australian Government following the 2010 release of the National Male Health Policy.

The study began in 2012 when health and lifestyle information was collected from nearly 16,000 men and boys across the country via surveys and interviews.

Ten to Men is funded by the Department of Health. The first two waves of the study were conducted by the University of Melbourne and AIFS will be managing Wave 3 of the study. Fieldwork for Wave 3 of the study began in 2018/19 and pre-interview testing will be conducted in the coming months. The testing will consist of cognitive testing and focus groups, and will test survey content as well as fieldwork materials such as envelopes and primary approach letters.

Refreshing the Ten to Men data was another key focus for the team in 2018/19 and it is hoped that the new data version will be released via the Australian Data Archive Dataverse platform later in 2019.

Ten to Men also went through a rebrand in the reporting period with a new logo, brand and website. The upgraded Ten to Men website is now able to support exciting and innovative communication products such as videos and podcasts. The new website was launched in June 2019, during Men’s Health Week.

Report on performance 33

Report on performance - Financial activities

Operating results

In accordance with the Australian Government net cash appropriation arrangements, AIFS incurred a deficit for the financial year 2018/19 of $405,387. This deficit is primarily due to the depreciation expense for 2018/19 of $448,535. After adjusting for this item, AIFS would have reported a surplus of $43,148.

See Table 3.7 (page 35) for a summary of budgeted and actual expenses for 2018/19.

Operating revenue

The total operating revenue was $14,096,672 and consisted of the following:

ƒ government appropriations of $4,412,000

ƒ sale of goods and rendering of services of $9,601,719

ƒ other revenue of $82,952.

Operating expenses

Total operating expenses were $14,502,058 and consisted of:

ƒ employee costs of $9,823,638

ƒ supplier expenses of $4,218,110

ƒ depreciation and amortisation of $448,535

ƒ loss on sale of assets of $11,777.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 34

Table 3.7: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2018/19, and budgeted expenses, 2019/20

Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, and the broader community

Budget 2018/19 $’000

Actual 2018/19 $’000

Variation (column 2 - column 1) $’000

Budget 2019/20 $’000

Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 14,708 14,021 687 15,428

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 379 481 (102) 532

Total for Program 1.1 15,087 14,502 585 15,960

Outcome 1 totals by appropriation type

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 14,708 14,021 687 15,428

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 379 481 (102) 532

Total expenses for Outcome 1 15,087 14,502 585 15,960

2018/19 2018/19 2018/19 2019/20

Average staffing level 1 82 79 (3) 82

Note: 1 . T he headcount and average staffing level are not the same measure . The headcount is the total number of employees at 30 June 2019 . The average staffing level is an average over the financial year .

Balance sheet

Net asset position

The net asset position at 30 June 2019 was $2,254,938 (2018: $2,389,115).

Total assets

Total assets at 30 June 2019 were $13,251,596 (2018: $11,131,457). Financial assets increased by $2,120,139. This increase in financial assets was mainly due to an increase in the amount of Section 74 receipts received at the end of

June 2019. Non-fi nancial assets increased by $221,446. The increase in non-financial assets is mainly due to purchase of capital assets mostly video and telephony systems following the move to new premises in 2018 and an increase in prepayments.

Total liabilities

Total liabilities at 30 June 2019 were $10,996,658 (2018: $8,742,342). The increase is mainly due to a higher level of unearned revenue of $2,112,059 and increases in employee provisions of $95,645.

Report on performance 35

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 36

Four —

Management and accountability

Management and accountability 37

Management and accountability

Management accountability is achieved with the support of the Corporate Services area of the Institute.

Corporate Services provides a range of enabling functions to assist us to meet our goals, through the ongoing improvement and application of financial, administrative, human resources,

communications and information management and technology policies and practices.

Accountability is met through our internal management committee, advisory and governance committees, staff and management committees, including the Senior Leadership Group, robust reporting processes, internal and external audits, the Business Continuity Plan and policies and guidelines under the Protective Security Policy Framework.

Corporate governance

We operate under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). The corporate focus throughout 2018/19 was the effective maintenance of high standards of governance, accountability and reporting in order to fulfil all PGPA requirements and build organisational capacity to achieve our research and communication objectives. This corporate oversight is conducted through senior management committees (detailed below).

The Family Law Act 1975 sets out our role, functions and governance arrangements. During 2018/19, the responsible minister for AIFS was the Hon. Dan Tehan (until 28 August 2018), the Hon. Paul Fletcher (until 29 May 2019) and Senator the Hon. Anne Ruston.

Fraud control

During the financial year 2018/19, no fraud was identified. The next fraud risk assessment is scheduled to be conducted in 2019/20.

Annual Report 2018/19 Fraud Control Certification

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I, Anne Hollonds, Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies, hereby certify that I am satisfied that the Institute has:

ƒ undertaken a fraud risk assessment and updated the fraud control plan

ƒ put in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and reporting mechanisms that meet the specific needs of the Institute

ƒ taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the Institute.

Anne Hollonds, Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies 06 September 2019

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 38

Senior executive members

Ms Anne Hollonds is the Director of the Institute reporting to the Minister for Social Services. Two Deputy Directors assist the Director in leading and managing AIFS. Dr Michael Alexander has been the Deputy Director (Corporate Services) since January 2016. Ms Kelly Hand has been the Deputy Director (Research) since February 2017.

Senior management groups

The Director has overall responsibility for the leadership and management of the Institute. A number of groups are in place to support this function.

Executive Group

The Executive group leads and coordinates all aspects of the research and corporate functions of the Institute. It comprises the Director and the two Deputy Directors.

Senior Leadership Group

The Senior Leadership Group comprises the Executive and Senior Managers from the corporate and research areas. The group is a strategic leadership forum providing advice to the Director and Deputy Directors.

Governance committees and advisory groups

We support sound management of our accountability and ethical and legislative responsibilities through the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee, and the Human Research Ethics Committee. We also have numerous research advisory groups providing advice on the research projects.

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee

The Risk Assessment and Audit Committee reports to the Director and plays a key role in our corporate governance. It helps ensure effective and efficient use of resources by reviewing the performance and operations of internal controls and performance management systems. It approves our internal audit program and advises the Executive on risk fraud compliance and performance. It also provides assurance to the Director on preparing and reviewing financial statements. An external member chairs the committee. Membership includes the two Deputy Directors and three independent members external to the Institute. The committee met four times during 2018/19, addressing a range of issues including the review of budgets.

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee members, 2018/19

ƒ Dennis Mihelyi (Chair), Chief Financial Officer, Australian Building and Construction Commission

ƒ Brian Scammell (Member), Assistant Commissioner, Corporate Group, Productivity Commission

ƒ Matthew Zappulla (Member), Technical Director, Auditing and Assurance Standards Board

ƒ Kelly Hand (Member), Deputy Director (Research), AIFS

ƒ Dr Michael Alexander (Member), Deputy Director (Corporate Services), AIFS

ƒ Anne Hollonds (Observer), Director, AIFS

ƒ Malcolm Williamson (Observer), Chief Financial Officer, AIFS

Management and accountability 39

© GettyImages/kohei_hara

Human Research Ethics Committee

The role of our Human Research Ethics Committee is to ensure the ethical standards outlined in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, and elaborated in our ethics statement, Ethical Issues in the Research Process (1996), are met in all research projects undertaken by us.

In particular, the committee must ensure projects meet the three key principles of: respect for persons, beneficence and justice, as set down in the National Statement. The committee is registered with the Australian Health Ethics Committee, a sub-committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council.

The Ethics Committee meets to consider new project proposals, receive brief oral and written reports on ongoing projects, consider any complaints or problems that may have arisen regarding ethical issues in our research, and review the complaints procedures, as required.

The committee met six times in 2018/19 and undertook expedited considerations on one occasion, assessing 20 ethics applications for new, revised or extended research projects. The committee has an expedited review process in place for projects that need approval between meetings of the committee.

Members of the Ethics Committee are appointed for three-year terms, with the exception of one member who has sought an extension of their appointment for a shorter term.

Human Research Ethics Committee members, 2018/19

ƒ Dr Duncan Ironmonger AM (Chair), BCom, MCom (Melb.); PhD (Cambridge); Department of Economics, University of Melbourne

ƒ Dr Richard Ingleby, MA, DPhil (Oxford); LLM (Cambridge); Visiting Professor, North China University of Technology

ƒ Ms Lorraine Parsons, BA (La Trobe); BSW (La Trobe); Grad. Cert. Management (Curtin)

ƒ Rev. John Lamont, BA (La Trobe); BTheol (United Faculty of Theology, Ormond College)

ƒ Dr Sarah Wise, BA (Hons), MA, PhD (Melb.); Good Childhood Fellow, Social Work, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne/Berry Street

ƒ Victoria Triggs, BA (Melb.), Grad. Dip. Ed. Admin. (Melb.), Williamson Fellow (Leadership Victoria), Grad. Dip. Australian Institute of Company Directors

ƒ Karena Jessup, BA (UTas), BTeach(Hons) (UTas), PhD (UTas), Senior Manager, Survey Research, The Australian Institute of Family Studies (Appointed September 2018)

ƒ Ms Carol Soloff , BSc (Hons) Australian National University

ƒ Mr Ian Walker

AIFS Expert Advisory Committee

The title and terms of reference of the old ‘Advisory Council’ were reviewed in October 2017. The future of this group is under consideration.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 40

Corporate and statutory reporting

During 2018/19 we continued to refine and strengthen our planning processes in order to make our reporting outputs more robust, including ongoing improvements to our budget development and review and monitoring processes. These initiatives continue to bring together a range of corporate and communications priorities, and have contributed to robust compliance standards and reporting performance against outcomes.

In August 2018 we published our fourth Corporate (Agency) Plan for 2018/19 to 2021/22, as required under the PGPA Act. We spent much of 2018/19 implementing the plan’s strategic priorities.

We undertook a deep-dive review of the Strategic Directions in the second quarter of 2018/19. This period marked the mid-point in the Strategic Direction’s lifecycle and the review involved:

ƒ developing a deeper understanding or ‘theory’ of the AIFS impact pathway; that is, mapping how what we do (activity) leads to positive outcomes for children and families (impact)

ƒ reviewing the Strategic Directions and yearly initiatives against this theory or understanding

ƒ reviewing our performance and impact measures, specifically whether current performance measures were fit for purpose.

This review resulted in:

ƒ an overarching ‘theory of change’ within which AIFS’ Strategic Directions and yearly initiatives are situated

ƒ a revised performance measurement and reporting framework

ƒ revised performance measures

ƒ identification of priority strategic initiatives for the current year

Risk management

In 2018/19 we have undertaken a number of activities to strengthen our approach to risk management.

Initially, we reviewed the questions in the Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey to identify practical and immediate ways in which we could improve the risk management maturity of the Institute across the nine elements of the Commonwealth’s Risk Management Framework. Some initiatives were implemented in the lead up to the survey - including the development of AIFS’ risk appetite and risk tolerances - while the remainder formed the basis for our risk management plan to be implemented throughout 2019. This led to an increased maturity in seven of the elements in our 2019 Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey results.

Improving our risk management practice and developing a positive risk culture is an important focus for the Institute. Comcover considers a positive risk culture to exist in an organisation when ‘officials understand the risks their entity faces and consistently make appropriate risk-based decisions aligned with the entity's risk appetite and tolerance’.

The initiation of risk culture assessments via a light-touch ‘taking the pulse’ survey began in April. Responses to risk questions on last year’s APS Employee Census indicated quite a high number of staff were unaware of how risk was managed within AIFS. By doing a brief in-house survey we gained some insight into our current risk culture, which we can use as a benchmark over time and to foster greater awareness of AIFS risk appetite and risk tolerances as part of business as usual activity.

In September 2018, we undertook a substantial review of all enterprise-level risks. Subsequent to the review, we assigned each risk to a risk owner and identified the frequency with which each risk should be identified (such as annually, biannually or quarterly). A risk review reporting template has been developed for this task and each reviewed risk is now considered by the Senior Leadership Group (SLG). The eight key enterprise risks are reviewed by the SLG each month.

Management and accountability 41

Our risk management plan includes a major review of our Risk Management Framework. As a first step, we cast a wide net to identify different ways in which other organisations, including other Australian Government agencies, structured and implemented their frameworks. In 2019/20 we will use this information to substantially redesign our own framework, which hasn’t been substantially changed in 12 years.

