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Australian National Maritime Museum—Report for 2019-20


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Australian National Maritime Museum

Annual Report 2019-20

2019-20

Contents

Publication information 1

Chairman’s letter of transmittal 3

Director’s statement 6

Our vision, mission and priorities 7

Year in review 8

Annual Performance Statement 13

Exhibitions and attractions 44

Governance and accountability 52

Financial Statements 2019-2020 91

Appendixes 132

Annual Report 2019-20 Publication information 1

Publication information Copyright Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2019-20 © Commonwealth of Australia 2020

ISSN 1039-4036 (print) ISSN 2204-678X (online)

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior permission from the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Australian National Maritime Museum

The Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) at Darling Harbour, Sydney, opens 9.30 am-5 pm every day (9.30 am-6 pm in January). Closed 25 December.

Entry at 30 June 2020 See it All Ticket

Adult $25, child $15, concession $20, family $60 (2 adults + 3 children), child under 4 free. Entry includes:

● Special exhibitions - Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Sea Monsters: Prehistoric ocean predators

● Top-deck vessel tours aboard HMB Endeavour and HMAS Vampire

● Permanent galleries - Under Southern Skies; Cook and the Pacific; HERE: Kupe to Cook

Big Ticket (1/7/19-4/12/19)

Adult $32, child $20, concession $20, family $79 (2 adults + 3 children), child under 4 free. Entry includes:

● Special exhibitions

● Vessels: HMB Endeavour, HMAS Vampire, HMAS Onslow and James Craig

● Permanent galleries

Big Ticket (5/12/19-30/6/20)

Adult $35, child $20, concession $25, family $89 (2 adults + 3 children), child under 4 free. Entry includes:

● Special exhibitions

● Vessels: HMB Endeavour; HMAS Vampire; HMAS Onslow and James Craig

● Permanent galleries

Annual Report 2019-20 Publication information 2

Vessel Only Ticket (17/12/19-24/12/19)

Adult $20, child $12, concession $15, family $50 (2 adults + 3 children), Members and child under 4 free.

Entry includes:

● Vessels: HMB Endeavour; HMAS Vampire; HMAS Onslow and James Craig

● Permanent galleries

Special Exhibitions Ticket

Adult $20, child $12, concession $15, family $50 (2 Adults + 3 children)

Mini Mariners Ticket

Adult $8, child $12, members free

Group bookings: 20% discount on ticket prices for groups of 10 or more

Galleries Ticket

Free admission to permanent galleries

Members/Australian pensioners/child under 4

Free

Mailing address Wharf 7, 58 Pirrama Road, Pyrmont NSW 2009 Australia

Ph (02) 9298 3777

Fax (02) 9298 3780

Website (including this annual report) www.sea.museum

Contact officer For enquiries about this report please contact the Publications Officer, Janine Flew Ph (02) 9298 3777 Email publications@sea.museum

Editor Janine Flew Assistant editor Laura Signorelli Staff photographer Andrew Frolows

Cover: The new Under Southern Skies gallery. Image Andrew Frolows/ANMM

Annual Report 2019-20 Chairman’s letter of transmittal 3

Chairman’s letter of transmittal Hon Paul Fletcher MP

Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

On behalf of the Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum, I am pleased to present

the museum’s annual report for the financial year ended 30 June 2020.

This report has been prepared and is submitted to you in accordance with all applicable obligations of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act),

including section 46, which requires that you table the report in the Parliament. The report includes the museum’s audited financial statements and the annual performance statement as required by the PGPA Act.

This report was considered by the Council on 2 September 2020. The members of Council accept the report as a fair and accurate representation of the museum’s performance during the

2019-20 financial year.

As required by section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I certify that:

● the museum has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans

● the museum has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation and reporting

mechanisms that meet its specific needs

● the Council has taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to

the museum.

This report highlights the extraordinary results achieved by the museum’s director and staff in 2019-20 but also demonstrates the challenges of this most unusual year.

Minister, the Council’s focus this year has been on various strategic priorities, including the museum’s funding and growth, as well as finances and risk. Some of the matters considered by Council include the management of COVID-19, the Encounters 2020 program (commemorating

the 250th anniversary of Cook’s first Pacific voyage), the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, the Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme, optimisation of the museum’s site and the museum’s People and Culture Strategic Plan.

Annual Report 2019-20 Chairman’s letter of transmittal 4

For the record, I note that the museum has given a high priority to implementation of public health measures to combat the spread of COVID-19. To this end, the museum closed to the general public in response to guidance from the State and Commonwealth Governments from 24 March and reopened on 22 June 2020. Regrettably, for reasons of public health and safety, we were unable to proceed with many aspects of the Encounters 2020 program, particularly the circumnavigation of Australia by the Endeavour replica or our search for Cook’s Endeavour in

Newport, Rhode Island. The disruptions to our operations, while necessary for public health, have adversely affected self-generated revenue, visitation, outreach and research. But on the upside, we quickly transitioned to a virtual offer and this resulted in significant growth in online audiences.

Overall, the museum has achieved good results against key performance measures for visitation, outreach, education, growing and providing access to the National Maritime Collection and supporting Indigenous maritime heritage, and progress has been made on each of the strategic priorities set out in the museum’s corporate plan for 2019-23.

In 2019-20, total expenses were $43M, which was 9.5% lower than budgeted, primarily due to the suspension of the Encounters 2020 program, including the circumnavigation of Australia by the Endeavour replica, and savings measures implemented in the final quarter of the year to

offset the lost revenue impacts associated with COVID 19. Total revenue was $40.1M, of which $19.7M (42.8% excluding one-offs) was self-generated. Excluding the Collection Development Acquisition Budget (CDAB) depreciation-related loss that the museum is able to incur, approval for a forecast operating loss of $1.324M was sought despite significant cuts to discretionary expenditure and ambition. Subsequent to this application being made, the museum’s final result improved to a profit of $900K (excluding CDAB depreciation) due to a successful insurance

claim being made by the museum for lost revenue impacts associated with COVID-19. Notably, this position was also able to be reached without any reductions in APS employees.

I must emphasise the deep financial impact of COVID-19 on government agencies like the museum with a strong commercial focus. You will recall that in 2018-19, the museum generated some 45% of revenue from non-government sources and our ambition was to exceed 50% in 2019-20. COVID-19 made this target impossible to achieve. Ironically, the museum has been a victim of its own success to a degree in that, despite its really young age, it has one of the highest percentages of self-generated income of any Australian cultural institution. In a COVID-19 world, therefore, assuming government support remains at constant

levels, the ANMM will have lost a far greater percentage of its revenues than institutions that rely more heavily on government funding.

Minister, we are doing our very best to navigate these challenging times without turning to government for additional support, and despite this still are being able to maintain the museum as one of Australia’s premier cultural institutions. However, I must advise that we estimate that due to COVID-19, total own-source revenue in 2020-21 will decrease by $10M (or around 45%) from previous years. This downward revision comes on top of the already challenging revenue environment (such as reductions in operating grants, reduced interest returns and

Annual Report 2019-20 Chairman’s letter of transmittal 5

increased depreciation expenditure). To manage this situation, we will need to implement further significant expenditure cuts in discretionary areas and anticipate seeking approval to incur an operating loss next year, covered by reserves, so as to balance our budget.

While I am confident the museum will come out of the crisis leaner and smaller, but still healthy and performing, we are increasingly reliant upon the expertise and support of our Councillors, director, museum staff, volunteers, Members and donors.

John Mullen AM Chairman

Annual Report 2019-20 Director’s statement 6

Director’s statement The Australian National Maritime Museum is a statutory authority established by the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 and responsible to the Minister for Communications, Cyber

Safety and the Arts. During this period, the responsible Minister was the Hon Paul Fletcher MP.

This annual report is a report of operations for the first financial year of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Corporate Plan 2019-2023. It has been made in accordance with a resolution of the councillors of the Australian National Maritime Museum, those councillors being responsible under Section 9 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) for the preparation and content of the report. The report was prepared in

accordance with the relevant statutory and government requirements.

Certain categories of information do not appear in full but are available to Members of Parliament and Senators on request.

Kevin Sumption PSM Director and CEO

Annual Report 2019-20 Our vision, mission and priorities 7

Our vision, mission and priorities Our vision ‘More than a museum’: we create encounters and experiences that change peoples’

understanding of Australia

Our mission Our mission is to lead the promotion and conservation of Australia’s maritime heritage and culture through:

● developing and sharing our collections, knowledge and expertise

● motivating learning through research, educational programs and products

● supporting community participation to retain our maritime heritage; and

● exploring contemporary issues

Our priorities Since its establishment in 1991, the museum has been a leader in the preservation, promotion and sharing of Australia’s maritime heritage. The museum has set six priorities in its corporate plan for 2019-23 to build upon this proud history and to guide the museum’s path and programs towards a longer-term future:

Priority 1 Sharing the national maritime story Priority 2 Compelling experiences

Priority 3 Supporting reconciliation Priority 4 A trusted voice and custodian Priority 5 A strong financial future Priority 6 People first

Annual Report 2019-20 Year in review 8

Year in review Highlights ● Record-breaking visitation for first three quarters of the year (prior to COVID-19 pandemic)

● Successful expansion of online offer and audiences, particularly digital learning tools such

as Cook’s Voyages game

● Opened new permanent gallery, Under Southern Skies

● Sailed the Endeavour replica to New Zealand to participate in Tuia 250, New Zealand’s

commemoration of the 250th anniversary of Cook’s first Pacific voyage

● Launched Encounters 2020 program to mark the 250th anniversary of Cook’s visit to

Australia’s east coast and delivered a range of initiatives to explore the view from ship and shore

● Hosted the international Communicating the Arts conference

● Provided seed funding for short film Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky, unlocking more than

$600K of external funding for the project

● Prioritised bushfire-affected areas for MMAPSS grants

● Completed e-book We are Many - Stories of Australia’s migrants

● Showed two exhibitions overseas, in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea: Two Nations, which

highlighted Australia’s connection to Indonesia’s independence story, and Massim Canoes,

which records the designs and unique features of the traditional canoes of the Massim cultures of Papua New Guinea

Grants received ● $1.47M Commonwealth government grant from the Public Service Modernisation Fund

(PSMF)

● $329K Visions of Australia grant for our Looking Back Looking Forward exhibition

● $70K Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade grant received towards the opening of the

travelling exhibition Container: the box that changed the world in Fremantle and the transport of the Container travelling exhibition in Darwin

● $54.5K Visions of Australia grant, administered by the Australian Government through the

former Department of Communications and the Arts (now Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications), received to develop Remarkable: Australians and their vessels

● $5K received from Multicultural NSW towards the next Welcome Wall unveiling

Annual Report 2019-20 Year in review 9

● We also received $476K as a strategic financial assistance grant from the former

Department of Communications and the Arts (now Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications), which was appropriated to the department as PSMF.

Director’s report This is my eighth annual report for the Australian National Maritime Museum and the most challenging to write. This was truly the best and worst of years, as we observed extraordinarily

strong results in the first three quarters, and were on track to deliver the best year on record, only to be somewhat thwarted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The management of the museum’s response to COVID-19 is foremost in my mind at present. As the Chairman has observestrad, the museum closed to the public from 24 March to 21 June 2020 inclusive due to COVID-19 and most of our staff are still working from home. Being open for only eight days in the fourth quarter adversely affected revenue, visitation and face-to-face learning, in particular. To ensure the safety of the public, the NSW Government cancelled the VIVID festival and we had to cancel the Classic & Wooden Boat Festival - both of these events

usually bring significant visitors. Our offsite visitation results were also much less than expected in the fourth quarter because of the temporary closure of institutions hosting our touring exhibitions. The current restrictions on international travel also had a significantly adverse impact on the museum’s results.

Turning to the positives, I am delighted to report that, despite COVID-19, total visitor engagement in 2019-20, excluding Encounters 2020, was on target at 4.1 million, an increase

of 800,000 on last year. Total visitation was more than 1.85 million, which, while 7% behind target, was better than all past years except 2017-18 (1.87 million) and 2018-19 (2.1 million).

Onsite visitation was 5% ahead of target, while offsite visitation was 16% behind target. The museum’s diverse exhibitions were again central to our results. Particularly noteworthy are Sea Monsters - Prehistoric ocean predators, Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Bligh: Hero or Villain?. These exhibitions have had strong visitation and visitor appeal, good curriculum

alignment, attractive programming and opportunities for publicity, commercial return, reputational benefit and/or stakeholder engagement.

The highlight of our extensive offsite program was the voyage of the Endeavour replica to New Zealand from 12 September to 21 December 2019 to participate in that country’s Tuia 250

program. This voyage was a great success. A total of 19,427 people visited the vessel at six ports in New Zealand and this contributed to offsite visitation.

Our online visitation, and particularly our digital learning, were the standout achievements of the year. Online participation was 1.72 million (24% ahead of target) and student participation in school programs was 380,000 (120% ahead of target). The key contributors to results were a partnership with ABC Education, the ‘Virtual Endeavour’ VR tour, two educational games (The Voyage Game and Cook’s Voyages), the online collection and a concerted effort to drive online

engagement after the museum temporarily closed to the public.

Annual Report 2019-20 Year in review 10

2020 marked the 250th anniversary of Cook’s first Pacific voyage. Regrettably, after five years of preparation, due to COVID-19 we were unable to proceed with the circumnavigation of Australia by the Endeavour replica or the associated shore-based activities or to complete our search for Cook’s Endeavour in Newport, Rhode Island. However, I am pleased to report that we acknowledged the anniversary with the opening of the new permanent gallery called Under Southern Skies and three temporary exhibitions, as well as an extensive digital offering that

includes a new educational game and a new rooftop projection. We provided funding for a new film to be screened later in the year and will be acquiring new artworks from the Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair. Most significantly, I am pleased to report there is some evidence that the museum has succeeded in building national understanding and changing the narrative regarding Cook. About 2.25M people were exposed to media mentions of ‘view from the ship and view from the shore’ this year - a phrase coined by the museum about five years ago to refer to the bicultural perspectives of Cook’s encounter with Australia’s Indigenous peoples.

This year we achieved good results against key performance measures for growing and

providing access to the National Maritime Collection. Our collection of Indigenous maritime heritage was enhanced by the addition of 34 acquisitions valued at $236K; 2,712 objects were digitised; and, most pleasingly, more than 800 objects were accessioned to clear a longstanding backlog. Significant progress was also made toward accreditation for the Protection of Cultural Objects on Loan Scheme.

The delivery of our operational plan was also somewhat compromised by the disruptions from COVID-19 and any projects that were not completed this year will be carried over into 2020-21. However, I am pleased to report that good progress was made towards a new site masterplan, including a waterfront plan, and construction of a new gallery and venue facing Darling Harbour

that will be completed in coming months. This was the first full year of our Reconciliation Action Plan and 68% of all deliverables were completed, with 22% currently in progress. Our efforts to progress the national migration story have also been successful, with the highlight being the finalisation of a new publication, We are many - Stories of Australia’s migrants, which speaks to

this important aspect of national identity. We are also prioritising our plans for the upcoming United Nations Decade of Ocean Science, and our partnerships with Sydney Metro and the Silentworld Foundation are delivering good progress on the recovery and conservation of the ‘Barangaroo Boat’.

It is deeply disappointing to report that our pattern of year-on-year growth in self-generated

revenue was not realised this year due to COVID-19. While we still generated 42.8% self-generated revenue, which is ahead of many of our competitors, this was behind last year (45%) and the year before (43.6%). Unfortunately, COVID-19 adversely affected all revenue lines and this is expected to continue in 2020-21. To progress a strong financial future, we began various ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) infrastructure upgrade projects, achieved our savings target from sustainability investments, began a trial of third-party licensing of the museum’s collection, and developed a VIP management strategy and a new fundraising strategy.

The museum has been seriously tested in the delivery of its strategic commitment for People and Culture this year. Unfortunately, the demands of managing COVID-19 made it necessary to

Annual Report 2019-20 Year in review 11

defer work on diversity, volunteering and the enterprise agreement. The safety of our people and visitors has been a priority. During the early days of the pandemic, we prioritised the safety of staff and volunteers and communication about social distancing and hygiene. Consistent with public health advice, many of our staff were required to work from home and after we reopened the museum to the public, staff were required to take on new front-facing duties. One of the most difficult aspects of the pandemic has been standing down our at-risk volunteers.

Going forward, I expect 2020-21 to be even more challenging as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, both economically and socially, continues. We are working on a range of measures to ensure that core functions are maintained and the museum can remain in a healthy position to recover. We have many strengths and opportunities, particularly in the area of digital engagement and domestic tourism appeal, and we also have the potential to be part of the psychological recovery of the nation from COVID-19.

Kevin Sumption PSM Director

Director’s highlight

Museum Director Kevin Sumption PSM singles out Under Southern Skies as the highlight for 2019-20.

Under Southern Skies, the first permanent gallery experienced by most visitors to the museum,

opened to the public on 22 June 2020. Designed, curated and installed by museum staff, on a

very modest budget, this gallery offers the most comprehensive look at navigating the oceans that surround our island nation.

In a year that has focused on the milestone of 250 years since James Cook charted the east coast of Australia, it was timely to redevelop the longstanding Navigators Gallery to showcase Cook’s story alongside that of other important navigators.

Under Southern Skies brings our navigational history to life in a rich, immersive fashion. From

the importance of the night sky in Torres Strait Islander navigation to Polynesian stick star charts, and from Cook’s observation of the transit of Venus to Flinders’ circumnavigation of the continent, the planets and stars of the southern skies unite the long history of all navigators

around Australia.

Starting with the earliest celestial navigators, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, we lay a foundation on navigation in this region. We then move to the Muslim Makassan sailors

Annual Report 2019-20 Year in review 12

from Indonesia through to the European period of exploration. This approach puts the achievements of the European explorers who are so important to our country in a broader historical context.

Refreshing the permanent galleries is one of the joys of being a museum director. I am delighted to say that Under Southern Skies includes more than 500 objects from the National

Maritime Collection, many of which have not been exhibited or exhibited recently.

The gallery includes a selection of important new material associated with James Cook and other European navigators, as well as new acquisitions and objects from Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and Indigenous Pacific navigators.

We also feature more than 20 ship models, from Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander watercraft to European vessels; the important Bradley Log from HMS Sirius, featuring the first charts of Sydney Harbour; a range of historical navigational instruments; and a 13-metre dugout canoe from Papua New Guinea, showing voyaging histories connecting to Australia’s north. These objects are beautifully displayed alongside artworks from the collection, including Gail Mabo’s iconic Constellations and wonderful European maritime artworks.

We know our audiences treasure the National Maritime Collection and that they look forward to seeing how we use it to reveal our maritime history. Early feedback is that this new gallery and our approach are delighting visitors young and old as they see the timeline of our history come to life before their eyes.

Kevin Sumption PSM Director

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 13

Annual Performance Statement Introductory statement The Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum, as the accountable authority of the Australian National Maritime Museum, presents the 2019-20 annual performance statements of the Australian National Maritime Museum, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). In Council’s

opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with section 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

John Mullen AM

Chairman, Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum

Purpose of the museum The functions of the Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) are set out on section 6 of the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990.

The ANMM is responsible for leading the promotion and conservation of Australia’s maritime heritage and culture. This is done through developing and sharing its collections, knowledge

and expertise; motivating learning through research, educational programs and products; supporting community participation to retain Australia’s maritime heritage; and exploring contemporary issues of public interest and maritime relevance.

This purpose is elaborated in the mission in our Corporate Plan for 2019-2023 as follows:

Our purpose is increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime heritage by managing the National Maritime Collection and staging programs, exhibitions and events.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 14

Our mission is to lead the promotion and conservation of Australia’s maritime heritage and culture through:

● developing and sharing our collections, knowledge and expertise

● motivating learning through research, educational programs and products

● supporting community participation to retain our maritime heritage

● exploring contemporary issues.

Location of major activities and facilities The major facilities and activities of the museum are located at Darling Harbour, Sydney.

Results for 2019-20 The measurement and assessment of the museum’s performance in the reporting period in achieving its purposes are set out below.

The COVID-19 pandemic adversely affected several aspects of the museum’s performance in 2019-20. The museum was only open for eight days in the fourth quarter, temporarily closing on 24 March 2020 and reopening to the general public on 22 June 2020 with social distancing, hygiene and other public health measures. The adverse impact extended beyond our site. The circumnavigation of Australia by the museum’s Endeavour replica as part of the Encounters

2020 program did not proceed, and various other major events, such as the Classic & Wooden Boat Festival and VIVID, were cancelled or deferred. Several of our touring exhibitions were

also affected by the temporary closure of partner institutions.

Priority 1 - Share the national maritime story across Australia We will continue to innovate and expand opportunities for communities across the country and

the world to engage with Australia’s maritime story - past, present and future.

As custodian of the National Maritime Collection we will continue to care for it, maintain its

relevance and use new methods to maximise access for audiences and researchers.

We will create an Encounters 2020 program that meaningfully reaches audiences whatever

their background and wherever they are located.

Performance criterion

The key performance measure of sharing the national maritime story is:

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 15

Engagement

● Total visitor engagement (onsite, including programs; travelling; online; education;

Encounters 2020)

● Total number of annual offsite visitors to the organisation

● Total number of annual online visits

● Total number of students participating in educational programs (onsite, offsite and online)

Encounters 2020

● Number of participants in and visitors and viewers to the Encounters 2020 program offsite

by 2023

Collection digitisation and online accessibility

● Percentage of the total collection available to the public online by 2022

● Percentage of the total collection digitised.

Criterion source

2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS), pp 144-145 2019-23 Corporate Plan, p 7

Engagement

Results

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18 actual

2016-17

actual

Total visitation 1,987,863 1,852,771 2,107,611 1,873,751 1,523,197

Student participation (excluding via museum website)

172,013 69,886 30,747 36,893 36,223

Online visitation (including education resources)

1,382,179 1,716,504 1,146,980 1,163,352 939,939

Social media 434,177 487,157 NR NR NR

Subtotal 3,976,232 4,126,318 3,286,598 3,067,850 2,500,029

Encounters 2020 1,839,400 3,439,730 NA NA NA

Total visitor engagement

5,815,632 7,556,048 3,286,598 3,067,850 2,500,029

Note: NR = not reported; NA = not applicable

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 16

Total visitation

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19 actual

2017-18 actual 2016-17 actual

Number of visitors to the museum (offsite) 1,115,356 936,192 1,089,592 1,051,330 763,188

Number of visitors to the museum (onsite) 872,507 916,579 1,018,019 822,421 760,009

Total 1,987,863 1,852,771 2,107,611 1,873,751 1,523,197

Student participation

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Number of students participating onsite 25,000 14,083 20,039 29,505 36,708

Number of students participating offsite 8,000 10,945 10,221 7,388 NR

Subtotal 33,000 25,028 30,747 36,893 36,708

Number of students participating online (excluding museum website)

NA 44,858 NR NR NR

Students participating online (museum website)

139,013 309,657 NR NR NR

Total 172,013 379,543 30,747 36,893 36,223

Online participation

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18 actual

2016-17

actual

Visits to the website (non-educational) NA 1,406,847 NR NR NR

Education visits to the website NA 309,657 NR NR NR

Total visits to the website 1,382,179 1,716,504 1,146,980 1,163,352 939,939

Social media engagements

434,177 487,157 NR NR NR

Note: NR = not reported; NA = not applicable

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 17

Methodology

Total engagement

Total visitor engagement is the aggregate of the key engagement elements of total visitation, student participation (onsite, offsite and online), online visitation, social media engagement and engagement with the museum’s Encounters 2020 initiatives, including mainstream media

reporting. The method of calculation of each element is set out below.

Note that for the purpose of measuring total engagement only, the student participation figure excludes engagement with learning products on the museum’s website, including The Voyage Game, Cook’s Voyages and teacher resources. This is to ensure that these are not double

counted, as they are counted as part of online visitation.

Total visitation

Total visitation is calculated by aggregating onsite visitation to the museum and visitation to the museum’s offsite exhibitions and programs, including voyaging. Onsite and offsite visitation are separately reported. The framework for onsite visitation is at Annex A (see page 42).

Offsite visitation

Offsite visitation is determined through aggregation of actual attendance data provided by various borrowing institutions. It also includes attendees to talks given by the museum’s Speaker’s Group, as well as visitors to Endeavour while at port in New Zealand for the Tuia 250

program.

Onsite visitation

Onsite visitation is determined by aggregating actual ticket sales and membership visitation recorded at front of house (collected through the AXPOS system), actual venue client data (collected in the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system and Events Perfect

catering system), manual counting of actual visitors to Wharf 7 exhibits, an estimate of museum footprint visitation (based on a standard formula derived from onsite counting camera data over a week of sampling) and, for rooftop projections, an estimate of viewers on the Pyrmont Bridge (based on a formula which has regard to data provided by Property NSW and the results of sampling using camera counting and manual counting). The museum introduced use of mobile phone tracking data, compiled by an external company, to measure visitation for outdoor temporary exhibitions from December 2018, taking a conservative approach (that is, reducing numbers) to ensure staff were not inadvertently counted. Onsite visitation excludes people only using the museum’s store, coffee kiosk, restaurant or facilities. Consistent with past years, it

includes participants in public programs onsite but excludes participants in organised school programs onsite.

Student participation

Total participation in organised school programs is the aggregate of onsite, offsite and online participation by students and teachers. However, for the purpose of the calculation of total engagement, online student participation excludes education material on the museum’s website (this is counted as online visitation).

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 18

Onsite participation in school programs is determined by aggregating data regarding actual numbers collected by front of house from the museum educators. As the data is also used to compile invoices for payment for school visits, there is an additional check involved. Offsite participation is the sum of all who participate in museum education programs that are held beyond our site, calculated by collating data from delivery staff and school bookings. Total online participation in school programs includes museum learning content on other websites (eg

ABC Education) and user sessions on the following pages of the museum’s website: all pages that include curriculum-linked resources; The Voyage Game; Cook’s Voyages; and Virtual Endeavour. Total online participation in school programs is calculated using a range of methods

(ABC Learning provides data on visitation to museum content on its website; schools advise on the number of students participating in video-conferencing; participants in web-streaming are estimated using classroom views calculated by the Digital and Remote Technology System of the NSW Department of Education or equivalent).

Online visitation

Online visitation is the number of visits to the museum’s website (www.sea.museum), calculated by using the sessions metric in Google Analytics. This is calculated retrospectively by looking at the data for the financial year for all digital properties and adding them together. As the website receives more than 500,000 visits per financial year, the numbers are subject to Google Analytics data sampling. In order to avoid double counting for total engagement purposes, the museum tracks participation in online education programs, virtual excursions, as well as The Voyage Game and Cook’s Voyages as a separate line, and these are included in total online

visitation. Online visitation does not include visitors to the museum’s social media pages, downloads of the museum app or visits by museum staff. Note that visits to museum

educational or other content on other organisation’s websites (such as the ABC) are not included in the total (these are counted under the student participation category).

Social media engagements are calculated by consolidating the data provided directly from Twitter, Facebook and Instagram analytics. An engagement is counted when someone likes, comments, shares or interacts with a post made on the museum’s social channels.

Encounters 2020

While an element of total engagement, the methodology for calculation of participation in Encounters 2020 is separately reported below.

Note 1: The data in this Annual Performance Statement is compiled by the relevant business

unit applying the data definitions in the National Cultural Institutions Key Performance Indicator Framework compiled by the former Department of Communications and the Arts (now Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications) with refinements where appropriate.

Note 2: Data for performance past years is sourced from the relevant Annual Report and adjustments made in the 2018-19 report have been carried forward.

Note 3: All supporting data for the analysis is actuals collected at the operational level.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 19

Analysis

Total engagement

Total engagement in 2019-20 was 7.56M this year, with 3.44M attributable to mainstream media mentions of the Encounters 2020 program. The Encounters 2020 result is discussed

separately below.

Excluding Encounters 2020, the museum engaged with 4.1M people in 2019-20, which was

ahead of target. This is a strong result given that the major contributor to the engagement figures, total visitation, was heavily affected by the closure of the museum and partnering institutions for much of the fourth quarter due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Very strong onsite visitation figures in the third quarter effectively carried the performance for the year in this area. Also, the very pleasing results in the online space and with social media helped the museum to stay connected with the public during the closure and meet the total engagement target.

The target for people engaging with the Encounters 2020 program was exceeded by 1.5M due to media mentions of the program and despite the Endeavour replica not circumnavigating as

planned. The results on this aspect are discussed separately below.

Total visitation

Total visitation for the year was more than 1.85M, which was 7% below target.

Despite the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on total visitation, this was still a strong year for visitation and the results exceeded total visitation for every previous year except 2017-18 (1.87M) and 2018-19 (2.1M).

The contribution of offsite visitation is analysed below and onsite visitation is analysed on page 25.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 20

Offsite visitation

There were 936K offsite visitors this year, which was 16% behind target.

Offsite visitation contributed more than 50% to the museum’s total visitation this year, demonstrating that the challenge of sharing the national maritime story is being met.

Touring exhibitions

In 2019-20 there were 910,947 visitors to the museum’s travelling exhibitions in Australia and overseas. This is behind target due to the fact that most venues in Australia and overseas were

closed from the middle of March onwards due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Number of travelling exhibitions 16 20 17 17

Number of exhibitions in Australia 11 18 15 12

Number of venues in Australia 64 82 92 83

Number of exhibitions overseas 10 6 3 7

Number of venues overseas 17 12 10 8

Information about the museum’s touring exhibitions is included in the annual report (see

page 48). This year the museum toured 16 exhibitions in total. Ten of these exhibitions were displayed at 17 international venues and 11 exhibitions were displayed at 64 venues throughout Australia, with distribution set out in the following table:

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 21

ANMM touring exhibitions in 2019-20 NSW QLD NT WA SA VIC TAS ACT Total OS

Total number of venues

(flat-pack exhibitions)

14 16 0 8 3 17 0 0 58 12

Number of venues

(other touring exhibitions)

3 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 6 5

Total 17 16 0 10 3 17 1 0 64 17

From 12 September to 12 December 2019, the museum’s Endeavour replica voyaged to New Zealand to participate in that country’s Tuia 250 program. A total of 19,427 people visited the

vessel at six ports in New Zealand and this contributed to offsite visitation.

This year the museum’s Speakers Bureau delivered 123 talks to a total audience of 6,321. While this number was down on last year due to the impact of COVID-19, it should be noted that in Q4 the speakers were able to deliver 10 talks to 503 people via online methods, indicating that the program will move forward next year even if distancing requirements make physical talks impossible.

Student participation

Almost 380K students participated in onsite, offsite and online learning programs this year,

which was 120% ahead of target. 25K students participated in onsite and offsite learning programs and the remainder participated online (through either the museum’s website or by engaging with the museum’s learning products on external websites).

While participation in onsite and offsite learning programs was down due to COVID-19, online student participation was extraordinarily strong.

The development of a key partnership with ABC Education has led to a significant online footprint that has increased the exposure of the museum’s resources and allowed for the collaborative development of new materials designed specifically for student audiences reaching 45K this year. Particularly successful over the past 12 months have been the ABC digibooks (Journey along Australia’s East Australian Current and The HMB Endeavour’s voyage of exploration).