Internal audit

During 2018/19, two reviews were undertaken by the internal auditors, namely reviews of our Information Management Security and Payroll practices and our compliance to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and related legislation. Both reviews confirmed that we have maintained, in all material respects, effective control procedures.

We currently engage BDO East Coast Partnership to provide internal audits.

Business continuity

We completed a major review and update of our Business Continuity Plan. In the event of a critical incident the plan provides the necessary guidelines to enable us to:

ƒ take appropriate action to safeguard staff and property

ƒ take action to prevent or minimise potential disruption to critical business processes

ƒ plan and effectively manage the recovery of operations of the business to a satisfactory level.

A scenario planning exercise was undertaken by the Business Continuity Management Team in February 2019 to test the new documentation.

Protective Security Policy Framework

The Australian Government Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF) underwent a major update in 2018/19 with the first changes coming into effect in December 2018. All staff attended mandatory training in December 2018 and January 2019 following the changes. We will continue to implement and adhere to the core PSPF requirements in accordance with the new guidelines published by AGD.

Privacy

During 2018/19, we implemented the first year of our Privacy Management Plan to comply with the requirements of the Australian Government Agencies Privacy Code 2018 (Code) and Australian Privacy Principle 1.2. We tailored the plan to the specific needs of our agency. In the last year we focused on updating our Privacy Management Policy, which details how we manage personal information. We also provided privacy training to all AIFS staff around their obligations under the Privacy Act and the Australian Privacy Principles.

We were not subject to any decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner in 2018/19.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 42

© GettyImages/Ondrooo

Ethical standards

We continue to take actions designed to integrate the APS Values into the organisational culture and the day-to-day work of all employees. The obligations of employees to uphold the APS Values and abide by the APS Code of Conduct are:

ƒ promoted in staff induction and training

ƒ applied to human resource management processes, including individual performance plans

ƒ reflected in human resource policies and procedures, which are made available to all employees on our intranet.

External scrutiny

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) performs an annual statutory audit of our financial statements. In addition, an independent contractor conducts a program of internal audit reviews (BDO East Coast Partnership). The outcomes of all audits are presented to the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee and plans developed for the implementation of recommendations and the ongoing monitoring of resultant actions for improved processes.

In 2018/19, we were not subject to reports by the Auditor-General, parliamentary committees or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

We do not have statutory administrative decision-making powers and were not subject to any judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals in 2018/19.

Management and accountability 43

Management of human resources

Employee skills and qualifications

We are fortunate to have employees with a great diversity of skills, knowledge and experience. This ranges from research knowledge in multiple disciplines - including social science, psychology, family law, child and adolescent development, criminology, demography, economics, statistics and survey design - to management skills such as commercial contract negotiation, project management, financial and human resource management, information technology and

communications. This diversity of knowledge and expertise exemplifies one of the benefits of working in a small organisation. These skills are known and, as such, can be used across a number of facets of our operations.

Figures 4.1 and 4.2 show, respectively, the highest qualifications gained by our employees overall and by those employed in the research area.

Figure 4.1: Employee qualifications as at 30 June 2019 Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications as at 30 June 2019

Year 10 1%

Doctorate 25%

Masters 25%

Postgraduate diploma 14%

Bachelor degree including honours 28%

Undergraduate diploma or equivalent 2%

Associate diploma or equivalent 1%

Year 12 4%

Doctorate 34.8%

Masters 28.8%

Postgraduate diploma 6.1%

Bachelor degree including honours 30.3%

Note: All sta*: includes Director, excludes casuals. Note: All research sta*: includes Director, excludes casuals.

Workforce planning

In 2018/19, we continued to develop our capacity to plan and respond to changing workforce needs. Building capacity and other workforce issues, including increasing the diversity of our workforce, will continue to be an area of focus in 2019/20.

Learning and development

The primary focus of learning and development activities is to ensure that we have the organisational capability to meet operational objectives, both now and in the future.

During the year, staff development covered a range of topics including leadership, research and analysis tools, privacy, interpersonal skills and wellbeing. The effectiveness of the training

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 44

provided was evaluated after each course and in the performance reviews conducted between managers and individuals.

We also continue to provide professional development opportunities for employees via professional memberships, attendance at conferences and support for formal study.

Recruitment

Our recruitment in 2018/19 focused on specialist research positions, including key positions in knowledge translation, data analysis and management, and longitudinal studies. Our vacancies were advertised via online channels including the APS Jobs site and our social media pages.

Staff engagement, participation and development

We recognise the vital contribution our people make to the achievement of our purpose and the importance of staff being engaged with their work, participating in the workplace, and developing professionally.

AIFS ranked in the top 10 agencies in the Australian Public Service in 2018 in the categories of staff wellbeing, engagement and innovation (Source: APS Employee Census). These results are evidence of the large amount of work undertaken to respond to staff concerns. Successful initiatives include:

ƒ building management capability

ƒ improved internal communication

ƒ a more coordinated approach to change management

ƒ a focus on wellbeing initiatives.

In 2018/19 AIFS was shortlisted as a finalist in the IPAA ‘Public Sector Innovation’ Awards 2019 in the category of Culture and Capability in recognition of our internal culture transformation.

AIFS is now a better place to work, with 81% of staff reporting that they would recommend AIFS as a good place to work (up from 36% in 2016).

AIFS Values

In 2018/19 we worked to embed our AIFS Values and Behaviours, which along with the APS Values, help to shape our culture and guide us towards achieving our purpose. AIFS’ five values and behaviours are:

Champions of our work and each other

We want everyone’s boat to rise: We take collective pride in each other’s work and success.

Excellence for impact

We are committed to producing excellent work that makes a difference for families.

Fearless and curious explorers

We value experimentation, creativity and ongoing learnings.

Honest and respectful conversations

We are authentic and have meaningful conversations including the tough ones.

Seeing the lighter side

We value collegiality, humour and fun.

Workplace Relations Committee

The Workplace Relations Committee provides a forum for management and employees to discuss matters relating to the Enterprise Agreement as well as the workplace in general. The committee comprises management and employee representatives. The Committee’s work in 2018/19 focused on staff consultation on policies supporting the 2017 Enterprise Agreement, which commenced in June 2017.

Health and Safety Committee

The Health and Safety Committee was established to represent staff and facilitate consultation and discussion between management and employees regarding health and safety matters in the workplace. Committee meetings are held at least quarterly and provide an effective forum for staff to raise particular health and safety issues as well as the planning and promotion of health and safety practices and principles in the workplace.

Management and accountability 45

Statistics on staffing

As at 30 June 2019, there were 104 staff - 22 males and 82 females - employed at the Institute under the Public Service Act 1999, excluding the Director.

Tables 4.1 and 4.2 present profiles of our staff by gender and type of employment at 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2018 respectively. As Table 4.1 indicates, at 30 June 2019 we had 32% of staff in ongoing positions and 68% of staff in non-ongoing positions. This represents an increase in non-ongoing staff of 11 percentage points compared to the previous year, reflecting rapid growth stemming from the commencement of new projects. Table 4.3 (page 47) describes staff by classification level, gender and type of employment as at 30 June 2019.

Table 4.1: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2019

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Totals

Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time

Male 8 0 10 4 22

Female 14 11 32 25 82

Total number 22 11 42 29 104

% of all staff 21 11 40 28 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Table 4.2: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2018

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Totals Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time

Male 6 1 8 5 20

Female 14 15 17 21 67

Total number 20 16 25 26 87

% of all staff 23 18 29 30 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 46

Table 4.3: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff, by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2019

Classification

AIFS classification

Ongoing Non-ongoing

Total

% of all staff Male Female Male Female

SES Band 1 SES Band 1 1 1 0 0 2 2

Executive Level 2 AIFS EL2 2 11 2 4 19 19

Executive Level 1 AIFS EL1 4 6 2 9 21 20

APS6 AIFS Band 5-6 1 6 4 21 32 30

APS5 AIFS Band 5-6 0 2 4 13 19 18

APS4 AIFS Band 3-4 0 1 1 5 7 7

APS3 AIFS Band 3-4 0 0 1 3 4 4

APS2 AIFS Band 1-2 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS1 AIFS Band 1-2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 8 27 14 55 104 100

% of all staff 8 26 13 53 100

Note: E leven employees on higher duties were counted at the higher duties level . Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Employees who identify as Indigenous

As at 30 June 2019 we had no ongoing or non-ongoing employees who identified as Indigenous, the same as at 30 June 2018.

Individual and collective agreements

Details of the number of staff covered by our Enterprise Agreement or a Section 24(1) determination at 30 June 2019 are shown in Table 4.4.

Performance pay

No employees were eligible for performance pay in 2018/19.

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2019

Type of agreement No. of staff

Enterprise Agreement 102

Section 24(1) determination 2

Note: Two EL 2 employees covered by the Enterprise Agreement have been provided with Section 24(1) determinations to supplement the provisions of the Enterprise Agreement .

The number of staff excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Management and accountability 47

Table 4.5: Remuneration of key management personnel

Base salary1 $

Bonuses1 $

Other benefits & allowances1 $

Super-annuation contributions2 $

Long service leave3 $

Other long-term benefits 3 $

Termi-nation benefits $

Total remun-eration $

Anne Hollonds Director 331,399 - 37,892 41,863 5,973 - - 417,126

Michael Alexander Deputy Director

169,830 - (6,282) 31,824 6,377 - - 201,749

Kelly Hand Deputy

Director

169,830 - 8,924 31,872 6,637 - - 217,264

Total 671,059 - 40,534 105,559 18,987 - - 836,139

Notes: 1 . Sh ort-term benefits; 2 . P ost-employment benefits; 3 . Ot her long-term benefits .

Assets management

We maintain a detailed and effective assets register. Assets management is not a significant aspect of our strategic business.

Purchasing

All purchasing is carried out in line with the requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Accountable Authority’s Instructions and Financial Guidelines, and in keeping with the core principles of ethical, efficient, effective and economical conduct. Templates covering all aspects of purchasing and approval have been developed and are used consistently.

All procurements in excess of $10,000 are reported in AusTender, and contracts in excess of $100,000 are included in Senate Order 192 reporting.

Consultants

Our core business, to conduct research and communicate the findings, can require the use of consultant expertise. Consultants are generally engaged when particular specialist expertise is

necessary and sufficiently skilled expertise is not immediately available in-house, or independent advice is required.

The services provided by new and continuing consultants in the reporting period included website content governance services, the review and audit of financial activities, human resources and business process analyses, as well as media relations services.

Processes for the engagement of consultants were consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Financial Guidelines. As with all procurement, the priority in the engagement of consultants is to obtain value for money. Competitive processes are used for the selection of consultants, and the Accountable Authority’s Instructions contained guidelines for the approval of expenditure.

Consistent with the policy of including trend data in annual reports, expenditure on consultancy contracts over the three most recent financial years is listed in Table 4.6 (page 49).

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 48

Table 4.6: Expenditure on consultancy contracts over 2016/17 to 2018/19 (incl. GST)

Financial year

Consultancy contract expenditure $

2016/17 386,888

2017/18 366,279

2018/19 232,790

During 2018/19, three new consultancy contracts were entered into (including those to the value of less than $10,000), involving total actual expenditure of $89,842 (incl. GST). In addition, five ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the year, involving total actual expenditure of $142,948 (incl. GST). Expenditure for the year totalled $232,790 (incl. GST).

The Annual Report contains information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies over $10,000 is available on the AusTender website: www.tenders.gov.au

Commissioning bodies

During the 2018/19 financial year, the following organisations commissioned projects from the Institute:

ƒ Attorney-G eneral’s Department

ƒ Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety Ltd

ƒ Centracare South West NSW

ƒ Central Queensland University

ƒ Department of Education, Northern Territory

ƒ Department of Education and Training

ƒ Department of Health

ƒ Department of Social Services

ƒ Department of Veterans’ Affairs

ƒ Economic and Social Research Council UK

ƒ Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

ƒ National Centre for Vocational Education Research

ƒ National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

ƒ Northern Territory Government

ƒ Parenting Research Centre

ƒ Queensland Family Child Commission

ƒ RMIT Training Pty Ltd

ƒ Singapore Ministry of Social and Family Development

ƒ University of New South Wales (Social Policy Research Centre)

ƒ Victorian Department of Health and Human Services

ƒ Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

Management and accountability 49

© GettyImages/Thomas Northcut

Australian National Audit Office access clauses

Our contract templates contain standard clauses to provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises. All contracts let during the reporting period contained these standard clauses.

Exempt contracts

We have not entered into any contracts or standing offers above the reporting threshold value of $10,000 that have been exempted from publication in AusTender.

Procurement initiatives to support small business

We support small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Our procurement practices support small and medium enterprises (SMEs) by using the following:

ƒ the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low-r isk procurements valued under $200,000

ƒ Australian Industry Participation Plans in whole-of-government procurement where applicable

ƒ the Small Business Engagement Principles (outlined in the government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda), such as communicating in clear, simple language and presenting information in an accessible format

ƒ electronic systems or other processes used to facilitate on-time payment performance, including the use of payment cards.

SME and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website: www.finance.gov.au/ procurement/statistics-on-commonwealth-purchasing-contracts/

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 50

© GettyImages/manonallard

Five —

Financial statements

Financial statements 51

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 52

Financial statements 53

Statement by the Director and Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2019 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41 (2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Institute of Family Studies will be able to pay it's debts as and when they fall due.

Anne Hollonds M alcolm Williamson

Director C hief Financial Officer

06 September 2019 0 6 September 2019

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 54

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2019

Notes

2019 $

2018 $

Original

Budget 2019 $

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 3A 9,823,638 8,383,158 10,402,000

Suppliers 3B 4,218,110 4,280,213 4,338,000

Depreciation and amortisation 6A 448,535 623,453 347,000

Losses from asset sales 11,777 26,221 -

Total expenses 14,502,058 13,313,045 15,087,000

Own-source income

Own-source revenue

Sale of goods and rendering of services 4A 9,601,719 8,202,350 10,195,000

Royalties 30,092 33,030 44,000

Other revenue 4B 44,113 51,203 57,000

Total own-source revenue 9,675,925 8,286,583 10,296,000

Gains

Gains from sale of assets 8,747 - 32,000

Total gains 8,747 - 32,000

Total own-source income 9,684,672 8,286,583 10,326,000

Net cost of services (4,817,387) (5,026,462) (4,759,000)

Revenue from Government 4C 4,412,000 4,683,000 4,412,000

Deficit before income tax on continuing operations (405,387) (343,462) (347,000)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation surplus 82,210 - -

Total other comprehensive income 82,210 - -

Total comprehensive loss (323,176) (343,462) (347,000)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 55

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2019

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2018/19 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2018/19 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items

Employee benefits are lower than budget as Average Service Level (ASL) was lower than anticipated due to delays in commencement of project research in 2018/19. There were also several unfilled budget positions during the year.

Employee benefits

The Institute incurred additional costs in data collection and travel. Suppliers

Depreciation was higher due to amortisation of lease incentive for a full year. Depreciation and amortisation

The majority of the Institute’s revenue is earned from commissioned research and/or evaluation projects. The Institute’s estimated revenue as published in the 2018/19 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on anticipated new contracts.

During 2018/19 the total value of research the Institute was commissioned to deliver was less than anticipated new contracts.

Sale of goods and rendering of services

Lower revenue was earned from cost recovery activities and support of administrative activities Other revenue

Valuation of non-financial assets was undertaken at the end of the year and resulted in an asset revaluation surplus of $82,210. Changes in asset revaluation surplus

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 56

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2019

Notes 2019

$

2018 $

Original

Budget 2019 $

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 5A 1,660,720 1,017,446 474,000

Trade and other receivables 5B 8,534,735 7,279,317 6,607,000

Total financial assets 10,195,455 8,296,763 7,081,000

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements 6A 1,834,567 1,782,741 984,300

Plant and equipment 6A 880,080 813,996 345,700

Intangibles 6A 42,000 4,392 132,000

Prepayments 6B 299,493 233,565 309,000

Total non-financial assets 3,056,140 2,834,694 1,771,000

Total assets 13,251,596 11,131,457 8,852,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Unearned income 7A 7,327,257 5,215,200 4,078,000

Supplier payables 7B 207,069 170,742 313,000

Other payables 7C 877,304 977,313 85,000

Total payables 8,411,630 6,363,255 4,476,000

Provisions

Employee provisions 8A 2,234,732 2,139,087 2,211,000

Other provisions 8B 350,296 240,000 -

Total provisions 2,585,028 2,379,087 2,211,000

Total liabilities 10,996,658 8,742,342 6,687,000

Net assets 2,254,938 2,389,115 2,165,000

EQUITY

Contributed equity 4,362,511 4,173,511 4,435,000

Reserves 296,630 214,420 393,000

Accumulated deficit (2,404,203) (1,998,816) (2,663,000)

Total equity 2,254,938 2,389,115 2,165,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 57

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2019

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2018/19 PBS.

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2018/19 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items

The Institute received $1,224,341.41 of section 74 receipts at the end of June 2019 which were unable to be returned to the Official Public Account (OPA) during the 2018/19 financial year and was not factored into the PBS estimate of Cash at Bank Account.

Cash and cash equivalents

Several major projects have been funded in advance with cash transferred to the OPA. Trade and other receivables

Value of leasehold improvements and plant and equipment increased due to revaluation of fitouts, capitalised leasehold incentive and additional replacement of ICT equipment.

Plant and equipment

There were some deferments for software (intangibles) purchase due to operational reasons. Intangibles

Unearned revenue represents cash receipts received in advance for work yet to be performed. The Institute’s estimated revenue as published in the 2018/19 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on historical trends. The balance of unearned income at 30 June is difficult to estimate and can vary from year to year as it is impacted by the timing of payments received for contracted research projects and the timing of deliverables of those projects as these may not necessarily fall in the same financial year. Timing of payments and project deliverables are also subject to change after the publication of the PBS.

Unearned income

Other payables is largely lease incentive and GST payable on increased revenue received in June 2019. Other payables

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 58

Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2019

Notes

2019 $

2018 $

Original

Budget 2019 $

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 4,173,511 2,898,295 4,246,000

Adjusted opening balance 4,173,511 2,898,295 4,246,000

Adjustment to revaluation reserve due to disposal of assets

- 178,216 -

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Departmental capital budget 189,000 190,000 189,000

Equity injection - 907,000 -

Total transactions with owners 189,000 1,097,000 189,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 4,362,511 4,173,511 4,435,000

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period (1,998,816) (1,655,354) (2,316,000)

Adjusted opening balance (1,998,816) (1,655,354) (2,316,000)

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (405,387) (343,462) (347,000)

Total comprehensive income (405,387) (343,462) (347,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June (2,404,203) (1,998,816) (2,663,000)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 214,420 392,636 393,000

Adjusted opening balance 214,420 392,636 393,000

Adjustment to revaluation reserve due to disposal of assets

- (178,216) -

Comprehensive income

Changes in asset revaluation surplus 82,210 - -

Total comprehensive income 82,210 - -

Closing balance as at 30 June 296,630 214,420 393,000

TOTAL EQUITY 2,254,938 2,389,115 2,165,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 59

Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2019

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2018/19 PBS.

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2018/19 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items

The result for the year was an increased deficit due to revenue for contract research being lower than anticipated. Deficit for the period

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 60

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2019

Notes

2019 $

2018 $

Original

Budget 2019 $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 15,125,709 14,502,406 3,852,000

Sale of goods and rendering of services 13,192,860 12,081,800 10,767,000

GST received 426,722 - 16,000

Other 33,000 24,981 2,000

Total cash received 28,778,291 26,609,187 14,637,000

Cash used

Employee benefits (9,926,172) (8,667,396) (10,302,000)

Suppliers (4,555,009) (4,435,478) (4,305,000)

GST paid (1,068,491) (486,414) -

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA (12,566,560) (12,454,507) -

Total cash used (28,116,232) (26,043,795) (14,607,000)

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 662,059 565,392 30,000

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contribution towards purchase of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment - 600,000 -

Total cash received - 600,000 -

Cash used

Purchase of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (444,577) (2,077,330) (189,000)

Total cash used (444,577) (2,077,330) (189,000)

Net cash used by investing activities (444,577) (1,477,330) (189,000)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contributed equity 425,792 1,310,954 189,000

Total cash received 425,792 1,310,954 189,000

Net cash from financing activities 425,792 1,310,954 189,000

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held 643,274 399,016 30,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,017,446 618,430 444,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 1,660,720 1,017,446 474,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 61

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2019

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2018/19 PBS.

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2018/19 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $251,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items

The presentation of the Cash Flow Statement in the PBS does not require entities to account for the return of section 74 receipts to the OPA and the redrawing of these funds from the relevant Appropriation Item. Subsequently, the Cash Flow Statement presented in the 2018/19 Financial Statements identifies significantly higher amounts of ‘Cash received’ and ‘Cash used’ than in the PBS.

Appropriation, Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA

The majority of the Institute’s revenue is earned from commissioned research and/or evaluation projects. The Institute’s estimated revenue as published in the 2018/19 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on historical trends.

During 2018/19 the total value of revenue received for research and evaluation the Institute was commissioned to deliver was more than historical averages, resulting in a higher value of unearned income carried forward to future periods.

Sale of goods and rendering of services

The Institute incurred additional costs in data collection, travel and relocation costs including legal advice relating to signing of the new leasehold.

Suppliers

Employee numbers were below budgeted as new projects took time to engage new employees, resulting in reduced employee benefits. Employee benefits

The Institute completed fit out of new premises at 40 City Road, Southbank, Including new telephony, and also upgraded it's Information Systems Technology.

Purchase of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 62

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

Note 1: O verview and summary of significant accounting policies 64

Note 2: E vents after the reporting period 65

Note 3: Expenses 66

Note 4: O wn-source income 68

Note 5: F inancial assets 70

Note 6: N on-financial assets 71

Note 7: Payables 74

Note 8: Provisions 75

Note 9: Appropriations 76

Note 10: Net cash appropriation arrangements 77

Note 11: K ey Management Personnel remuneration 78

Note 12: R elated party disclosures 79

Note 13: C ontingent assets and liabilities 79

Note 14: F inancial instruments 80

Note 15: F air value measurements 83

Note 16: A ggregate assets and liabilities 85

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 63

Note 1: O verview and summary of significant accounting policies

1.1 B asis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

b) A ustralian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FRRs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the Institute or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executory contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

1.2 S ignificant accounting judgements and estimates

Refer to Note 15 for explanation of assumptions used in estimating the fair value of assets.

The liability for long service leave has been estimated using present value techniques in accordance with the short hand method in accordance with section 24 of the FRR. This takes into account expected salary growth, attrition and future discounting using Commonwealth bond rates.

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.3 N ew Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

New standards, amendments to standards and interpretations that were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board prior to the signoff date and are applicable to future reporting periods are not expected to have a future material impact on the Institute's financial statements.

AASB 16 Leases issued February 2016

Application date for the Institute: 1 January 2019.

The Institute operates from leased premises and the application of AASB 16 in the future may have a impact on the amounts reported and disclosures made in the Institute’s financial statements. However, the Institue is currently in the process of detail review in order to implement AASB 16 from 1 July 2019.

64

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

1.4 T axation

The Institute is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except:

a) w here the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

b) f or receivables and payables.

Note 2: E vents after the reporting period

There are no subsequent events that have been identified.

65

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 3: E xpenses

2019 $

2018 $

Note 3A: Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 6,969,087 6,136,802

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 961,865 785,674

Defined benefit plans 469,403 317,345

Leave and other entitlements 1,323,112 954,449

Other employee benefits 100,172 188,887

Total employee benefits 9,823,638 8,383,158

Note 3B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 1,265,564 332,981

Contractors 1,320,483 2,216,839

Travel 357,328 335,660

IT Services 253,036 313,794

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 3,196,411 3,199,274

Goods supplied 72,345 118,574

Services rendered 3,124,066 3,080,700

Total goods supplied 3,196,411 3,199,274

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals 637,798 761,759

Workers compensation expenses 383,899 319,180

Total other suppliers 1,021,697 1,080,939

Total suppliers 4,218,110 4,280,212

Leasing commitments The Institute in its capacity as lessee holds a lease, payable monthly, for the occupancy of Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank for 10 years, due to end on 30 April 2028. The lease includes an option to extend for a further five years.