Over 300K students and teachers used the resources on the museum’s website this year. This included all pages that include teacher resources, The Voyage Game, Cook’s Voyages game and the museum’s Virtual Endeavour VR (virtual reality) tour.

Online visitation

There were 1.7M online visitors and 487K social media engagements this year. Online visitation was 24% ahead of target. This result was due to several major initiatives - the online learning games (The Voyage Game and Cook’s Voyages), strong public relations and online marketing

of the museum’s exhibitions and programs, as well as the online collection and a concerted effort to drive online engagement after the museum’s closure on March 24.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 22

Encounters 2020

Results

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

Engagement with Encounters 2020 1,839,400 3,439,730

Methodology

The Encounters 2020 program, scheduled over the 2019-20 and 2020-21 financial years, has

many elements, including onsite and offsite exhibitions and educational programs, as well as the circumnavigation of Australia by the Endeavour replica, a film, an art fair commission and a digital game (Cook’s Voyages).

To avoid double counting for visitation and student participation etc, this measure is confined to people engaged in voyaging (ship and shore), viewers of sail-by, viewers of the broadcast of the funded film, visitors to the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair and readers of print media referring to the program. It is acknowledged that achievement of the targets regarding viewers of the documentary film, visitors to Cairns Indigenous Art Fair (and also the viewers of ABC Online educational videos) and mainstream media are outside the primary control of the museum.

Audience data for the film and art fair are to be sourced from the broadcaster and event organiser respectively. Data for readers of media articles related to the Encounters 2020

program are sourced from an external media monitoring company, with only articles referring to ‘Encounters 2020’ counted towards the target. As the voyage did not proceed this year, no data

were collected related to ship or shore voyaging and related activities.

Analysis

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the museum did not proceed with the circumnavigation of Australia by the Endeavour replica this year. As a result, there were no visitor engagements for

voyaging or associated onshore activities. Also, as neither the film nor the Cairns Indigenous Art

Fair was programmed for this year there was, as expected, no audience engagement from these sources. The Cook’s Voyages educational game was launched on 29 April 2020 and

8,538 people played 13,590 games this year (note these players are counted towards the student participation targets).

Mainstream media reporting of the Encounters 2020 program generated significant publicity for

the museum and the anniversary of Cook’s charting of the east coast - reaching audiences of 3,439,730 for 83 articles with mentions of ‘Encounters 2020’. This was the tip of the iceberg in

terms of media profile for this project (for example, 3.5M people read articles about the 29 April anniversary, some of which did not mention ‘Encounters 2020’, and, as mentioned below,

2.25M people read articles referring to ‘the view from the ship and the view from the shore’).

The museum acknowledged the 250th anniversary of Cook’s first Pacific voyage with the opening of the Under Southern Skies gallery and three temporary exhibitions (Ship and Shore, Cook and the Pacific and HERE: Kupe to Cook), as well as an extensive digital offering

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 23

including the Cook’s Voyages game and a new rooftop projection called Strange big canoe. We are also the principal funder of a new film, Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky, to be screened

later in the year, and are proceeding with acquisitions from the Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair.

There were 105 media mentions of ‘view from the ship and view from the shore’ this year - a phrase coined by the museum about five years ago to refer to the bicultural perspectives of Cook’s encounter with Australia’s Indigenous peoples. The museum was referred to in 82 of

these mentions. A total of 2.25M people were exposed to the phrase ‘ship and shore’, with an advertising value of $2.1M.

Collection digitisation and online accessibility

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Percentage of total collection available to public online

70% 70.28% 68.14% 67.90% 65.13%

Percentage of the total collection digitised 61% 61.65% 61.23% 61.32% 60.48%

Methodology

All data pertaining to collection item management is recorded in or derived from the museum’s

collection management system (TMS). The percentage of collection objects digitised is based on the percentage of objects in the collection for which there is at least one digital image as at 30 June.

Analysis

In November 2016, the museum officially launched the ‘Unlocking the Collection’ initiative, which provides the public with access to digital images and information about objects in the collection. As at 30 June 2020, there were 105,114 objects available online. There were 83,636 visits to the online collection this year (up from 72,905 last year).

In 2019-2020, 712 objects were digitised. As at 30 June 2020, 61.65% of the objects in the National Maritime Collection had been digitised. This result was on target. The priorities of digitisation are determined by the museum’s digitisation strategy. All high-value items and new acquisitions have been digitised.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 24

Priority 2 - Compelling experiences We are renowned as a ‘must visit’ museum because we put audiences at the heart of everything we do and our indoor, outdoor and outreach activities, exhibitions and programs tell the story of our island nation in new and surprising ways.

We put the visitor at the centre of all we do and tailor our offerings to their diverse needs and

expectations.

We will take every advantage of our collection, fleet, location, expertise, facilities and technology to provide imaginative, engaging and rewarding experiences for our onsite visitors.

We will strategically improve our assets supported by long-term planning to maximise the impact of our expenditure.

Criterion

The key measures of performance are:

Visitation

● Total number of onsite visitors to the organisation

● Annual number of international visitors (ticketed)

● Number of participants in public participation programs onsite

Exhibitions

● Number of major temporary exhibitions on site

Visitor satisfaction

● The percentage of our visitors that were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit.

Criterion source

2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS), p 145 2019-23 Corporate Plan, p 8

Visitation

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Number of onsite visitors to the museum 872,507 916,579 1,018,019 822,421 760,009

Number of paid onsite visitors to the museum 230,347 202,310 236,832 217,124 213,346

Number of unpaid onsite visitors to the museum 642,160 714,269 781,187 605,297 546,663

Number of international visitors to the museum 85,000 64,607 89,329 80,068 73,412

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 25

Number of people participating in public programs

83,769 34,577 43,717 81,329 57,134

Methodology

The methodology for calculation of onsite visitation is described above and in the framework for onsite visitation at Annex A (see page 42).

The number of international visitors onsite is the number of ticketed visitors who identify as

foreigners at front of house (collected through the AXPOS system). Ticketed visitors are paid ticketed visitors (that is, visitors who have purchased an entry ticket, including tourism and group booking tickets) and unpaid ticketed visitors (that is, visitors who have received a free

gallery ticket, including tourism and group booking tickets for the galleries only).

A ‘public program’ excludes school learning programs. Public programs ranged from participation in the ROV ‘underwater drone’ program and special event programs (such as NAIDOC), through to our stroller tours for parents. Onsite ‘public program’ participant numbers are determined by aggregating data of actual participation collected onsite by manual counting. The data is compiled and aggregated at the operational level.

Analysis

Onsite visitation was ahead of target at 916,579 and would most likely have broken records but for COVID-19. It is noteworthy that January 2020 was the museum’s best January on record, with more than 45K ticketed visitors, and onsite visitation was 46% ahead of target at the end of the third quarter. There were very few visitors in the fourth quarter due to the temporary closure of the museum.

International visitor numbers in the third and fourth quarter were heavily affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Australia placed restrictions on foreign nationals from China from January 31, and eventually closed the borders to all international visitors on March 20. Therefore, the total

number of international visitors (64,607) was 24% behind target.

The museum conducted public programs for 34,577 people this year. The number of participants was significantly below target as the Classic & Wooden Boat Festival had to be cancelled due to COVID-19. The last festival in 2018 (2017-18 FY) attracted more than 33,000 people. In addition, COVID-19 affected public programs in two school holiday periods, which is generally a significant driver of program participation for the museum.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 26

Exhibitions

Results

The following table summarises the museum’s exhibition offer this year. Information about the exhibitions, including rooftop projections, is included in the annual report.

2019-20

target

2019-20 actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Number of major exhibitions delivered annually

4 6 7 9 7

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Onsite exhibitions 32 31 36 30

Major exhibitions 6 7 9 7

Minor exhibitions 20 13 17 16

Rooftop projections 5 11 10 7

Methodology

A temporary exhibition is considered major if it is over 250 square metres, has a budget of more than $100K, and has a marketing campaign attached to it.

Analysis

The major exhibitions in 2018-19 were Wildlife Photographer of the Year (2019 and 2020), Bligh: Hero or Villain?, Sea Monsters: Prehistoric ocean predators, Capturing the home front

and HERE: Kupe to Cook.

In addition, a new permanent gallery, Under Southern Skies, was installed this year in the space that was previously the Navigators Gallery.

In 2019-20, entry fees applied to four major exhibitions and to Action Stations and the Endeavour replica. The exhibitions for which entry fees were charged were Wildlife Photographer of the Year (2019 and 2020), Bligh: Hero or Villain? and Sea Monsters. A fee also applied to the Antarctica VR Experience.

Action Stations provided paying visitors with access to the museum’s naval vessels - HMA

Ships Onslow, Vampire and Advance. Paying visitors could also visit the Endeavour replica,

which was berthed at the museum for most of the year. The other vessels in the museum’s floating collection could be observed by all visitors from the museum’s wharves for no charge. When the museum reopened on 22 June, only the top decks of HMAS Vampire and Endeavour

were available to visitors, in order to ensure social distancing arrangements could be maintained. The museum’s ticket prices were adjusted to reflect this.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 27

Some highlights of the free offer this year included Capturing the home front and the outdoor exhibition Elysium Artic. HERE: Kupe to Cook was one of the drawcards of the reopening after

the three-month COVID-19 closure.

This year we also offered 43 hours of rooftop projections, which are very popular with audiences in the Darling Harbour precinct. This is down compared to last year, due to the cancellation of Sydney’s VIVID festival, which the museum typically participates in. The highlight of the rooftop

projection program was Strange big canoe, which launched our Encounters 2020 program on

April 29, allowing engagement with the precinct while the museum was closed to visitors. On 15 March, in partnership with the Australian National Imams Council (ANIC), the museum displayed the names of the 51 victims of the Christchurch mosque shootings to acknowledge the first anniversary of their deaths.

Visitor satisfaction

Results

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

% visitor satisfaction 90% 94% 98% 92% 95%

Methodology

Visitor satisfaction is measured by sending out monthly surveys to online ticket holders after their visit. Visitors are asked to rate their experience on a scale of 1 to 10 (poor to outstanding). The level of satisfaction is the proportion of respondents who rate us 7 or higher.

Analysis

Visitor satisfaction is ahead of target at 94%. Of the 463 people surveyed, 437 were satisfied or very satisfied with the museum.

Priority 3 - Supporting reconciliation We will encourage understanding, appreciation and deep respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and heritage, and take action to be a preferred employer and business partner.

Criterion

The key performance measures are:

● Expenditure on major Indigenous acquisitions

● Percentage of staff and volunteers who have completed cultural awareness training

● Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee satisfaction with progress.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 28

Criterion source

2019-23 Corporate Plan, p 9

Results

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Expenditure on major Indigenous acquisitions

$80K $189K $35K $295K $378K

% of staff and volunteers who have completed cultural awareness training

85% 100% 100% 95% 100%

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee satisfaction with progress

80% 85% NA NA NA

Note: NA = not applicable

Methodology

Expenditure on Indigenous acquisitions is compiled by the museum’s Finance department from the finance system records.

Cultural awareness training is recorded in the Learning Management System.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee satisfaction with progress is a rating determined by the Chairperson of the Committee, having regard to the museum’s Reconciliation Action Plan implementation report and the updates provided by the museum to the Committee throughout the year.

Analysis

This year the museum acquired 34 Indigenous acquisitions valued at $235,830. These acquisitions comprised $188,535 in expenditure noted in the table above and $47,295 in donations. New acquisitions included several important works of art by Torres Strait Islander artist Alick Tipoti through the Cultural Gifts Program, as well as donations through the Australian

National Maritime Museum Foundation.

All new staff and volunteers are required to complete a cultural awareness training course through the Learning Management System (LMS) as part of the induction process. The

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 29

museum supplements this with a range of informal learning opportunities, such as promoting watching The Australian Dream and considering how truth-telling applies to the work we do

through a survey taken after watching, participating in NAIDOC Week activities, and encouraging watching the Ocean Talk ‘Connected to Sea Country’.

The Chairperson of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee has reported 85% satisfaction with the museum’s progress with reconciliation. The museum is in the second

year of its Reconciliation Action Plan and has reported to Council and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee on a quarterly basis regarding progress made under the plan. With another year to go, 68% of the deliverables have been completed and 22% are in progress.

Some of the highlights achieved under our Reconciliation Action Plan in 2019-20 include:

● strong engagement with Indigenous communities or organisations, particularly as part of

Encounters 2020 but also in respect of acquisitions, exhibitions, museum programs,

NAIDOC Week and attendance at Indigenous art fairs

● Kanalaritja: an unbroken string exhibition in the Eora Gallery, part of the ongoing strategy to

move from a permanent gallery to a space with temporary and travelling exhibitions

● 10% of the Store’s sales were goods produced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

artists and suppliers

● the museum is a member of the Indigenous Art Code and is committed to ensuring that

other institutions are aware of the benefits of membership

● engaging with an Indigenous organisation to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait

Islander staff have access to culturally appropriate support

● the museum used Supply Nation as part of its overall procurement practice and commitment

to using best endeavours to apply the Commonwealth’s Indigenous Procurement Policy

● on 25 August 2019 - Australian South Sea Islanders National Recognition Day - the

museum hosted a South Sea Islander flag-raising event to acknowledge the Australian South Sea Islander community, and local Aboriginal custodians gave a Welcome to Country and a healing smoking ceremony. This was a powerful demonstration of unity between two cultures.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 30

Priority 4 - A trusted voice and custodian We will draw on our knowledge and collection to be a uniquely relevant and trusted place of discourse and inquiry. We will be a preferred partner and undertake dedicated exploration and research to ensure our exhibition, public and learning programs are deep, authentic and widely

shared in public, media and educational forums. The collection will be managed to best practice standards and made available for a multiplicity of educational and research purposes to promote inquiry and understanding of the maritime heritage and contemporary issues.

Criterion

The key performance measures of success are:

Learning

● Number of students participating in school programs annually

● Number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs onsite

● Percentage of teachers reporting relevance to the classroom curriculum

● Percentage of teachers reporting overall positive experience

Partnerships

● Number of formal partnerships with educational and research institutions in place

National Maritime Collection

● Number of acquisitions made

● Number of objects accessioned

● Percentage of the total collection available to the public

Criterion source

2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS), p 145 2019-23 Corporate Plan, p 10

Results

Learning

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016- 17

actual

Number of students participating in school programs (onsite, offsite, online)

172,013 379,543 195,809 148,104 137,371

Number of educational institutions participating in 650 287 456 577 623

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 31

organised school learning programs onsite

% of teachers reporting relevance to the classroom curriculum

95% 93% 98% 96% 95%

% of teachers reporting overall positive experience 90% 98% 100% 96% 95%

Partnerships

2019-20

target

2019-20

actual

2018-19

actual

2017-18

actual

2016-17

actual

Number of formal partnerships with educational and research institutions in place

10 56 38 28 NR

Note: NR = not reported

National Maritime Collection

2019-20

target

2019-20 actual

2018-19 actual 2017-18 actual

2016-17 actual

Number of acquisitions

100 122 133 132 889

Number of objects accessioned 100 711 1,099 1,080 1,007

% of the total collection available to the public

70% 71.41% 69.36% 69.26% 66.63%

Actual at

30 June 2020

Actual at 30 June 2019

Actual at 30 June 2018

Actual at 30 June 2017

Number of objects in the National Maritime Collection 149,559 148,480 147,354 146,262

Learning

Methodology

The methodology for student participation is described above (see page 17). Note that, for the purpose of this priority, we also count online participation involving educational materials.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 32

The number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs onsite is calculated by aggregating information from the museum’s Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Front of House records.

Teacher satisfaction and curriculum relevance are measured by evaluating visiting teacher feedback received by the Learning team through an online survey at completion of onsite visits.

Analysis

The analysis of student participation is included above (see page 21). This year 379,543 students participated, comprising 25,028 students who participated in face-to-face formal learning and 354,515 who engaged with the museum’s online educational resources. This included online gamified resources, classroom materials and curriculum-focused video content.

The museum has had great success in supporting students and teachers with online resources this year through the development of new resources, partnerships and strategies designed to support teachers in the dynamic classroom environment of 2019-20.

The smaller number of institutions engaged with the museum on formal learning programs

onsite is a result of the trend toward smaller numbers of much larger visitor groups along with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this figure excludes institutions engaged in education programs conducted by our educators offsite.

Teacher satisfaction is pleasing at 98% (against a target of 90%) and 93% of teachers report that programs are relevant to the curriculum (against a target of 95%).

Partnerships

Methodology

The number of formal partnerships with educational and research institutions, excluding MMAPSS grant agreements, is recorded at the operational level. A formal contractual

collaboration is one where a signed MOU or written contract is in place. A national/international cultural/educational institution is a public or non-profit institution that engages in the cultural, intellectual, scientific, environmental, educational or artistic enrichment of people. The number of partnerships is collated on a quarterly basis through the year and the number reported is the highest number of formal agreements in place across the four quarters.

Analysis

The museum had 56 formal partnerships with various educational and research institutions this year, 34 of them in Australia and 22 overseas. Twenty-eight of the partnership agreements related to object loans. The remainder dealt with inbound or outbound exhibitions, maritime

archaeology projects, cultural diplomacy projects, education or acquisitions. For completeness, it should be noted the museum also had a large number of formal partnerships with commercial and government entities, as well a diverse range of informal partnerships with educational and research institutions, which are not reflected in the above numbers.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 33

National Maritime Collection

Methodology

All data pertaining to collection item management (such as acquisitions, loans, object locations) is recorded in or derived from the museum’s collection management system (TMS). The number of items in the collection and the percentage available to the public is at 30 June. To assist with comparisons, results for past years have been adjusted to actuals at 30 June. Also, to make

movements throughout the year transparent, the annual results for public access are now compared with the quarterly results for these indicators.

Analysis

There were 149,559 objects in the National Maritime Collection at 30 June 2020, an increase of 1079. Accessions to the collection totalled 711 objects against a target of 100. The number of new acquisitions was 120 against a target of 100.

Major acquisitions this year included a series of ceramic works by Bern Emmerichs about Chinese migration to the Victorian goldfields and Aboriginal watercraft (20190809-1); a

significant selection of works of art by leading Torres Strait Islander artist Alick Tipoti, including Maza Mawa (Wapiya) I mask and linocut prints (20190603-1), Mawa III (Kisay) mask (20191202-2) and Danagi Waaru (Blind Turtle) (20200110-1); Surgeon John White’s A Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales, 1790 (20200318-1); W Bartleet & Sons fishing tackle didactic

display, 1880s (20190329-1); a Waga Hot canoe model from Paneati Island, Papua New Guinea (20190701-1); a scale model of record-breaking supermaxi Wild Oats XI (20190924-1); and Invasion, a photographic series by Michael Cook 2019 (20190901-1).

The percentage of the collection available to the public (71%) is ahead of target (70%) and ahead of last year (69.36%). The following table compares the accessibility of the collection

across the year.

National Maritime Collection accessibility Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

% of collection available to the public 70.04 71.24 71.13 71.41

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 34

Priority 5 - A strong financial future We will build on our success and achieve long-term sustainability, including by expanding our audiences, philanthropy, programs and partnerships and by diversifying our income sources.

Criterion

The key measures of performance are:

% of total income that is self-generated (excluding Encounters 2020 revenue)

Criterion source

2019-23 Corporate Plan, p 11

Results

2019-20

target

2019-20 actual 2018-19 actual

2017-18 actual 2016-17 actual

2015-16 actual 2014-15 actual

Percentage self-generated revenue (excluding one-offs and Encounters 2020)

53 42.8 45 43.6 39.2 36.2 33.1

Methodology

Financial data, including about the Australian National Maritime Foundation, is derived from the museum’s systems and has been audited and agreed to in the Financial Statements.

Percentage of self-generated revenue is calculated as total revenue received by the museum other than by appropriation from government. Total self-generated revenue has been adjusted for the purpose of this calculation by removing oneoff gains (primarily gains on donated assets

and insurance proceeds) and grant funding received from the government to deliver the Encounters 2020 program.

Analysis

Self-generated revenue was $19.7M, which is behind target by 16.4% ($3.9M).

2019-20

PBS target

$’000

2019-20

actual

$’000

2018-19

actual

$’000

2017-18

actual

$’000

2016-17

actual

$’000

Total self-generated revenue 23,555 19,681 18,948 17,440 17,780

● Grants

3,492

3,461

884

749

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 35

● Donations

759

664

668

2,114

3,580

● Sponsorship

3,261

993

1,902

1,914

1,160

● Interest

500

378

898

744

499

● Admissions &

Retail

4,975

4,441

4,739

4,331

4,022

● Venue hire

2,303

1,542

2,283

1,769

2,000

● Leasing

2,915

2,693

2,651

2,177

1,861

● Other

5,350

5,509

4,103

3,507

3,909

The majority of self-generated revenue lines were severely affected by the closure of the museum as result of COVID-19 during quarter 4, and the suspension of the Encounters 2020

program.

● The museum received insurance proceeds of $1.2M relating to the COVID-19 insurable

event, which partially offset some of the commercial revenue losses.

● The museum’s long-term arrangements to accommodate Google and the Australian

Maritime College (University of Tasmania) onsite continued to generate important revenue for museum operations.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 36

Priority 6 - People first Our staff and volunteers are our greatest assets.

We will continue to be a sought-after place to work by promoting excellence in all we do and supporting our people with development opportunities and effective systems and processes.

We recognise the vital role that our volunteers play in meeting the needs of our visitors.

We will commit to increasing the diversity and cultural awareness of our staff and volunteers through effective recruitment and training initiatives.

We will build our capabilities in emerging areas such as the use of technology and audience engagement.

Criterion

The key measures of performance are:

● Museum staff satisfaction in the APSC State of the Service Survey

Criterion source

2019-20 Corporate Plan, p 12

Results

2019-20

target

2019-20 actual 2018-19 actual

2017-18 actual

Museum staff satisfaction in the APSC State of the Service survey >APS average

NR 64% 68%

Note: NR = not reported

Methodology

The museum encourages APS staff to participate in the Australian Public Service Commission’s annual State of the Service Survey. The APSC’s report on the response to the question ‘Considering everything, I am satisfied with my job’ is used for this criterion. This question was also asked last year.

Analysis

The APSC State of the Service survey was delayed due to COVID-19.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 37

Delivery against the museum’s ‘Statement of Intent’ for 2019-20 In 2019, the museum provided a ‘Statement of Intent’ for 2019-20 in response to the Government’s ‘Statement of Expectations’. The following table summarises progress in delivering the Statement of Intent.

ANMM intentions Actions and results

Contribute to economic activity, particularly in regional centres, through touring and other outreach activities

Investment in a diverse range of outreach activities, including in regional areas, as part of the Encounters 2020 program:

● Leveraging seed funding to secure investment by partners in a documentary film as part of the Encounters 2020 program

● Acquisition of contemporary Indigenous art from regional areas for the National Maritime Collection, including in partnership with the Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair

● Grants and in-kind support under the Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS).

● Seed funding of $400K in the film Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky unlocked over $600K in external funding for the project.

● Acquisition of artworks from regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists (valued at $189K), as well as a pledge for $100K for works from the Cairns Indigenous Arts Fair in 2020-21.

● Container: The box that changed the world exhibition toured to Narrabri and Dubbo, NSW, and Fremantle, WA.

● Bushfire-affected areas were prioritised in the MMAPSS grants process. Four successful organisations were bushfire affected, including one project that would benefit eight organisations on the South Coast.

Provide leadership to the collections sector as an employer of choice

Provide leadership to the collections sector as an employer of choice, particularly:

● Offering to share with the collections sector our journey in advancing a range of ‘people first’ initiatives being implemented under our Operational Plan.

● Partnering with not-for-profit employers, such as Settlement Services International, and exploring new practices with regards to labour.

● Enhancing corporate social responsibility by introducing various frameworks across the museum.

● Commencing work on a volunteering framework that will enable a diverse range of volunteers to benefit from participation, particularly individuals with a disability. The framework will provide volunteers with greater opportunities to work in a range of roles

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 38

across the museum, and establish a volunteer pool that can be accessed by other organisations.

Accept opportunities to shape and promote Australian identity through the museum’s public-facing activities both nationally and internationally

Continue to offer public-facing activities speaking to Australian identity and, where relevant, we will invite and support our visitors to reflect on issues of Australian identity in our public facing activities, particularly:

● The Encounters 2020 program will provide a safe place for all Australians to discuss and debate a wide range of perspectives on the 250th anniversary of Cook’s first Pacific voyage, with an equal emphasis on the ‘view from the shore’ and the ‘view from the ship’

● In addition to Encounters 2020, we will provide diverse onsite and touring exhibition programs, including Faces of Australia, Mariw Minaral and Koori Art Expressions as well as the Classic & Wooden Boat Festival. A continued focus on collecting and sharing stories about Indigenous maritime heritage, migration to Australia and the members of the Royal Australian Navy.

● Collaborated with ABC Education on a ‘digibook,’ HMB Endeavour’s voyage of exploration.

● The Endeavour replica participated in Tuia 250, New Zealand’s commemoration of the 250th anniversary of Cook’s voyages.

● The Virtual Ocean Talk Cook, Man or Myth, with Peter Fitzsimmons and John Maynard, was watched by 2,000 people worldwide.

● Completed We are Many - Stories of Australia’s Migrants

● Opened exhibitions which provide opportunities for reflection on issues of Australian identity:

● Capturing the home front

● Art of Navy

● Challenging, Thrilling, Racing: 75 years of the Sydney to Hobart

● Koori Art Expression

● Kanalaritja - an unbroken string

● Under Southern Skies (permanent gallery)

● Two Nations, which highlights Australia’s connection to Indonesia’s independence story, toured Indonesia

● Sons of Sindbad, featuring the photography of Australian Alan Villiers, opened in Kuwait.

Consider opportunities to create and meet demand for inbound tourism

Consider opportunities to create and meet demand for inbound tourism, particularly:

● developing and implementing an International Tourism Project Plan.

● Commenced overhaul of international tourism strategy in light of COVID-19. The Tourism Manager has been using digital technology to maintain connections with key international distributors.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 39

● Became a member of Cultural Attractions of Australia.

Provide leadership in the delivery of collection management, arts education and public programs

Provide leadership in the delivery of collection management, education and public programs, particularly:

● Development of a range of new exhibitions and programs for Encounters 2020, as well as exhibitions such as Sea Monsters, Elysium Arctic, Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Mariw Minaral and Faces of Australia

● Visitor programs and site and vessel activation

● Support for the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project

● Upgrading our e-collection, collection digitisation and sustainability

● Progressing accreditation to support protection of cultural gifts on loan

● Hosting a major international conference (Communicating the Arts - November 2019).

● National leadership of the Migration and Multicultural Museums Alliance and the Maritime Museums Council.

● Encounters 2020 pivoted to an online program, with supportive physical elements including a rooftop projection (Strange big canoe), a banner exhibition (Ship and shore) and exhibitions Cook and the Pacific and HERE: Kupe to Cook.

● Exhibitions Sea Monsters, Elysium Arctic, Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Bligh: Hero or Villain? And Capturing the home front were all opened on site.

● Michael Cook - A selection of works from the Undiscovered Series opened online.

● 5,840 images and 10 videos of 2,545 individual objects were digitised during the FY. 70% of the collection is available through the e-collection.

● Cook’s Voyages, an online game whose approach highlights a First Nations perspective on player choices, launched on 29 April. 8.5K unique users played the game in the first two months.

● The museum hosted the Communicating the Arts and Culture Business conferences in November 2019.

● Protection of Cultural Objects on Loan (PCOL) accreditation was actively progressed during the FY.

● The director presented a workshop on creating engaging exhibitions at the Museum Nasional, Indonesia, in November 2019.

● Members of the Migration and Multicultural Museum Alliance participated, via videolink, in the museum’s commemoration of the first anniversary of attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.

● Implementing a number of sustainability measures, including improved waste management.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 40

Explore opportunities to grow private sector support and increase own-source revenue

Continue to build on the success to date in pursuing opportunities for own-source income by a stronger focus in the museum on identifying and implementing alternative revenue, including:

● growing onsite visitation revenue

● growing international cultural tourist visitors to museum

● growing online revenue

● developing a merchandising strategy

● prioritising strategic partnerships and alliances

● meeting fundraising targets to support agreed priority projects for the Foundation Board.

● $19.7M raised in self-generated revenue, or 42.8% excluding one-offs (behind target due to COVID-19).

● Paid onsite visitation was $3.576 (10.7% behind target due to COVID-19). Note that the museum was on track for a strong result (9% ahead at the end of the third quarter).

● Draft retail strategy incorporating merchandising developed.

● Online revenue increased 223% from the last year.

● Significant strategic partnerships secured with Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation (CSC), Port Authority of NSW, Multicultural NSW, Settlement Services International, Sydney Festival and the City of Sydney.

● $664K was raised this year from cash donations. The museum’s total philanthropy revenue also included Welcome Wall ($205K), fundraising campaigns ($259K) and a Gala Dinner ($88K).

● The ANMM Foundation agreed to provide $135K towards museum priorities and underwrote projects valued at $205K.

Analysis of overall performance against purpose

The museum had a particularly promising start to 2019-20, and by January 31, it was looking like it would be the best year yet for visitation. Those strong results meant that the museum did

not lose too much ground when, on March 24, we shut our doors in accordance with the COVID-19 pandemic public health order. We reopened on 22 June, trading for only eight days of the fourth quarter.

Despite COVID-19, the museum succeeded in attracting visitors onsite, offsite and online and visitor satisfaction is very high.

The museum’s diverse exhibitions have been central to our success this year. Particularly noteworthy are Sea Monsters: Prehistoric ocean predators, Wildlife Photographer of the Year and Bligh: Hero or Villain?. These exhibitions have had strong visitation and visitor appeal, good

curriculum alignment, attractive programming, and opportunities for publicity, commercial return,

reputational benefit and/or stakeholder engagement.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 41

A highlight of offsite visitation was the Endeavour replica’s voyage to New Zealand for that country’s Tuia 250 program. A total of 19,427 people visited the vessel at six ports.

The museum’s contribution to student education reflects high-quality curriculum-aligned programs onsite, offsite and online. Some highlights of the year include our Women in Science event, War and Peace in the Pacific and the new Cook’s Voyages game.

The National Maritime Collection is growing and public access to the collection is on target. The

museum’s Indigenous collection continued to grow this year with the acquisition of a number of key contemporary artworks that highlight relationships with the sea.

This year the museum earned 42.8% of revenue from own source (excluding one-offs), compared to 45% in 2018-19. This was a very good result considering the impact of COVID-19 on all revenue lines. The museum again faced increased depreciation expenditure and a reduction in venue hire activity, which was affected by onsite construction work during the year.

Finally, the museum largely delivered on its Statement of Intent for the year.

Going forward, the museum is anticipating a challenging 2020-21 as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, both economically and socially, continues. The museum is committed to a range of measures in order to ensure that core functions are maintained and the museum can remain in a healthy position to recover.

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 42

Annex A Framework for measurement of total onsite visitation

Annual Report 2019-20 Annual Performance Statement 43

Annex B Adjustments and corrections to the results for 2018-19 in the previous Annual Performance Statement

The following corrections are required to the 2018-19 results in the Annual Performance

Statement published in the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Annual Report for 2018-19.