Commitments for operating lease rentals as follows:

Within 1 year 726,535 700,923

Between 1 to 5 years 3,179,458 3,068,340

More than 5 years 3,496,209 4,333,863

Total operating lease commitments 7,402,203 8,103,126

66

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Accounting Policy: Employee benefits

Superannuation

The majority of the staff of the Institute are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance and Deregulations administered schedules and notes.

The Institute makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The Institute accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June each year represents pro-rata outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

Refer also to note 8 for accounting policy with respect to leave provisions.

Accounting Policy: Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits. Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of the benefits derived from the leased assets.

The Institute has no finance leases.

Note 3: Expenses continued

67

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 4: O wn-source income

2019 $

2018 $

Own-source revenue

Note 4A: Sale of goods and rendering of services

Sale of goods and rendering of services in connection with

Sale of goods 24,567 2,554

Rendering of services 9,577,152 8,199,796

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 9,601,719 8,202,350

Note 4B: Other revenue

Cost recovery 11,113 10,086

ANAO Audit services received free of charge 33,000 31,500

Other - 9,617

Total other revenue 44,113 51,203

Note 4C: Revenue from Government

Departmental appropriations 4,412,000 4,683,000

Total revenue from Government 4,412,000 4,683,000

Accounting Policy: Revenue

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

a) t he risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

b) t he Institute retains no managerial involvement nor effective control over the goods;

c) t he revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

d) i t is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Institute.

The Institute receives contract revenue by conducting high-quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding families in Australia for various stakeholders. The key stakeholders comprise mainly other Commonwealth agencies, State Government agencies as well as non-government entities.

Revenue from rendering of contract services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

a) t he amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

b) t he probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Institute.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to either:

a) s ervices performed to date as a percentage of total services to be performed; or

b) t he proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction; or

c) m ilestones achieved against provision in the contract.

68

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Accounting Policy: Revenue (continued)

Unearned income are commissioned research revenue payments received but that cannot be recognised as revenue because the tasks or deliverables are not completed at the time payments were received.

Copyright royalty revenue for the use of the Institute’s publications and bibliographic databases is recognised on an accrual basis. The Institute has no control over the amount of royalties and a provisional amount is accrued based on historical receipts.

Cost recovery which relates mainly to Comcare receipts and sponsorships of travel expenses is recognised on an accrual basis.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30-day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the Institute gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Resources received free of charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Accounting Policy: Gains

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements. The Institute did not receive any contribution of assets in 2018/19 or 2017/18.

Sale of assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Note 4: Own-source income continued

69

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 5: F inancial assets

2019 $

2018 $

Note 5A: Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,660,720 1,017,446

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,660,720 1,017,446

Note 5B: Trade and other receivables

Appropriation receivable (existing programs) 6,694,386 5,078,328

Goods and services receivables in connection with

Goods and services 1,813,868 2,177,295

Other receivables 26,481 23,694

Total goods and services receivables 1,840,349 2,200,989

Total trade and other receivables 8,534,735 7,279,317

Trade and other receivables (net) aged as follows

Not overdue 8,534,735 7,114,629

Overdue by:

0 to 30 days - -

31 to 60 days - 7,056

61 to 90 days - 108,682

More than 90 days - 48,950

Total trade and other receivables (net) 8,534,735 7,279,317

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for receivables .

Accounting Policy: Cash

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes:

a) c ash on hand; and

b) d emand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

70

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 6: N on-financial assets

Note 6A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment and intangibles

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment and intangibles for 2019

Leasehold improvements $

Plant and equipment $

Computer software $

Total $

As at 1 July 2018

Gross book value 1,866,259 1,091,715 218,416 3,176,390

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (83,518) (277,719) (214,024) (575,261)

Total as at 1 July 2018 1,782,741 813,996 4,392 2,601,129

Additions

Purchase 1,160 383,793 42,000 426,953

Provision for make good 106,667 - - 106,667

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income

150,379 (68,169) - 82,210

Depreciation and amortisation (206,380) (237,763) (4,392) (448,535)

Other movements -

Accumulated depreciation on disposals - 106,098 - 106,098

Disposals - (117,875) - (117,875)

Total as at 30 June 2019 1,834,567 880,080 42,000 2,756,647

Total as at 30 June 2019 represented by

Gross book value 1,863,367 880,080 42,000 2,785,447

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (28,800) - - (28,800)

Total as at 30 June 2019 1,834,567 880,080 42,000 2,756,647

Note: No plant and equipment, leasehold improvements and computer software are expected to be sold within the next 12 months .

Accounting Policy: Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

71

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Accounting Policy: Leasehold improvements, plant and equipment

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000 and for leasehold improvements and computer software for purchases costing less than $10,000 which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by AIFS where there exists an obligation to restore property to it’s original condition. These costs are included in the value of leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for 'make good' recognised.

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset class Fair value measurement

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and equipment Market selling price

Following initial recognition at cost, leasehold improvements, plant and equipment were carried at fair value. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable leasehold improvements, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Institute using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Leasehold improvements 10 years

Plant and equipment 3 to 15 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2019. As no indicators of impairment were identified. It was determined that there was no impairment.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Institute were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

72

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Accounting Policy: Intangibles

The Institute’s intangibles comprise commercially purchased software and are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $10,000 which are expensed on acquisition. Intangibles are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Institute’s software are 3 to 5 years (2017/18: 3 to 5 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2019.

2019 $

2018 $

Note 6B: Prepayments

Prepayments

No more than 12 months 299,493 233,565

More than 12 months - -

Total prepayments 299,493 233,565

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for prepayments .

73

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 7: P ayables

2019 $

2018 $

Note 7A: Unearned income

Unearned income advanced 7,327,257 5,215,200

Total unearned income 7,327,257 5,215,200

Note 7B: Suppliers

Suppliers in connection with

Trade creditors and accruals 207,069 170,742

Total suppliers 207,069 170,742

Suppliers are expected to be settled in no more than 12 months. Settlement was usually made within 30 days.

Note 7C: Other payables

Wages and salaries 70,543 57,075

Superannuation 10,732 9,282

Lease incentive 530,000 600,000

GST payable 267,577 315,832

Other (1,548) (4,876)

Total other payables 877,304 977,313

Other payables to be settled

No more than 12 months 407,304 437,313

More than 12 months 470,000 540,000

Total other payables 877,304 977,313

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities

Unearned income are commissioned research revenue payments received but that cannot be recognised as revenue because the tasks or deliverables are not completed at the time payments were received.

The Institute classifies its financial liabilities as ‘other financial liabilities’. This comprises suppliers and other payables that are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

74

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 8: P rovisions

2019 $

2018 $

Note 8A: Employee provisions

Leave 2,234,732 1,999,094

Separations and redundancies - 139,993

Total employee provisions 2,234,732 2,139,087

Employee leave provisions expected to be settled

No more than 12 months 726,804 734,778

More than 12 months 1,507,928 1,404,309

Total employee provisions 2,234,732 2,139,087

No liability existed for separation and redundancy in 2019. (2018: three redundancies totalling $139,993)

$ $

Note 8B: Other provisions

Provision for make good

As at 1 July 240,000 -

Additional provision made 106,667 240,000

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate 3,628 -

Total other provisions 350,295 240,000

The Institute currently has an agreement for leasing of premises which has provisions requiring the Institute to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. The Institute has made a provision to reflect present value of this obligation.

Accounting Policy: Provisions

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits ) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the Institute is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the Institute’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by the use of the Department of Finance’s shorthand method using the Standard Commonwealth sector probability profile. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

75

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 9: A ppropriations

Note 9A: Annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

Annual appropriations for 2019

Annual

appropriation1 $

Adjustments to appropriation2 $

Total

appropriation $

Appropriation applied in 2019 (current and prior years)

$

Variance3 $

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 4,412,000 12,566,560 16,978,560 15,125,709 1,852,851

Capital budget4 189,000 - 189,000 425,792 (236,792)

Total departmental 4,601,000 12,566,560 17,167,560 15,551,501 1,616,059

Notes: 1 . I n 2018/19, there were no appropriations which have been withheld (Section 51 of PGPA Act) and quarantined for administration purposes . 2 . I n 2018/19, adjustments to appropriation were mostly PGPA Act Section 74 receipts . 3 . T he variance is attributable to the change in the balance of unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2018 and 30 June 2019

(see note 9B) . This is due to delays in revenue being recognised on contracted research and timing of capital expenditure . 4 . D epartmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No . 1 ,3,5) . They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts .

Annual appropriations for 2018

Annual

appropriation1 $

Adjustments to appropriation2 $

Total

appropriation $

Appropriation applied in 2018 (current and prior years)

$

Variance3 $

Departmental

Ordinary annual services 4,683,000 12,454,507 17,137,507 14,502,406 2,635,101

Capital budget4,5 190,000 - 190,000 403,953 (213,953)

Equity injections6 907,000 907,000 907,000 -

Total departmental 5,780,000 12,454,507 18,234,507 15,813,359 2,421,148

Notes: 1 . I n 2017/18, there were no appropriations which have been withheld (Section 51 of PGPA Act) and quarantined for administration purposes . 2 . I n 2017/18, adjustments to appropriation were mostly PGPA Act Section 74 receipts . 3 . T he variance is attributable to the change in the balance of Unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2017 and 30 June 2018

(see note 9B) . 4 . D epartmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No . 1 ,3,5) . They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts . 5 . T he allocation of amounts between operating and capital is set out in the 2017-18 Portfolio Budget Statement as there is no itemisation

in Appropriation Acts . A re-allocation of $251,000 from departmental operating to departmental capital was approved by the Minister for Finance on 15/09/2017 . As re-desigation between operating and capital are not permitted under accounting standards, they have not been reflected in this appropriation note . 6 . E quity injections are appropriated through Appropriation Act (No . 2) via the modernisation fund .

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 9B: Unspent annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

2019 $

2018 $

Departmental

Appropriation Act 1 2017-18 - 5,078,328

Appropriation Act 1 2017-18 Cash at bank - 1,017,446

Appropriation Act 1 2018-19 6,694,386 -

Appropriation Act 1 2018-19 Cash at bank 1,660,720 -

Total departmental 8,355,107 6,095,774

Accounting Policy: Transactions with the Government as owner

Equity injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Other distributions to owners

The FRR require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless in the nature of a dividend. There was no distribution to owners in 2018/19 or 2017/18.

Note 10: N et cash appropriation arrangements

2019 $

2018 $

Total comprehensive income (loss) less depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations 125,358 279,991

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations (448,535) (623,453)

Total comprehensive income (loss) - as per Statement of Comprehensive Income

(323,176) (343,462)

Note 9: Appropriations continued

77

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 11: K ey Management Personnel remuneration

During the reporting period ended 30 June 2019, the Institute had three executives who meet the definition of Key Management Personnel (KMP). KMP are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of AIFS directly or indirectly. AIFS determined the KMP to be the Director, Deputy Director Corporate, and Deputy Director Research. Their names and length of terms as KMP are summarised below:

Name Position Term as KMP

Anne Hollands Director Full year

Michael Alexander Deputy Director Full year

Kelly Hand Deputy Director Full year

2019 $

2018 $

Short-term employee benefits

Salary 671,059 654,505

Other benefits and allowances 40,534 57,494

Total short-term employee benefits 711,593 711,999

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 105,559 98,692

Total post-employment benefits 105,559 98,692

Other long-term employee benefits

Long service leave 18,987 19,531

Total other long-term employee benefits 18,987 19,531

Total Key Management Personnel remuneration expenses 836,139 830,222

KMP remuneration was prepared on an accrual basis. The total number of KMP that are included in the above table is three (2018: Three).

The above KMP remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Institute.

78

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 12: Re lated party disclosures

Related party relationships

The Institute is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties of the Institute include but are not limited to:

ƒ KMP as outlined in Note 11;

ƒ Close family members of KMP outlined in Note 11; and

ƒ Organisations controlled by these KMP and their close family members.

Related parties to the Institute also included the Portfolio Minister, Cabinet Ministers and other Australian Government entities.

Transaction with related parties

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during the reporting period by the entity, it has been determined that there are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

Note 13: C ontingent assets and liabilities

The Institute had no quantifiable or unquantifiable contingent assets or liabilities as at 30 June 2019 (2018: nil).

79

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 14: F inancial instruments

Note 14A: Categories of Financial Instruments

2019 $

2018 $

Financial assets under AASB 139

Receivables

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,017,446

Goods and services 2,177,295

Other receivables 23,694

Total receivables 3,218,435

Total financial asset at fair value through profit or loss 3,218,435

Financial Assets under AASB 9

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,660,720

Goods and services 1,813,868

Other receivables 26,481

Total financial assets at amortised cost 3,501,069

Total financial assets 3,501,069 3,218,435

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors and accruals 207,069 170,742

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 207,069 170,742

Total financial liabilities 207,069 170,742

80

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9

Notes

AASB 139 original

classification

AASB 9 new classification

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Financial assets class

Cash on hand or on deposit 5A Amortised Cost Amortised Cost 1,017,446 1,017,446

Goods and services 5B Amortised Cost Amortised Cost 2,177,295 2,177,295

Other receivables 5B Amortised Cost Amortised Cost 23,694 23,694

Total financial assets 3,218,435 3,218,435

Reconciliation of carrying amounts of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9

AASB 139 carrying amount at 30 June 2018

$'000 Reclassification $'000

Remeasure-ment $'000

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000

Financial assets at amortised cost

Receivables

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,017,446 - - 1,017,446

Goods and services 2,177,295 - - 2,177,295

Other receivables 23,694 - - 23,694

Total amortised cost 3,218,435 - - 3,218,435

Accounting Policy: Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the entity classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) fi nancial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b) fi nancial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and

c) fi nancial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Note 14: Financial instruments continued

81

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Accounting Policy: Financial assets (continued)

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as a result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial assets either doesn't meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Note 14: Financial instruments continued

82

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Note 14B: Net gain or losses on financial assets/financial liabilities

There was no gain or losses from financial assets - loans and receivables - at amortised cost in the financial year ended 30 June 2019 (2018: nil).

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities and financial assets

Financial liabilities and financial assets that are not contractual (such as GST, created as a result of statutory requirements imposed by governments) are not financial instruments.

Receivables Receivables consist of contractual receivables, Such as accounts payable and accruals.

Payables Payables consist of contractual payables, such as accounts payable and accruals.

Note 15: F air value measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The remaining assets and liabilities disclosed in the statement of financial position do not apply the fair value hierarchy.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Accounting policy

AIFS engaged the service of the Jones, Lang, La Salle (JLL) to conduct a detailed external valuation of all non-financial assets at 30 June 2019 and has relied upon those outcomes to establish carrying amounts. An annual assessment is undertaken to determine whether the carrying amount of the assets is materially different from the fair value. Comprehensive valuations carried out at least

once every three years. JLL has provided written assurance to AIFS that the models developed are in compliance with AASB 13.

The methods utilised to determine and substantiate the unobservable inputs are derived and evaluated as follows:

Physical Depreciation and Obsolescence - Assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the Depreciated Replacement Cost approach. Under the Depreciated Replacement Cost approach the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and then adjusted to take in physical depreciation and obsolescence. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration. For all Leasehold Improvement assets, the consumed economic benefit/asset obsolescence deduction is determined based on the term of the associated lease.

AIFS's policy is to recognise transfers into and transfers out of fair value hierarchy levels as at the end of the reporting period.

83

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

15A: Fair value measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2019 $

2018 $ Valuation technique(s) and inputs used

Non-financial assets 2 Plant and equipment1 - - Market approach: This approach seeks to estimate the

current value of an asset with reference to recent market transactions involving identical or comparable assets.

Inputs: Prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving plant and equipment assets were considered.

Plant and equipment1 880,080 813,996 Depreciated replacement cost: The amount a market participant would be prepared to pay to acquire or construct a substitute asset of comparable utility, adjusted for physical depreciation and obsolescence.

Inputs: Current prices for substitute assets. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the assets under consideration.

Leasehold improvements1 1,834,567 1,782,741 Depreciated replacement cost: The amount a market participant would be prepared to pay to acquire or construct a substitute asset of comparable utility, adjusted for physical depreciation and obsolescence.

Inputs: Current costs per square metre of floor area relevant to the location of the asset. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on the term of the associated lease.

Total non-financial assets 2,714,647 2,596,737

Notes: 1 . N o non-financial assets were measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2019 (2018: nil) . 2 . A IFS’ assets are held for operational purposes and not held for the purposes of deriving a profit . The current use of all non-financial asset’s is considered their highest and best use .

3 . T here were no transfers between Levels 1 and 2 for recurring fair value measurements during the year .

Note 15: Fair value measurements continued

84

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

15B: Reconciliation for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements

Non-financial assets

Leasehold improvements Plant and equipment Total

2019 $

2018 $

2019 $

2018 $

2019 $

2018 $

As at 1 July 1,782,741 233,207 813,995 683,541 2,596,736 916,748

Total gains/(losses) recognised in net cost of services1 (206,380) 84,095 (131,665) (53,199) (338,045) 30,896

Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income2 150,379 - (68,169) - 82,210 -

Addition to make good 106,667 240,000 - 106,667 240,000

Purchases 1,160 1,575,249 383,794 502,081 384,954 2,077,330

Disposals - (349,810) (117,875) (318,428) (117,875) (668,238)

Transfers into Level 33 - - - -

Transfers out of Level 3 - - - - - -

Total as at 30 June 1,834,567 1,782,741 880,080 813,995 2,714,647 2,596,736

Notes: 1 . T hese gains/(losses) are presented in the Statement of Comprehensive Income under Depreciation and Amortisation and Write Down and Impairment of Assets . 2 . T hese gains/(losses) are presented in the Statement of Comprehensive Income under Other Changes in Asset Revaluation Reserves . 3 . T here have been no transfers into or out of Level 3 during the year (2018: nil) .

Note 16: A ggregate assets and liabilities

2019 $

2018 $

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 10,943,483 9,153,781

More than 12 months 2,308,112 1,977,676

Total assets 13,251,595 11,131,456

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 8,707,354 6,582,033

More than 12 months 2,289,304 2,160,309

Total liabilities 10,996,658 8,742,342

Note 15: Fair value measurements continued

85

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2019

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 86

© GettyImages/Imgorthand

Six —

Appendices

Appendices 87

Appendix A: Other mandatory information

Work health and safety

We are committed to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace, and meeting its responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. See 'Management and accountability' (page 38) for our workplace health and safety policies, processes and performance.

Advertising and market research

No payments of $13,200 or greater (inclusive of GST) were made for the purposes of advertising and market research expenditure, as described in section 321A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Our management and staff continue to be committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

The HWT Tower in which we are located has a 4.5 star NABERS energy rating. Lighting throughout our office is sensitive to movement, meaning it will automatically turn off after a set period of no activity and only turn back on when movement is detected to reduce energy usage on unnecessary lighting. In November we installed block-out blinds on all north and west facing windows to reduce heat transmission in the warmer months.

Other energy efficient practices, such as staff shutting down their computers at the end of the day continue to be encouraged, together with ensuring all office equipment and appliances conform to environmental standards.

Meaningful comparison of electricity consumption within the tenancy with previous years is not possible yet as we have only just completed our first 12 months occupancy, although we are confident that our consumption is less than our previous tenancy due to our reduced footprint (from 1,532 m2 over 1.5 floors to 1,290 m2 over a single floor).

Adverse effects due to transport (causing emissions to the air and use of resources) continue to be mostly due to domestic airline flights. The proximity of our office to train and tram networks enables the majority of staff to take public transport to and from the office. Webinars continue to be very popular and regularly replace face-to-face seminar presentations, extending their reach and reducing the need for people to travel to the Institute to hear them. Installation of new state of the art video-conferencing equipment in late 2018 has meant reduced travel for both staff and key stakeholders as it is now very easy to participate in meetings from our office.

Paper consumption (use of natural resources) is minimised by using recycled paper and ensuring that the office printers default to using both sides of the paper. Two new Konica Minolta printers were installed in February 2019 providing updated technology, reduced consumption of resources during use and more granular reporting of print usage.

Paper use in 2018/19 (number of printer/ copier impressions) decreased by 16.22%. This continues the decreased usage reported over the previous three years.

Our transition to digital working in line with the Australian Government’s digital transition and digital continuity 2020 policies is continuing. All staff now use laptop computers, meaning they can be fully mobile when they work, with less need to print or store hardcopy records.

Waste generation is reduced by the separation of paper, cardboard, glass, plastics and organic waste at waste stations throughout the tenancy.

Disability reporting

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007/08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 88

and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available from the Commission’s website (see apsc.gov.au). Since 2010/11, departments and agencies have not been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by a new National Disability Strategy 2010-20, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with a disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with a disability are faring. The first of these reports was published in late 2014 (see dss.gov.au).

Information Publication Scheme

Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements.

Although no new requests were received in 2018/19, a decision made in 2017/18 was reviewed and upheld by the Office of Australian Information Commissioner.

Contact details

FOI Contact Officer Australian Institute of Family Studies Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006

Telephone ( 03) 9214 7888 Facsimile ( 03) 9214 7839 Email aifs-foi@aifs.gov.au

Appendices 89

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2018/19

Actual available appropriation for 2018/19 $ (a)

Payments made 2018/19 $ (b)

Balance remaining 2018/19 $ (a) - (b)

Ordinary annual services1

Departmental appropriation2 23,263,333 14,908,227 8,355,106

Total 23,263,333 14,908,227 8,355,106

Total ordinary annual services A 23,263,333 14,908,227 8,355,106

Other services3

Departmental non-operating

Equity injections4 - - -

Total - - -

Total other services B - - -

Total available annual appropriations and payments

23,263,333 14,908,227 8,355,106

Special appropriations

Total special appropriations C - - -

Special accounts5

Total special accounts D - - -

Total resourcing and payments A+B+C+D 23,263,333 14,908,227 8,355,106

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts through annual appropriations

- - -

Total net resourcing and payments for AIFS 23,263,333 14,908,227 8,355,106

Notes: 1 . A ppropriation Act (No . 1) 2018/19 and Appropriation Act (No . 3) 2018/19 (and Appropriation Act (No . 5) 2018/19 if necessary) . This may also include prior year departmental appropriation and Section 74 Retained Revenue Receipts . 2 . I ncludes an amount of $0 . 1 89 million in 2018/19 for the Departmental Capital Budget . For accounting purposes this amount has been

designated as ‘contributions by owners’ . 3 . A ppropriation Act (No . 2) 2018/19 and Appropriation Act (No . 4) 2018/19 (and Appropriation Act (No . 6) 2018/19 if necessary) . 4 . I ncludes appropriation equity provided through Appropriation Bill (No . 2 ) 2018/19 . 5 . D oes not include ‘Special Public Money’ held in accounts like Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts (SOETM) .

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 90

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2018/19

Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, and the broader community

Budget 11 2018/19 $’000

Actual expenses 2018/19 $’000 (b)

Variation 2018/19

$’000 (a) - (b)

Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation2 14,708 14,021 687

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year

379 481 (102)

Total for Program 1.1 15,087 14,502 585

2018/19 2018/19 2018/19

Average staffing level (number) 82 79 (3)

Notes: 1 . F ull year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2018/19 Budget at Additional Estimates . 2 . D epartmental Appropriation combines Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Acts Nos . 1, 3 and 5) and Retained Revenue Receipts under Section 74 of the PGPA Act 2013 .

Appendices 91

Appendix C: AIFS publications, events, webinars, presentations and submissions 2018/19

The following are the research publications, presentations and other outputs prepared by AIFS staff during 2018/19.

Publications

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2018). Corporate Plan 2018/19 to 2021/22. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2018). Annual report 2017/18. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2018). Growing Up in Australia - The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children annual statistical report 2017. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2018). Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Data User Guide - December 2018. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2018). Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: Data issues Waves 1 to 7. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bandara, D., Sipthorp, M., Sufi, F., & Daraganova, G. (2018). Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) data in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Technical Paper No. 21). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter. J. A. (2018). Parents living elsewhere (Longitudinal Study of Australian Children Technical Paper No. 22). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J. A. (2018). Who do adolescents spend their time with? In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia - The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 25-34). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J. A. (2019). Fathers and work: A statistical overview (AIFS Research Summary). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Browne, M., Hing, N., Russell, A. M. T., Thomas, A., & Jenkinson, R. (2019). The impact of exposure to wagering advertisements and inducements on intended and actual betting expenditure: An ecological momentary assessment study. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 8, 146-156.