Page Correction Explanation

28 Visitors to the museum (offsite) - omit 1,089,592 and insert 1,090,682 An extra 1090 visitors were

advised after publication 26 Consequential change to total visitation - omit 2,107,611 and insert 2,108,701

26 Consequential change to total visitor engagement - omit 3,286,598 and insert 3,287,768

33 Under ‘International visitors’, omit ‘behind’ and insert ‘ahead of’ in the sentence:

‘The museum’s ‘China-ready’ tourism initiatives again contributed to China being the highest source of international visitors for the fourth year running, behind the United States of America, United Kingdom and New Zealand.’

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 44

Exhibitions and attractions A major attraction during this reporting period was Encounters 2020. This umbrella program,

five years in the planning, was designed to commemorate Cook’s first Pacific voyage and to give equal weight to the stories from both the ship and the shore. It included exhibitions (Ship and Shore, Cook and the Pacific, HERE: Kupe to Cook, Paradise Lost - Daniel Solander’s legacy, Defying Empire, Seascapes and a new permanent exhibition, Under Southern Skies) and a range of other initiatives, such as a documentary film, Looky Looky Here Comes Cooky,

an online game, Cook’s Voyages - Views from the Shore and a national education project. The Encounters 2020 program originally included voyaging HMB Endeavour to 38 ports around the

country alongside a travelling exhibition. Unfortunately, this major element had to be suspended due to COVID-19.

Exhibitions featuring Indigenous cultures and histories were a focus this year. They were presented both in support of our Encounters 2020 program and as part of our commitment to

concentrate on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and First Peoples cultures from around Oceania as part of our Reconciliation Action Plan. Highlights included Koori Art

Expressions, displaying work from Sydney school students, Kanalaritja: an unbroken string, with beautiful shellwork from Tasmania, and Undiscovered: Photographic works by Michael Cook. Broader stories from around Oceania featured in HERE: Kupe to Cook, Cook and the Pacific and Massim Canoes from Papua New Guinea.

Monsters have been big this year, with our phenomenally successful exhibition Sea Monsters - Prehistoric ocean predators, which helped drive our best January ever. Outside we had The Return and Earn Kraken - made from approximately 4,000 plastic bottles - which highlighted

the importance of recycling and encouraged people to recycle their bottles and keep our oceans clean. We continue to do our bit with our Seabin and our commitment to recycling materials and

exhibition furniture. Environmental conservation also featured in our photography exhibitions Elysium Arctic and our perennial favourite Wildlife Photographer of the Year, which this year got

even bigger and brighter with a new display technique using light panels.

Capturing the home front and Dark Victory featured as part of our ongoing War and Peace in

the Pacific 75 program, which was funded by the USA Bicentennial Gift Fund. The program asked students from the USA, Japan and America to investigate ‘secrets and spies’ during World War II around the Pacific and produce documentaries on their research.

Some of our permanent galleries had an overhaul. In the Navy Gallery, we replaced the Westland Wessex Mk 31B helicopter with a ‘new’ S-70B Seahawk with an eye-catching tiger-striped tail. Our Navigators gallery had some small updates in 2019 to highlight the contributions of Islamic navigators from Indonesia. Then, during the COVID-19 closure in 2020, the whole

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 45

gallery was re-curated to include more stories from navigators around Asia and Oceania in the permanent exhibition Under Southern Skies.

Across five decades - photographs by Richard Bennett

Dramatic photographs of the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race over the past five decades, through the eyes of committed photographer Richard Bennett. Yots €, 22 December 2019-28 January 2020

Aquatic Imaginarium

Indoor play and discovery space where children encountered a wonderland of giant inflatables, evocative sensory installations, object storytelling and hands-on art-making activities. South Gallery, 1 July-2 October 2019

The Art of Navy

Internationally recognised Australian artist Ralph Kerle was commissioned by the Royal Australian Navy in early 2019 to apply his innovative digital photographic technique to capture images of ships of the fleet in the waters of Sydney Harbour. Tasman Light Gallery, 4 October-

17 November 2019

Au Karem Ira Lamar Lu - Ghost Nets of the Ocean

Ghost Nets of the Ocean was created by Indigenous artists from Erub Arts, Darnley Island, and

non-Indigenous collaborating artists. It shares their concerns for the loss of marine life and environmental damage caused by discarded fishing nets, highlights the irreparable harm that they cause, and provokes reflection on how humans are affecting the world’s oceans. Museum foyer, 8 September 2018-24 March 2020, then from 15 June 2020 ongoing

Australian Sailing Hall of Fame

Featuring the stories of Australian Sailing Hall of Fame honourees who have produced some of

Australia’s greatest sporting moments - in the America’s Cup, the Olympics, bluewater racing and world sailing. Updated for 2019 honourees. Wharf 7, 18 October 2019-24 March 2020 and 15 June-October 2020

Bligh - Hero or Villain?

Bligh - Hero or Villain? Challenged the popular narrative, looking beyond the Bounty mutiny to

explore the many sides of this most infamous of maritime figures. Visitors judged for themselves - with pretty even results! Lower Gallery, 25 July 2019-2 February 2020

Capturing the home front

Photographs by Dorothea Lange, Toyo Miyatake and Australian wartime photographers.

Produced in association with the Museum of Contemporary Photography Columbia College Chicago and Toyo Miyatake Studio. Supported by the USA Bicentennial Gift Fund. Tall Gallery, 30 October 2019-16 February 2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 46

Cook and the Pacific

Visitors were introduced to James Cook’s three remarkable Pacific voyages and explored this spectacular region through the eyes of the British voyagers and the First Peoples they met. This exhibition was based on a larger show produced by the National Library of Australia. Tasman Light Gallery, 31 March-October 2020

Dark Victory: Operation Jaywick

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of Operation Jaywick, the museum collaborated with the National Museum of Singapore to produce a wide-screen film about this daring commando raid and a virtual reality experience that will take people ‘on board’ the historic MV Krait. We also installed a graphic exhibition on the roof of Action Stations. Action Stations, 27 September

2018-24 March 2020, then from 22June ongoing

Elysium Arctic

Produced in conjunction with internationally acclaimed photographer Michael Aw, this series of artworks captured the icons of the polar north - majestic icebergs and glaciers, playful wildlife and stunning views of land and sea. Elysium Arctic also recorded the devastating impact of

climate change in the earth’s northernmost regions. Outside Wharf 7, 7 August 2019-1 July 2020

HERE: Kupe to Cook

Showcased artworks by 20 leading Aotearoa New Zealand and Australian contemporary artists who investigate the long and varied histories of South Pacific voyaging - from Polynesian navigator Kupe to the arrival of James Cook in 1769. Lower Gallery, 15 June-25 November 2020

Kanalaritja: an unbroken string

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery’s exhibition Kanalaritja: An unbroken string displayed a

variety of beautiful, delicate and rare shell necklaces, created by Tasmanian Aboriginal ancestors in the 1800s, acclaimed makers of today, and a new wave of stringers who had the opportunity to learn the tradition through the luna tunapri (women’s knowledge) cultural revitalisation project. Eora Gallery, 31 August 2019-16 February 2020

Koori Art Expressions

A selection of highly imaginative visual artworks created by Sydney school students from kindergarten to year 12. Based on the 2019 NAIDOC theme ‘Voice. Treaty. Truth.’ And influenced by the ‘Uluru Statement of the Heart’. South Gallery 21 November 2019-28 January

2020

Massim canoes

Large-scale drawings capture the intriguing construction of the Massim canoes of Papua New Guinea (PNG), their sail and rig layout, and the wonderful carving details. A dozen different canoe types were on show and the drawings revealed each canoe’s individual characteristics.

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 47

Also on display at the Alotoa Museum in Papua New Guinea. Tasman Light, 1 August-26 September 2019

Out of Hawaii - surfing goes global

In 1961 a group of 20 Australian surfers flocked to Hawaii for its huge waves and the famed Makaha surfing contest. This display features one of them - a young Bernard ‘Midget’ Farrelly. Tall Gallery, from 14 June 2017 ongoing

The Return and Earn Kraken

Made from plastic bottles and cans, the Kraken descended on the Maritime Museum to highlight the problem of litter and plastics on our environment. Museum entrance, 15-29 January 2020

RSV Nuyina LEGO model

A LEGO model of Australia’s new icebreaker, RSV Nuyina, which will make its maiden voyage

to Antarctica in 2020-21. Foyer and South Gallery, 11 April-2 October 2019

Sea Monsters: prehistoric ocean predators

The Sea Monsters exhibition combines real fossils from millions of years ago, gigantic replicas -

including a 13-metre-long Elasmosaurus and 9-metre-long Prognathodon - a 180-degree

immersive video that puts you right inside the action, hands-on interactives to make your own monster, dress-ups, dino poo and much more! North Gallery, 26 September 2019-24 March 2020 and 15 June-11 October 2020

Seahawk helicopter

The striking S-70B Seahawk is 19.76 metres long and painted with tiger stripes to reflect the 816 Squadron Crest, which depicts the head of a Bengal tiger, with the motto ‘Imitate the action of the tiger’. The helicopter is enriched with a new eight-minute film commissioned from the Royal Australian Navy. Navy Gallery, from 1 July 2019 ongoing

Challenging, thrilling, racing: Sydney to Hobart 75 years

Charting the history of the bluewater classic, with stunning photography by acclaimed photographers Andrea Francolini, Carlo Borlenghi and Richard Bennett, this exhibition comprised an expansive visual timeline and evocative film. Tasman Light Gallery, 30 November 2019-24 March 2020

Under Southern Skies

A rejuvenation of our former Navigators Gallery. This exhibition travels across history, from bark paintings that depict Makassan fishermen trading with Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory, to sextants, compasses and telescopes that show the technological advancement in

navigational instruments. Under Southern Skies Gallery, from 15 June 2020 ongoing

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 48

Undiscovered: Photographic works by Michael Cook

This series of artworks questions who really discovered Australia, while making reference to what was always here, what has been introduced and the effect this has had on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their culture and country. Eora Gallery, 21 February-24 March 2020

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 54 (2018)

An exhibition of the winning images selected by an international jury. This year’s selection saw three Australians in the final selection: Georgina Steytler, Justin Gilligan and Robert Irwin.Tall Gallery, 7 March-25 August 2019

Wildlife Photographer of the Year 55 (2019)

Internationally acclaimed exhibition Wildlife Photographer of the Year returned to the museum

bigger and better than ever in 2020, with the use of backlit panels to give the photographs even more impact. Tall Gallery, 5-24 March 2020 and 15 June 2020-28 January 2021

Touring exhibitions Our international touring exhibitions program had one of its most diverse years yet, with

exhibitions touring to New Zealand, the USA, Papua New Guinea, the UK, Indonesia, Kuwait City, Japan, Singapore, France and Denmark. The museum reached more than 900,000 visitors in Australia and overseas. New promotional and marketing materials were produced with a focus on providing film footage of exhibition installations to promote our touring exhibitions to potential host venues.

Our blockbuster travelling exhibitions continue to tour the world. Just over 21,000 visitors attended James Cameron - Challenging the Deep at Otago Museum in New Zealand. Complex

advance planning for object and multimedia installation was required to ensure the experience for visitors replicated the display in Sydney, and our team forged valuable relationships with

their counterparts from Otago. Exhibits displayed in Sydney a few years ago were seen by new audiences, with Escape from Pompeii attracting 227,000 visitors in France and Denmark, while Horrible Histories® Pirates - the exhibition continued its residency at the Royal Navy Museum

in Portsmouth.

We had two important international collaborations this year - with the Australian Embassy in Indonesia, which hosted the exhibition Black Armada/Two Nations: A friendship in born, and with the Alotau Museum in Papua New Guinea, which hosted Massim Canoes. In both

instances we commissioned work from local people to help us translate or design the exhibitions.

Our outdoor exhibit Container: the box that changed the world continued its tour and was

displayed in Narrabri and Dubbo, NSW, and Fremantle, WA. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Fremantle Ports helped with funding to ensure the exhibition could be transported across the Nullarbor to WA. 2019 marked 50 years of the international container

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 49

trade to Fremantle and the display was timed to mark this anniversary. The position of the containers opposite the working port and alongside the Western Australian Maritime Museum was perfect to attract passing pedestrians to enter our colourful containers to discover fascinating facts about international shipping.

Our touring exhibitions were clearly affected by the pandemic, with some venue cancellations and logistical issues to resolve. The exhibit team is indeed grateful for the support of Royal Wolf Australia for providing a storage solution for our Container exhibition in WA. Working with

colleagues at museums around the country to re-program our existing and future touring exhibition schedules has been the main challenge for staff in the final month of the financial year. Our touring program bounced back in late June, however, when some of our remote and regional museum venues were again able to start displaying our popular banner exhibition Submerged.

Container - the box that changed the world

Narrabri Council, 18 May 2019-29 July 2019

Western Plains Cultural Centre, Dubbo, NSW, 9 August-14 October 2019

Western Australian Maritime Museum, Fremantle, WA, 31 October 2019-March 2020

Escape from Pompeii: the untold Roman rescue in conjunction with Expona

Musée de la Romanité, Nîmes, France, 6 April-6 October 2019

Moesgaard Museum of Aarhus, Denmark, 5 November 2019-12 March 2020

Horrible Histories® Pirates - the exhibition

National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth, UK, 12 April 2019-18 March 2020

James Cameron - Challenging the Deep

Otago Museum, Dunedin, New Zealand, 21 July 2019-23 February 2020

Little shipmates

Museum of Art and Culture Lake Macquarie, Booragul, NSW, 6 April-5 July 2019

Massim Canoes

Alotau Museum, Papua New Guinea, 24 October-15 December 2019

Pop Up Australian National Maritime Museum

Sydney International Boat Show, 30 July-3 August 2019

Alan Villiers & the Sons of Sindbad

Amricani Cultural Centre, Kuwait City, 1 December 2019-31 January 2020

Kuwait Assembly, Kuwait City, 1 February-31 March 2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 50

Banner exhibitions

The museum has continued to tour banner exhibitions, enabling us to share the maritime story with Australians visiting local libraries, trade shows, historical societies, naval bases and clubs throughout the nation. This year we focused on touring the panel display Submerged: Stories of Australia’s shipwrecks developed with members of the Australian Maritime Museums Council

(AMMC) and funded by Visions of Australia, Office for the Arts. We also worked closely with

members of the AMMC to plan the next banner exhibit, which will commence its tour of regional Australia late in 2020.

Australian Sailing Hall of Fame - five venues in Australia

Black Armada/Two Nations: A friendship is born - four venues in Indonesia

Clash of the Carriers/The Battle of the Coral Sea (banner display and film) - one venue in the

USA and one in Australia

Dark Victory - Operation Jaywick (banner display and virtual reality experience) - one venue in

Singapore

Guardians of Sunda Strait (banner display and film) - two venues in the USA

Nawi Indigenous watercraft - four venues in Australia

Submerged: Stories of Australia’s shipwrecks - 45 venues in Australia

War and Peace in the Pacific 75 - two venues in Japan and two in the USA

Multimedia Our innovative digital artworks and documentaries are a must-see for visitors.

Rooftop projections

Celebration of 550th birth anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev ji

A commemorative piece to celebrate the 550th birth anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev ji for an event organised by the Indian Government. The film about the life of Guru Nanak focused on

his teachings of love, peace, equality and brotherhood. 12 November 2019

International Migrants Day

The museum showed the rooftop projection Threads of Migration, which uses textile items from

our collection to illustrate the history of migration to our shores. 18 December 2019

Australia Day

The museum showed the rooftop projection Threads of Migration, which uses textile items from

our collection to illustrate the history of migration to our shores. 26 January-2 February 2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Exhibitions and attractions 51

Remembering the Christchurch attacks

A commemorative piece for an event marking the first anniversary of the attacks on two mosques in New Zealand. 15 March 2020

Ship and shore / Strange big canoe

The film Strange big canoe was part of the museum’s Encounters 2020 program and was shared to mark James Cook’s arrival in HMB Endeavour on the east coast of Australia in 1770.

27 April-1 May and 4-8 May 2020

Videos

Adrift - planktonic journeys

A simulation of 2,000 virtual marine microbes as they drift in a virtual ocean environment. Lower Gallery, from 17 June 2020

Bamal Badu

A 3D virtual worldscape showing pre-colonial Darling Harbour by Brett Leavey, a First Nations digital Aboriginal artist who descends from the Kooma people. Foyer, 17 July 2019-24 March

2020

Boundless Plains

A film following four young Muslim men who set off in 2011 determined to discover at first hand more about Australian-Muslim history. Produced by the Islamic Museum of Australia. Theatrette, 20 May-6 September 2019

Conflict, pirates and storms: ‘Tiger 75’

An eight-minute film about the striking S-70B Seahawk that hangs in the museum’s galleries and its 29-year action at sea. Produced by the Royal Australian Navy. Navy Gallery, from 9 October 2019

Virtual reality

The Antarctica VR Experience

A day in the life of Antarctic scientists as they research this mysterious continent. A film using 360-degree camera control to produce a stunning 4K, high-resolution vision experience.

North Gallery, Waterside Studio and Peter Doyle Learning Centre, 6 July-13 October 2019

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 52

Governance and accountability Corporate governance The museum is a statutory authority within the Arts Portfolio. Its enabling legislation, the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 (the ANMM Act), established a governing

council to ensure the proper and efficient performance of its functions.

At 30 June 2019 the Council comprised 11 members, including the museum’s Director and a representative of the Royal Australian Navy.

The full Council met five times during the reporting period. At the September 2019 meeting of

Council, it was agreed that the committees would be the Audit Committee, the Remuneration Committee and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee. All committees have charters and members are appointed by Council.

The Council operates under a governance policy that includes a requirement for periodic self-assessment. The Council is committed to continuous improvement, and various changes were implemented throughout the course of the year. A number of councillors are members of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and subject to its code of conduct. All councillors are aware of the need to comply with both the letter and the spirit of relevant legislation. Operations

are informed by the highest museological standards and codes of practice and all staff are bound by the Australian Public Service Values and Code of Conduct.

The museum prepares corporate plans over four years and annual operating plans for ministerial approval in accordance with the ANMM Act. The Minister receives reports on matters of significance, and the Chairman and Director meet with the Minister as required. A senior departmental representative attends all Council meetings as an observer and copies of the minutes are provided to the Minister and department. The museum is subject to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

All museum staff are aware of the importance of good governance, and governance is a regular

item on the agenda for the executive management group’s fortnightly meetings.

The names of the museum’s executives and their responsibilities, as at 30 June 2020, are:

Kevin Sumption PSM Director and CEO

Tanya Bush Deputy Director, Corporate Services and Chief Financial Officer

Zena Habib Head, People and Culture

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 53

Michael Harvey Assistant Director, Public Engagement and Research & Commercial and

Visitor Services

Paul McCarthy Senior Executive, Strategy and External Relations.

Roles and functions of the museum The role and functions of the museum are specified in Sections 6 and 7 of the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990.

Functions of the museum (Section 6)

● to exhibit, or make available for exhibition by others, in Australia or elsewhere, material

included in the National Maritime Collection or maritime historical material that is otherwise in the possession of the museum

● to cooperate with other institutions (whether public or private) in exhibiting, or in making

available for exhibition, such material

● to develop, preserve and maintain the National Maritime Collection

● to disseminate information relating to Australian maritime history and information relating to

the museum and its functions

● to conduct, arrange for and assist research into matters relating to Australian maritime

history

● to develop sponsorship, marketing and other commercial activities relating to the museum’s

functions.

Powers of the museum (Section 7)

Subject to the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990, the museum has power to do all

things necessary or convenient to be done for or in connection with the performance of its functions and, in particular, has power:

● to purchase, commission the creation of or take on hire, deposit or loan, maritime historical

material

● to lend or hire out or otherwise deal with maritime historical material

● to recover, or to arrange for or assist in the recovery of, maritime historical material from the

Australian marine environment and from other areas

● to dispose of, in accordance with section 10, material included in the National Maritime

Collection and to dispose of maritime historical material that is otherwise in the possession of the museum

● from time to time as the occasion requires, to exhibit in Australia or elsewhere, material,

whether in written form or in any other form and whether relating to Australia or to a foreign

country

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 54

● to accept gifts, devises, bequests or assignments made to the museum, whether on trust or

otherwise, and whether unconditionally or subject to a condition and, if a gift, devise, bequest or assignment is accepted by the museum on trust or subject to a condition, to act as trustee or to comply with the condition, as the case may be

● to acquire and operate vessels, whether in Australian waters or otherwise and whether or

not the vessels are maritime historical material

● to collect, and make available (whether in writing or in any other form and whether by sale or

otherwise), information relating to Australian maritime history

● to make available information relating to the museum and its functions

● to make available (whether by sale or otherwise) reproductions, replicas or other

representations (whether in writing or in any other form) of maritime historical material

● to arrange for the manufacture and distribution (whether by sale or otherwise) of any article

or thing bearing a mark, symbol or writing that is associated with the museum

● to enter into contracts

● to acquire, hold and dispose of real or personal property

● to erect buildings and structures and carry out works

● to take on leases of land or buildings and to grant leases and sub-leases of land or buildings

● to fix charges for entry onto any land or water, or into any building, structure or vessel,

owned by, or under the control of the Museum, being charges that:

● are in addition to the charges fixed by the regulations; and

● relate to special exhibitions or other special events

● to purchase or take on hire, deposit or loan, and to dispose of or otherwise deal with,

furnishings, equipment and other goods

● to raise money for the purposes of the museum by appropriate means, having regard to the

proper performance of the functions of the museum

● to charge such fees and impose such charges (in addition to the charges fixed by

regulations) as are reasonable in respect of services rendered by the museum

● to act on behalf of the Commonwealth or of an authority of the Commonwealth in the

administration of a trust relating to maritime historical material or related matters; and

● to appoint agents and attorneys and act as an agent for other persons.

The museum may exercise its powers either alone or jointly with another person or other persons.

Role and functions of the Minister

The Minister responsible for the Australian National Maritime Museum during the reporting

period was the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts.

Key ministerial powers under the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 include the

Minister’s ability to:

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 55

● transfer property, real or personal, held on lease or otherwise by the Commonwealth, to the

museum for its use or for inclusion in the National Maritime Collection (Section 8)

● approve criteria and guidelines for the National Maritime Collection (Section 9)

● approve the disposal of material in the National Maritime Collection with value exceeding

$20,000 (Section 10(4)(b))

● give direction to the Council with respect to the performance of the functions or the exercise

of the powers of the museum (Section 14)

● appoint a member of the Council to act as chairperson of the Council or appoint an acting

member of Council where there is a vacancy (Section 18)

● approve guidelines for the leave of absence to Council members (Section 19)

● convene a meeting of the Council at any time (Section 23)

● approve the Corporate and Annual Operational Plans and any variations (Sections 26-28)

● approve the Director engaging in paid employment outside the duties of the Director’s office

(Section 32)

● approve leave of absence to the Director on such terms or conditions as she or he

determines (Section 34)

● appoint a person (not a member of Council) to act as Director during a vacancy with such

appointment not to exceed 12 months (Section 38)

● approve contracts exceeding $2,000,000 and leases exceeding 10 years duration (Section 7

of the ANMM Regulations).

Legislation The museum was established by the Australian National Maritime Museum Act 1990 (No 90 of

1990), where its functions and powers are set out. The legislation history is published as End Note 3 in the reprint of the Act on the website legislation.gov.au.

The Act was amended in 1992 (Act No 118); 1993 (Act No 17); 1997 (Acts No 1 and 152); 1999 (Acts No 146 and 156); 2001 (Act No 159); 2005 (Act No 110); 2006 (Act No 101); 2011 (Acts No 5 and 46); 2014 (Act No 62); 2015 (Acts No 36, 126 and 164) and 2016 (Act No 61).

The Australian National Maritime Museum Regulations 2018 were made and registered on 14 September 2018 (F2018L02194). The Regulations replaced the Australian National Maritime Museum Regulations 1991.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 56

Outcome and program structure As outlined in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2019-20, the museum has one outcome and one program.

Outcome 1: Increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime heritage

by managing the National Maritime Collection and staging programs, exhibitions and events.

Program 1.1: Management of maritime heritage.

ANMM Council All members of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Council, except the Director, are non-Executive members. The members of the Council during the reporting period are set out below.

Chairman John Mullen AM

Councillor Term: 6 May 2016-17 August 2019 Chair: 18 August 2019-17 August 2022

Mr Mullen is the Chairman of Telstra and Toll Holdings Ltd. Until recently, Mr Mullen was the Chief Executive Officer of Asciano Ltd. He has worked in the logistics industry for more than two decades, including roles as global CEO of DHL Express and global CEO of TNT Express Worldwide. He is currently on the board of Kimberley Foundation Australia and is co-founder of the Silentworld Foundation, which supports maritime archaeology in Australia. John is passionate about maritime exploration and Indigenous rock art in the Kimberley, WA. He spends his spare time diving for colonial shipwrecks and maintains a private museum dedicated to historical material from early maritime voyages to the Pacific. Mr Mullen brings his expertise in philanthropy, maritime archaeology, leadership and management to the Council. As the

former Chair of the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation, Mr Mullen’s appointment strengthens communication and relationships between the Council and the Foundation. He was made a member (AM) in the Order of Australia for significant service to business and to the community in 2020.

Chairman Peter Dexter AM FAICD

Term: 19 July 2010-17 August 2019

Mr Dexter has accepted a number of appointments since retiring as Regional Director of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, Oceania, in September 2005. Current appointments are non-executive Director of Qube Holdings Limited and Wilh Wilhelmsen Investments Pty Limited. Mr

Dexter is also a director on the Board of the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation. He is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (FAICD) and was awarded the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit by the King of Norway for his contribution to Norwegian- Australian business. He was named a Member in the Order of Australia (AM) for services to the

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 57

development of the shipping and maritime industries through leadership roles, to international relations and to the community in 2005.

David Blackley

Term: 14 April 2017-13 April 2020

Mr Blackley was inducted into the Australian Advertising Hall of Fame in 2015 for his achievements in the advertising industry over more than 30 years. He is a former Chairman of

Clemenger BBDO and a member of the Worldwide Creative Board of BBDO New York, representing BBDO’s interests across Australia, New Zealand and Asia on that board. Under his leadership, Clemenger BBDO won the Australian Agency of the Year award eight times. Mr Blackley has been involved with Brainwave Australia, a charity supporting children with neurological conditions, since its inception in 1994, and joined its board in 2008.

Hon Ian Campbell Term: 12 December 2014-11 December 2020

Mr Campbell is the ASG Group Deputy Chairman and Group Executive at Brookfield Asset

Management. Mr Campbell has extensive offshore and inshore yacht racing experience, including the Sydney to Hobart race, and has competed successfully in state, national and world championships. He recently completed a circumnavigation of Australia and crossed the Tasman Sea from Sydney to Auckland in his own boat. In 2016 he sailed through the Beagle Channel and around Cape Horn. As Minister for Heritage he initiated Duyfken’s voyage around Australia

to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the 1606 mapping of Cape York and advocated for the purchase of the HMB Endeavour replica. He has also been the Chairman of the

International Sailing Federation World Sailing Championships held in Fremantle in 2011. Mr Campbell is Chairman of the Perth Children’s Hospital Foundation and the Harry Butler Institute

at Murdoch University. Mr Campbell was in the Howard Government Ministry from 1996 to 2007, in the Leadership Group from 1996 to 2004 and the Expenditure Review Committee of Cabinet from 2004 to 2007.

Stephen Coutts

Term: 29 May 2020 to 28 May 2023

Stephen has an honours degree in history from Sydney University. Upon graduating Stephen worked as an adviser in the NSW Government serving in the offices of the Premier and Treasurer, the Minister for Community Services and the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs. Since 1995 Stephen has worked as a government relations adviser in the private sector and is

currently a director at Richardson Coutts, a bi-partisan firm that provides advisory services to local and international businesses across a wide range of industry sectors. Stephen is a former Councillor of the Royal Australian Historical Society, a former Secretary of the Australian Asia Young Leaders Program, a former Director of the Motor Accidents Insurance Board of Tasmania, a former Observer for Government Relations on the Board of Soccer Australia and former Chair of Hear for You, a charity which provides services for deaf and hearing impaired teenagers. Stephen is a member of the Council of the Sydney University Near Eastern Archaeology Foundation and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 58

Hon Justice Sarah C Derrington Term: 4 November 2015-7 March 2022

Justice Derrington is currently President of the Australian Law Reform Commission and a Judge of the Federal Court. She was previously head of School and Dean of Law at TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, and has also had a distinguished academic career overseas. She is a PhD in the field of marine insurance law, has an extensive history of involvement in

maritime organisations and has served on a range of boards and councils, including the Australian Maritime College and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead AO Term: From 14 March 2018

Jonathan Dallas Mead joined the Royal Australian Naval College in 1984 and graduated in 1986 with a Diploma of Applied Science. He specialised in mine clearance diving and explosive ordnance disposal and after serving as Executive Officer of Clearance Diving Team One, he undertook Principal Warfare Officer (ASW) training. A succession of warfare postings then followed, including Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer in HMAS Melbourne and HMAS Arunta, Fleet Anti-Submarine Warfare Officer and Executive Officer of HMAS Arunta.

In 2005, Commander Mead took command of HMAS Parramatta and saw active service in the

North Arabian Gulf as part of Operation CATALYST in 2005 and 2006; for this his ship was awarded a Meritorious Unit Citation and he was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM). He undertook studies at the Indian National Defence College in 2007, after which Captain Mead was appointed as Australia’s Defence Adviser to India.

Promoted to Commodore, in July 2011 he deployed to the Middle East where he commanded Combined Task Force 150, responsible for maritime counter terrorism, from October 2011 to

April 2012. He was consequently awarded a Commendation for Distinguished Service, in 2013, for his service in the Middle East region. Upon his return to Fleet Headquarters in 2012, he served as Commander Surface Force. In January 2015, he was promoted to Rear Admiral and assumed the position as Head Navy Capability.

Rear Admiral Mead holds a Masters degree in International Relations, a Masters degree in Management and a PhD in International Relations. He is the author of Indian National Security: Misguided Men and Guided Missiles, published in 2010. He was appointed as an Officer of the

Order of Australia (AO), in the Military Division, in the Queen’s Birthday Honour List 2020.

Rear Admiral Mead assumed the position of Commander Australian Fleet on 19 January 2018.

Alison Page Term: 12 August 2017-28 May 2023

Ms Page is currently a Director of the Australian Government’s Indigenous Land Corporation and Chair of the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence. She has also served as a member of numerous boards, including the Expert Panel for Constitutional Recognition of Indigenous Peoples, the Museums and Galleries NSW Board and the Australian Museum Trust. Ms Page has substantial experience in design, communications and marketing and was a panellist for eight years on the ABC television program The New Inventors, which showcased Australian

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 59

innovation. She is currently a Professor of Practice in the school of design at the University of Technology Sydney.