Carson, R. (2019). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the Children and Young People in Separated Families project. CFCA short article. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Carson, R., Qu, L., De Maio, J., & Roopani, D. (2019). Direct cross-examination in family law matters (AIFS Research Summary). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Child Family Community Australia. (2018). Digital technology use in the child, youth and family sector (CFCA Resource Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Child Family Community Australia. (2018). The intersection between the child protection and youth justice systems (CFCA Resource Sheet). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Daraganova, G., Smart, D., & Romaniuk, H. (2018). Family Wellbeing Study: Part 1: Families of current and ex-serving ADF members: Health and wellbeing. Canberra: Department of Defence and Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Dean, A. (2019). Elder abuse: Key issues and emerging evidence (CFCA Paper No. 51). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Edwards, B., Forrest, W., Vassallo, S., Greenwood, C., & Olsson, C. A. (2019). Depression and anxiety in adolescent and young adult offenders: A longitudinal study from 13 to 32 years using the Australian Temperament Project. Journal of Criminal Justice, 62, 87-93.

El-Murr, A. (2018). Intimate partner violence in Australian refugee communities: Scoping review of issues and service responses (CFCA Paper No. 50). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 92

Forrest, W., Edwards, B., & Daraganova, G. (2019). The intergenerational consequences of war: Anxiety, depression, suicidality, and mental health among the children of war veterans. International Journal of Epidemiology, 47, 1060-1067.

Gray, M., Qu, L., Stanton, D., & Weston, R. (2019). Fifty years of changing families: Implications for income support. In P. Saunders (Ed.), Revisiting Henderson: Poverty, social security and basic income (pp. 67-88). Carlton: Melbourne University Publishing.

Gray, S., & Daraganova, G. (2018). Adolescent help-seeking. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia - The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 59-72). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Gray, S., Romaniuk, H., & Daraganova, G. (2018). Adolescents’ relationships with their peers. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia - The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 47-58). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Gribble, R., Mahar, A., Godfrey, K. Muir, S., Albright, D., Daraganova, G., Spinks, N., Fear, N., & Cramm, H. (2018). What does the term ‘military family’ mean? A comparison across four countries. Kingston, Ontario: Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research.

Harvey, J., & Muir, S. (2018). National survey of FaRS-funded service providers (Research Report). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Hateley-Browne, J., Hodge, L., Polimeni, M., & Mildon, R. (2019). Implementation in action: A guide to implementing evidence-informed programs and practices (Families and Children Expert Panel Practice Resource). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Hervatin, M., (2019). Working with fathers who use violence: Highlights from the Invisible Practices project. Emerging Minds short article. Adelaide: Emerging Minds.

Hing, N., Browne M., Russell, A. M. T., Greer N., Thomas, A., Jenkinson, R., & Rockloff, M. (2019). Where's the bonus in bonus bets? Assessing sports bettors' comprehension of their true cost. Journal of Gambling Studies, 35, 587-599.

Hing, N., Russell, A., Rockloff, M., Browne, M., Langham, E., Li, E., Lole, L., Greer, N., Thomas, A., Jenkinson, R., Rawat, V., & Thorne, H. (2018). Effects of wagering marketing on vulnerable adults. Melbourne: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Hing N., Russell, A., Thomas, A., & Jenkinson, R. (2019). Wagering advertisements and inducements: Exposure and perceived influence on betting behaviour. Journal of Gambling Behaviour. DOI: 10.1007/s10899-018-09823-y.

Homel, J., & Warren, D. (2018). The relationship between parent drinking: Differences for mothers and fathers, boys and girls. Substance use and misuse, 54, 661-669.

Humphreys, C., Diemer, K., Bornemisza, A., Spiteri-Staines, A., Kaspiew, R., & Horsfall, B. (2019). More present than absent: Men who use domestic violence and their fathering. Child and Family Social Work, 24, 321-329.

Jenkinson, R., de Lacy-Vawdon, C., & Carroll, M. (2018). Weighing up the Odds: Young men, sports and betting. Final Report to the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Jenkinson, R., de Lacy-Vawdon, C., & Carroll, M. (2019). Weighing up the odds: Sports betting and young men (AGRC Research Summary). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Livingstone, C., Rintoul, A., de Lacy-Vawdon, C., Borland, R., Dietze, P., Jenkinson, R., Livingston, M., Robin Room, R., Smith, B., Stoove, M., & Winter, R. (2019). Identifying effective policy interventions to prevent gambling-related harm. Melbourne: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

McLean, S. (2018). Therapeutic residential care: An update on current issues in Australia (CFCA Paper No. 49). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Muir, S. (2018). Family Wellbeing Study: Part 2: Military family approaches to managing transition to civilian life. Canberra: Department of Defence and Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Muir, S., Purtell, J., Hand, K., & Carroll, M. (2019). Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study on Leaving Care Wave 3 Research Report: Outcomes for young people leaving care in Victoria. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Appendices 93

O’Connor, M., Warren, D., & Daraganova, G. (2018). Eating problems in mid-adolescence. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 113-124). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Price-Robertson, R. (2018). Diagnosis in child mental health: Exploring the benefits, risks and alternatives (CFCA Paper No. 48). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Price-Robertson, R., Meddick, T., & Parker, E. (2019). Supporting staff to work with children and families with complex needs: A checklist for organisations. Adelaide: Emerging Minds.

Price-Robertson, R., Reupert, A., & Maybery, D. (2019). Online peer support programs for young people with a parent who has a mental illness: Service providers' perspectives. Australian Social Work, 72, 274-286.

Price-Robertson, R, & Schuurman, C. (2019). Supporting children in families with complex needs: Nine tips for practitioners who feel out of their depth. Adelaide: Emerging Minds.

Purtell, J., Muir, S., & Carroll, M. (2019). Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study on Leaving Care Wave 2 Research Report: Transitioning to post-care life. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L. (2019). Family dispute resolution: Use, timing, and outcomes. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 40, 24-42.

Rintoul, A., & Deblaquiere, J. (2019). Gambling in Suburban Australia (AGRC Research Report). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Rioseco, P., Baxter, J., & Warren, D. (2018). Kids’ care and activities before and after school. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 87-98). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Smart, J. (2019). Needs Assessment (Families and Children Expert Panel Practice Resource). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Smart, D., Muir, S., & Daraganova, G. (2018). Family Wellbeing Study: Summary report. Canberra: Department of Defence and Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Vassallo, S., Sanson, A., Letcher, P., & Olsson, C. A. (2018). What factors protect bullies and victims from adverse outcomes? APS College of Educational and Developmental Psychologists’ e-NEWS.

Vassallo, Smart, D., Tan. E. P., Barker, S., & Letcher, P. (2018). Australian Temperament Project participant newsletter, December 2018. Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Vassallo, S., & Warren, D. (2018). Use of technology in the classroom. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 99-112). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D. (2018). Children’s housing experiences. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 9-24). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D. (2018). Children’s use of health services. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 125-142). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., Daraganova, G., & O’Connor, M. (2018). Preschool and children’s readiness for school. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 73-86). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Whitehouse, G., Baird, M., Brennan, D., & Baxter, J. A. (2018). Australia country note. In S. Blum, A. Koslowski, A. Macht, & P. Moss (Eds.), International review of leave policies and research 2018 (pp. 45-56). London: International Network on Leave Policies and Related Research.

Yu, M., & Baxter, J. (2018). Relationships between parents and young teens. In D. Warren and G. Daraganova (Eds.), Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, Annual Statistical Report 2017 (pp. 35-46). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 94

Updated CFCA resource sheets

Children in care (September 2018)

The economic costs of child abuse and neglect (September 2018)

What is child abuse and neglect? (September 2018)

Helplines and telephone counselling services for children, young people and parents (December 2018)

Child protection and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children (January 2019)

Reporting child abuse and neglect: Information for service providers (June 2019)

Events and webinars

AIFS events

Australian Institute of Family Studies 2018 Conference, Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC), 25-27 July 2018.

Outcomes Measurement and Evaluation. Workshop: Bendigo (15-16 August 2018).

Outcomes Measurement and Evaluation. Workshop: Albury (22-23 August 2018).

'Voices of children and young people in family law' Forum, hosted by the Tasmanian Commissioner for Children and Young People and the Australian Institute of Family Studies, Hobart (29 October 2018).

Stephen Crossley, Northumbria University. 'Troubled families' or a 'troubling policy'? Lessons to be learnt from the UK's Troubled Families Programme, 28 November 2018.

Christian Bason, CEO, Danish Design Centre. Policy Design Masterclass, 19 March 2019.

Lisa Calderwood, Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. Teenagers in the UK today: Initial findings from the age 14 sweep of the Millennium Cohort Study, 10 April 2019.

Outcomes Measurement and Evaluation. Workshop: Wagga Wagga (30 April - 1 May 2019)

'Family law in Australia: Where to from here?' Discussion panel, Melbourne (6 June 2019)

CFCA webinar series

Muriel Bamblett, VACCA; Candice Butler, QATSICPP. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination in child protection, 18 July 2018.

Peter Parry, University of Queensland. Diagnosing children with mental health difficulties: Benefits, risks and complexities , 2 August 2018.

Rachel Carson, AIFS; Norma Williams, UnitingCare. Give children a bigger voice more of the time: Children’s and young people’s experiences of the family law system, 27 September 2018.

Jessica Cocks, Life Without Barriers. ‘A community that values its children will cherish their parents’: Family inclusion in child protection systems, 24 October 2018.

Andrew Cummings, Multicultural Youth Advocacy Network; Sally Thompson, Multicultural Youth Tasmania. Working with young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds: Applying the National Youth Settlement Framework in mainstream services, 28 November 2018.

Erica Frydenberg, Janice Deans, University of Melbourne. Building resilience and wellbeing in the early years: Coping strategies for parents and children from CALD backgrounds, 27 February 2019.

Alissar El-Murr, AIFS; Adele Murdolo, Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health; Cecilia Barassi-Rubio, Immigrant Women’s Support Service. Intimate partner violence in Australian refugee and immigrant communities: Culturally safe strategies for practice, 27 March 2019.

Paul McDonald, Anglicare Victoria; Philip Mendes, Monash University. Extending care: Supporting young people’s transition from out-o f-home care to adulthood, 15 May 2019.

CFCA-Emerging Minds webinar series

Brad Morgan, Helen Francis, Jaisen Mahne, Emerging Minds. What is infant and child mental health and why is it important for all practitioners to think about it? 9 October 2018.

Chris Dolman, Lisa Johnson, Dom Kleinig, Emerging Minds. Engaging children as partners

Appendices 95

in practice to support their mental health and wellbeing, 12 December 2018.

Angela Obradovic, Myfanwy McDonald and Mandy, Emerging Minds. Sharing information and engaging with parents about child mental health, 12 February 2019.

Sarah Wendt, Flinders University; David Tully, Relationships Australia South Australia. Child-f ocused approaches when working with parents affected by family and domestic violence , 29 May 2019.

CFCA-Expert Panel webinar series

Paul Harkin, the Benevolent Society; Jessica Smart, AIFS. Needs assessment: A tool for program planning and community building, 8 May 2019.

Robyn Mildon, Jessica Hateley-Browne, Centre for Evidence and Implementation. Implementing programs and practices in child and family services: The ‘why’ and ‘how’ of good implementation practice, 26 June 2019.

Presentations

Armstrong, R. (2018, November). Creating a culture of research and evaluation: Communication for impact - telling the story of your program. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA) National Conference, Cairns.

Armstrong, R., & Hand, K. (2018, October). Improving our impact: Building institutional capacity for effective knowledge translation . Paper presented at the Global Evidence and Implementation Summit (GEIS), Melbourne.

Armstrong, R., Reddel, T., West, S., & Maiorano, V. (2018, July). How can research be made relevant? Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Bandara, D., Daraganova, G., Mohal, J., & Edwards, B. (2018, July). Consent to data linkages in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC): The role of survey methodology, participant characteristics and public concerns

about personal data security. Paper presented at the Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys II Conference, Essex, UK.

Bassett, M., Canning, M., Renda, J., Kok, B., & Foeken, E. (2018, December). LSAC goes online: Asking young people to complete an online survey prior to the home visit. Paper presented at the 6th ACSPRI Social Science Methodology Conference, Sydney.

Baxter, J. A. (2018, July). Motherhood and employment transitions: Updated findings using the Australian Census Longitudinal Dataset. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Baxter, J. A. (2018, July). Trends in fathers’ working arrangements. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Baxter, J. A. (2018, August). Fathers at work: Statistical overview. Paper presented at the 'Why Fathers’ Care Matters: Enabling Gender Equity in Care and Work' Forum, Canberra.

Baxter, J. A. (2018, November). Fathers and mothers: Work and care. Paper presented at the IPAA WA Women in Public Sector Leadership Forum, Perth.

Broadley, K., & Paterson, N. (2019, May). Violence towards workers in the child, family and community welfare sector. Poster presentation at the 6th Child Aware Conference, Brisbane.

Carroll, M., & Lapinski, V. (2018, July). What’s in a game? Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2018, July). Children participating in research: Experiences from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2018, July). Direct cross-examination in family law matters - a new approach? Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2018, July). Developing an Australian definition of abuse of older people . Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 96

Carson, R. (2018, July). Findings from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2018, July). Presentation of data from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the Family Court of Australia.

Carson, R. (2018, August). Direct cross-e xamination in family law matters. Paper presented at the Family Law Practitioners (Western Australia) Conference, Perth.

Carson, R. (2018, October). Children and young people in separated families: Key findings . Paper presented at the 'Voices of children and young people in family law' Forum, hosted by the Tasmanian Commissioner for Children and Young People and the Australian Institute of Family Studies, Hobart.

Carson, R. (2018, October). Elder abuse national research: Stage one, strengthening the evidence base. Paper presented at the National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) Annual Seminar, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2018, October). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented to the Family Law Courts Children's Committee, Brisbane.

Carson, R. (2018, November). Direct cross-e xamination in family law matters: Findings from new research. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA) National Conference, Cairns.

Carson, R. (2018, November). Elder abuse national research: Stage one, strengthening the evidence base. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA) National Conference, Cairns.

Carson, R. (2018, November). Elder abuse national research: Stage one, strengthening the evidence base, defining abuse of older people . Paper presented at the Australian Association of Gerontology Conference, Melbourne.

Carson, R. (2018, November). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA) National Conference, Cairns.

Carson, R. (2018, November). Voices of children and young people in family law. Paper presented at the Australian and New Zealand Children's Commissioners and Guardians Meeting, Adelaide.

Carson, R. (2019, February). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented to the Australian Department of Social Services, Canberra.

Carson, R. (2019, February). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented to the Great Hobart Family Law Pathways Network, Hobart.

Carson, R. (2019, February). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented to the Launceston and Northern Tasmania Family Law Pathways Network, Launceston.

Carson, R. (2019, May). Give children a bigger voice, more of the time: Findings from the AIFS Children and Young People in Separated Families Study. Paper presented at the 6th Child Aware Conference, Brisbane.

Coleiro, A. (2018, July). Effective translation of research. Panel presentation at the School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne.

Daraganova, G., Bandara, D., Renda, J., & Jessup, K. (2018, July). What can process data add to our understanding of attrition in LSAC? Paper presented at the Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys II Conference, Essex, UK.

Daraganova, G., & Benassi, H. (2018, July). Effects of servicemen's transition from military to civilian life on spouses/partners: Findings from the Transition and Wellbeing Research Programme's Family Study. Paper presented at the 16th European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Conference, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

de Lacy-Vawdon, C., & Livingstone, C. (2018, July). Targeting children: Restricting gambling promotions by adapting lessons from tobacco, alcohol and food. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Appendices 97

Deblaquiere, J., & Rintoul, A. (2018, August). ‘Family-friendly’ EGM venues and family harms derived from gambling: Experiences from the GISA Study. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Conference, Geelong.

El-Murr, A. (2018, November). Intimate partner violence in Australian refugee communities: An overview of underlying issues and service responses. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA) National Conference, Cairns.

Foeken, E., Renda, J., Jessup, K., Kok, B., Bassett, M., & Canning, M. (2018, December). Events history calendars: Benefits and challenges . Paper presented at the 6th ACSPRI Social Science Methodology Conference, Sydney.

Goldsworthy, K., Moore, S., Muir, S., & Smart, J. (2018, November). Program Logic Workshop. Workshop presented at the Family and Relationship Services National Conference, Cairns.

Goldsworthy, K., & Muir, S. (2019, June). What makes a good evaluation? Experiences from the Expert Panel project. Paper presented at the Ian Potter Foundation Evaluation Education Forum, Melbourne.

Guiver, T., & Bandara, D. (2018, December). Data linkage in LSAC: Great benefits but also some challenging issues. Paper presented at the 6th ACSPRI Social Science Methodology Conference, Sydney.

Haynes, K., Moore, S., Smart, J., Muir, S., & Hand, K. (2018, November). Creating a culture of research and evaluation: Evaluation planning and program logics. Paper presented at the Family & Relationship Services Australia (FRSA) National Conference, Cairns.

Hollonds, A. (2018, October). Voices of children and young people in family law, at Family Law Forum, hosted by the Tasmanian Commissioner for Children and Young People and the Australian Institute of Family Studies, Hobart.

Hollonds, A. (2019, March) Using data to inform and inspire big ideas to optimise family wellbeing. Keynote presentation at the Families in Canada Conference in Ottawa, Canada.

Jenkinson, R. (2018, June). Young men and sports betting. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Research Priorities and Grant Round Launch, Melbourne.

Jenkinson, R., de Lacy-Vawdon, C., & Carroll, M. (2018, July). Weighing up the odds: Young men, sports and betting. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Jenkinson, R., de Lacy-Vawdon, C., & Carroll, M. (2018, August). Sports and gambling. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Conference, Geelong.

Jenkinson, R., de Lacy-Vawdon, C., & Carroll, M. (2018, November). ‘Barstool betting’: Exploring the relationship between alcohol consumption and sports betting among a sample of young Victorian men. Paper presented at the Australasian Professional Society for Alcohol and Other Drugs (APSAD) Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Jessup, K., Renda, J., Kok, B., Corey, J., & Martin, K. (2018, July). LSAC goes online: Asking young people to complete an online survey prior to the home visit. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Milan, Italy.

Jessup, K. (2018, July). What can process data add to our understanding of attrition in LSAC? Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Milan, Italy.

Moore, S. (2018, July). The Expert Panel project: Reflections and results from a national workforce capacity building initiative. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Muir, S. (2018, October). Research on the role of families in transitions from military service. Paper presented at the Veterans’ Families Forum, Invictus Games Symposium, Sydney.

Muir, S. (2018, November). Lessons from the Families and Children Expert Panel project. Paper presented at 'Attracting funding and support for program evaluation: A workshop and partnership networking event for funders, program providers and program evaluators', Melbourne.

Muir, S. (2019, March). Lessons from the Families and Children Expert Panel project. Paper presented at the Communities for Children Forum, Canberra.

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 98

Muir, S., & Purtell, J. (2018, July). The Beyond 18 study: Outcomes for young people leaving out-of-home care in Victoria. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

O'Connor, M., Romaniuk, H., Gray, S., & Daraganova, G. (2018, July). Continuity of mental health problems from childhood to adolescence in the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Paper presented at the 25th International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development Biennial Meeting, Gold Coast.

Price-Robertson, R. (2018, July). Diagnosis in child mental health: Exploring the benefits, risks and alternatives. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Price-Robertson, R. (2018, October). Interdependence in mental health recovery. Paper presented at the 16th Annual Bouverie Centre Mini-Conference, Melbourne.

Purtell, J. & Muir, S. (2018, July). Insights into research with children and young people from highly vulnerable populations. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Qu, L. (2018, July). Caring about carers: Findings from a national survey of foster and relative/ kinship carers. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Qu, L., Gray, M., Stanton, D., & De Vaus, D. A. (2018, July). Have the financial consequences of relationship separation changed for older Australians? A comparison of two cohorts. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Quadara, A. (2018, July). Trends in service integration to address family violence. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Rioseco, P. (2018, July). English language proficiency among humanitarian youth: A longitudinal study. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Rioseco, P. (2018, July). Factors associated with psychological distress among recently arrived humanitarian migrants to Australia. Paper presented at the 25th International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development Biennial Meeting, Gold Coast.

Smart, D., & Poerio, L. (2018, July). Impact of transition from military to civilian life on families. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Vassallo, S. (2018, July). What helps? What hinders? Key insights about mental health from a 35-year longitudinal study. Paper presented at the 25th International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development Biennial Meeting, Gold Coast.

Warren, D. (2018, September). Young carers: The influence of informal caring on cognitive social outcomes. Paper presented at the ‘Lunchtime

Learning’ session, Carers Victoria, Melbourne.

Warren, D., & Daraganova, G. (2018, July). Self-h arm and suicidal behaviour among young people aged 14-15. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Milan, Italy.

Warren, D., & Edwards, B. (2018, July). Young carers in Australia: The influence of informal caring on cognitive and social outcomes. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Milan, Italy.

Warren, D., & Edwards, B. (2018, July). Young carers: Implications for NAPLAN outcomes. Paper presented at the 15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne.

Warren, D., O’Connor, M., & Daraganova, G. (2018, July). The impact of early childhood education programs on children’s developmental outcomes: Evidence from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Life Course Studies Conference, Milan, Italy.

Appendices 99

Submissions

The Institute prepares submissions to inquiries and responds to requests for consultation. Such activity is an indication of the Institute’s involvement in the policy and research process.

In 2018/19, the Institute made the following submissions:

ƒ Submission to The Senate Environment and Communications References Committee Inquiry into gaming micro-transactions for chance-based items (July 2018)

ƒ Submission to the National Children's Commissioner - Children’s rights (August 2018)

ƒ Submission to the House of Representatives Select Committee on Intergenerational Welfare Dependence: Inquiry into Intergenerational Welfare Dependence (September 2018)

ƒ Submission to the Australian Government Department of Health - Draft Charter of Aged Care Rights (October 2018)

ƒ Submissions to Senate Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee: Inquiry into the Federal Circuit and Family Court of Australia Bills (2018) (November 2018)

ƒ Submission to the Australian Law Reform Commission - Review of the family law system - Discussion Paper 86 (November 2018)

ƒ Submission to the Australian Law Reform Commission - Inquiry into the Federal Circuit and Family Court of Australia Bills 2018 (November 2018)

ƒ Submission to the Productivity Commission’s ‘What Works’ Review’ (March 2019).

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Appendix D: Acronyms and abbreviations

Table D1: Acronyms and abbreviations

Acronyms and abbreviations Description

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

ADF Australian Defence Force

AFM Advance to the Finance Minister

AGD Attorney-G eneral’s Department

AGRC Australian Gambling Research Centre

AIFS Australian Institute of Family Studies

ALRC Australian Law Reform Commission

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANROWS Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety

APS Australian Public Service

ASL Average Service Level

BNLA Building a New Life in Australia

CALD Culturally and linguistically diverse

CCS Coordinated Client Support

CFCA Child Family Community Australia

CfC FP Communities for Children Facilitating Partners

COAG Council of Australian Governments

CQU Central Queensland University

CSRM Centre for Social Research and Methods

CSS Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme

DHHS Victorian Department of Health and Human Services

DHS Department of Human Services

DET Department of Education and Training

DoH Department of Health

DSS Department of Social Services

DVA Department of Veterans’ Affairs

EL Executive Level

FaC Families and Children

FBT Fringe Benefits Tax

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

FRR Financial Reporting Rule

Appendices 101

Acronyms and abbreviations Description

FVOCI Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income

FVTPL Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

GST Goods and Services Tax

HILDA The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey

HWT Herald and Weekly Times

IPAA Institute of Public Administration Australia

IPS Information Publication Scheme

JLL Jones, Lang, La Salle

KMP Key Management Personnel

KT Knowledge Translation

LSAC Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

MOU Memorandum of Understanding

MP Member of Parliament

NABERS National Australian Built Environment Rating System

OOHC Out-o f-hom e care

OPA Official Public Account

PIA Privacy Impact Assessment

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PGPA Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PRC The Parenting Resource Centre

PSPF Protective Security Policy Framework

PSS Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

PSSap PSS accumulation plan

QFCC Queensland Family and Child Commission

SES Senior Executive Service

SLG Senior leadership group

SME Small and medium enterprises

SNAICC Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care

SOETM Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts

SPPI Solely payments of principal and interest

SPRC Social Policy Research Centre

SRC Social Research Centre

UK United Kingdom

UNSW University of New South Wales

VRGF Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 102

Appendix E: List of requirements

The Annual Report is prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit. This index refers to mandatory and suggested reporting items.