Hon Margaret White AO Term: 5 August 2014-4 August 2017, 11 August 2017-10 August 2020

Ms White is currently a Commissioner for the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory. She has had a distinguished legal career over

more than three decades. She was a Judge of the Supreme Court of Queensland for almost 20 years before her appointment to the Court of Appeal in Queensland in 2010. Ms White has also been a Deputy President of the Defence Force Discipline Appeals Tribunal and was Commissioner for the Queensland Racing Commission of Inquiry. She has been the Chair of the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, Deputy Chancellor and Member of the Senate of the University of Queensland and Chair of the Supreme Court of Queensland Library Committee. Ms White was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2013 for distinguished service to the judiciary and to the law particularly in Queensland, as a leading contributor to legal

education and reform, and to professional development and training. Ms White is a retired officer of the Royal Australian Naval Reserve and has a deep and longstanding interest in maritime law and history.

Kevin Sumption PSM

Term: 15 November 2012-15 February 2022

Mr Sumption was appointed Director and CEO of the Australian National Maritime Museum in February 2012 after holding high-profile leadership roles in cultural institutions in Australia and abroad. He was one of the founding curators of the ANMM in 1991.

His international career has focused on developing the digital landscape of cultural institutions

for more than 20 years, covering museum management, exhibition curation, program development, maritime heritage and digital cultural content.

Mr Sumption also lectured at the University of Technology, Sydney for over 18 years in design theory and history, covering digital media in cultural institutions, digital curatorship, interactive media, constructivist design history and research methodology. He is an internationally renowned speaker.

Mr Sumption was awarded the Public Service Medal for outstanding service as Director of the Australian National Maritime Museum in the 2017 Queen’s Birthday Honours. He was reappointed as Director for five years from 15 February 2017.

Arlene Tansey Term: 3 August 2018-2 August 2021

Arlene Tansey is a Director of Aristocrat Leisure Limited, Wisetech Global, Primary Health Care, Infrastructure NSW and Lend Lease Investment Management. Arlene is also a member of the

advisory board of Serco Asia Pacific. Before becoming a non-executive Director, Arlene Tansey worked in commercial and investment banking in Australia and in investment banking and law in the United States. She holds a Juris Doctor from the University of Southern California Law

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 60

Centre and an MBA from New York University. She is a member of Chief Executive Women and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Arlene Tansey is originally from New York and has lived and worked in the United States, South America, and Europe. She has lived in Australia for the past 23 years and is an Australian citizen. She is married with two daughters.

Dr Ian J Watt AC

Term: 22 March 2019-21 March 2022

Dr Ian J Watt AC has had a long career as one of Australia’s most distinguished public servants, with nearly 20 years at the highest levels of the public service. His most recent and most senior appointment was as Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and head of the Australian Public Service, a position he held from 2011 until the end of 2014. Prior to that, he was Secretary of the Departments of Defence; Finance; and Communications, Information Technology and the Arts between 2001 and 2011. Before that, he was Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Dr Watt is Chair of the International Centre for Democratic Partnerships and Chair of the ADC

Advisory Council. He is also the recently retired Chair of BAE Systems Australia. He serves on the Boards of Citibank Pty Ltd, Smartgroup Corporation, the Grattan Institute (University of Melbourne), O’Connell Street Associates Pty Ltd and the Committee for Economic Development of Australia. Dr Watt is also a Member of the Male Champions of Change, a Member of the Melbourne School of Government Advisory Board at the University of Melbourne, a Fellow of ANZSOG, and Senior Adviser to Flagstaff Partners. He also has an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from the University of Technology Sydney and the University of Wollongong.

John Longley AM Term: 6 May 2019-5 May 2022

John Longley has had a long career in sailing initially in dinghies and then ocean racing. This led to his involvement in the Americas Cup which saw him competing in five matches from 1974 to 1987, including being project manager and crewman on Australia II during its successful

challenge for the Cup in 1983. He was subsequently charged with managing the build of Endeavour, a museum-standard replica of Captain James Cook’s famous ship of discovery, HMB Endeavour. After the six-year build he continued to manage the project as the ship

circumnavigated the globe, visiting 149 ports. John was a Board Member and later Chair of the Duyfken 1606 Foundation and managed Duyfken’s tour of Australia in 2006 that marked the

400th anniversary of the first recorded landing of a European ship in Australia. More recently

John was the Event Director of Perth 2011, World Sailing’s Olympic Classes World Championship, with 1,200 competitors from 80 nations. John was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM), was the West Australian Citizen of the year (Sport) and has been inducted into the America’s Cup Hall of Fame.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 61

Other committee members (not appointed to Council)

Hon Peter Collins AM QC Term: 12 December 2017-30 June 2020

The Hon Peter Collins is the Chairman of the American Friends of the Australian National Maritime Museum. He is Deputy Chairman of Industry Super Australia, a Director of Super Fund HOSTPLUS and Chairman of Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health District. Mr Collins has

chaired several public authorities and founded Barton Deakin Government Relations. Mr Collins has extensive experience in politics, governance and military and naval service. He served as a reserve officer in both the Army and Navy; was the first reserve officer to act as Fleet Legal Officer; saw active service in Iraq in 2007; and transferred to the retired list as a Captain in 2012. Mr Collins served 22 years in the New South Wales Parliament, including seven years in various senior Ministries and then as Leader of the Opposition. He was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2003.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Committee Members

Kenny Bedford Current Term: 4 March 2020-30 June 2021

Mr Kenny Bedford lives on and represents the remote island of Erub (Darnley) on the Torres Strait Regional Authority Board. He is also a Board Member of Reconciliation Australia and has held the Executive position of Portfolio Member for Fisheries since 2008 and is President of the Erub Fisheries Management Association, a member of Erubam Le Traditional Land and Sea Owners (TSI) Corporation and sits on Far North Queensland’s Abergowrie College Community Consultative Committee. Mr Bedford has a Bachelor of Applied Health Science and Diploma of Youth Welfare, received the Vincent Fairfax Fellowship in 2000, and is a graduate of the

Australian Rural Leadership Program.

Dillon Kombumerri Current Term: 4 March 2020-30 June 2021

Dillon Kombumerri is employed by the NSW Government Architects Office as a Principal Government Architect. He is a registered architect with 30 years’ experience and has designed several award-winning projects. During this time his work has focused heavily on projects addressing the well-documented disadvantages faced by Indigenous communities. Dillon has extensive experience in tutoring and lecturing on a national and international level. He has been Adjunct Professor at the University of Sydney since 2012. Dillon has featured on national radio

and television and written articles for several highly regarded professional journals.

Ray Ingrey Current Term: 4 March 2020-30 June 2021

Mr Ingrey is of Dhungutti and Dharawal descent and is from the La Perouse Aboriginal

community at Botany Bay. He holds a number of leadership positions, including Chairperson of the Gujaga Foundation and Deputy Chairperson of the La Perouse Local Aboriginal Land Council. He leads language, culture and research activities within his community.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 62

Professor John Maynard Current Term: 4 March 2020-30 June 2021

Professor John Maynard is of the Worimi people of Port Stephens, New South Wales. He is the Director of the Purai Global Indigenous History Centre and Chair of Aboriginal History at the University of Newcastle. He completed a Diploma of Aboriginal Studies from the University of Newcastle in 1995 and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of South Australia in 1999. He

was awarded a PhD examining the rise of early Aboriginal political activism from the University of Newcastle in 2003. Professor Maynard was an Australian Research Council post-doctoral fellow and was Deputy Chairperson of Council with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in Canberra until 2016. He was the recipient of the Aboriginal History (ANU) Stanner Fellowship for 1996 and the New South Wales Premier’s Indigenous History Fellowship for 2003-04, a member of the Executive Committee of the Australian Historical Association 2000-02 and the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Committee 2006-07. Professor Maynard has worked with and within many Aboriginal

communities urban, rural and remote. He is the author of 12 books.

Nicholas Wappett Current Term: 4 March 2020-30 June 2021

Nick Wappett is a Senior Analyst at JBWere and manages over $300 million in investments on behalf of various not-for-profit organisations. Prior to joining JBWere in June 2015, Nick participated in the NAB (National Australia Bank) Graduate Program and participated in Career Trackers Indigenous Internship Program. Nick has a Bachelor of Business from the University of Technology, Sydney and a Diploma of Stockbroking from Deakin University and is an accredited Foreign Exchange Advisor.

Council meetings and committees The ANMM Council met five times this year, as well as dealing with various matters out of session. This year, the Council’s focus has been on various strategic priorities, including the museum’s funding and growth, as well as finances and risk. Some of the matters considered by Council include the management of COVID-19, the Encounters 2020 program (commemorating

the 250th anniversary of Cook’s first Pacific voyage), the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project, the Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS), optimisation of the museum’s site and the museum’s people and culture strategic plan.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 63

ANMM Council committees There are currently three committees of Council:

● Audit Committee

● Remuneration Committee

● Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee.

The appointment of members of committees is agreed by Council. However, all Councillors are eligible to attend all committee meetings and are treated as members of the Committee for that

meeting (excluding the Chairman and Director, who are ineligible to be members of the Audit Committee).

2019-20 Council and committee meetings

Five Council meetings held in 2019-20 Council meetings

attended 2019-20

Audit Committee

met 4 times

Remuneration Committee

met twice

Infrastructure, Fleet and Operations Committee

met once

Public Engagement, Research, Commercial and

Visitor Services Committee

met once

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee

met twice

John Mullen 5 1* 2 1 1 0

Peter Dexter (term ended 16 August)

0 0 2 0 0 0

David Blackley 5 0 1 1 0

Ian Campbell 4 4 1 1 0

Stephen Coutts (appointed 28 May)

0 0 0 0 0

Sarah Derrington 5 4 2 1 0 0

John Longley 5 3 1 1 1

Jonathan Mead 5 0 0 0 0

Alison Page 5 3 1 1 2

Arlene Tansey 5 4 0 0 0

Ian Watt 4 3 0 0 0

Margaret White 5 3 1 1 0

Kevin Sumption 5 4* 1 1 0

Kenny Bedford† 1

Raymond Ingrey† 2

Dillon Kombumerri† 2

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 64

John Maynard† 1

Nicholas Wappett† 1

Peter Collins†

MHP Chair‡

* Observer

† Non-Council members ‡ The MHP Committee did not meet this year

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 65

Legal and compliance Privacy legislation

There were no notifiable data breaches in the reporting period.

Freedom of Information

There was one continuing request and one new request under the Freedom of Information Act 1982. The Director has authorised the Deputy Director and the Senior Executive, Strategy and

External Relations to make decisions under the FOI Act.

Judicial decisions and reviews by outside bodies

There were no judicial decisions of which the museum was aware that affected the museum

during the period under review. There were also no reports on museum operations by the Auditor-General, a parliamentary committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

Ministerial directions and Government Policy Orders

The museum received no formal notifications or ministerial directions or orders during the reporting period.

The Minister’s Statement of Expectations for 2019-20, dated 21 October 2019, and the museum’s Statement of Intent are published on the ANMM website.

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

No current or former member of the accountable authority or officer has been given any

indemnity and there are no agreements to give any. Normal directors’ and officers’ insurance is carried through Comcover.

Non-compliance with Finance law

There were no significant issues reported to the responsible Minister under paragraph 19(1)€ of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 that relate to non-compliance

with finance law.

Subsidiary entities

The museum has one subsidiary entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation.

Capability reviews

There were no capability reviews released during the reporting period.

Government Policy Orders

There are currently no Government Policy Orders in effect under the PGPA Act.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 66

Fraud control

The museum maintains a fraud control plan (FCP), which includes an enterprise-wide fraud risk assessment (FRA), as well as fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes.

All reasonable measures have been taken to minimise incidents of fraud, including regularly reviewing and updating both the FCP and FRA.

Internal audit

The museum has a five-year internal audit plan, which is designed to identify and address the

highest areas of financial and operational risk on a rolling basis. The plan is agreed and updated annually in consultation with the museum’s internal audit provider, museum management and the Council’s Audit Committee. The museum commissioned one internal audit during the financial year to assess workplace health and safety practices.

Large transactions with Commonwealth entities

There were no transactions of the kind specified in section 17BE(n) of the PGPA Rule 2014 during the reporting period.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 67

People and culture Staffing overview

At 30 June 2020, the number of staff employed under the Public Service Act 1999 totalled 120

(74 ongoing full-time, 9 ongoing part-time, 31 non-ongoing full-time, 2 non-ongoing part-time and 4 non-ongoing casual). All employees were located at the museum’s Sydney premises.

Enterprise Agreements/ Individual Flexibility Agreements (IFAs)

At 30 June 2020, the number of APS staff covered by an Enterprise Agreement was SES 1 and

non-SES 119. The number of staff covered by an IFA was SES nil and non-SES 33.

Salary rates and benefits

The salary rates available for APS staff by classification structure (as at 30 June 2020) are as follows:

Classification Pay point 30 June 2020

APS Level 1 1.1 $42,944

1.2 $44,388

1.3 $45,589

1.4 $47,453

1.5 $48,412

APS Level 2 2.1 $48,601

2.2 $49,941

2.3 $51,254

2.4 $52,583

2.5 $53,896

2.6 $54,973

APS Level 3 3.1 $55,359

3.2 $56,795

3.3 $58,240

3.4 $59,749

3.5 $60,946

APS Level 4 4.1 $61,698

4.2 $63,660

4.3 $65,317

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 68

4.4 $66,990

4.5 $68,328

APS Level 5 5.1 $68,816

5.2 $70,974

5.3 $72,971

5.4 $74,285

APS Level 6 6.1 $74,325

6.2 $76,177

6.3 $78,264

6.4 $82,196

6.5 $85,379

6.6 $87,087

Executive Level 1

1.1 $95,282

1.2 $102,888

1.3 $104,948

Executive Level 2

2.1 $109,896

2.2 $115,936

2.3 $124,592

Non-salary benefits provided to employees

● Access to confidential professional counselling service through Employee Assistance

Program

● Reimbursement of costs for APS staff for vaccinations

● Bulk influenza vaccinations on site for staff

● Eyesight testing for APS staff and reimbursement for cost of spectacles

● Provision of prescription sunglasses to employees who regularly work outdoors

● Access to salary sacrifice - laptop computers, additional superannuation, novated and

associate motor vehicle leases for staff

● Studies assistance for ongoing APS staff

● Access to relevant training for APS staff including first aid, fire warden, work health and

safety representatives

● Access to purchased leave scheme for ongoing APS staff

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 69

● Flexible working hours and a range of family-friendly initiatives, such as working from home

and payment of child care fees if staff are required to travel away from home for museum business.

Performance bonus payment

The aggregate performance bonus payment to APS staff for the agency as a whole in 2019-20 was $66,250.

Effectiveness in managing People and Culture

The APS ongoing staff turnover rate in 2019-20 was 8.1% compared with 5.8% in 2018-19 and

6.5% in 2017-18.

Key training and development initiatives

Employees undertook a range of work-related training activities, courses and conferences relating to COVID-19. The leadership team and section managers attended various courses and conferences across the areas of executive leadership, digital transformation, and national summit for HR and Directors forum. All employees continued to undertake induction, compliance, fire warden, first aid, Work, Health and Safety, APS Code of Conduct, bullying and harassment and diversity training as required.

Commonwealth disability strategy

A new ANMM Accessibility Action Plan is to be developed.

Assessment of achievement in terms of Australian Government policy

People and Culture policies have been developed and updated in accordance with Australian Government policy and workforce requirements.

The enterprise agreement

The ANMM Enterprise Agreement for 2017-2020 commenced on 11 September 2017. The Enterprise Agreement covers the following:

● working conditions for staff

● allowances

● pay rates

● leave

● consultative process and terms of representation.

Indigenous employment

As at 30 June 2020 there are three ongoing employees who identify as Indigenous.

Industrial democracy

The museum’s Joint Consultative Council (JCC) met three times during this period to discuss the continuing transformation of the museum. The JCC consists of three elected employee representatives.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 70

Disability reporting

Work continues on the museum’s Accessibility Action Plan, which will highlight our deliverables over the next three years. Explicit and transparent reference to agency-level information is available through other reporting mechanisms.

Establishment and maintenance of ethical standards

At induction all staff are briefed on the APS values and Code of Conduct. Refresher training is provided periodically and conduct is considered as part of the performance management process.

Staffing

2019-20 2018-19 2017-18

Average staff level 114.43 119.94 119.14

Staff by gender

2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

Male Female Not

identified

Male Female Not

identified

Male Female Not

identified

Senior management (EL 2 & SES)

10 4 0 9 6 0 8 4 0

Middle management (EL 1)

16 13 1 16 12 1 15 13 1

Other 36 50 0 35 46 0 35 44 0

Total 62 67 1 60 64 1 58 61 1

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 71

Staff by division

Division 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

Executive 9 7 4

Corporate Services 19 16 17

Public Engagement, Research, Commercial and Visitor Services 57 60 88

Strategy and External Relations Division created in 2020

Division created in 2020

4

Encounters 2020 Division

created in 2020

Division created in 2020

1

People and Culture Division

created in 2020

Division created in 2020

6

Commercial and Visitor Services 14 11 Division

ceased in 2020

Operations 31 31 Division

ceased in 2020

Total 130 125 120

Salaries

Division 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20

Executive $724,115 $1,008,438 $945,366

Corporate Services $1,669,056 $2,216,072 $3,015,024

Public Engagement, Research, Commercial and Visitor Services $4,646,755 $6,203,421 $8,089,648

Strategy and External Relations Division created in 2020

Division created in 2020

$759,218

Encounters 2020 Division

created in 2020

Division created in 2020

$417,218

People and Culture Division

created in 2020

Division created in 2020

$357,739

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 72

Commercial and Visitor Services $1,448,444 $1,215,037 Division ceased in 2020

Operations $2,519,614 $2,538,360 Division

ceased in 2020

Total $11,007,984 $13,181,328 $13,584,213

Organisation structure

Work health and safety (WHS) performance

The museum complies with obligations under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and Work

Health and Safety Regulation 2011. WHS safety management procedures are in place and are maintained in accordance with Australian Standard 4801 (Safety Management System). Through following best practice, a safe working environment is provided for museum workers and volunteers. During the year, 11 Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) from a cross-section of museum workgroups were appointed to replace ANMM’s WHS Committee. The HSRs play an important role in relation to WHS risk identification and consultation on WHS risk management processes. There were no new workers compensation claims submitted, ANMM managed one open claim, and all claims were handled in accordance with the museum’s WHS policies and procedures. The workers returned to full pre-injury duties. Comcare was satisfied

that risk management processes and actions taken were appropriate and subsequently closed the matter.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 73

Other information Assessment of effectiveness of asset management

As part of the strategic planning process, the Australian National Maritime Museum engages independent reviews of its Strategic Asset Management Plan (SAMP) to identify upcoming capital enhancement, capitalised maintenance and regular and reactive maintenance requirements in line with contemporary cost management processes and sound engineering practices. The Strategic Asset Management Plan is forward-looking over 10 years and budget is made available for this purpose. The plan is current.

The management of heritage and collection assets, including the floating vessels, involves

dedicated Conservation and Registration teams, museum-grade environmental conditions for the galleries and warehouse to be maintained as part of the SAMP, and individual maintenance plans for each of the floating vessels due to their exposure to harsh marine environmental conditions.

Plans are regularly assessed by the executive team and presented to Council as required.

Assessment of purchasing against core policies and principles

The Australian National Maritime Museum has a procurement policy, a delegations framework and procurement guidelines. These have been developed in line with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and processes. The procurement policy is regularly reviewed. The ANMM

processes are transparent and competitive and designed to ensure value-for-money outcomes.

Contracts and consultancies

Information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website.

A list of contracts valued at $100,000 or more is published on the ANMM website to meet obligations under the Senate Order for Entity Contracts.

Information Publication Scheme statement

Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish

information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8

statement in an annual report. The museum’s Information Publication Plan is published on its website.

Productivity gains

The museum’s longstanding commitment to continuous improvement continued throughout the reporting period. A high priority is given to the visitor experience, and the museum implemented the following initiatives to reduce red tape and enhance productivity:

● Implemented SAP Concur expense management software to streamline processing of

company card payment acquittals and approvals

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 74

● Implemented Diligent Board management software to improve efficiency in relation to

Council secretarial processes and issuing of papers

Other visitor experience improvements in the last year included:

● Renewal of our exploration-themed gallery, now titled Under Southern Skies, focusing on

the full multicultural history of navigation in Australian waters

● Creation and delivery of a suite of projects relating to the first encounters between James

Cook and Australia’s and New Zealand’s First Peoples - including indoor and outdoor exhibitions, and the development of film and digital projects

● Creation of the extraordinarily popular Sea Monsters exhibition, in collaboration with

Queensland Museum, which headlined a record-breaking summer for museum visitation in Darling Harbour.

Correction of material errors to the 2018-19 annual report

The following corrections are required to the 2018-19 results in the Annual Performance Statement published in the Annual Report for 2018-19:

Page 28: Visitors to the museum (offsite) - omit 1,089,592 and insert 1,090,682. Explanation: an extra 1090 visitors were advised after publication

Page 26: Consequential change to total visitation - omit 2,107,611 and insert 2,108,701; consequential change to total visitor engagement - omit 3,286,598 and insert 3,287,768

Page 33: Under ‘International visitors’, omit ‘behind’ and insert ‘ahead of’ in the following sentence: ‘The museum’s ‘China-ready’ tourism initiatives again contributed to China being the highest source of international visitors for the fourth year running, behind the United States of America, United Kingdom and New Zealand.’

Other corrections required:

Pages 90-94: minor changes were made to the dates of appointment of councillors.

Page 96: The museum has one subsidiary entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation.

Advertising, design and market research (Section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns

In the 2019-20 financial year, the Marketing team spent the following amounts on marketing design and strategy, media buying and advertising and market research agencies:

Creative agencies for developing advertising campaigns and strategies

Bligh - Hero or Villain? campaign creative: Grainger Films $10,950, Really Useful Crew $1,460

General museum marketing: Grainger Films $3,300, Murphy Carlisle $800 International and interstate tourism campaign creative: Murphy Carlisle $1,700

Museum brand implementation creative: Aspect Studios $1,320, Canvas $1,842, Murphy

Carlisle $4,240, Salt Advertising $135

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 75

Sea Monsters campaign creative: Extension 77 $29,496, Grainger Films $9,460, Limehouse

Creative $3,800, Murphy Carlisle $1,428, Ray Gun $3,600, Really Useful Crew $3,960

What’s On creative: Murphy Carlisle $3,040

Wildlife Photographer of the Year campaign creative: Grainger Films $1,898, Salt Advertising

$7,403

Market research

Collection of exit survey data: Julia Ross Recruitment $1,516

Market research for quarterly school holiday exit surveys: Strategy 8 Consulting $4,950

Museum brand research: DBM $10,000

Media advertising organisations

Antarctica VR Experience advertising and media buying: Facebook $1,000, Google $2,000,

Universal McCann $10,337

Bligh - Hero or Villain? advertising: Facebook $2,976, Fairfax $,5005, Traces $1,000

Capturing the home front advertising: Facebook $689

Elysium Arctic advertising: Google $1,000, Universal McCann $11,500

General museum advertising: Facebook $1,442, Google $975, Universal McCann $7,711, Vision Graphics $1,657

International and interstate tourism advertising: Big Bus Tour Company $6,112, Cultural Attractions of Australia $1,500, JTB Australia $680, The Official Sydney Guide $20,980, The Informed Tourist $8,450, MiniCards $3,600, Sydney Think China $11,770, Vision Graphics

$383, What’s On in Sydney $10,650, Sydney Where $6,000

School Holiday advertising: Facebook $760, Google $5,500, Universal McCann $28,305, Vision Graphics $421

Sea Monsters advertising: APN Outdoor $157,049, Australian Geographic $5,000, Cactus

Imaging $5,585, City of Sydney $14,209, Facebook $1,575, Forest Printing $840, Letterbox Media $6,824, National Geographic $25,440, Selbys $11,459, Universal McCann $130,917, Vision Graphics $5,637

Wildlife Photographer of the Year advertising: APN Outdoor $51,456, Cactus Imaging $7,185,

Head On $409, TimeOut $12,225

In the 2019-20 Financial Year, the Learning team spent a total of $305 on marketing.

In the 2019-20 financial year, the Welcome Wall team spent $2,038 on marketing design and media advertising.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 76

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

Ecologically Sustainable Development Report

Activity How it accords with the

principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD)

How it furthers or advances ESD principles

Compliance with Section J of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (BCA) in the design and procurement of new projects or modification to existing facilities

Ensures that any change/addition to our facilities takes into account and implements energy efficiency initiatives that will minimise the environmental impact related to energy usage and/or GHG emissions

Minimises adverse environmental impact with the aim of reducing overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions

Electricity reduction by the implementation of new energy-saving technologies/products, including the installation of a 235kW solar panel system in Wharf 7’s roof

Planned and innovative upgrade to new energy-efficient technologies reduces overall electricity usage associated with power-hungry items of equipment

Reduces overall electricity usage and therefore GHG emissions

Water reduction due to the installation of new water-saving devices/fixtures in the newly upgraded amenities in the museum building, which includes water-efficient taps and toilet cisterns with smaller capacity

Preserves water by reducing its usage within our facilities to acceptable levels

Reduces overall usage of both water and cleaning products associated with the operation and upkeep of our amenities

Implementation of e-water technology to reduce then phase out the requirement of chemical-based cleaning products in kitchens, amenities and general cleaning

Protects the environment by minimising the risk of spillage/contamination, as well as plastic sub-product (containers, dispensers, etc) by using water-based alkaline/acid solution for cleaning

Provides a safe workplace for staff, visitors and contractors as well as protecting the environment and sea life where the museum operates

Provision of bicycle parking facilities for staff and visitors Reduces the use of private/public transport by encouraging staff and

visitors to come by bicycle

Encourages a healthier alternative for people to come to the museum; alleviates traffic burden on public roads, which fosters greener environments

Waste management, including onsite rubbish recycling, composting and glass recovery

Waste recycling minimises adverse impact to the environment as well as the energy required to process waste and sub-products

Reduces the amount of waste going to landfill; reduces operational expenditure associated with waste disposal

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 77

Environmental Performance Report

Theme Steps taken to reduce

environmental impact Measures to review and improve the reducing effect

Energy efficiency 235kW solar panel system on Wharf 7’s roof Monthly/annual comparison of electricity

consumption

HVAC transitional change from seawater to cooling tower heat-rejection system

Monthly/annual comparison of electricity consumption

Seasonal adjustment of temperature and relative humidity

Monthly/annual comparison of electricity consumption

LED lighting upgrade (base building) Monthly/annual comparison of electricity

consumption

BMCS upgrade, rezoning and optimisation Monthly/annual comparison of electricity

consumption

Upgrade of bathroom hand dryers to low-energy option

Monthly/annual comparison of electricity consumption

Installation of airlock to exit door from museum to Ben Lexcen Terrace, to reduce load on HVAC system (project to be finalised by September 2020)

Monthly/annual comparison of electricity consumption

Water conservation Installation of water-saving taps/devices (completed in museum building)

Monthly/annual comparison of water consumption

Upgrade from traditional bathroom features to new water-efficient technologies (completed in museum building)

Monthly/annual comparison of water consumption

Waste management Waste audit completed in August 2019 Monthly/annual comparison of waste

landfill diversion

Installation of onsite recycling stations Monthly/annual comparison of waste

landfill diversion

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 78

New waste management system implemented January 2020 including threeadditional streams of recycling - co-mingled, paper/ cardboard, and organic waste

Monthly/annual comparison of waste landfill diversion

Environmental Performance Indicator Report

Theme Performance measure Indicator(s) 2018-19 2019-201

Energy efficiency Total consumption of electricity across all

facilities

Total cost of electricity purchased across all facilities

Amount of electricity consumed in kWh

Cost of electricity purchased in $

During the year, the cost of electricity increased from $0.18 to $0.186 per kWh

4,365,218

$776,369

3,601,921

$662,758

Total consumption of gas across all facilities

Total cost of gas across all facilities

Amount of gas consumed in MJ

Cost of gas purchased in $

During the year, the cost of gas of $0.03 per MJ remained unchanged

8,664,000

$179,284

7,172,934

$160,828

Greenhouse gas emissions

Amount of greenhouse gases produced (tonnes)

3,533 920

Water Total consumption of water across all facilities

Total cost of water across all facilities

Amount of water consumed across all facilities in kL

Cost of water purchased in $

During the year, the cost of water increased from $2 to $2.20 per kL

8,015

$44,824

13,3442

$58,201

Total trade-waste water generated Amount of grey water captured in

kL

7,288 12,421

Waste Total co-mingled waste production

Total co-mingled waste diverted from landfill

Amount of co-mingled waste produced (tonnes)

Amount of co-mingled waste

65

7

Nil

1023

20

Nil

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 79

diverted from landfill (tonnes)

Amount of waste not recorded

Unrecyclable waste

production

Amount of waste going to landfill (tonnes) as stated by current service provider

58 61

Recyclable waste

production: recycled glass

Amount of waste going to landfill (tonnes) as stated by current service provider

6 6

Transport Number of onsite parking facilities for employees

Number of onsite bicycle parking spots

15 15

Number of parking

facilities for visitors Number of bicycle parking spots 20 20

NOTES

1 Energy use was affected by the museum exhibition building being closed to the general public from 24 March to 21 June inclusive due to NSW Public Health Order related to COVID-19.

2 Increase in water usage due to HVAC transitional change from seawater to cooling tower heat-rejection system. Positive environmental offset received from corresponding reduction in

electricity usage.

3 Increase in co-mingled waste production due to new waste management system implemented in January 2020.

Grants programs MMAPSS grants and internships

The museum’s Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme (MMAPSS) provides grants of up to $15,000, in-kind support and internships to non-profit organisations, such as museums and historical societies, that care for Australia’s maritime heritage. Usually these are community-based and often run by volunteers. The grants are designed to fund a range of projects, including those related to restoration, conservation, collection management and

exhibition development. MMAPSS is administered by the museum and jointly funded by the Australian Government with support provided by the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications. MMAPSS demonstrates the diversity of the nation’s maritime heritage and the important role that local communities, smaller museums and historical societies play in preserving it. The scheme was initiated in 1995 and since then the

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 80

program has distributed more than $1.8M and supported organisations across Australia to run more than 440 projects and over 60 internships.

Funding available in 2019-20 was $125,000, with a maximum allocation of $15,000 to any one

grant. We received 38 project applications, requesting a total of $370,000 in funding, and ten internship applications. The selection committee awarded grants to 17 organisations, and in-kind support was offered to nine organisations. The maximum amount of $15,000 was awarded to two organisations and internships were offered to all ten applicants. Funding was paid, and projects undertaken or funding expended, in this reporting period.

Bushfire-affected areas were prioritised in the MMAPSS grants process.

A summary of each project funded under MMAPSS is published below.

Information on grants awarded to the museum is available at sea.museum and at link to

relevant part of report.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 81

MMAPSS grants 2019-20 actual 2018-19 actual

2017-18 actual

2016-17 actual

2015-16 actual

2014-15 actual

Value of grants $125,000 $125,000 $125,000 $125,000 $135,000 $135,300

Number of project grants

17 16 11 22 19 19

Number of projects supported in kind

9 3 6 4 12 10

Number of internships

10 4 7 3 3 3

Number of grants and in-kind support under MMAPSS

NSW QLD NT WA SA VIC TAS ACT

2019-20 9 2 2 2 4 4 3 0

2018-19 4 3 1 1 5 3 3 0

2017-18 6 3 0 1 2 3 1 1

2016-17 10 1 0 5 5 3 2 0

2015-16 14 2 1 4 3 4 3 0

2014-15 13 4 0 2 4 5 1 0

Recipients by State and Territory

New South Wales

Age of Fishes Museum $2,490

Upright display stand

The Age of Fishes Museum at Canowindra houses 360-million-year-old internationally significant fossils. It has 200 sandstone slabs (80 tonnes) and currently only 12 upright display stands. The stands make the fossils more accessible to visitors, improve the professionalism of

the displays and promote tourism. Funding is awarded to build one stand.

Ballina Naval and Maritime Museum $1,600 and In-kind Support

Light craft in a heavy sea - The story of PV Richmond and its life and times on the Richmond

River at Ballina

As the pilot vessel for the port of Ballina, PV Richmond and its crew played a major part in

Ballina’s rich maritime history. Funding is awarded for interpretation, and in-kind support is also awarded for a curator from the ANMM to inspect the vessel and help prepare a vessel management plan (VMP).

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 82

Eden Killer Whale Museum $4,950

Conservation assessment of the skeleton of the orca (killer whale) known as ‘Old Tom’

Funding is awarded to engage a specialist cetacean conservator to undertake a detailed condition assessment of the skeleton, with a view to identifying any urgent and future preservation needs for the long-term display of this icon of Eden’s unique whaling history.

Friends of the North Coast Regional Botanic Garden $15,000

Botanists’ Walk: A project in honour of the 250th Anniversary of Cook’s voyage

This project aims to show three things: how the First Peoples seen by Cook and his crew collected and used plants in their daily lives; how Endeavour’s botanists collected, stored,

recorded and eventually took back to Europe nearly 30,000 samples of local flora; and the importance of this trip in our knowledge of plant taxonomy.

Lawrence Historical Society Inc In-kind support

Restoring the Clarence River flood boat Cedar Queen

Flood boats were a part of life on the Clarence River from the late 1800s to around the 1970s. This heritage-listed boat has been on display at Lawrence Museum in recent years, without

restoration. Lawrence Museum is now constructing a new display area, and Cedar Queen will be a main feature. In-kind support is awarded for a curator from the ANMM to inspect the vessel and help prepare a vessel management plan (VMP).

Lismore Rainforest Botanic Gardens Inc $10,900

Endeavour 2020 - creation of educational resource and establishment of Banks’ Garden

Native flora identification wheels will be designed and printed for use by primary school students during tours of the Lismore Rainforest Botanic Gardens and the Arakwal National Park. All plants will be those collected by Joseph Banks during his voyage on the Endeavour. A small

garden, featuring the plants on the wheels, will be planted and maintained at the Lismore

Rainforest Botanic Gardens as a living collection.

Manning Valley Historical Society Inc $1,285

Showcasing boatbuilding and shipping on the Manning River

The Manning Valley has a remarkable maritime history that was crucial to river and coastal trade in the early years of NSW. Wingham Museum acknowledges this history with its modest, but significant collection of maritime artefacts, photographs and research materials. A kiosk-style information point will be placed at the Manning River display to provide access to photographs and other audio-visual material, that is not currently available to the public.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 83

Port of Yamba Historical Society / Yamba Museum $1,000

Looking to Conserve

Funding is awarded to engage a professional conservator to conserve two maritime instruments, a hand-held brass/leather telescope and a boxed sextant. These objects have been identified as requiring urgent conservation to prevent any further deterioration.

Ballina Naval and Maritime Museum - Internship

Secretary - Up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Camden Haven Historical Society Inc - Internship

Volunteer - Up to $2,000 for 1 week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Northern Territory

Board of the Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory - In-kind support

Aboriginal Watercraft Conservation Project - Phase One: Assessment

The Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory has a select collection of significant Aboriginal watercraft; three of these require assessment, conservation and treatment. In-kind support is offered for staff from the ANMM’s Curatorial and Indigenous teams to collaborate on

a session that fosters the sharing of knowledge.

Darwin Military Museum - In-kind support

Four showcase units

The Darwin Military Museum has acquired a growing and valuable naval and maritime collection of artefacts in recent years and seeks four ‘showcase’ glass display cabinets to suitably house and display this collection in a dedicated space. In-kind support is offered for one of the ANMM’s Interpretation and Design team to ascertain whether there are appropriate ex-ANMM showcases that can be delivered to the Darwin Military Museum.

Norfolk Island Museums and Research Centre - Internship

Museum and Research Officer - Up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Norfolk Island Museums and Research Centre - Internship

Museum and Bookshop Attendant - Up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Queensland

Cooktown Re-enactment Association - In-kind Support

Continent of Smoke

This project aims to develop an online accessible account of Cook’s 1770 voyage taken from the combined journals of the four principal journal keepers on board HMB Endeavour. In-kind

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 84

support is offered for an ANMM staff member to work with the association to assist with the development of this project.

Rockhampton Art Gallery $9,250

Maritime Heritage Interpretation Strategy and Plan for the new Quay Street Cultural Precinct

This project proposes to develop a Maritime Heritage Interpretation Strategy and Plan for the new Quay Street Cultural Precinct, bringing together the sites of Customs House, Bonds Store,

Horse Stables and the New Rockhampton Art Gallery with an overlay of maritime history and activities focused upon post-European settlement to the region. Funding is awarded to engage a cultural and museums services specialist to consider site and place to establish a post-European settlement narrative of Rockhampton’s maritime history, including Indigenous engagement.

National Trust Australia Queensland James Cook Museum - Internship

Museum Visitor Services Coordinator - Up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum

South Australia

National Trust of South Australia Goolwa Branch $854 and in-kind support

Presentation and Interpretation of the relics from the South Australian Government cutter Water Witch

The Water Witch was the South Australian Government supply vessel that was used to carry

out surveys along the coastline and also to support early expeditions. It sank at Moorundie in December 1842 and in 1986 a number of artefacts were salvaged. Funding is awarded to prepare story boards and in-kind support is offered for one of the ANMM’s Interpretation and Design team to ascertain whether there are appropriate ex-ANMM showcases that can be delivered to the organisation.

Port Adelaide Historical Society $5,000

Preservation of the ST Tancred wheelhouse

Tancred saw service with the Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy during World War II and

later with the Australian Salvage Board then the Department of Marine and Harbours, South Australia. Tancred was cut up for scrap in 1988 but the wheelhouse section was retained and is

on display at the Port Adelaide Historical Society Museum. Funding is awarded for work to preserve the wheelhouse.

South Australian Maritime Museum and Britt Gow (joint application) $10,000

The Duchess, Pamela and the Captain

This exhibition will showcase photographs documenting life on the windjammer Herzogin Cecilie

taken by British journalist Pamela Bourne in the 1930s. The goal of the South Australian Maritime Museum (SAMM) is to link communities across one of the longest shipping routes in the world through this extraordinary collection from rural Victoria that encapsulates a global

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 85

story. SAMM will work with small museums in Finland and South Australia to produce an exhibition based around this collection. SAMM plans to digitise the entire Bourne collection. Funding is awarded for design and film production.

Tasmania

Dover History Group Inc $4,000 and in-kind support

Maritime History of Dover and the far south of Tasmania

This project is for the digitisation and conversion of local maritime history displays, presently presented on foamboard, to more modern museum-style banners. In-kind support is also awarded for a representative from the Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) to provide professional interpretation and design advice and assistance.

Maritime Museum of Tasmania Inc In-kind support

Preparation of a vessel management plan for the yacht Westward

Westward is one of this museum’s most significant collection items. It was built in Battery Point,

Hobart, in 1947 by Jock Muir and won (on handicap) the Sydney to Hobart races of 1947 and 1948. The yacht is on the Australian Register of Historic Vessels. In-kind support is awarded for

one of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s Curatorial team to inspect of the vessel and assist in preparing a vessel management plan (VMP).

Maritime Museum of Tasmania Inc - Internship

Assistant Curator - up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Woodbridge School Marine Discovery Centre (MDC) - Internship

Primary Coordinator (teacher) - up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum

Woodbridge School Marine Discovery Centre (MDC) - Internship

Secondary Coordinator (teacher) - up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National

Maritime Museum

Victoria

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village and Museum Warrnambool City Council $6,500 and in-kind support

Whales: Beneath the Surface

Through an exciting blend of science, storytelling, artefacts and art, Flagstaff Hill will create an exhibit which will allow visitors to immerse themselves in the fascinating world of the whale. Funding is awarded for consultation sessions, interpretation panels, production of a soundscape

and digital technology, and the design and production of family activity packs, education resource kits and school activities. In-kind support is also offered for a representative from the ANMM to provide professional interpretation and design advice and assistance with furthering the museum’s interpretive displays.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 86

National Trust of Australia (Victoria) $9,000

Polly Woodside tall ship online education resources

The Polly Woodside tall ship in Melbourne delivers tailored education excursions to over 9,000

students annually in Humanities and STEM curriculum areas including History, Geography and Mathematics. Funding is awarded to support the National Trust to develop free online teacher resources for schools to access related to maritime history and heritage.

Port of Echuca Discovery Centre $4,000

Preservation Needs Assessment

The Port of Echuca Discovery Centre last engaged a professional to undertake a Preservation Needs Assessment in 2007. Since then much has changed at the Port of Echuca, altering many of the recommendations outlined in the original document. Funding is awarded to engage a qualified conservator to undertake an assessment of the centre’s paper-based and photographic collection to ensure items are stored correctly.

Flagstaff Hill Maritime Village and Museum - Internship

Curator of Collections - Up to $2,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Western Australia

Albany’s Historic Whaling Station $13,250

Whaler’s Tales: Oral histories of Albany’s past whaling community

Albany’s Historic Whaling Station is a unique maritime museum. This project aims to expand its oral history collection for archival purposes as well as to have authentic material for application in targeted audio-visual exhibits being planned for the museum. Funding is awarded to engage a production company to undertake interviewing, filming and editing.

Busselton Jetty Incorporated $15,000

Busselton Jetty undersea sculptures

Planning is under way to provide underwater sculptures near the seaward end of the Jetty in view of the Underwater Observatory and proposed Australian Underwater Discovery Centre windows. Funding is awarded towards the design, construction and implementation of the first sculpture, a model of the liner Pericles. The ship was wrecked on 31 March 1910. The wreck

lies 5.6 km south of Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse at a depth of 35 metres. The sculpture will centre on Australia’s maritime heritage and archaeology, history and marine life and will rest at a maximum depth of 8 metres, to a height of 5-6 metres deep. Underwater educational plaques will provide information about the Pericles, maritime history and aquatic life in the area.

Broome Historical Society and Museum - Internship

Administrator/Collection Manager - Up to $3,000 for one week at the Australian National Maritime Museum.

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 87

Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation As the fundraising arm of the museum, the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation is

overseen by a Board chaired by Mr Daniel Janes.

The past year has seen some considerable achievements, with $233,985 raised, including over $177,000 in June. Cultural gifts valued at $113,000 were also added to the collection.

This year the Foundation agreed to invest $135,000 in museum priorities, including a major work for the upcoming Alick Tipoti retrospective Mariw Minaral (Spiritual Patterns) and another

major project which will be announced in due course. The Foundation also underwrote fundraising for an additional three objects for the Tipoti exhibition and, to date, a second major work for the retrospective, Danagai Waaru (Blind Turtle), has been acquired with the support of

the museum’s inaugural ambassador, Christine Sadler.

The Foundation also underwrote the innovative installation A Mile in My Shoes.

A Mile in My Shoes

With the support of the Foundation referred to above and a large number of donors, the museum will present A Mile in My Shoes, in partnership with the UK-based Empathy Museum,

in January 2021. This installation will provide visitors with the opportunity to literally walk in the shoes of a migrant and listen to their story. The museum raised nearly $90,000 towards this project, including from the end-of year appeal, an online crowdfunding campaign, a major donation on behalf of the Kytherian Association and a grant from the City of Sydney. In-kind support from the project has also been secured from Melbourne Arts Centre, SBS and Muslim Times. The museum will continue fundraising in 2020 and has achieved unprecedented

outreach to migrant and ethnic communities, with more than 300 organisations contacted so far.

Welcome Wall

After being closed for new registrations for more than 12 months, the Welcome Wall was reopened in September 2019. The 20-year-old computer system was improved and upgraded. Changes included online registration and additional space for families to outline and share their story. The 82nd panel of the Welcome Wall filled quickly, with 287 inscriptions added. An

unveiling took place on 1 December 2019 with more than 1,000 in people attendance. $204,500 was donated during the financial year from the Welcome Wall registrations, which will be directed towards the museum’s Migration Heritage Fund to continue sharing the stories of people who started a new life in Australia.

Inaugural gala dinner

The inaugural gala dinner for the Foundation took place on 28 February 2020, at which 170 guests enjoyed drinks on the HMAS Vampire before proceeding to the Lighthouse Gallery to

enjoy dinner curated by guest chef Giovanni Pilu and sustainable seafood donated by the Sydney Fish Markets. The Sydney Symphony Orchestra quartet’s music and speech by the

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 88

Museum’s Chairman, Mr John Mullen AM, were highlights of the evening. The event raised more than $88,000 net for the Foundation.

MV Krait

A generous donation of $25,000 honouring Sgt Douglas Herps, Z Special Unit and Mrs Patricia Herps ensures that the astonishing historic events of MV Krait will be recounted to future generations. Our education team is producing a student pack detailing Krait’s daring wartime

undercover operations through its involvement with Operation Jaywick by the Z Special Unit in World War II.

SY Ena

Thanks to a generous $75,000 donation from the David and Jennie Sutherland Foundation, Ena

is receiving the regular maintenance and support needed to keep it in condition. The 120-year-old steam yacht is now in full survey and a new business plan will maximise the potential of this remarkable museum asset.

Dr David and Mrs Jennie Sutherland were made Ambassadors of the museum this year, as their total gifts to the Foundation now exceed more than $100,000.

American Friends

The American Friends of the Australian National Maritime Museum met on 2 April 2020. Chaired by the Hon Peter Collins, the group agreed to appoint Jill Viola to assist the organisation in maintaining US legislative requirements and promote fundraising initiatives based in the USA.

Governance and administration

The Board met four times this year: 19 August 2019, 18 November 2019, 30 March 2020 and 3 June 2020.

List of directors and number of meetings attended

Daniel Janes 4 (Board Member until appointed Chairman in August 2019)

John Mullen AM 4 (Chairman until August 2019; ex-officio Board Member)

Kevin Sumption PSM 3 (ex-officio Board Member)

Arlene Tansey 3

Peter Dexter AM 4

David Mathlin 2 (appointed December 2019)

Jeanne-Claude Strong 2 (appointed December 2019)

Tom O’Donnell 2 (appointed December 2019)

David Blackley 1 (appointed May 2020)

Jeff McMullen AM 0 (resigned August 2019)

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 89

Rob Mundle OAM 0 (resigned January 2020)

The Head of Fundraising and Development, Mr Malcolm Moir, left the Museum in May 2020, after which Paul McCarthy, Senior Executive Strategy and External Relations, again assumed day-to-day responsibility for management of the Foundation and supporting the Foundation Board.

Biographies of Foundation Board

Daniel Janes

Daniel Janes was appointed Chairman of the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation on 17 August 2019. Mr Janes is the Managing Director and Co-Head of Investment Banking Coverage (Australia) at Bank of America (formerly Bank of America Merrill Lynch), and previously held senior positions at Credit Suisse, Barclays and ABN AMRO. During his 20-year investment banking career in London, New York and Sydney, Dan has advised and led, on behalf of clients, a wide range of high-profile transactions. These have involved many of Australia’s landmark transactions, including over $120bn successful M&A transactions and over $60bn of capital markets transactions. He is also a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered

Accountant of England and Wales. Dan has studied maritime history and has maintained an avid interest.

Peter Dexter AM

Peter Dexter AM retired from his executive role as Regional Director of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, Oceania, in September 2005 to assume a range of non-executive appointments. Mr Dexter is a director of the Board of the Australian National Maritime Foundation and former Chairman of the Australian National Maritime Museum. He is a fellow (FAICD) of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, and was awarded the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit by the King of Norway for his contribution to Norwegian/Australian business and his work during the

Tampa crisis. He was named a member (AM) in the Order of Australia for services to the development of the shipping and maritime industries through leadership roles, to international relations and to the community in 2005.

David Blackley

David Blackley was inducted into the Australian Advertising Hall of Fame in 2015 for his achievements in the advertising industry over more than 30 years. He is a former Councillor of the Museum, Chairman of Clemenger BBDO and a member of the Worldwide Creative Board of BBDO New York, representing BBDO’s interests across Australia, New Zealand and Asia on

that Board. Under his leadership, Clemenger BBDO won the Australian Agency of the Year award eight times. Mr Blackley has been involved with Brainwave Australia, a charity supporting children with neurological conditions, since its inception in 1994 and joined its board in 2008.

David Mathlin

David Mathlin is an avid sailor and has a strong interest in maritime history. He has served as the public company director of Transfield Services Infrastructure Fund, as a director of the

Annual Report 2019-20 Governance and accountability 90

Muscular Dystrophy Foundation and is currently a member of the Chairman’s Council at the Australian Chamber Orchestra.

Dr Jeanne-Claude Strong

Dr Jeanne-Claude Strong is a practising medical doctor and has been a non-executive director of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research Foundation since 2011. She is also a competitive sailor with numerous wins to her name, including the Etchells Australasian Championship in

2015.

Tom O’Donnell

Tom O’Donnell has had a global career in private banking and is the CEO of TOD Advisory, a strategic investment company. He served on the Sydney Swans Centre Circle board for six-and-a-half years and has been a Taronga Zoo Foundation Board member since 2013.

Note: Biographies for John Mullen, Kevin Sumption and Arlene Tansey can be found on pages 57 and 60 respectively.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 91

Financial Statements 2019-2020 Independent Auditor’s Report

To the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian National Maritime Museum and its subsidiaries (together the Consolidated Entity) for the year ended 30 June 2020:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and (b) present fairly the financial position of the Consolidated Entity as at 30 June 2020 and its

financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Consolidated Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2020 and for the year then ended:

● Statement by the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer;

● Statement of Comprehensive Income;

● Statement of Financial Position;

● Statement of Changes in Equity;

● Cash Flow Statement; and

● Notes to the financial statements comprising a summary of significant accounting

policies and other explanatory information.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing

Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 92

standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Consolidated Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for

Professional Accountants (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that

they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Consolidated Entity, the Council is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Council is also responsible for such internal control as the Council determines is necessary to enable

the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Council is responsible for assessing the ability of the Consolidated Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Council is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial Statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

● identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether

due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 93

● obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit

procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Consolidated Entity’s internal control;

● evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of

accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;

● conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern

basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Consolidated Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material

uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Consolidated Entity to cease to continue as a going concern;

● evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including

the disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation; and

● obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence regarding the financial information of the entities

or business activities within the Consolidated Entity to express an opinion on the financial report. I am responsible for the direction, supervision and performance of the Consolidated Entity audit. I remain solely responsible for my audit opinion.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Rahul Tejani Executive Director Delegate of the Auditor-General Canberra 3 September 2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 94

Statement by the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2020 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA

Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41 (2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian National Maritime Museum (the museum) will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the museum’s Council.

John Mullen AM Kevin Sumption PSM Tanya Bush

Chairman Chief Executive Officer Deputy Director,

02 September 2020 02 September 2020 Corproate

Services, Chief Finanical

Officer 02 September

2020

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 95

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2020 Notes 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Original Budget

$’000

NET COST OF SERVICES

EXPENSES

Employee benefits 3A 16,687 16,148 17,854

Suppliers 3B 14,990 15,475 19,704

Grants 3C 120 97 118

Depreciation and amortisation 6A 10,881 9,442 9,891

Impairment loss on financial instruments 3D 65 - -

Write-down and impairment of other assets 3E 281 619 -

Losses from asset sales 3F 1 8 -

Total expenses 43,025 41,789 47,567

LESS:

OWN-SOURCE INCOME

Own-source revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 4A 8,848 9,287 10,878

Interest 4B 378 898 500

Rental income 4C 2,692 2,651 2,915

Other revenue 4D 7,650 5,626 9,262

Total own-source revenue 19,568 18,462 23,555

Gains

Other gains 4E 113 486 -

Total gains 113 486 -

Total own-source income 19,681 18,948 23,555

Net cost of services 23,344 22,841 24,012

Revenue from Government 4F 21,217 21,415 21,217

Surplus (deficit) attributable to the (2,127) (1,426) (2,795)

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 96

Australian Government on continuing operations

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Total other comprehensive income - - -

Total comprehensive income (deficit)

attributable to the Australian Government

(2,127) (1,426) (2,795)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Commentary is provided where the variance between the budget and actual line item is

+/- $500 and 10% and +/- 2% of the budget category (e.g. Expenses, Own-source revenue, Financial asset etc.).

Explanation of variance Line item Amount

Primarily due to COVID-19 - includes suspension of the Encounters 2020 program, and impact of savings measures across a variety of discretionary expenditure items

Suppliers 4,714

Includes impact of increased fixed asset base due to additional capital works expenditure in recent years

Depreciation and

amortisation

(990)

Primarily due to COVID-19 - includes suspension of the Encounters 2020 program, and impacts of temporary closure of the museum, including on admissions, retail and venue hire activity

Revenue from contracts with customers (2,030)

Includes reduced cash and in-kind sponsorship revenue, including for Encounters 2020 program, partially offset by insurance proceeds relating to COVID-19 insurable event

Other revenue (1,612)

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 97

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2020 Notes 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Original Budget

$’000

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 5A 24,058 25,357 13,476

Trade and other receivables 5B 2,580 1,877 1,491

Total financial assets 26,638 27,234 14,967

Non-financial assets1

Land and buildings 6A 156,839 155,727 161,615

Infrastructure, plant and equipment 6A 8,778 9,412 14,557

Heritage and cultural assets 6A 72,870 73,756 73,511

Intangibles 6A 4,690 5,101 4,545

Inventories 6B 403 300 350

Other non-financial assets 6C 658 380 248

Total non-financial assets 244,238 244,676 254,826

Total Assets 270,876 271,910 269,793

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 7A 1,606 3,314 2,485

Other payables 7B 1,855 1,974 2,396

Total payables 3,461 5,288 4,881

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 8 - 22 -

Total interest bearing liabilities - 22 -

Provisions

Employee provisions 9A 3,248 3,459 2,841

Provision for makegood obligations 9B 78 78 -

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 98

Total provisions 3,326 3,537 2,841

Total Liabilities 6,787 8,847 7,722

Net Assets 264,089 263,063 262,071

EQUITY

Contributed equity 34,591 31,438 34,591

Reserves 180,016 180,016 180,016

Retained surplus 49,482 51,609 47,464

Total Equity 264,089 263,063 262,071

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. Right-of-use assets are included in the line item Land and buildings

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position

Commentary is provided where the variance between the budget and actual line item is

+/- $500 and 10% and +/- 2% of the budget category (e.g. Expenses, Own-source revenue, Financial asset etc.).

Explanation of variance Line item Amount

Includes higher opening cash balance at 1 July 2019 and delays in capital works program expenditure (discussed

below)

Cash and cash equivalents 10,582

Primarily due to COVID-19 - business interruption

insurance proceeds relating to COVID-19 insurable event in 2020

Trade and other receivables 1,089

Includes delays in the museum’s capital works expenditure program, relating to upgrades and improvements to the museum’s buildings and infrastructure, reallocations in asset classifications between budget and actual, and a

lower than anticipated opening balance at 1 July 2019

Infrastructure, plant and equipment (5,779)

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 99

Includes timing of capital works program expenditure, and

a reduction in expenditure incurred in quarter four 2019-20

Suppliers 879

Includes a lower than anticipated opening balance at 1 July 2019 and reduction in multi-year sponsorship contracts

Other payables 541

Includes a higher than anticipated opening balance at 1 July

2019, partially offset by a reduction in long-term bond rates

Employee provisions (407)

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 100

Statement of Changes in Equity for the period ended 30 June 2020 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Original Budget

$’000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 31,438 23,617 31,438

Transaction with owners

Contributions by owners

Equity injection 3,153 7,821 3,153

Total transactions with owners 3,153 7,821 3,153

Closing balance as at 30 June 34,591 31,438 34,591

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 51,609 53,035 50,259

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (2,127) (1,426) (2,795)

Total comprehensive income (2,127) (1,426) (2,795)

Closing balance as at 30 June 49,482 51,609 47,464

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 180,016 180,016 180,016

Comprehensive income

Total comprehensive income - - -

Closing balance as at 30 June 180,016 180,016 180,016

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 263,063 256,668 261,713

Comprehensive income

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 101

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (2,127) (1,426) (2,795)

Total comprehensive income (2,127) (1,426) (2,795)

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Equity injection 3,153 7,821 3,153

Total transactions with owners 3,153 7,821 3,153

Closing balance as at 30 June 264,089 263,063 262,071

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Changes in Equity

The variances in the statement of changes in equity relate largely to differences between the budgeted and actual balances of retained earnings at 1 July 2019 (due to 2019 activity) and the deficit for the period (discussed in the statement of comprehensive income).

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 102

Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2020 Notes 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Original Budget

$’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sale of goods and rendering services 9,471 9,328 11,995

Receipts from Government 21,217 21,415 21,217

Interest 462 885 500

Rental income 2,488 2,867 2,915

GST received 2,314 1,782 2,003

Other 4,761 2,098 9,262

Total cash received 40,713 38,375 47,892

Cash used

Employees (15,455) (13,616) (17,854)

Suppliers (20,192) (14,771) (22,824)

Other (144) (164) (118)

Total cash used (35,791) (28,551) (40,796)

Net cash from operating activities 4,922 9,824 7,096

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Sales of property, plant and equipment 45 430 -

Total cash received 45 430 -

Cash used

Purchase of property, plant and

equipment

(6,679) (7,900) (12,912)

Purchase of heritage and cultural items (1,590) (4,684) (2,412)

Purchase of intangibles (1,150) (1,562) (1,400)

Total cash used (9,419) (14,146) (16,724)

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 103

Net cash from / (used by) investing

activities

(9,374) (13,716) (16,724)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contributed equity 3,153 7,821 3,153

Total cash received 3,153 7,821 3,153

Net cash from / (used by) financing activities 3,153 7,821 3,153

Net increase (decrease) in cash held (1,299) 3,929 (6,475)

Cash and cash equivalents at the

beginning of the reporting period

25,357 21,428 19,951

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 5A 24,058 25,357 13,476

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Cashflow Statement

Commentary is provided where the variance between the budget and actual line item is

+/- $500 and 10% and +/- 2% of the budget category (e.g. Expenses, Own-source revenue, Financial asset etc.).

Explanation of variance Line item Amount

Primarily due to COVID-19 - includes suspension of the Encounters 2020 program, and impacts of temporary closure of the museum, including on admissions, retail and

venue hire activity

Sale of goods and rendering services (2,524)

Includes lower than anticipated cash donation and sponsorship revenue and changes in allocation methodology between 2020 budget and actual activity

Other cash received (4,501)

Primarily due to COVID-19 - includes suspension of the Encounters 2020 program, and reductions in the use of

labour hire and casual workforce

Employees 2,399

Primarily due to COVID-19 - includes suspension of the Suppliers 2,632

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 104

Encounters 2020 program, and impact of savings measures

across a variety of discretionary expenditure items

Includes delays in the museum’s capital works expenditure program, relating to upgrades and improvements to the

museum’s buildings and infrastructure

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 6,233

Primarily due to COVID-19 - includes timing of major restoration and renewal project relating to floating vessel

fleet

Purchase of heritage and cultural items 822

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2020

1. Summary of significant accounting policies The museum is structured to meet a single outcome:

Outcome 1 - Increased knowledge, appreciation and enjoyment of Australia’s maritime heritage

by managing the National Maritime Collection (NMC) and staging programs, exhibitions and events.

The continued existence of the museum in its present form and with its present programmes is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the museum’s administration and programs.

Basis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:

● Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR);

and

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 105

● Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements

issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial

position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars. Values are rounded to the nearest $1,000, except key management personnel remuneration (Note 11) which is rounded to the nearest dollar.

Consolidation and associated company

The financial statements show information for the economic entity only; this reflects the consolidated results for the parent entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum, and its controlled entity, the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation (the foundation). The results of the parent entity do not differ materially from the economic entity and have therefore not been separately disclosed. The foundation is a company limited by guarantee (see Note

14).

The accounting policies of the foundation are consistent with those of the museum and its assets, liabilities and results have been consolidated with the parent entity accounts in accordance with Accounting Standards. All internal transactions and balances have been eliminated on consolidation.

New Accounting Standards

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

All new, revised and amended standards and interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period:

● did not have a material impact on the museum’s financial statements; and

● are not expected to have a material impact on the museum’s future financial statements.

Standard/ Interpretation Nature of change in accounting policy,

transitional provisions, and adjustment to financial statements

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 2016-8

Amendments to Australian Accounting

Standards - Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities and AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July

2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue, AASB 111 Construction Contracts and Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes. The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 106

promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the museum expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the museum to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

AASB 16 Leases AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019.

This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretation 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretation 115 Operating Leases— Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers / AASB 1058 Income of Not-For-Profit Entities

The museum adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASBs and related

interpretations.

Under the new income recognition model the museum shall first determine whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customer are ‘sufficiently specific’. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are ‘sufficiently specific’ (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the museum applies the general

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 107

AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met, the museum shall consider whether AASB 1058 applies.

In relation to AASB 15, the museum elected to apply the new standard to all new and uncompleted contracts from the date of initial application. The museum is required to aggregate the effect of all of the contract modifications that occur before the date of initial application.

In terms of AASB 1058, the museum is required to recognise volunteer services at fair value if

those services would have been purchased if not provided voluntarily, and the fair value of those services can be measured reliably.

The museum receives revenue from a number of different sources that relate to AASB 15. These sources include activities such as admissions revenue, retail revenue and venue hire revenue. The museum has performed an assessment on the contracts that are revenue - driven. The museum is satisfied that revenue is recognised in line with the performance of contractual obligations. As a result, there are not any material transition impacts to AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers and/or AASB 1058 Income for Not-for-Profit Entities.

Application of AASB 16 Leases

The museum adopted AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019.

Accordingly, the comparative information presented is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under AASB 117 and related interpretations.

The museum elected to apply the practical expedient to not reassess whether a contract is, or contains a lease at the date of initial application. Contracts entered into before the transition date that were not identified as leases under AASB 117 were not reassessed. The definition of a lease under AASB 16 was applied only to contracts entered into or changed on or after 1 July 2019.

The Museum previously classified leases as operating or finance leases based on its assessment of whether the lease transferred substantially all of the risks and rewards of ownership. Under AASB 16, the museum recognises right-of-use (ROU) assets and lease liabilities for most leases. However, the museum has elected not to recognise ROU assets and lease liabilities for some leases of low value assets based on the value of the underlying asset when new or for short-term leases with a lease term of 12 months or less.