Table E1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI iii A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by

accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) v Table of contents Mandatory

17AJ(b) 109 Alphabetical index Mandatory

17AJ(c) 101 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms Mandatory

17AJ(d) 102 List of requirements Mandatory

17AJ(e) ii Details of contact officer Mandatory

17AJ(f) ii Entity’s website address Mandatory

17AJ(g) ii Electronic address of report Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) 2 A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) 10 A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) 11 A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) 12 A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) iv A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) 11 Position title of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 103

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) 11 Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period. Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) N/A An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity Portfolio departments - mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, mandatory

17AD(c) Report on the performance of the entity

Annual performance statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F 14 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule. Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on financial performance

17AF(1)(a) 34 A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) 35 A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory

17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, mandatory

17AD(d) Management and accountability

Corporate governance

17AG(2)(a) 38 Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems) Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) 38 A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii) 38 A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) 38 A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) 38 An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 104

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(2)(d)-(e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, mandatory

External scrutiny

17AG(3) 43 Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny. Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, mandatory

17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. If applicable, mandatory

Management of human resources

17AG(4)(a) 44 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) 46 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-on going basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees

(b) statistics on part-time employees

(c) statistics on gender

(d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

17AG(4)(b) 46-47 Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-on going basis; including the following:

ƒ statistics on staffing classification level

ƒ statistics on full-time employees

ƒ statistics on part-time employees

ƒ statistics on gender

ƒ statistics on staff location

ƒ statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) 47 Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) 47 Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc. identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c). Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) 47 The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 105

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(c)(iii) 44 A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, mandatory

Assets management

17AG(5) N/A An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities. If applicable, mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) 48 An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Mandatory

Consultants

17AG(7)(a) 49 A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7)(b) 49 A statement that ‘During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]’.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) 48 A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) 49 A statement that ‘Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website.’

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, mandatory

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 106

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) 50 A statement that ‘[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.’

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) 50 An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature - a statement that ‘[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.’

If applicable, mandatory

Financial statements

17AD(e) 51 Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory

Executive remuneration

17AD(da) 48 Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule Mandatory

17AD(f) Other mandatory information

17AH(1)(a)(i) N/A If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that ‘During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.’

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) 88 If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that ‘Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].’

If applicable, mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 107

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AH(1)(c) 88

Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) 89 Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found. Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable, mandatory

17AH(2) 88 Information required by other legislation. mandatory

Note: N/A = not applicable

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 108

© GettyImages/Thomas Northcut

Seven —

Index

Index 109

accountability, 37-50 advertising and market research, 88 advisory groups, 39-40 agency overview, 9-12 Agency Plan, see Corporate Plan agency resource statements, 90-1 agreements, individual and collective, 47 AIFS Values and Behaviours, 8, 25, 45 Analysis of HILDA dataset, 28 assets management, 48-9 assets, total, 35 Auditor’s Report, 52-3 Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC), 4, 11,

29, 32 Australian National Audit Office access clauses, 50 Australian Temperament Project, 18, 27

balance sheet, 35, 57-8 Baseline Study - National Consumer Protection Framework for online wagering, 28 Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study on Leaving Care,

18, 27, 31 budgeted expenses, 34, 91 Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA) data

collection & management, 4, 18, 27 business continuity, 38, 42

cash flow statement, 61-2 CFCA resource sheets, 95 CFCA webinar series, 95-6 Child Care Package Evaluation, 3, 28 Child Family Community Australia (CFCA)

information exchange, 4, 11, 27 Children and Young People in Separated Families study, 5 collaboration, 23 collective agreements, 47 commissioning bodies, 49 committees, 38-9 communicating our research, 6-8 conferences, 6, 10, 16-17, 22, 32, 45 consultants, 48-9 contact details, ii, 89 contracts, exempt, 50 corporate and statutory reporting, 41 corporate governance, 38 Corporate (Agency) Plan, 10, 12, 15, 17-18, 20, 22, 24, 41 Corporate Services, 11, 38

Data Linkage Integration Authority, 29 data management strategy, 8, 26 deliverables, 12 Direct Cross-Examination in Family Law Matters, 2, 5 Director’s review, 1-8 disability reporting, 88-9 DVA Coordinated Client Support program (CCS), 28

ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance, 88 Elder Abuse National Research - Prevalence Study, 29 Elder Abuse Research: Strengthening the evidence

base stage 1, 5, 28 Emerging Minds, 7, 22-3, 28 Emerging Minds - LSAC analysis, 28 Employee skills and qualifications, 44 employees, see management of human resources employment agreements, 47 environmental performance, 88 ethical standards, 43 Evaluation of Child and Family Centres, 29 Evaluation of Third Action Plan to Reduce Violence, 29 events, 67, 22-3, 95 Executive group, 39 exempt contracts, 50 expenses, 34-5 Expert Advisory Committee, 40 external scrutiny, 43

Families and Children Expert Panel, 5, 7, 27, 32 Families at First Teachers, 28 Families Framework, 15, 22 Families Framework Research Areas, 27-9 Family Law Act 1975, 10, 38 Family Law Research, 5, 29 financial activities, report on performance, 34-5 financial statements, 51-85 forums, 17, 32 fraud control, 38 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 89

governance, 7-8 Governance and Management Framework, 25 governance committees, 39-40 governance, corporate, 38 Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of

Australian Children (LSAC), 5, 18, 20-1, 27-8, 33 government submissions, 22, 100

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 110

health and safety, 45, 88 Health and Safety Committee, 45 Human Research Ethics Committee, 40 human resources, management of, 44-8

Independent Auditor’s Report, 52-3 individual and collective agreements, 47 information exchanges, 10-11, 15 Information Publication Scheme, 89 internal audit, 42

key management personnel, 48

leadership development program, 25 learning and development, 44-5 liabilities, total, 35 list of requirements, 103-8 longitudinal studies, 4, 5, 11, 15, 17-18, 21, 31, 33, 45 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC), 5,

18, 20-1, 33 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC): Production of a technical paper, 28 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC)

Waves 5-9 project management and data collection, 27

management, assets, 48-9 management and accountability, 37-50 management of human resources, 44-8 mandatory and suggested reporting items, 103-8 mandatory information, 88-9 market research, 88 media mentions, 17, 20 media strategy, 23

net asset position, 35 Notes to and forming part of the financial statements, 63-85

operating expenses, 34 operating results, 34 operating revenue, 34 organisational culture, 7-8 organisational structure, 11 organisational sustainability, 24-6 Outcome 1, 35, 91 outcome and program structure, 12 outcomes, 90-1 outlook for 2019/20, 8 overview, agency, 9-12

Partners of Vietnam Veterans: Further analysis of the Vietnam Veterans Family Study, 28 partnerships, 8, 14, 17, 22 performance, 7-8, 13-35 performance against AIFS research directions, 27-9 performance criteria, 17 Performance Management Framework, 25 performance statement, 14 Permanency outcomes - Evidence Scoping Review, 29 Pints, punts ’n’ peers, 4, 28, 32 podcasts, 21 presentations, 20, 96-9 Privacy Management Plan, 26, 42 procurement initiatives to support small business, 50 program structure, 12 project management, 44 Protective Security Policy Framework, 42 Public Governance Performance and Accountability

Act 2013, 38, 42, 54 Public Service Act 1999, 10, 46 publications, 7, 20, 92-5 purchasing, 48

qualifications, 24, 44

recruitment, 45 Relationship between domestic violence and gambling, 28 report on performance, 13-35 reporting, corporate and statutory, 41 requirements, list of, 103-8 research areas, key 10, 15 research, communicating, 6-7, 20-1 research directions, performance against, 27-9 research domains, 15-16 research highlights, 3-5, 31-3 research projects, 2-3, 15, 17-19, 27-9

Analysis of HILDA dataset, 28 Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC), 4, 11, 29, 32 Australian Temperament Project, 18, 27 Baseline Study - National Consumer Protection

Framework for online wagering, 28 Beyond 18: The Longitudinal Study on Leaving Care, 18, 27, 31 Building a New Life in Australia (BNLA) data

collection & management, 4, 18, 27 Child Care Package Evaluation, 3, 28 Child Family Community Australia (CFCA)

information exchange, 22-3, 28 Data Linkage Integration Authority, 29

Index 111

DVA Coordinated Client Support program (CCS), 28 Elder Abuse National Research - Prevalence Study, 29 Elder Abuse Research: Strengthening the

evidence base stage 1, 5, 28 Emerging Minds, 7, 22-3, 28 Emerging Minds - LSAC analysis, 28 Evaluation of Child and Family Centres, 29 Evaluation of Third Action Plan to Reduce

Violence, 29 Families and Children Expert Panel, 5, 7, 27, 32 Families at First Teachers, 28 Family Law Research, 5, 29 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC):

Production of a technical paper, 28 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) waves 5-9 project management and data

collection, 27 Partners of Vietnam Veterans: Further analysis of the Vietnam Veterans Family Study, 26 Permanency outcomes - Evidence Scoping Review, 29 Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers, 4, 28, 32 Relationship between domestic violence and

gambling, 28 Sexual Violence Research, 29 Stronger Outcomes for Families Reform:

Evaluation model, 28 Study on co-parenting styles and arrangements, 29 Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 5, 18, 28, 33 VRGF Preventing Gambling-Related Harm:

services to Monash University, 28 Wagering marketing on vulnerable adults, 27 Weighing up the odds: Grants for gambling

research, 27 Women’s Safety Package: Local support coordinator evaluation, 28 Work and Family Interactions, 29 Young people with sexually abusive behaviours:

Perpetrator interventions, 27 research reports, 20 resource statements, agency 90-1 results, operating, 34 revenue, operating, 34 Risk Assessment and Audit Committee, 39 Risk Management Benchmarking Survey, 41 risk management, 7-8, 25, 41-2 role and functions, iv, 10

security, 42 seminars, 10, 16-17, 21-2, 25 senior executive members, 39 Senior Leadership Group, 38-9, 41 senior management groups, 39-40

Sexual Violence Research, 29 skills and qualifications, 44 small business procurement initiatives, 50 social media, 6-7, 20, 45 staff engagement, participation and development,

7-8, 45 staffing overview, 46-7 staffing see management of human resources Statement by the Director and Chief Financial

Officer, 54 statement of changes in equity, 59-60 statement of comprehensive income, 55-6 statement of financial position, 57-8 statutory reporting, 41 Strategic Directions, 2, 17-25, 41 strategic goals, 2, 25 Strategic Planning Framework, 25 strategic priorities, 10, 41 Stronger Outcomes for Families Reform: Evaluation

model, 28 Study on co-parenting styles and arrangements, 29 submissions, government, 22, 100

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 5, 18, 28, 33 total assets, 35 total liabilities, 35

Values and Behaviours, 8, 25, 45 VRGF Preventing Gambling-Related Harm: services to Monash University, 27

Wagering marketing on vulnerable adults, 27 webinars, 4, 6-7, 10, 16-17, 20-2, 88, 95-6 websites, 6-7, 10, 20-1 Weighing up the odds: Grants for gambling

research, 27 What Works for Families Research Framework, 15, 22 Women’s Safety Package: Local support

coordinator evaluation, 28 Work and Family Interactions, 29 work health and safety, 45, 88 Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 88 workforce planning, 44 Workplace Relations Committee, 45

Young people with sexually abusive behaviours: Perpetrator interventions, 27

Australian Institute of F amily Studies | Annual report 112

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ANNUAL REPORT 2018/19

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Visit the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) website at aifs.gov.au to explore our work, publications and events, and to discover our research agenda in more detail.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Annual Report 2018/19

Discovering what works for families

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