On adoption of AASB 16, the museum reclassified long-term peppercorn finance leases over land and building for the main exhibition building and Wharf 7 (a combination of office, exhibition

and storage spaces) from land and building to ROU assets. The impact on transition is summarised below:

Departmental 1 July 2020

Right-of-use assets - property, plant and equipment 155,727

In accordance with the transitional arrangements under AASB 16, the ROU assets previously classified as finance leases under AASB 117 were initially recognised on AASB 16 transition

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 108

date at their carrying amount under AASB 117 immediately prior to transition. There is no corresponding lease liability in relation to these assets.

Impacts of COVID-19 on preparation of statements

COVID-19 has created significant uncertainty about future outcomes. The use of estimates and judgements in the preparation of these financial statements has been reviewed in light of the circumstances of COVID-19 at the end of, and after, the reporting date. Additional disclosures

are provided at the relevant notes as appropriate (see notes 2, 3D, 4C, 4D, 5B and 6A).

Transactions by the Government as owner

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for the year, which include Collection Development Acquisition Budget (CDAB), are recognised directly in Contributed Equity in that year (2020: $3,153; 2019: $7,821).

Taxation

The museum is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Breach of Section 83 of the Constitution

There were no breaches of Section 83 of the Constitution by the museum and its controlled entity for the reporting period.

2. Events after the reporting period There were no events after the reporting period, including relating to the impacts of COVID-19, that provide evidence of conditions that existed as at 30 June 2020 or are indicative of conditions that arose after the date that require adjustment to, or disclosure in, these financial

statements.

3. Expenses

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

3A: Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 8,421 8,204

Superannuation

● Defined contribution plans

1,358 1,311

547 564

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 109

● Defined benefit plans

Leave and other entitlements 1,334 1,605

Volunteer resources, free of charge 1,436 1,827

Workers Compensation 282 263

Labour Hire 2,981 2,280

Other employee expenses 328 94

Total employee benefits 16,687 16,148

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in Note 9A.

3B: Suppliers 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Cost of goods sold 401 490

Brand and marketing 2,082 2,428

Collections 238 73

Contractors 4,262 4,415

Consultants 1,337 1,600

Utilities 887 975

Functions, exhibition, events 1,997 1,835

Staff related expenses 1,170 1,110

Technology and telecommunication 728 721

Vessels 340 413

Other 1,396 1,283

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 14,838 15,343

Goods supplied 2,051 2,153

Services rendered 12,787 13,190

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 14,838 15,343

Other suppliers

Operating lease rentals1 - 132

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 110

Short-term leases 152 -

Total other suppliers 152 132

Total suppliers 14,990 15,475

1 The Museum has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB

117.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with notes 4C, 6A and 8.

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The museum has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short- term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The museum recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

3C: Grants

Non-profit institutions 120 97

Total grants 120 97

3D: Impairment loss on financial instruments 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Impairment on trade and other receivables 65 -

Total impairment on financial instruments 65 -

3E: Write-down and impairment of other assets 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Write-down on infrastructure, plant and equipment 108 449

Impairment on intangible assets 173 170

Total write-down and impairment of other assets 281 619

3F: Losses from asset sales 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 111

Loss from sale of property, plant and equipment 1 8

Total losses from asset sales 1 8

4. Income

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

4A: Revenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods 866 1,025

Rendering of services 7,982 8,262

Total revenue from contracts with customers 8,848 9,287

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers

Revenue from contracts with customers has been disaggregated into categories based on

the timing of transfer of goods and services to the customer, to enable users of financial statements to understand the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of income and cash

flows.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Major product / service line:

Chartering/hiring fees and berth sales 2,083 1,517

Public admissions, memberships and programs 4,339 4,456

Sale of inventory 865 1,024

Venues and events 1,543 2,282

Other 18 8

8,848 9,287

Timing of transfer of goods and services:

Over time 1,887 1,400

Point in time 6,961 7,887

8,848 9,287

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 112

The museum receives revenue from a number of different activities, which relate to AASB 15, as they involve a sufficiently specific performance obligation with the customer. These include admissions, retail and other related revenue from visitors to the museum,

and revenue from the hire of museum facilities for events and functions. In most instances for revenue of this type, the performance obligation is satisfied at a point in time, namely when the customer consumes the service (i.e. visits the museum, or the event/function is held).

Where the obligation occurs over time, for example annual memberships programs, the revenue is recognised as the customer gains control of the service over the period of the membership.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the museum expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

4B: Interest 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Deposits 378 898

Total interest 378 898

Accounting Policy

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

4C: Rental income

Operating lease

Lease income 2,692 2,651

Total rental income 2,692 2,651

Operating Leases

In the capacity as lessor, the museum leases space in Wharf 7, its wharves and its main

museum on a commercial basis.

Maturity analysis of operating lease income receivables

2020

$’000

Within 1 year 2,329

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 113

One to two years 2,047

Two to three years 1,248

Total undiscounted lease payments receivable 5,624

The museum has applied the National Cabinet Mandatory Code of Conduct SME Commercial Leasing Principles During COVID-19 in respect of its eligible tenants. Lease income in 2020 and

operating lease income receivables within 1 year have been reduced accordingly.

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 3B, 6A and 8.

4D: Other revenue 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Donations 550 181

Grants 3,461 1,704

Resources received free of charge 1,436 1,827

Sponsorship 993 1,902

Other 1,210 12

Total other revenue 7,650 5,626

The museum received insurance proceeds from its insurer of $1.2 million, for business interruption caused by COVID-19 for the period 24 March 2020 to 31 May 2020, during operation of the NSW Public Health (COVID-19 Restrictions on Gathering and Movement) Order 2020.

Accounting Policy

Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when and only when a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Cash donations with no commitments are recognised when received.

Grants revenue is recognised based on an assessment of the terms and obligations of the individual grant agreement.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

4E: Other gains

Donated assets - heritage and cultural 113 486

Total other gains 113 486

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 114

Accounting policy

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 115

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

4F: Revenue from Government

Corporate Commonwealth Entity payments from the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communication 21,217 21,415

Total revenue from Government 21,217 21,415

Accounting Policy

Funding received or receivable from non-corporate Commonwealth entities is recognised as Revenue from Government by the museum unless the funding is in the nature of an equity

injection or a loan.

5. Financial assets

5A: Cash and cash equivalents 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Cash on hand or on deposit 24,058 25,357

Total cash and cash equivalents 24,058 25,357

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

5B: Trade and other receivables

Goods and services

Goods and services 304 936

Total receivables for goods and services 304 936

Other receivables:

GST receivable from the ATO 142 209

Interest 16 100

Other 1,008 667

Insurance receivable 1,210 -

Total other receivables 2,376 976

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 2,680 1,912

Less impairment loss allowance (100) (35)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 2,580 1,877

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 116

Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance

Movements in relation to 2020 Goods & services

$’000

Total

$’000

As at 1 July 2019 35 35

Increase/(Decrease) recognised in net cost of services 65 65

Total as at 30 June 2020 100 100

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

The museum classifies all its financial assets as financial assets measured at amortised cost.

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are soley payments of principle and interest (SPPI), and that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any impairment loss allowance.

The impact of COVID-19 on recovery of trade receivables, loans and other receivables has been assessed at the reporting date. The impairment loss allowance has been increased in line with the assessment.

The museum currently has no loans.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 117

6. Non-financial assets

Land

$’000

Buildings & Wharves

$’000

Total Land, Buildings &

Wharves1

$’000

Infrastructur e, Plant & Equipment

$’000

Heritage & Cultural

Assets $’000

Intangibles

$’000

Total

$’000

As at 1 July 2019

Gross book value 14,894 78,720 15,960 109,574

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment

(5,482) (4,964) (10,859) (21,305)

Total as at 1 July 2019 9,412 73,756 5,101 88,269

Recognition of right of use asset on initial application of AASB 16

52,380 103,347 155,727 155,727

Adjusted total as at 1 July 2019 52,380 103,347 155,727 9,412 73,756 5,101 243,996

Additions

By cost including work in progress 2,287 2,027 1,199 5,513

Right-of-use assets 4,761 4,761 4,761

In-kind at fair value 113 113

Revaluations

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive

income for right-of-use assets

Impairments on right-of-use assets recognised in net cost of services

Depreciation and amortisation

(2,812) (2,981) (1,437) (7,230)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets (3,651) (3,651) (3,651)

Disposals (133) (133)

Disposals depreciation 88 88

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 118

Write-down and impairment of asset (109) (173) (282)

Other movements of right-of-use assets

Transfers

Total as at 30 June 2020 52,380 104,459 156,839 8,778 72,870 4,690 243,178

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by

Gross book value 52,380 108,108 160,490 17,072 80,727 16,986 275,275

Accumulated depreciation/amortisatio n

(3,651) (3,651) (8,294) (7,857) (12,296) (32,097)

Total as at 30 June 2020 52,380 104,459 156,839 8,778 72,870 4,690 243,178

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 52,380 104,459 156,839 156,839

1 Under AASB16, the museum is required to meet the disclosure requirements of AASB116 for items of property, plant and equipment subject to an operating lease, and in doing so disaggregate items of property, plant and equipment subject to an operating lease from items of property, plant and equipment not subject to an operating lease.

The asset class, Total Land, Building & Wharves consists of the museum’s site, main exhibition building, wharves, and the Wharf 7 building, which are primarily held and used by the museum.

The museum has four separate commercial leasing arrangements with tenants for areas of the

museum’s site, main exhibition building, wharves, and the Wharf 7 building, and these assets are therefore each partially subject to an operating lease. To disaggregate each of these assets between primarily held and used by the museum and subject to an operating lease would result in an arbitrary allocation of values between the two categories. As the assets are primiarly held and used by the museum, they are included in the tabulated disclosure in 6A and disaggregation has not occurred.

Land, buildings and other property, plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the Heritage and Cultural Assets class.

All revaluations of non-financial assets were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated in this note. The last revaluation took place at 30 June 2017, with a desktop valuation undertaken at 30 June 2020 during which no material changes in fair value were identified.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 119

The impact of COVID-19 was considered at the time the desktop valuation was undertaken, and again prior to completion of these statements, including in relation to rental returns on similar land holdings to those of the museum, changes to building values (replacement costs and

useful life) and changes in active markets for heritage and cultural items. The assessment concluded that the impacts did not result in a material change in fair value at 30 June 2020. Asset carrying values will continue to be reviewed as further information about the impacts of COVID-19 (if any) become available.

Indications of impairments were identified for a software asset (Intangibles) and a discontinued capital project (Building & Wharves), resulting in loss from impairment and write downs of assets of $281 (2019: $619). An item of heritage and cultural assets with a carrying value of $45 was sold during the year resulting in a loss (2019: $8) - see Notes 3C & 3D.

The museum has contractual commitments for acquisitions of property, plant, equipment and intangibles of $2,739 (2019: $2,462). Total contractual commitments are due for acquisitions of property, plant, equipment and intangibles are due within 1 year.

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as otherwise stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of

financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise the initial lease liability amount, plus initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease, less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as

separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 120

use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value (or an amount not materially different from fair value) less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from

the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the operating results. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the operating results except to the extent they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

When an item of property, plant and equipment is revalued, any accumulated depreciation as at

the revaluation date is treated in one of the following ways:

1. restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount; or

2. eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the net amount restated to the revalued amount of the asset.

Non-financial assets were valued using Level 2 and Level 3 unobservable inputs.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual

values over their estimated useful lives to the museum using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2020 2019

Wharves 5-10 years 5-10 years

Buildings 5-60 years 5-60 years

Property, Plant & Equipment 3-50 years 3-50 years

Heritage & Cultural 3-400 years 3-400 years

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 121

Planned expenditure on the preservation of museum buildings is depreciated over the Strategic Asset Management Plan (SAMP) cycle of 10 years.

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the

asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily

dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the museum were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further

future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Heritage and Cultural Assets

The museum collects, manages and displays heritage and cultural assets relating to Australia’s maritime history. These assets are classified as heritage and cultural assets as they are primarily used for purposes that relate to their cultural significance.

Heritage and cultural assets are valued on a continuing basis by external valuers and by the museum’s curators based on their potential market value.

The museum has adopted appropriate curatorial and preservation policies for the heritage and

cultural assets, which are depreciated according to the assessment of useful lives.

Planned expenditure on the conservation and preservation of heritage and cultural assets is depreciated over the current planning period.

Intangibles

The museum’s intangibles comprise internally developed software for internal use and digital content for external use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software and digital content are amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the museum’s software are 3 to 20 years (2019: 3 to 20 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2020.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 122

Significant estimates and judgements

The fair value of land has been determined by an independent valuer, with reference to the market value of similar properties, which is then discounted to recognise the restricted permitted use of the land under the terms of the lease. The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement is the subjective discount factor to reflect restricted use provisions.

The fair value of the buildings, which are purpose built, has been determined by an independent valuer at depreciable replacement cost. The last revaluation took place at 30 June 2017, with a

desktop valuation undertaken by an independent valuer at 30 June 2020 during which no material changes in fair value were identified. The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement is the replacement cost of purpose-built buildings.

The fair value of the wharves has been determined by an independent valuer using an income capitalisation approach, whereby a yield is applied to the potential income earning capacity of the underlying asset. The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement is the estimated market yields.

The fair value of the vessels (a sub-set of heritage and cultural assets) has been determined by an independent valuer, using either the:

● current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation (in the case of the Endeavour)

- the significant unobservable input used in fair value measurement is the cost of rebuilding the vessel; or

● cost approach (in the case of all other vessels in the museum’s fleet), taking into

account both the residual (scrap) value of the vessel and indexed costs of planned maintenance

- the significant unobservable inputs used in fair value measurement include the scrap value and required condition of the vessels.

The fair value of heritage and cultural assets (excluding vessels) has been determined by either an independent valuer or museum curators at the market value of similar heritage and cultural assets. The last revaluation took place at 30 June 2017, with a desktop valuation undertaken by an independent valuer at 30 June 2020 during which no material changes in fair value were identified.The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement are the market values of the individually valued items (those items assessed at over $10,000) and the sample price of items valued by way of sampling.

Significant differences in the above mentioned unobservable inputs would result in a significantly different fair value measurement.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

6B: Inventories

Inventories held for sale 403 300

Total inventories 403 300

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 123

During 2019-20 $401 of inventory held for sale was recognised as an expense (2019:

$490). All inventories are current assets.

Inventories held for resale by the museum store are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

Inventories acquired at no cost or nominal consideration are initially measured at current replacement cost at the date of acquisition.

6C: Other non-financial assets 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Prepayments 658 380

Total other non-financial assets 658 380

No indications of impairment were found for other non-financial assets. All other non- financial assets are current assets.

7. Payables

7A: Suppliers 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Trade creditors and accruals 1,606 3,314

Total suppliers 1,606 3,314

All suppliers are expected to be settled within 12 months.

7B: Other payables 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Salaries and wages 190 99

Superannuation - 77

Deferred revenue 1,410 1,346

Other 255 452

Total other payables 1,855 1,974

All other payables are expected to be settled within 12 months.

Deferred revenue relates to operating lease payments received in advance and contracts

assessed under AASB15 (see accompanying notes 4A and 4C).

Accounting Policy

All financial liabilities are classified as other financial liabilities.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 124

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowing costs, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest method.

Suppliers and other payables are recognised at their amortised cost, being the amounts at which the liabilities will be settled. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods and services have been received and irrespective of having been invoiced.

Revenue received is reported as deferred revenue, until such time as recognition as revenue is allowed under the relevant accounting standard. This disclosure should be read in conjunction with the accompanying note 4.

8. Interest bearing liabilities

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Leases

Finance leases1 - 22

Total leases - 22

1 The Museum has applied AASB 16 using the modified retrospective approach and therefore the comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under AASB 117.

Accounting Policy

Refer Overview section for accounting policy on leases.

9. Provisions

9A: Employee provisions 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Leave 3,248 3,459

Total employee provisions 3,248 3,459

Employee provisions expected to be settled:

No more than 12 months 1,316 1,378

More than 12 months 1,932 2,081

Total employee provisions 3,248 3,459

Accounting Policy

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 125

Liabilities for ‘short-term’ employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick

leave taken in future years by employees is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the museum’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The non-current portion of the liability for long service leave is recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at 30 June 2020. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and

pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Separation and redundancy

Provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The museum recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out terminations (2020: nil; 2019: nil).

Superannuation

The museum’s staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), or other

superannuation funds held outside the Australian Government. The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The museum makes employer contributions to the employees’ defined benefit superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The museum accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2019 represented outstanding contributions.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 126

9B: Provision for makegood obligations

Provision for makegood obligations 78 78

Total other provisions 78 78

Provision for makegood obligations to be settled in

More than 12 months 78 78

Total provision for makegood obligations 78 78

The museum has one makegood obligation relating to the installation of public art works.

10. Related party disclosures Related party relationships

The museum is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the museum are the Director, Key Management Personnel including Councillors, the Portfolio Minister and Senior Executives, and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties

The museum’s related party transactions during the financial year were nil (2019: nil).

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

11. Key management personnel remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the museum, directly or indirectly. The museum has determined the key management personnel to be the museum’s Councillors, the Director and CEO, and all members of the museum’s Executive.

2020

$

2019

$

Short-term employee benefits

Salary 1,594,155 1,450,826

Performance bonus 92,221 50,608

Other short-term benefits 152,617 125,907

Total short-term employee benefits 1,838,993 1,627,341

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 127

Post-employment benefits

Superannuation 238,210 207,766

Total post-employment benefits 238,210 207,766

Other long-term employee benefits

Long service leave 45,827 38,773

Total other long-term employee benefits 45,827 38,773

Termination Benefits 127,265 -

Total Termination Benefits 127,265 -

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 2,250,295 1,873,880

The total number of key management personnel included in the above table is 20 including 12 Councillors (2019: 19 including 12 Councillors). One Councillor’s term ceased during the year and two new Councillors were appointed.

The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the portfolio minister. The portfolio minister’s remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the museum.

12. Contingent liabilities At 30 June 2020 the museum had one unquantifiable contingent liability in respect of legal

action commenced against it and multiple other parties in the United States of America (the action). The action relates to damage to a submersible vehicle while in transit to the museum (the event). It is not possible to estimate the amount of any eventual payments that may be required in relation to the event. The museum holds current insurance policies in relation to the event. Those policies have reimbursed legal and other expenses incurred to date by the museum in defending the action and are available in the event that any potential damages are incurred.

Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial

position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 128

13. Aggregate assets and liabilities

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

13A: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 27,699 27,914

More than 12 months 243,177 243,996

Total assets 270,876 271,910

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 4,777 6,688

More than 12 months 2,010 2,159

Total liabilities 6,787 8,847

14. The Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation The Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation is a Company Limited by Guarantee and is controlled by the Council of the Australian National Maritime Museum.

The Foundation’s objectives are to create a capital fund, through gifts, bequests and fundraising activities, for the purposes of:

● Acquiring major additional items or collections of items to develop the National

Maritime Collection;

● Conserving the National Maritime Collection; and

● Other activities which enhance the National Maritime Collection.

The financial position of the Foundation is consolidated into the Australian National Maritime Museum and is as follows:

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Opening balance at 1 July 1,108 1,037

Revenues: Interest - 6

Revenues: Donations 234 168

1,342 1,211

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 129

Less Expenses: Suppliers 6 4

Contribution to Museum collection - 99

Closing Balance at 30 June 1,336 1,108

Represented by:

Cash at bank 1,339 1,113

Receivables 1 -

Payables (4) (5)

1,336 1,108

15. Assets held in trust The museum has established a number of trust accounts which are detailed below.

Gifts and moneys received for specified purposes are placed in separate bank accounts and expended on those purposes in accordance with the trust terms. These moneys are not

available for other purposes of the museum and not recognised in the financial statements.

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

15A: USA Bicentennial Gift Fund

A gift was received to develop and maintain the USA Gallery at the museum and upon completion of the fitout, the assets were transferred to the museum. The residual of the gift is held in trust and the financial position of the Fund is as follows:

Opening balance as at 1 July 3,666 4,251

Receipts: Distributions/Interest 66 109

3,732 4,360

Other expenses 736 694

Closing balance at 30 June 2,996 3,666

Represented by:

Cash at bank 3,968 3,883

Distributions/Interest receivable 4 23

Payable to the museum (976) (240)

2,996 3,666

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 130

15B: NZ Bicentennial Gift Fund 2020

$’000

2019

$’000

A fund was created in respect of the yacht Akarana.

The financial position of the Fund is as follows:

Opening balance at 1 July 94 92

Receipts: Interest 2 2

Closing balance at 30 June 96 94

Represented by Investment 96 94

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

15C: Louis Vuitton Fund

A fund was created to set up the Louis Vuitton Collection and for the acquisition of materials relating to the maritime association between France and Australia.

The financial position of the Fund is as follows:

Opening balance at 1 July 27 26

Receipts: Interest 1 1

Closing balance at 30 June 28 27

Represented by Investment 28 27

16. Net cash appropriation arrangements

2020

$’000

2019

$’000

Total comprehensive income/(loss) less

depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through

revenue appropriation

854 886

Plus: Depreciation previously funded through revenue

appropriation

(2,981) (2,312)

Total comprehensive income/(loss) as per the Statement of

Comprehensive Income

(2,127) (1,426)

Annual Report 2019-20 Financial Statements 2019-2020 131

The museum receives a separate Collection Development Acquisition Budget (CDAB) provided through an equity appropriation to fund heritage and cultural assets.

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 132

Appendixes Appendix 1 - Selected acquisitions and donations to the National Maritime Collection In the reporting period, 122 individual objects were added to the National Maritime Collection, in

35 acquisitions. Some of the more significant are listed below.

Sir Thomas Stewart Gordon material

A personal archive of scrapbooks, letters, photographs and papers documenting the life and times of the prominent maritime industry figure Sir Thomas Stewart Gordon, chairman of the Allied Consultative Shipping Council in May 1942 and later director of shipping responsible for all Australian waters during the war. ANMM Collection 20180308-1 Wendy Prettlejohn Gift

Foam blocks and switch box used in the design development of DEEPSEA

CHALLENGER

3D prototype flotation core model of blocks of the lower hull section of the famous submersible made of patented ISOFLOAT syntactic foam invented by Australian Ron Allum. Allum worked with James Cameron on DEEPSEA CHALLENGER’s early design development as the Acheron

Project. The duo developed the polycarbonate switch box to house batteries to power the submersible. ANMM Collection 20181214-1 Ron Allum Deepsea Services Gift

Watercolour ship portraits of Freak and Oliver Cromwell

Two important early works by colonial artist Frederick Garling from 1847. Freak, built on the

Clarence River, carried goods, troops, passengers and workers, including South Sea Islanders, around the colonies to India, China and the Pacific. It includes a rare late view of Aboriginal fishing on Sydney Harbour. The Aberdeen-built Oliver Cromwell was praised for its innovative

clipper design, and Garling’s painting of it was reviewed in the second exhibition for the Society for the Promotion of the Fine Arts in Australia in 1849. ANMM Collection 20190320-1 Mrs Alison and Mr Phil Lumsden Gift

W Bartleet & Sons fishing tackle display box

Impressive decorative arrangement of recreational and industrial fishing tackle made by W Bartleet & Sons, Redditch, England, which was displayed in the fishing tackle supply and oyster supper rooms of Danish sailor Frederick Christensen in George St, The Rocks, Sydney, in the

1880s. It also features eight gold medals awarded to W Bartleet & Sons at various late 19th-century trade exhibitions around the colonies. ANMM Collection 20190329-1 Ms Christine Fraser Gift

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 133

Drafting and design items from UNSW School of Naval Architecture Stream

This equipment consists of a mechanical integrator, a 1905 ship’s cargo loadicator and test tank models of the VIM 12 metre class, used to develop Gretel, Australia’s 1962 America’s Cup

challenger, and the Cape York/Cape Arnhem Ro-Ro cargo ship design of the 1960s. This technology was used in the classical period of naval architecture and engineering when calculations were done by hand and practical methods were used for testing. ANMM Collection

20190402-1 University of New South Wales Gift

Miniature diecast models of Hamburg Sud cargo ships, a Maersk tugboat and a dockside gantry crane

Thirty-one Hamburg Sud model ships collected by Achim Drescher, former chair of Columbus Line and a leading shipping industry figure, representing the German shipping company’s technology and design and its influence on the cargo and container shipping industry in the 20th and 21st centuries. ANMM Collection 20190604-3 Mr Achim Drescher Gift

Westpac Little Ripper Life Saver (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)

This innovative Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) conducts remote search, rescue and lifesaving

operations. It was successfully deployed by New South Wales Surf Life Saving as the Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver UAV in early 2018. It also supports thermal imaging and coastal mapping and has been adapted to deploy purple dye for identification of rip currents. In partnership with the University of Technology, Sydney, the UAV carries a world-first and award-winning AI-enabled marine threat detection system called SharkSpott, which was also successfully used for crocodile spotting along Queensland beaches in 2019. ANMM Collection 20190826-1 Little Ripper Group Gift

Model of supermaxi Wild Oats XI

A 1:25 scale model of the multiple Sydney to Hobart race-winning supermaxi Wild Oats XI. The

yacht represents design innovation and the legacy of Bob Oatley AO and embodies the Oatley family’s ongoing commitment to the sport and industry of yachting. ANMM Collection 20190924-1 Sandy Oatley Gift

Surgeon John White’s A Journal of a Voyage to New South Wales, 1790

This publication is one of five first-hand accounts written by members of the First Fleet and joins The Charlotte Medal, believed to have been engraved in January 1788 from a flattened kidney

dish by convict Thomas Barrett for Surgeon White, in the National Maritime Collection. Both are important visual and documentary records of the voyage of the First Fleet from the United

Kingdom in 1787 and the fledgling European colony. ANMM Collection 20200318-1 Mr Peter Chaldjian Cultural Gifts Program

Journal of sea voyage of Victor Wilson on MV Bulolo in 1948

This delightful journal was kept by 16-year-old Irish immigrant Victor Mills Wilson on a voyage with his family from England to Australia on MV Bulolo in 1948. It contains daily entries

documenting the voyage and settling in Sydney, watercolour illustrations and even the

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 134

preserved skin of a flying fish he caught in the Indian Ocean in 1948. ANMM Collection 20190731-2 Victor Wilson Gift

Ceramic works by Victorian artist Bern Emmerichs, 2019-20

A series of three painted ceramic works about Chinese migration to the Victorian goldfields from 1857: Arrival in the Land of cakes, The celestial trek and New gold mountain Xin Jin Shan plus a diptych titled Nawi. These artworks by leading ceramic artist Bern Emmerichs are appealing

contemporary imaginings of events that are not widely documented in historic imagery. Emmerichs has explored colonial government attempts to restrict the arrival of Chinese miners on the goldfields in the 1850s, and depicted a scene of a historic Sydney Harbour crowded with Indigenous watercraft. ANMM Collection 20190809-1 Maunsell Wickes at Barry Stern Galleries Purchase $22,000

T-shirt and scarf from The Social Outfit’s 2019 Kinetic Bloom collection

Produced by Newtown-based ethical fashion brand The Social Outfit, the Kinetic Bloom collection features the sealife-themed ‘Fairfield’ digital print. It was created in collaboration with newly arrived teenage refugees and migrants at the Fairfield High School Intensive English

Centre in western Sydney and sewn by women from Burma, Afghanistan, Iran and Syria. ANMM Collection 20190920-1 The Social Outfit Purchase

Collection of posters by Peter Drew

Adelaide street artist Peter Drew addresses themes in Australia’s immigration history over the past century: the ‘AUSSIE’ series, inspired by Certificates of Exemption from the Dictation Test; the ‘Stop the Boats’ series, a response to former Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s 2013 campaign and the introduction of Operation Sovereign Borders; and, the ‘Real Australians Say Welcome’ series inspired by the oft-forgotten second verse of Australia’s national anthem, particularly the line ‘courage to combine’ - a sentiment that the artist notes as strangely absent from Australia’s

treatment of asylum seekers. ANMM Collection 20191021-1 Peter Drew Arts

Collection of items relating to Bob Manderson’s migration from England to Australia on SS ORONTES in 1961

Film footage and shipboard souvenirs relating to 23-year-old Bob Manderson’s migration to Australia with his friend Bob Mitchell as a ‘ten-pound Pom’ on the Orient Line’s SS Orontes in

1961. This was one of the ship’s final voyages before it was scrapped in 1962. He recorded the journey with a camera he had purchased on route in Aden. ANMM Collection 20190731-3 Bob Manderson Gift

Tablecloth associated with SS Orontes, WREN service and immigration to Australia in WWII

WREN Dr Elizabeth ‘Betty’ Hall embroidered the tablecloth on her voyage from England to Sydney on the SS Orontes in 1944, in company with returning Australian servicemen and

POWs. The uneven flower work reveals the privations of wartime, when thread was scarce. Betty demobbed in Australia and returned to her original craft of floristry. This evocative item

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 135

brings into focus themes such as the flow of Allied defence personnel, post-war immigration policy and the careers of 20th-century immigrant ships.

ANMM Collection 20190304-1 Dr Elizabeth (Betty) Kate Hall Gift

Bluebird class yacht model

The 1:16 scale model of the Bluebird class yacht is an accurate representation of an amateur-built plywood version of this popular Australian class of yacht designed by Sydney naval

architect Ken Watts during World War II. ANMM Collection 20190715-1 Model commissioned from Sydney Heritage Fleet by the ANMM Foundation; funded by a bequest from Dr Keith Jones

Bluebird class yacht plans for Kotare

Kotare was designed by Ken Watts as one of the popular class of Australian day sailing yachts after World War II. Robert Brown, its owner, built Kotare in his backyard from the late 1970s and

launched it in 1982. It is an example of an Australian folkboat classic. ANMM Collection 20190603-5 Robert Brown Gift

Dugong bones

Dugong skeleton from Bardi Jawi country at One Arm Point, Western Australia, collected after a traditional hunt by local man Bruce Wiggan. ANMM Collection 20170804-1 Sylvia Adam Gift

Garara (fishing spear) and crab wire

The fishing spear and crab wire are examples of intergenerational and familial knowledge transmission from the south coast of New South Wales, made by late Aboriginal elder James (Jimmy) Scott of Bega on the far south coast of NSW. ANMM Collection 20191206-1 Gift

Ningher canoe model

Ningher canoes are the unique traditional watercraft of Tasmanian Aboriginal people. The design is highly functional in its local environment. ANMM Collection 20200212-1 Sheldon

Thomas Commissioned by ANMM

Ghost net sculptures

Artwork made from discarded fishing nets by Lynnette Griffiths in collaboration with Erub Arts. In northern Australia local artists use these ‘ghost nets’ to highlight the danger to sea life by creating representations of animals often caught in the nets. ANMM Collection 20190122-1 Martin Browne Contemporary Purchase

Artworks by prominent Torres Strait Islander artists Billy Missi, Job Kusu and Claude Mabo

This important group includes a linocut, a dugong hunting platform and harpoon, a spinning top and a war club, all artworks and artefacts used in ceremony, cultural practices and sport and social activities. Titles are Mawan Wasal - Mawa Ceremony II, Nath aw Wap, Gubugab and Kolap. ANMM Collection 20190604-1 Michael Kershaw and Diane Kershaw Cultural Gifts

Program

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 136

Yanyuwa People of the Sea

Poster by Australian artist Chips McKinolty to celebrate the return of the islands to the Yanyuwa traditional owners in 1986 by then Aboriginal Affairs minister Clyde Holding. The poster contains printed signatures of the traditional owners. The key text on the poster reads: LI-ANTHAWIRRIYAR RA, which translates to mean ‘people of the sea’. ANMM Collection 20191113-1 Chips Mackinolty Gift

Captain James Crook (unmasked)

This bronze bust of Captain James Cook by artist Jason Wing takes the form of a classical bronze portrait. This contemporary piece challenges foundation narratives of the colonial history of Australia from an Aboriginal perspective and is a companion work to Captain James Crook (4/4), a bust overlaid with a very modern balaclava. ANMM Collection 20191119-1 Artereal

Gallery Purchase

Invasion (Evening Standard)

Invasion explores an alien attack as metaphor. This fictional newspaper accompanies Michael

Cook’s photographic series highlighting the brutal treatment that Australian Aboriginal people

have suffered at the hands of British colonists. ANMM Collection 20191212-1 Michael Cook Cultural Gifts Program

Invasion, photographic series by Michael Cook, 2019

Invasion explores an alien attack as metaphor. Michael Cook’s work is leavened by irony,

flawless beauty and a retro look that emphasises its fictional role reversal highlighting the brutal treatment that Australian Aboriginal people have suffered at the hands of British colonists. ANMM Collection 20190901-1

Andrew Baker Gallery Purchase

Bedhan Lag: Land of the Kaiwalagal, Brian Robinson, Linocut, 2019

Robinson, of the Kala Lagaw Ya and Wuthathi language groups of the Torres Strait and Cape York Peninsula, created this work in response to the 250th anniversary of Cook’s voyage to Australia in 2020, interpreting Cook’s act of taking possession on Bedhan Lag, an island he named Possession Island. ANMM Collection 20190603-2 Brian Robinson Purchase

Artworks by leading Torres Strait Islander artist Alick Tipoti

Maza Mawa (Wapiya) I mask made from fibreglass, resin, fibre, beads, rope, feathers; four linocuts depicting cultural stories, ceremonies and totems from Torres Strait entitled Wadth, Zigin Ar Kusikus, Koedal Kazil Garr Yatharmik, Warul Ar Bidhiyal and Kuyku Garpathamai

Mabaig. ANMM Collection 20190603-1 Alick Tipoti Cultural Gifts Program

Mawa III (Kisay) mask by Alick Tipoti

Ancient turtle-shell masks made by ancestors are sacred in Torres Strait Islander cultures. In this impressive work Tipoti continues the cultural practice of mask making through a contemporary lens. Masks created today are not sacred, but their use observes the same

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 137

cultural protocols as in former times. ANMM Collection 20191202-2 The Australian Art Network Purchase

Danagi Waaru (Blind Turtle) by Alick Tipoti

This sculptural work explores the significance of the green turtle to Torres Strait Islander cultures and highlights ongoing threats of ocean pollution and its impact on sustainability.

ANMM Collection 20200110-1 Purchased with funds from the Sid Faithfull and Christine Sadler

program supporting Contemporary Indigenous Maritime Heritage in Far North Queensland and the Torres Strait Islands through the ANMM Foundation

Ngay

This linocut, the first self-portrait by leading Torres Strait Islander artist Alick Tipoti, is informed in iconography, style and form by the traditional cultural practices of his people. ANMM Collection 20190605-1 The Australian Art Network Purchase

Model of Wuvulu Island canoe from the Sepik River coast Papua New Guinea, made c2000

Made from local wood, including driftwood, Wuvulu canoes are today used for racing and

ceremonial purposes. Originally they also had a warring role. The model demonstrates the diverse technology of the many different outrigger canoes found in the Pacific and Papua New Guinea. ANMM Collection 20190319-1

Theodore Bruce Auctions Purchase

Waga Hot canoe model from Panaeati Island, Papua New Guinea

Rare, highly accurate model of the single outrigger canoes used by the Panaeati and related communities in the Calvados Chain of the Louisiade Archipelago for trade, transport and their part of the Kula circle exchange for community and culture. Made of local woods, fibres, cowrie shells and carvings, with a pandanus sail. Waga Hot means ‘true canoe’. This style of canoe is

no longer made in the region. ANMM Collection 20190701-1 Graeme Baxter Gift

Kalipoula model canoe

A model kenu made by Jack Molugutola of Tukwaukwa village in the Trobriand Islands of

Papua New Guinea, one of three main types of canoe from the area - the middle-sized canoe called kalipoula. They are built for fishing and transporting cargo such as loading new house

materials from nearby islands.

ANMM Collection 20191115-1 Dickson Lige Purchase

Note

As flagged in the 2018-19 Annual Report, the deaccession of the museum’s Royal Australian Navy Westland Wessex Mark 31B anti-submarine helicopter (collection number 00015660) was approved by the Minister in this reporting period.

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 138

Westland Wessex helicopters were used by the RAN between 1963 and 1989 as anti-submarine warfare, air-sea rescue, and utility support aircraft. Twenty-seven were ordered from England in 1962 and the first delivered in 1963. The Wessex is no longer required as part of the National Maritime Collection because we have since acquired a more significant or representative example of its kind, so its ongoing conservation and storage costs cannot be justified. Also, the engine from the Wessex has hazardous (radioactive) substances and poses

a risk to staff. The Wessex helicopter was transferred to the Australian War Memorial.

Appendix 2 - ANMM publications Books

Bligh - Hero or Villain?, ISBN 978-0-9775471-7-3, 104 pp, author Dr Nigel Erskine

Serials

Signals, quarterly journal of the Australian National Maritime Museum, Nos 127-131, ISSN

1033-4688, 80 pp, editor Janine Flew, published September, December, March, June. Free to Members

Australian National Maritime Museum Annual Report 2018-19, ISSN 1039-4036 (print) / 2204-678X (online), 188 pp, editor Janine Flew

All Hands, e-magazine of Australian National Maritime Museum Volunteers, edited by a

Volunteer committee: Geoff Barnes, Alex Books, Roz Gatwood, Bob Hetherington, John Lea, Doug Logan, Neale Philip, Jenny Patel, Brooke Twyford and David van Kool, published quarterly online. Free to ANMM Volunteers, staff and Council members and volunteers at maritime-related museums Australia wide

Education resource materials

This year the museum placed a clear focus on engaging learners not just onsite, but also in classrooms and in their homes. The result was a set of sector-leading resources that have driven extremely pleasing online engagement numbers. Resources developed include:

● The Cook’s Voyages online game

● Encounters 2020 teacher resources. A set of 26 digitally hosted resources to support

primary and secondary learners in understanding the importance, complexity and lasting impacts of Cook’s visit to Australia’s east coast

● Journey along the East Australian Current. A digital collaboration with ABC Education that

includes eight videos and classroom activities

● Pirate School. A digitally hosted adventure for students exploring the history and science of

pirate life

● War and Peace in the Pacific 75. The third instalment of the international education program

bringing students from Australia, Japan and the USA toward the goals of peace and cooperation

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 139

● Sea Monsters. Primary and secondary resources to support onsite programs and travelling

exhibition learning experiences

● Navigators, Explorers and Traders. A new onsite program to engage students with the

Under Southern Skies gallery.

● ERTH’s Prehistoric Aquarium. Onsite, live action puppet show for Summer 19-20

● Public programs: quarterly, onsite family engagements.

Corporate publications

Shaped by the Sea: Australian National Maritime Corporate Plan 2019-23, ISSN 1320 6656,

32 pp

2020 program, 48 pp

Internet

ANMM website: sea.museum/ ANMM blog: sea.museum/discover/blog ANMM on Flickr Commons: flickr.com/photos/anmm_thecommons ANMM on Flickr: flickr.com/photos/anmm/

ANMM on Twitter: twitter.com/seamuseum_/ ANMM on Facebook: facebook.com/sea.museum/ ANMM on Instagram: instagram.com/sea.museum/ Digital stories: sea.museum/discover/stories Google arts and culture: artsandculture.google.com/partner/australia-national-maritime-museum YouTube: youtube.com/user/MaritimeMuseum

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 140

Appendix 3 - Reconciliation Action Plan implementation progress (as at 30 June 2020) Action Deliverable Timeline Milestones achieved

Relationships

RAP Working Group (RWG) actively monitors RAP development and implementation of actions, tracking progress and reporting

RWG oversees the development, endorsement and launch of the RAP

February 2019 Completed.

RWG established and all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff are members.

All four meetings for the 2019 calendar year have now been held.

March and June meetings for 2020 were held on 31 March and 18 June. An additional meeting to review the RAP took place on 16 April.

Establish Terms of Reference for the RWG February 2019

Ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are represented on the RWG

February 2019, 2020

Meet quarterly (with minutes taken) to review and report on RAP implementation

March, June, September, December 2019, 2020 & 2021

Celebrate National Reconciliation Week (NRW) by providing opportunities to build and maintain relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians

Organise and hold at least one event each year for ANMM employees to celebrate NRW

May 2019 & 2020

Completed for 2019 and 2020.

All staff were given the opportunity to participate in a cultural experience on board Tribal Warrior’s Mari Nawi.

The Remembering Mabo rooftop projection was featured during National Reconciliation Week.

In May 2020, due to COVID-19, the museum launched a Welcome to Country video on the website, in partnership with the Metropolitan Land Council.

Register all events via Reconciliation Australia’s NRW website

May 2019

May 2020

Support an external National Reconciliation Week event May 2019 May 2020

Ensure our RWG participates in an external event to recognise and celebrate NRW

May 2019

May 2020

Develop and maintain mutually beneficial relationships between the ANMM and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, communities and

Develop and implement a plan to engage and work with the ANMM’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stakeholders

June 2019 Planning is off track but engagement still occurs as needed.

Principles and procedures are yet to be codified.

Meetings and engagement have

Hold meetings with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations to

March 2019

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 141

organisations to support and ensure positive outcomes

develop guiding principles for future engagement

occurred, particularly in the context of the Encounters 2020 project.

Preliminary work in identifying current contacts and priority organisations has occurred.

Establish a network of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations that have direct links to maritime activities, histories and cultures

June 2020

Raise internal and external awareness of our RAP to promote reconciliation within the ANMM and to all its stakeholders and those working and engaging with the cultural sector generally

Launch the ANMM RAP onsite with all employees, volunteers and other stakeholders in attendance

February 2019 RAP launched on 6 March 2019.

Draft communications strategy commenced. In the interim, information shared through formal mechanisms (such as annual report) and informal mechanisms (team and whole staff meetings).

Implementation ideas for use as appropriate:

· Divisional meetings

· KPIs (referring back to operational plan)

· Next volunteers’ forum

· Volunteers’ briefings

Promotion of RAP and achievements to museum partners.

Develop, implement and review a strategy for the communication and promotion of the ANMM’s RAP and progress made on its implementation to all internal and external stakeholders

February 2019, 2020

Ensure the RAP is effectively promoted by the ongoing and regular engagement by the ANMM and the RWG with internal and external stakeholders in relevant elements of the plan

March, June, September, December, 2019, 2020, 2021

Promote reconciliation through ongoing active engagement with all stakeholders

December 2019

Establish an Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander advisory committee for the museum

Develop terms of reference for the Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander advisory committee, the terms and conditions of appointment, and indicative meeting schedule for approval by the ANMM Council

June 2019 The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee has been established and met for the first time at the June Council Meeting. It will meet again prior to the November Council meeting.

Appointments to the committee are ongoing.

Appoint the members of the Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander advisory committee

July 2019

Convene the first meeting of the Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander advisory committee

August 2019

Convene meetings of the Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander advisory committee

August 2020

Respect

Engage employees in continuous cultural learning opportunities to

Develop and implement a cultural awareness training strategy which defines and

June 2019 and ongoing Strategy yet to be formalised. However, staff

have participated in

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 142

increase understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, histories and achievements

addresses the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural learning needs of ANMM employees, volunteers and contractors, working in all areas, and provides various options for learning (for example, online, face-to-face workshops and cultural immersion)

cultural awareness training (face-to-face and online), as well as procurement training (including Indigenous procurement). Volunteers have had access to online training. Further training will be provided related to Encounters 2020.

The museum will leverage the Encounters 2020 exhibitions for cultural awareness training.

Councillors participated in cultural training focused around truth telling. The museum has leveraged connections with local groups such as Tribal Warrior.

RWG members participated in an Australian Dream screening and discussion on 12 December 2019.

Terri Janke and Company, an Aboriginal legal firm, delivered specific training open to all staff on the Australian Museums Art Galleries Association Indigenous Roadmap.

Investigate and develop opportunities to work with local traditional owners and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consultants to develop and deliver cultural awareness training and immersion

September 2019

31 December 2019

Provide opportunities for RWG members and other key managers to participate in advanced cultural awareness training, experiences and immersion

December 2019

Engage employees in understanding the significance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural protocols such as Welcome to Country and Acknowledgement of Country to ensure there is a shared meaning

Develop, implement and communicate a cultural protocol document for Welcome to Country and Acknowledgement of Country

February 2019 Acknowledgement of Country incorporated into the Bamal Badu worldscape.

Completed.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Completed.

Prepare a list of key contacts for organising and delivering a Welcome to Country and maintaining respectful partnerships

February 2019 & 2020

Invite a traditional owner to provide a Welcome to Country at all significant ANMM events, including exhibition and program openings

February 2019 and ongoing

Include an Acknowledgement of Country at the commencement of important meetings involving internal and external stakeholders

June 2019 and ongoing

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 143

Encourage staff to include an Acknowledgement of Country at the commencement of all meetings

June 2019

Organise and display an Acknowledgment of Country (sign or plaque) at the entrance or in the foyer of the ANMM’s main building

June 2019

Provide opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees to engage with their cultures and communities by celebrating NAIDOC Week

Review and update People and Culture policies and procedures to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees are provided with opportunities and are actively encouraged to participate in NAIDOC Week

May 2019

May 2020

Review yet to commence but current practice is to encourage participation in NAIDOC Week initiatives.

Paid day approved by organisation for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff members who attended NAIDOC day community events

Drafted for inclusion in leave policy. Potential EBA inclusion.

Provide opportunities for all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees to participate in, and with, their cultures and communities during NAIDOC Week

July 2019

July 2020

Use the National Maritime Collection and museum programs to build awareness of and respect for the richness and diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, cultures and histories

Continue to develop collections, exhibitions, blogs and oral histories to:

- celebrate the maritime culture and heritages of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

- promote the use of National Maritime Collection material by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to support cultural maintenance

- mark Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dates of significance on an annual basis

- present positive, diverse images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on our website and in publications.

February 2019 and ongoing Bamal Badu, a work by Brett Leavy, was

launched during NAIDOC Week.

Aboriginal perspectives of Sydney Harbour talks and cruises offered to guests.

Kanalaritja: An unbroken string, a touring exhibition from TMAG, was exhibited in 2019.

Mariw Minaral, a retrospective of works by Alick Tipoti, is in planning, with significant artist consultation.

Defying Empire, a touring exhibition from the National Gallery of Australia, will open to the Museum in the first half of FY2020-21.

Ongoing changes to TMS (registration) entries are occurring.

A number of community groups from the locations of the Endeavour voyage ports were engaged with.

Work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and organisations to continue to develop and care for the National Maritime Collection, including enhancing information about language in our collection records.

February 2019 and ongoing

Work closely with community to ensure our approach to February 2019, 2020, 2021

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 144

Encounters 2020 is respectful, balanced and committed to truth telling.

Due to COVID-19, the delivery of onsite exhibitions is currently in abeyance.

Deliver at least two exhibitions on site, as part of Encounters 2020, which give voice to contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples on the themes of the program.

November 2020

Opportunities

Investigate opportunities to improve and increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment opportunities at the ANMM.

Annually review (and revise as necessary) People and Culture recruitment policies and procedures to ensure there are no barriers to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment in our workplace

May 2019

June 2020

May 2020

As People and Culture policies are reviewed, this element is being considered.

Informal consultation with staff regarding retention and ways to develop staff.

Under way and ongoing. Develop and implement an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment and retention strategy

June 2019

May 2020

Consult with Existing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff on employment strategies and on development opportunities.

May 2019

May 2020

Advertise vacancies that are required to be advertised, across all classifications, in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander media

June 2019

Collect, with consent, information on our current and past Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff to inform recruitment for future employment opportunities

May 2019

Investigate, develop and provide opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses to supply goods and services to the ANMM

Annually review (and update as necessary) procurement policies and procedures to ensure there are no barriers to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses supplying goods and services to ANMM

June 2019

June 2020

Supply Nation membership has been reviewed and renewed for 2019-20 FY.

Best endeavours to comply with the Commonwealth Indigenous Procurement Policy have been imbedded in the museum’s procurement policy.

Provide a list of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses that have supplied goods and services to the ANMM in the last financial year to all staff involved in procurement

March & September 2019

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 145

Using the Supply Nation database, provide a list of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses and the goods and services they provide to all ANMM staff involved in procurement

March & September 2019

September 2019 report circulated in November 2019.

Completed.

Exceeded target already this year. Two companies contracted to supply uniforms. Several new firms contracted for Store.

Renewed until February 2020.

Under way and ongoing.

Develop at least one additional commercial relationship with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander-owned business each year

March & September 2019

Review Supply Nation membership

February 2019 & 2020

Use best endeavours to comply with the Commonwealth’s Indigenous Procurement Policy

February 2019

Undertake community visits and outreach to schools to promote the ANMM and its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander programs, and to encourage and inspire Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students seeking training and employment in the cultural sector

Develop and implement a program of school and community visits for ANMM staff to promote the ANMM and potential careers in the cultural sector to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

June 2019 Currently occurs informally - we are encouraging consideration of employment in the cultural sector at the conclusion of tours for Indigenous students and interns.

Formalisation of this program is on hold due to restrictions for visiting schools and communities during COVID-19.

People and Culture is reviewing the internship framework at the museum, and will consider this as an element.

Develop a short-term internship program, of one to two months duration, and offer places to up to four Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to encourage training, qualifications and careers in the cultural sector

June 2019

June 2020

Assess the cultural, social and economic impact of the museum’s investment in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander maritime heritage

Engage an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander business with relevant expertise to advise the museum on the cultural, social and economic impact of the museum’s investment in supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander maritime heritages.

June 2020 Not commenced.

Governance, tracking, progress and reporting

Report RAP achievements, challenges and

Collate information/data on RAP achievements, challenges and learnings for consideration by the RWG

July 2019

July 2020

Discussions have commenced by RWG to look at challenges, achievements and

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 146

learnings to Reconciliation Australia Complete and submit the RAP Impact Questionnaire to the

ANMM executive group for approval

August 2019

August 2020

learnings, and this will be completed in Q4.

Not commenced. Reconciliation Australia advised that reporting was not required in July 2019 as the RAP had not been in place for a year.

Submit the approved and completed ANMM RAP Impact Measurement Questionnaire to Reconciliation Australia.

September 2019

September 2020

Investigate participating in the RAP Barometer May 2020

Report RAP achievements, challenges and learnings internally and externally

Quarterly reports prepared for the executive group, Council and other stakeholders on the progress on the implementation of the RAP

March, June, September, December, 2019, 2020

RAP achievements and progress reported to Council.

Share ANMM RAP achievements, challenges and learnings at regular all-staff meetings, in the annual report, on the website and in Signals.

July 2019

July 2020

Review the RAP and develop new RAP Liaise with Reconciliation Australia to develop a new

RAP based on learnings, challenges and achievements

April 2020 On track.

Send draft RAP to Reconciliation Australia for review and feedback

May 2020

Submit draft RAP to Reconciliation Australia for formal endorsement.

January 2021

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 147

Appendix 4 - Director and staff overseas travel Anne DORAN

Tokyo, Sendai, Hiroshima and Kuri, Japan, 6-16/19: War and Peace in the Pacific 75 Youth Program chaperone

Stephen GAPPS

London, UK, 9-18/11/19: to attend Shaped by the Sea design workshop, and British Museum

object loan discussions.

Wellington, NZ, 19-22/8/19: to attend Te Papa Museum curatorial discussions on Shaped by the Sea and inspect HERE: Kupe to Cook exhibition at Pataka Museum & Gallery.

Michael HARVEY

Wellington, NZ, 30-31/11/19: to join meetings with Avatar Alliance Foundation and James Cameron, and courtesy calls at Te Papa Tongarewa Museum of New Zealand.

London, UK, 13-16/10/19: to join design workshop for Shaped by the Sea project and attend

Wildlife Photographer of the Year meetings and events at the Natural History Museum and UK

Parliament (partially self-funded).

David PAYNE

Alotau and Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, 22/10-6/11/2019: to attend opening of Massim Canoe plans exhibition at Massim Museum Alotau, to attend Huhu Bay War Canoe Festival and

Kenu and Kundu Festival, then meet Director of National Museum PNG in Port Moresby.

Kevin SUMPTION

Wellington & Dunedin New Zealand, 17-21/7/19: to attend meetings with the director of TePapa Museum, Wellington, and Director of the NMC concerning the Endeavour charter for the Tuia

250 events; participate in the launch event of the ANMM travelling exhibition James Cameron - Challenging the Deep at the Otago Museum, Dunedin.

US, Europe and Kuwait, 5-25/9/19: Meetings in the US concerning the search for HMB Endeavour, field research for new exhibition space and venue business models; attendance

and presentation at the International Conference of Maritime Museums, Stockholm; discussions with Empathy Museum Directors concerning touring exhibition A Mile in My Shoes.

Whangarei, Bay of Islands, New Zealand, 2-9/11/19: Attended Tuia 250 cultural events in Waitangi and Kerikeri and participated in voyage as a crew member aboard HMB Endeavour as

part of the Tuia 250 flotilla.

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 148

Jakarta, Indonesia 12-14/11/19: Presented at the launch of the Black Armada - Two Nations

exhibition at the National Museum of Jakarta and provided a workshop, How to Build a Public Brand, for local museum directors and curators.

Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Korea, 28/11-7/12/19: Attended the launch of our travelling exhibition Alan Villiers & the Sons of Sindbad with the Australian Ambassador in Kuwait; accompanied by Embassy staff, met with Directors of cultural institutions in Riyadh concerning Villiers travelling

exhibition; discussions with Ambassador James Choi in Seoul concerning possible collaborative projects with Korean cultural institutions; met the Director of the Busan Maritime Museum to develop an MoU between the two institutions.

Tokyo, Japan, 2-10/2/20: participated in a study program hosted by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The program is designed to build new strategic relationships between Japanese Research and Cultural organisations and their Australian counterparts.

Middle East and London, 7-16/3/20: Accompanied by the First Secretary of the Australian Embassy Riyadh, participated in a series of meetings with directors of cultural institutions in Dammam, Bahrain and Oman regarding the Alan Villiers & the Sons of Sindbad travelling

exhibition; attended the International Congress of Maritime Museums meetings in Bristol. (Planned travel to France to meet with Australian Embassy staff and the Director of the Musée de la Marine regarding touring exhibitions and collaboration on a submarine exhibition was cancelled due to COVID-19.)

Appendix 5 - Sponsors, partners and supporters Major Sponsors

Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation

Nine Network NSW Ports Port Authority of NSW

Partners

Collin Biggers & Paisley Evan Powis Entertainment Laissez-faire Catering Ovolo 1888

Sponsors

ACFS Port Logistics Aurora Expeditions DP World Lockheed Martin

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 149

Maritime Container Services National Geographic Nova Professional Systems Royal Wolf Smit Lamnalco Sydney by Sail

Transport for NSW White Umbrella

Supporters

Challis & Company Douglas Fabian Productions Fairfax NITV

Property NSW SBS

Shipping Australia Limited Silentworld Foundation Sydney Fish Markets TimeOut TOMRA Tyrrells Vintage House Wines

Appendix 6 - Donors and benefactors Benefactors

Basil Jenkins

Dr Keith Jones Janette Parkinson

Captain’s Circle Members

Dan Janes Peter Poland Jonathon Casson David Mathlin Mark Bethwaite AM

John Jeremy AM Dawn Bradner William Hopkins Louise Taggart Dr Jeff Hughes

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 150

Judy Lee Jaz Stephens Martin Rathbone Hon Margaret White AO Arlene Tansey David N Blackley

Peter Dexter AM Campbell Edmondson Nicholas Yates Doyle Cook - Port Kembla Gateway Paul Binsted Dr Gary Holmes Dr Anne Reeckmann Nigel Stoke

Major donors

David and Jennie Sutherland Foundation Christine Sadler Turnbull Foundation Sgt Douglas Herps and Patricia Herps Jonathan and Xanthe Herps The Sun Foundation

Alfieris Foundation John Mullen Arlene Tansey

Jeanne-Claude Strong Judy Lee Dr Gary Holmes

Dr Anne Reekmann Susan Doenau Mary-Louise Williams Arthur Cunningham John Aveyard

John Rowe John C Jeremy AM

Appendix 7 - Corporate Members Bayer Australia Ltd Christine Cheung Epson Australia Pty Ltd Ingham Institute Maritime Mining & Power Credit Union

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 151

Musée Du Quai Branly Mediatheque Port Authority of NSW Regimental Trust Fund, Victoria Barracks

Appendix 8 - Recognising individuals of distinction The museum’s honours system recognises individuals who have made a significant contribution to the museum and to Australian maritime heritage and culture generally. The five levels of recognition are:

Honorary Fellowship - the highest honour conferred by the Council awarded to people who have made an exceptional contribution to the museum and whose status and ongoing association will serve to promote the museum and its activities

Ambassador - awarded by Council to people who have donated $100,000 or more to the Australian National Maritime Museum Foundation. Ambassadors are also members of the Foundation.

Honorary Life Membership - awarded by Council to people who have made a significant and enduring contribution to the museum

Honorary Research Associate - awarded by the Director in recognition of their distinguished service to former museum staff who wish to continue to contribute through research or other activities

Members of the ANMM Foundation - invited by Council to attend Foundation meetings and help meet its objectives.

This year four new Honorary Life Members were appointed by the Council - David Blackley, Christopher Harry, Ron Miller and Hon Margaret White AO.

A full list of Honorary Fellowship holders, Ambassadors, Honorary Life Members and Honorary Research Associates follows.

Honorary Fellowships

Mr John Mullen Mr Peter Dexter AM FAICD

Ambassadors

Christine Sadler David and Jennie Sutherland

Honorary Research Associates

Lindsey Shaw, former ANMM curator (appointed 2014) Jeffrey Mellefont, former ANMM Signals editor (appointed 2014)

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 152

Paul Hundley, former ANMM curator (appointed 2015) RADM Peter Briggs AO CSC (appointed 2015) Ian MacLeod (appointed 2016) Dr Nigel Erskine (appointed 2019)

Honorary Life Members

Member Date conferred

Yvonne Abadee 22/7/16

Kathy Abbass 22/6/18

Robert Albert AO RFD RD 6/1/92

Bob Allan 1/6/14

Alwyn Murray 17/10/18

Vivian Balmer 6/11/16

Tim Barrett AO CSC RAN 5/11/16

Maria Bentley 6/1/92

Mark Bethwaite AM 18/10/16

Paul Binsted 18/10/16

David Blackley 22/4/20

Marcus Blackmore AM 18/10/16

John Blanchfield 6/11/16

Alexander Books 15/9/16

Ian Bowie 11/8/95

Ron Brown OAM 5/11/16

Paul Bruce 10/2/92

Anthony Buckley 15/4/93

Richard Bunting 1/10/15

Richard Burgess 24/2/92

Kevin Byrne 4/1/92

Sue Calwell 10/12/92

David Campbell AM 5/9/97

Marion Carter 29/11/16

Victor Chiang 1/1/16

Robert Clifford 5/11/16

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 153

Helen Clift 5/2/18

Peter Collins AM QC 6/11/16

John Coombs 22/11/16

Kay Cottee AO 2/12/91

Helen Coulson OAM 5/9/97

Russell Crane AO CSM 5/11/16

John Cunneen 21/10/92

Laurie Dilks 18/2/94

Anthony Duignan 17/1/92

Leonard Ely 23/6/95

Nigel Erskine 6/3/19

John Farrell 5/11/16

Kevin Fewster AM 3/12/91

Bernard Flack 9/12/91

Daina Fletcher 6/11/16

Sally Fletcher 29/11/16

Derek Freeman 1/10/16

Geoff Geraghty CDR AM 5/11/16

Anthony Gibbs 5/9/16

Stephen Gilmore AM CSC 5/1/16

Paul Gorrick 22/3/94

Lee Graham 29/11/16

Macklan Gridley 6/1/92

James Hardy KBE OBE 5/9/97

Simon Harrington 24/3/92

Christopher Harry 28/12/19

Gaye Hart AM 15/11/16

Peter Harvie 5/11/16

Janita Hercus 20/9/93

Philip Hercus 20/9/93

Robyn Holt 5/11/16

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 154

William Hopkins OAM JP 22/9/92

Julia Horne PhD 5/11/16

Tony Hunt 16/6/95

Marilyn Jenner 11/2/92

John Jeremy AM 22/12/91

Peter Jones AO DSC 5/11/16

Michael Kailis 11/12/92

Tricia Kavanagh 14/10/92

John Keelty 21/12/92

Helen Kenny 16/9/15

Kristine Klugman OAM 10/12/92

Jean Lane 6/12/91

Judy Lee 21/1/92

David Leigh 5/7/16

Keith Leleu 6/1/92

Andrew Lishmund 7/4/95

James Litten 14/4/92

Hugo Llorens 11/8/16

Tim Lloyd 18/12/91

Ian David Mackinder 21/1/92

Casimiro Mattea 31/8/16

Stuart Mayer 4/10/18

Jack McBurney 6/11/16

Bruce McDonald AM 5/11/16

Lyn McHale 17/10/18

Ronald McJannett 12/12/19

Ron Miller 6/12/19

Arthur Moss 23/12/91

Patrick Moss 5/11/16

Rob Mundle OAM 6/11/16

Martin Nakata 5/11/16

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 155

David O’Connor 24/10/95

Gary Paquet 2/10/92

John Penrose AM 6/11/16

Neville Perry 17/5/94

Hon Justice Anthe Philippides 6/11/16

Peter Pigott AM 18/10/16

Len Price 5/2/18

Eda Ritchie AM 6/11/16

Peter Ross Sinclair 29/6/99

John Rothwell AO 6/11/16

Kay Saunders AM 5/9/97

Kevin Scarce AC CSC RAN (Rtd) 6/11/16

David Scott-Smith 23/12/91

Sergio Sergi 18/10/16

Mervyn Sheehan 7/1/92

Ann Sherry AO 6/11/16

Shane Simpson AM 6/11/16

Peter John Sinclair AM CSC 6/11/16

John Singleton AM 6/11/16

Brian Skingsley 10/10/16

Eva Skira 6/11/16

Bruce Stannard AM 26/11/93

JJ Stephens OAM 29/1/93

Michael Stevens 9/12/93

Neville Stevens AO 6/11/16

Frank Talbot AM 20/8/96

Mitchell Turner 26/10/94

Adam Watson 18/2/92

Jeanette Wheildon 6/11/16

Mary-Louise Williams 2/3/93

Nerolie Withnall 6/11/16

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 156

Cecilia Woolford 5/11/16

Hon Margaret White AO 22/4/20

Appendix 9 - Volunteers In this reporting period, more than 600 active volunteers committed 48,919 volunteer hours to the museum, mainly in:

● guiding visitors

● maintaining the museum’s fleet of vessels

● hosting in the Members’ Lounge

● assisting other museum departments

● speaking at various clubs and institutions.

Volunteer guides conducted 4,833 tours of museum vessels, the galleries and behind the scenes of the Wharf 7 building, for a total of 49,660 visitors.

The volunteer Speakers Group continued to grow in numbers of speakers, presentations and overall audience. This year they addressed 123 groups and a total audience of 6,321. Typically, they visit groups and societies such as Probus, Lions, Rotary, U3A, yacht clubs, seniors’ groups and historical societies. They spread the message of the work and role of the museum throughout the community and are increasingly successful in attracting these groups to visit the museum as paying customers via group tours or individually.

We would like to pay tribute to those volunteers who died during the year, including Colin Adam, George Bambagiotti, George Brown, John Corry, Ian Davidson, Philip Long, Maggie Muncaster,

Ray Spinks, Bill Starkey and Geoffrey Tonkin. We acknowledge their service and dedication to the museum and offer our condolences to their families.

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 157

Darling Harbour volunteers

Steve Adamantidis Nicole Dahlberg Janet Halliday John Lea Martin

Peebles

Victor Treleaven

Harold Adolphe

Tom Dalton Sue Hanckel Amy Lee Stuart

Pendlebury Madilina Tresca

Merinda Air Ivan Daly Michael

Hanson

Oliver Lennon Sandra Pericles Guy Tuplin

Hazel Allen Ewan Dare Janice

Harbison

Edmund Leong Gavril Peter Richard Twigg

John Allen Roger Dawson Debbie Hardy Julie Lewis Marie Pham Brooke Twyford

Graeme Andrews

Germaine De Castro Basto

Peter Hardy Gillian Lewis Noel Phelan John Tylor

Ellen Andrews Dina De Dios Richard Harper Lisa Li Neale Philip Ann Usher

Ian Anstee Natalia De

Francisco Vela Roger Harradence Wenting (Tina)

Liang

Andrew Phippen

David van Kool

Phillip Armstrong

Tamara De Silva Ron Harris Ivy (Yiwen) Liao Trevor

Pickering

Imeldo Ventura

Ryan Atkins Trevor Dean Jane Harris Jet (Guoyong)

Liu

John Pickhaver

Christie Verney

Mark Baker Richard deGrijs Anthony Harris Joseph Llaneta Jon Pioch Anthony Viviani

Peter Baldridge

Diego del Hoyo Chris Harry Terry Lloyd Pauline

Plowright

CNY Vols

Juliette Banerjee

Colin Delaney Dudley

Hartgrove

Doug Logan Roger Pottie Gerry

Wagemans

Ann Barlow Michael (Xin) Deng Karim Marc Hasanic Norman Lorens George Poularas

Christopher Wallbank

Geoff Barnes Jim Dennis Martin Hastings Margaret Love Geoff Pow Susanna Waller

Megan Barnes Eric Deshon Jim Hawkins Ernest Lui Judy Powell Raymond

Walsh

Lyndyl Beard Martin Dirs Breck Hayward Xin (Cynthia)

Ma

Ishwari Prasad

Michael Ward

Keith Beattie Dixie Dixon Theresa He John

MacDonald

Lily Price James Warrand

Peter Bennett Herman Djohan Issa He Matthew

Machuca

Len Price Liz Watts

Erina Leigh Bennett Roger Doenau Trish Heffernan Rex Malin Donna Priest Kimberly

Webber

Tony Bennett Margaret Dolling Derek Herbert Irini Malliaros Mark Pulley Ted Wei

Marisa Bishop Vincent Dorahy Wayne Herdman Roy Marchant Lily (Jing) Qian

Reuben Wesek

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 158

Claire Bissett Richard Doss Bob

Hetherington Stephen Martin Keith Radford Bill West

Steve Black Russell Down Kevin Hewitson Christian Martin Duncan Raith Brian West

John Black Richard Downer Logann Higgins Tony Martin Alessandra Ranalli Brian Wheatley

Marilyn Blackett

Peter Allan Driscoll Peter Higgs David Matley Ron Ray Jeannette

Wheildon

Alex Books Anthony Duignan Gregory Hill Hevi Mattini Leonard

Regan

David E Williams

John Booth Peter Dzubiel Neil Hird Oliver McBeath David Reid Graeme Wilson

Ian Boothroyd John Eades Jenny Ho Jack McBurney Tony Reid Tim Wilson

Martin Borri John Ebner Roger Hoare Rosemary

McCulloch

Alun Richards Bruce Wilson

Ron Bowrey Lindsey Edgar David Hoglund Mark McDonald James Rickards Bill Wilson

Kel Boyd Emily Edwards Uli Holmes Margaret

McDonald

Maddy Riley Robert Winkler

Colin Boyd Alex Edwards Justin

Holmwood

Lesley McFadzean

Rhonda Riley John Withers

John Braniff Doug Edwards Matthew

Honeybrook Frank McHale Cheryl Riley Karl-Heinz Wittge

Chris Bremner Derrick Ee Peter Hooker Lyn McHale Judith Roach Tony Wober

Don Brian Karen Eldridge Chris Hordern Raymond

McHannan

Jane Roberts Ian Wood

Sue Brian Noura Refaat El-Hajje Peter Housego Ron McJannett Jay Robertson Judith Woodroffe

Elizabeth Bridgman

John Emdin Frank Howarth Ken McKenzie Wal Robson John Worth

Bob Bright Ron Eslick Peter Huber John McKeown Gill Rogers David Wright

Ian Brissett Officer Exhibition Charles Hughes Colleen McLean John Rohde Anita Wright

Ric Broniman Hugh Farmer Don Humphrey Anthony McNaughton John Ronczka Kit Yee

Luka Brown Peter Farr Paul Hundley Peter Mellor Mervyn Rosen Nathan Zadro

John Brownhill John Favaloro Richard Hurley Barry Mews Barney Ross Ivy Zhang

Greg Buddle Diane Finlay Zhyan Hussein Tony Michaels Lorraine

Ruming

Peiyan Zhang

Barbara Burton

Bill Fleming Martin Husty Owen Michaels-

Hardy

James (Jim) Ruming Longfei Zhao

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 159

Orm Butler Pam Forbes Dahyana

Irarrazabal

John Minns Jan Russell Nina Zhao

Isis Cai Nastaran

Forouzesh

David Ireland Maureen Mitchell Stephen L Ryan

Eunice Zhao

Nadia Campbell

Noelene Forrest Greg Jackson Deborah Mitchell Terry Ryan

Graeme Campbell

Neill Francis Burkhard

Jahnicke

Joseph Monk Jill Saffron

MaryAlice Campbell

Peter French Derek James Myles Mooney Mark Salmon

Ray Carden Greg Frewer Jim Jeans Danny Moore Joy Salvetti

Brian Carney Randolf Fricke Ian Jenkins Tessie Mooring Dana Sattler

Marion Carter Bronwyn Fritz Jan Jensen John Morony Rick Scarr

Mohamed Chami

Rebecca Fung Heather Johnston Tony Mosman John Schattiger

Mary Champion

Sandra Funnell John Jones David John

Moss

Stephen Schmidt

Hoifung Chan Les Gade Terry Jones Oliver Moss Peter Scutts

Peter Chan Terry Gaffney Dennis Joseph Jill Mueller Ken Sherwell

Anthony Chandler

Paul Gale Chandra Jothy David Mueller John

Shirvington

Lindsay Charman

Paul Gardiner Gabriella Kaldy Ross Muller David

Simpson

Geoffrey Chisholm

John Gardiner Jenny Kang Peter Murphy Gillian

Simpson

Bob Clampett Allan Garrick Christine Kelly Alwyn Murray Merideth

Sindel

Christopher Clark Roz Gatwood John Kelly Hugh Murray Roslyn Slade

Bob Claxton Rebecca Georgiades Keith Kennedy Sulekha Nahar Ross Smith

Helen Clift Elizabeth Gewandt Richard Keyes Michael Napier Kevin Smith

Fairlie Clifton John Gibbins Bruce

Kingsford

Gavin Napier Ross Spirou

Graham Close Tony Gibbs Lewis Klipin Doug Neall Bill Starkey

Bryan Coates Col Gibson Kay Knight Janos Nemeth Barbara Stein

Georgina Collado

Bruce Gill Alfred Knight Barry Nesbitt Heather

Stevens

Lauren Collins Szczepan Glewicz Tanya Kwee Chiu Ng Ian Stevens

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 160

Stephen Comer

Pauline Goddard Andre Lagadec John Nobel Colleen Suter

Michael Connor

Steven Goh John Laing Paul Nolan Ruby

Sutherland

Mike Connors Warren Gold Allan Lambert Georgina Nolan Eric Tan

Guy Cooper Robert Goode Alanah Lamont Iffat Nonee Kristen Joy

Taylor

John Cornish Tony Goode Terry Lancaster David Norvill David Taylor

Katherine Cousins

Kade Gordon William Langert Werner Obernier Janice Taylor

Ken Cox Eddie Gordon Brett Langlands Barry O’Regan Max Thomas

David Crawford

Margaret Grimes Jan Larsen David

O’Sullivan

Ken Thomas

Gavin Crawford

Douglas Grinter Judith Laurence John Oxley Eric Tilt

Leon Cremer Dirk Gruene Penny Laver Shally Pais Greg Timms

Peter Cribb Bob Guest Jon Lawrence John

Papenhuyzen Esther Toland

Darryl Cross Bill Gunnee Terri Lawrence John Pascall Carrie Towers

Pat Cullen Chris Guy Owen Laws Jenny Patel Hugh Tranter

David Cunningham Alexandra Hackforth

Graham Lawson

Arthur Pearce Casandra Traucki

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 161

National volunteers

Colin Aburrow

Alex Campbell

Kay England

Matthew Hochman Norma Lodge Richard Pearce

Howard Simcoe

Con Vervaart

Robert Adamson

Ernest Carey

Jenifer English

Tess Hocking

Niklas Lohse Bruce Pearson Merv Simmons

John Villanti

Casper Adson

Bernard Carr

Terry Evans

Christine Hodgson Kathleen Loncar

Danielle Pender

Peter Simon Nicola Vragalis

Fay Agee Danielle

Carroll

Grant Eyre Barbara Hogbin Graham Long Frank Penistan

Campbell Sinclair

Richard Waddy

Jung Hyoun Ahn David Carter Colin Fabish

Ruth Holberton Russell Luckock

Meg Penningto n

Carmel Sinnott

Dennis Wagstaff

Bill Alford Tony

Caruana

Loretta Fanning

Tony Holbrook Juliet Ludbrook

Scott Perry

Dianne Skaines

Elizabeth Walker

Gloria Allen Susan Caslake Erica Farag

Gilbert Hollamby Maureen Lum Barry Peters

Donald Skerman

Ron Wall

Terry Allen Connie Cecys Kira Fareso

Gerald Holmes

Lai-Shy Lye Louise Phelps Louise Slattery

Phil Wallbank

Lisa Allen Barry

Chambers Erin Farley John Honeywill Pey-Shy Lye Neale

Philip

Peter Slattery

Robert Walsh

Bryan Amarant

Mary Champion Kerrie Farnswort

h

James Hood

David Mackay Bruce Phillips Rachel Slatyer

Joy Walterfang

Sarah Amesz

Yuen Yi Chan

Bernadett e Farrell Edmund Hore

Damian Macrae

Peter Phillips

Tracy Sleeman

Donna-Maree Ware

Ricardo Anasco

Lucille Chapuis

Debra Fasano

Jill Horton Rex Malin Mirabai

Phillips

Anthony Sly Rik Watson

Andrew Anastasios Peter Charlton

Douglas Faunt

Graham Houghton David Malton Julie Pinel Peter Small Dennis Watt

Murray Anderson

Wei-Lin Chen

Julie Fedele

Julia Houghton Hailey Mannell John Pinel Robert Smallman

Ian Watts

Colin Andrews

Rodney Chiapello

Russell Fielden

Diana Howard

Tony Manning Ernest Pitts Alan Smith John Watts

Kari Arason Lauren Churchill Peter Filmer

Dave Hume

Barry Marks Hugh Pitty Christopher Smith Georgia Watts

Csilla Ariese Derek Churchill Jennifer Filmer

Graham Humphrey s

Ric Marley Louise

Plug

Roger Smith Shirley Way

Melissa Armstrong Raymond Clarke

Fiona Finke

Ching-Ho Hung Darka Marotte Mark Polzer

Robert Smith

Vincent Weafer

Phillip Armstrong Suzanne Clayton-

Pearson

Don Firth Ricky Hung Robyn Marsden

Peter Pomi

Serenity Smith

Lawrie Webb

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 162

Michael Armytage

Tony Clegg Matthew Fitzgibbon Rick Hunt Katrina Matuszkiewicz

Jessie Poon

Laura Smith Claire Webber

Patricia Arnold

Michael Clementson Jennifer Fitzpatrick

James Hunter

Debbie McBride

Andrew Porteous Graham Smith

Geoffrey Weeks

Uschi Artym Eric Coates Yvonne Flanagan Feng Huo Peter McCabe Bill Porter Valda Smith OAM

Susan Westwood

Peter Ashburn

Christine Cockayne

Liam Flanagan Stanley Hutchings

Terence McCall

Bob Potter Susan Sneddon David Westwood

Jason Atkins Ross Cockle Lloyd Fletcher Bill Hutchison

Bill McCarthy Bill Potts Jillian Snell Harry

Wetherall

Andrew Attack

Lyndon Cole Jim Forbes Jacqueline Hyde

David McCuaig

Larraine Potts

Martin Snook

Jodie Whan

David Austin Barrie Cole Robert Fortier David I’Anson

David McEwan

Ian Powell Bill Snooks Jodie Whan

John Aveyard

Margaret Coleman

Elizabeth Frank Peter Illidge

Julie McGilvray

Lauren Powell

Xiaohan Song

David Wharington

Dr Marie-Louise Ayres

Kevin Colless

Thomas Fraser

Tammy Irvine

Kay McGowan Jim Poynter Colin South Victoria Whitcomb

Sally Bailey Ali Collier Ann

Fraser

Richard Jackson

Kevin McIntosh

Rick Price Christopher Speight Judith White

Joanna Bailey

Ian Collinson

Richard Freeman Reg Jackson

Bernie McIntosh

Lily Price John

Spooner

Bob White

Claire Baillie Michael Collyer Rupert French

Judith Jackson

Meg McKavanagh Roy Priest Edwin Spriggins

Bari Whitehouse

Leslie Baker Joshua Connelly Christine Fudge

Pamela Jacobs

Isabelle McKenna

Lea Priestley

George Springhall Monissa Whiteley

Jonno Ballard

John Connors

Paul Fuller Brian Jacobsen John McKernan

Reg Pugh Kathryn Spry Michael Whiting

Richard Balsillie

Barry Cook Jason Gale Sari Jacobsen

Jono McLaren Sandra Pugh Adrian Stagg

Stuart Whiting

Ross Bannister

Robert Cooke

Sally Gallacher Ross James

Marilyn McLean

Edward Purcell

Chris Stain Tallulah Whiting

Greg Barber John Coombs Marie Galloway

David James

Michael McLean

Sally Rackham Robert Stanley

Jeffrey Whittington

Howard Barker

Harlan Cooper

Helen Gane

Emily Jateff

Ian McMaster Kevin Radcliffe Kate Starr Eric Whyatt

Peter Barker Cynthia Cordingley George Gardiner

Jalal Jazayeri

Lynne McNaughton Greg Raffin

Sheryl Stead William Wiadrowski

David Barnes

Eveline Cornell-Trapp

Allan Garrick

Zack Jenkin

Irene Meager Ron Ray Kay Stehn Graeme

Wiencke

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 163

Rodney Barnett

Andrew Cornell-Trapp

Ross Gates

Carla Jenkins

Keith Mellis Heather Redman Mark Stephenson

Vivienne Wigg

Kym Barrett Laura Coulton John Gaul Bob Jenkins

Steve Merson Trevor Reeve Peter Sterling

Tabetha Wilkes

Roger Bartlett

Sophie Couzos

Denis George

Jan Jensen

Tony Metcalf Carolyn Reeve Jeanne-Marie

Stevens

Alastair Will

Warwick Barton

Jinene Coyle

Patrick Gibbons

Norman Johnson

Evelyn Michell Catherine Reeves Gordon Stokes

Rhianna Williams

Helen Bate Robert Craven Tony Gibbs

Ken Johnson

Terry Michell Martin Regis Jon Strachan

Patrice Williams

Peter Bate Alyson Crawford Anne Gibson

Philip Johnson

Michael Michie Helen Reis Muriel Strahm

John Williams

Ebony Battersby

Mary Crawford

Ray Gibson

Roz Johnston Amanda Midlam

Dr John Renney

Brian Stronach

Geoff Williams

Tom Baurley Peter Cribb Debbie Gibson Kingsley Joliffe

Naomi Miles Adrian Rhodes Russell Stuckey

Alan Williams

Nigel Beeke Brian Crisp Lynette Giddings Christine Jones

John Mill Christophe

r Rice

Brayden Stum

Philippa Williams

Pam Beinssen

Dennis Croft Sarah Gilbert Katrina Jones

Donald Millar Alana Richardso n

Jo Sullivan Wendy Williams

Margaret Bell

Sandy Crone

Peter Giles

Kylie Jones

Bruce Millinger Brian Richardso n

Mike Sumerling Elizabeth Williams

Simon Bell David Cropley Gordon Gill

Elizabeth Jones Austin Mills Mathew Richmond

Patricia Sutcliffe

Fred Williams

Lawrence Benbow

Robert Crouch

John Gill Daniel

Jones

Jason Milton David Rickard Shane Sutton

Rex Williams

Keira Bennett

Laura Cunningham Mark Gillow

Alvina Judkins

Andrew Mirtschin

Maria Riedl

Anthea Swann

Dennis Williams

Peter Bennett

Barrie Dallas Erin Giulieri Robert Kaberry

Don Mitchell Jillian Riethmulle r

Barbara Sweet

Raymond Willing

Geoff Bennett

Aaron Darrell

Brian Glover

Marian Kay

Peter Moffat Peter Rigby Stephanie Syme

Odette Willows

Anne-Marie Bensley Graeme Davey

Stan Glowacki Janet Keese

Arene Moir Patrick

Riley

Robert Symington Ian Wilson

David Bentley

Craig Davey Lindsay Godson Jack Keir Thomas Moorhead

Kingsley Riley

Wendy Takos

Robert Wilson

Ronald Bergman

Diane Davis Peter Gonder Des Kelly John Morony Wayne Rizzi

Ian Tarry Kelvin

Wilson

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 164

Danielle Berry

Bianca Davis

John Gorton

Pamela Kelly

Florian Morris Emma Roberts Christine Taylor

David Wilson

Barend Bester

Roger Dawson

Jonathon Goss Perryn Kember

Rick Morris Keith

Roberts

Fran Taylor John Winchester

Fiona Betts Annaliese Deitch Joe Gough

David Kemp

David Moss Richard Rogers Caron Taylor

Dorothy Winchester

Chris Bingham

Sue Delaney Sandra Graham Bryan Kendrick

Robyn Mounster

Vivian Rogers

Frank Taylor David Winter

Amelia Birnie

Jenny Demkin

Geoffrey Grant

Keith Kennedy Margaret Muir David Rollins

Diane Taylor David Winterforde-Young

Gayle Black Janet Dennant Tania Grasbon

Bill Kennedy Ian Munday Yara Rood David Taylor Emilia Wisniewski

Janet Blacklock

Patricia Dennis

Rhys Gray Peter Kenny Lila Murgatroyd

Colin Rose

Zheng-Yi Teoh

Jaimy Wisse

Paul Blackman

Emi Dews Denise Green Phyl Kerridge

John Murphy Sandra Rose John Thiele Bruce Wood

Raymond Blackshaw Graham Dimmitt

Emma Grieve

Peter Kervin

Kelly Needham

Kathleen Rousseau x

Greg Thomas

Reg Wood

Jill Blaikie Frank Dingle Christophe r Griffin Hazel Kewin

Jeff Nemec David

Rout

Peter Thomas

Graham Woodall

Sally-Ann Blakers

Sarah Dix Helen

Griffin

Anthony Kimber

Karen Nemec Stephen Rowse John Thomas

Jack Woods

Ron Blanchard Mo Dobbie Jennifer Groch

Graham Kirby

Selah Newall Stefan Rucinski Chris Thomas

Alison Worrell

Michael Bloomfield Michael Dockerty

Stephen Groch

Ron Kirby Robert Newbury Daphne Rudd

Peter Thompson Mike Wraith

Jennie-Maree Bock Ruth Dodd Douglas Haack

Colin Kline Dr Jonathan Newbury Jan Russell

Alan Thompson Lew Wray

Jane Boland Colleen Donovan David Habersho

n

John Klopp

Yoke-Leng Ng Tony Ruth Jeff Thompson Betty Wright

Alan Bold Michael

Dowd

Rebecca Hackett Terrance Knowles

Adrian Nicoll Trish Ryan Katherine Thomson Madeline Wright

Noel Bond William Dowd Tony Hacking

Ruth Knowles

Karen Nicoll Warren Sahr Wendy Thornton

Gai Wright

Mark Booth Glenn Dowey Martin Hales

Roger Knowles

Malcolm Nicolson

Mark Salmon

Gail Thornton

Marilyn Anne Wright

Linda Bootherston e

Peter Downes

Cathy Hall Horst Koerner Christine Nimmo

Richard Salom

Christopher Thorpe Mark Wyborn

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 165

Karl Borth Brian Dowse Susan Halliwell Adrian Koolhof

Louisa Norman

Colin Samuels Lyndon Thurlow

Greg Youdale

Rex Brady James Doyle Doug Hamilton

Christophe r Korvin Paul Nutt John

Sanders

Cindy Tilbrook

Maggie Youett

Cate Brand Leah Drummond Ian Hamilton

Adrian Kraft

John O’Brien Kenneth Sanderson Karen Tiller Anne Young

Ken Brice Brett Duck Rhona

Hamilton Kerry Kyle-Little Shane O’Brien Catherine

Sandland Cheryl Timbury

Antonia Zavone

Stephanie Briggs John Dugard Iain Hamilton

Kerry Lamb

Shenae O’Brien

Charles Sapsford Howard Timbury

Sonia Zhu

Garth Briggs Linda Dumbleton Joanne Hammond

Trudy Lamberton Barry O’Driscoll

Irene Schaffer

Michael Todd

Peter Brilliant

Joshua Dunn

Elizabeth Hanna Dorothy Lane

Veronica O’Keefe

Jodie Schipper Joel Torison

Tegan Brinkman

Tony Duvollet

Peter Harding

David Lanyon

Oladipupo Olubowale

Shirley Schlesing er

Corine Toune

Josh Brockbank Jane Dykstra

Tim Harley Joan Latham Bryce Onions Norman Scholes

Gary Towart

Ric Broniman

Purdey Eades

Nancy Harrison

Gerald Latham

Wayne Onions Dennis Schram Marian Trafalski

Robert Broughton Lynda Earney

Dr. Cameron Hartnell

Kathleen Le Fevre Denis O’Reilly Peter Scrine

Charles Trafford

Sholto Brown

Mike Earnshaw

Peter Harvey

Hannah Lee

Danielle Ostarek-Gammon

Debbie Seabrook Peter Tredgett

Susan Brown

John Easton Caroline Hayden Connor Leech

Dennis O’Sullivan

Wendy Sekuloff

Madalina Tresca

John Buckland

David Edward

Ron Hayward Alison Lepp

Janet Pagan Sophie Sexton Shane Trimby

Judith Bull Caitlin Edwards Norman Heath

Alan Lepp Dianne Page Susan Seymor Allan Trotter

Greg Bullen Adrian Edwards Claire Heath

Melinda Lewis

Michael Paget Christophe r Sharp Zoi Tsa Tsembelis

Mandie Burgess

Kit Edwards Anista Hely Martin Lewis

Debra Paini Dr Peter Sharp Lyn Tucker

Rob Burgess

Alex Edwards

Travis Hendrix

Sarah Liddiard

Doug Palmer Kevin Shaw Nazim Tuncay

Dominique Burgett-Leonard

James Egan Margaret Henry Robyn Liddle

Nina Park Glen

Shaw

John Turnwald

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 166

Brian Burn Barbra Eipper Bob Hetheringt

on

David Liddle

Doug Parker David Shea David Twitchen

Mark Burton Jane Elek Paul

Heyward John Livesley

Craig Parker Jill

Shearman Eddie Utberg

Roy Butterfield Owen Ellem Dennis Hilder

Robin Loblinks

Ray Parks Ken

Sheehan George Vajda

John Buxton-Rella Bill Ellemor Ryan Hiley Geoffrey Lock

Suzanne-Jo Patterson Robin Shepperso

n

John van de Lustgraaf

Terry Cain John Elliott Tony

Hillier

Carmen Lockerbie Tony Peace Michael Sheridan

Stephanie van den Hoek

John Campbell

Stewart Elston

Adrian Hinds

Jill Lockerbie Alan Pead Narelle

Sheridan Bob Vellacott

Colin Campbell

Phil Elvery Nicole Ho Kathryn Lockier Ian Pearce Michael

Shreeve

Plony Verkerk

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 167

Appendix 10 - Key management personnel and remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning,

directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly. The museum has determined the key management personnel to be the museum’s Councillors, the Director and

CEO, and all members of the museum’s Executive.

The following table identifies the key management personnel during the reporting period:

Name Position title Short-term benefits Post-

employm ent benefits

Other long-term benefits

Terminati on benefits

Total remuneratio n

Base salary

Bonuses Other benefits & allowanc es

Superann uation contributi ons

Long service leave

Other long-term benefits

MULLEN, John Patrick Chairman / Councillor 40,798 - - 6,283 - - - 47,081

BLACKLEY, David Neale Councillor 18,115 - - 2,789 - - - 20,904

CAMPBELL, Ian Gordon Councillor 22,141 - - 3,409 - - - 25,550

COUTTS, Stephen, William Councillor 1,398 - - 215 - - - 1,613

DEXTER, Peter Alan Chairman 6,950 - - 1,070 - - - 8,020

LONGLEY, John Francis Councillor 22,141 - - 3,409 - - - 25,550

PAGE, Alison Joy Councillor 22,141 - - 3,409 - - - 25,550

TANSEY, Arlene May Councillor 22,141 - - 3,409 - - - 25,550

WATT, Ian James Councillor 22,141 - - 1,701 - - - 23,842

WHITE, Margaret Jean Councillor 22,141 - - 3,409 - - - 25,550

SUMPTION, Kevin Stuart Director/CEO 273,833 38,471 - 32,727 10,151 - - 355,182

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 168

BUSH, Tanya Maree Deputy Director, Corporate Services/CF O

196,446 10,000 25,831 31,606 5,717 269,600

HABIB, Zena Head of

People and Culture

158,440 15,000 24,058 24,001 3,384 - - 224,882

HARVEY, Michael Assistant

Director, Public Engagement & Research

171,177 10,000 25,832 28,369 6,512 - - 241,889

MCCARTHY, Paul Joseph

Executive Manager, Governance & Corporate Strategy

143,341 10,000 25,841 23,615 5,576 - - 208,373

MOIR, Malcolm Robert Head of Foundation & Development

135,159 8,750 22,471 18,914 3,080 - - 188,373

ROUT, Peter Gavin Assistant

Director, Operations

151,659 - 2,558 25,003 6,710 - 127,265 313,195

Total 1,430,161 92,221 126,590 213,338 41,129 - 127,265 2,030,704

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 169

Appendix 11 - Glossary of acronyms AIATSIS Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies AMMC Australian Maritime Museu`ms Council ANIC Australian National Imams Council

ANMM Australian National Maritime Museum APSC Australian Public Service Commission ARHV Australian Register of Historic Vessels AWBF Australian Wooden Boat Festival BMCS Building Management Control System CDAB Collection Development Acquisition Budget CRM Customer Relationship Management CSC Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation CWBF Classic & Wooden Boat Festival

ESD Ecologically Sustainable Development FCP Fraud control plan FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

FRA Fraud risk assessment GHG Greenhouse gas HSR Health and Safety Representative HVAC Heating, ventilation and air conditioning IPS Information Publication Scheme LMS Learning Management System

MAGNT Museum and Gallery of the Northern Territory MMAPSS Maritime Museums of Australia Project Support Scheme MMC Maritime Museums Council MOU Memorandum of Understanding NAIDOC National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee NRW National Reconciliation Week PCOL Protection of Cultural Objects on Loan PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PSMF Public Service Modernisation Fund RAN Royal Australian Navy RAP Reconciliation Action Plan RIMAP Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project RWG RAP (Reconciliation Action Plan) Working Group SAMP Strategic Asset Management Plan TMAG Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery TMS The Museum System (the museum’s collection management system) VMP Vessel Management Plan

WAPIP75 ‘War and Peace in the Pacific 75’ Commemorative Program WHS Work Health and Safety

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 170

Appendix 12 - List of requirements Note: NA = not applicable

PGPA Rule Reference

Page of Report

Description

17BE Contents of annual report

17BE(a) 55 Details of the legislation establishing the body

17BE(b)(i) 53-54 A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in

legislation

17BE(b)(ii) 7, 13-14 The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan for the reporting period

17BE(c) 54 The names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or

responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers

17BE(d) 65 (NA) Directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument

during the reporting period

17BE(e) 65 (NA) Any government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during

the reporting period under section 22 of the Act

17BE(f)

65 (NA)

65 (NA)

Particulars of non-compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act

17BE(g) 13-43 Annual performance statements in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b)

of the Act and section 16F of the rule

17BE(h), 17BE(i) 65 (NA) A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance

17BE(j) 56-64 Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the

accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period

17BE(k) 72 Outline of the organisational structure of the entity (including any

subsidiaries of the entity)

17BE(ka)

67

67

70

67

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees;

(b) statistics on part-time employees;

(c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 171

17BE(l) 14 Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or

facilities of the entity

17BE(m) 52, 65-66 Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period

17BE(n), 17BE(o) 66 (NA) For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value of the transactions

17BE(p) 3-4, 9-11, 14, 19,

20, 25

Any significant activities and changes that affected the operation or structure of the entity during the reporting period [such as COVID-19]

17BE(q) 65 (NA) Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals

that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity

17BE(r)

65 (NA)

Particulars of any reports on the entity given by:

(a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

17BE(s) NA An explanation of information not obtained from a subsidiary of the entity

and the effect of not having the information on the annual report

17BE(t) 65 (NA) Details of any indemnity that applied during the reporting period to the

accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs)

17BE(taa) https://www.sea.m

useum/about/abo ut-the-museum/our-people/museum-council

56-60

56-60

63-64

167-168

The following information about the audit committee for the entity:

(a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee;

(b) the name of each member of the audit committee;

(c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the audit committee;

(d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee;

(e) the remuneration of each member of the audit committee

17BE(ta) 167-168 Information about executive remuneration

Annual Report 2019-20 Appendixes 172