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Australian Sports Commission—Report for 2018-19


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Acknowledgement of Country

The Australian Sports Commission acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands on which it stands and pays its respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

The ASC also recognises the outstanding contribution that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make to sport in Australia and celebrates the power of sport to promote reconciliation and reduce inequality. Senator the Hon. Richard Colbeck

Minister for Youth and Sport Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister,

On behalf of the Board of the Australian Sports Commission, I am pleased to submit our 35th Annual Report, for the financial year ended 30 June 2019. This report has been prepared in accordance with Government legislative requirements including section 48 of the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989, sections 38, 39, 42 and 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014.

The Australian Sports Commission is established in accordance with the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989. The Commissioners of the Board are responsible, as the accountable authority under section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, for the preparation and content of the annual report, including both financial and performance reporting. This report provides a comprehensive review of the Australian Sports Commission’s performance in relation to the accountability framework agreed with the Australian Government and highlights the success of its programs.

This report has been endorsed for presentation to you at the meeting of the Australian Sports Commission Board on 29 August 2019. I hereby submit this report to you as a true and accurate record of our compliance and achievements.

Yours sincerely

John Wylie am Chair Australian Sports Commission

2 October 2019

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The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government agency that develops, supports and invests in sport at all levels. It was established in 1985 and operates under the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989. The Australian Sports Commission forms part of the Health portfolio.

This report

This report has been prepared in accordance with parliamentary reporting and legislative requirements and provides details of the ASC’s performance and operations for the financial year ending 30 June 2019. The report details how effective the ASC has been at achieving its outcomes for the year as outlined in the ASC 2018-2022 Corporate Plan and the 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Ownership of intellectual property rights in this publication

Unless otherwise noted, copyright (and any other intellectual property rights, if any) in this publication is owned by the ASC.

Creative Commons licence

With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and photographic images, this publication is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence is a standard form license agreement that allows you to copy, distribute, transmit and adapt this publication provided that you attribute the work.

A summary of the licence terms is available from http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/3.0/au/deed.en.

The full licence terms are available from http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode.

The ASC’s preference is that you attribute this publication (and any material sourced from it) using the following wording — Source: Licensed from the Australian Sports Commission under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence.

Produced by the ASC’s Communications and Governance teams.

For general enquiries:

Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Email: communications@ausport.gov.au Website: sportaus.gov.au

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AUSTRALIAN

SPORTS COMMISSION A SNAPSHOT

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Who we are The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government agency responsible for supporting and investing in sport and physical activity at all levels.

The ASC was established in 1985 and operates under the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 and is governed by a Board of Commissioners appointed by the Minister for Sport. The Board determines the ASC’s overall direction, decides on allocation of resources and policy for delegated decisions, and is accountable to the Minister for Sport.

The ASC unites two entities: Sport Australia — responsible for driving the broader sport sector including participation, physical activity and industry growth and the Australian Institute of Sport — leading our high performance sport system.

Our focus Our vision is for Australia to be the world’s most active sporting nation, known for its integrity, sporting success and world leading sports industry.

From grassroots right up to the pinnacle of elite international competition, we work together with the sport industry and the wider community to champion the role sport can play in engaging every Australian, regardless of age, race, gender, cultural background and physical ability.

The ASC is delivering three key outcomes:

GETTING MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVING MORE OFTEN

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

CREATING NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

ASC staff and program locations

Note: Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees as at 30 June 2019. FTE is drawn from payroll data and is a calculation of the number of employees receiving salary or paid leave at a single point in time. Part-time and casual employees are converted to a full-time equivalent based on the hours they work divided by a full-time 37.5 hour week. This figure differs to the Average Staffing Level (ASL), which is the sum of all the individual fortnightly FTE averaged over the financial year.

Offices in Brisbane and Perth were closed by 31 July 2019 and Adelaide office is scheduled to close by 31 December 2019.

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Italy

464 TOTAL

Melbourne / 28.9

Gold Coast / 1.0

Sydney / 10.0

Brisbane / 2.0

Canberra / 408.3

Varese / 6.0

Perth / 2.0

Adelaide / 5.8

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CONTENTS OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS 13

Chair’s report 14

Sport Australia Executive report 16

AIS Executive report 18

About us 20

The Australian sporting environment 22

Highlights 24

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS 35

Statement by the Commissioner 36

Our purpose 37

Our performance 38

Analysis 56

OUR ORGANISATION 59

About the ASC 60

Corporate partners 67

Our operations 68

Authority and directions 73

Board and committees 75

Governance 86

External scrutiny 89

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE 91

Summary of financial outcomes 92

Independent auditor’s report 94

Statement from the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer 96 Financial statements 97

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS FOUNDATION 125

APPENDIXES & REFERENCES 127

Appendix 1: High performance results 128

Appendix 2: ASC Award recipients 132

Appendix 3: Funding to sports 135

Appendix 4: Mandatory Data Tables 140

Appendix 5: Contact officers 152

Appendix 6: Summary of Compliance 153

Shortened forms 157

Index 158

OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

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CHAIR’S REPORT 14

SPORT AUSTRALIA EXECUTIVE REPORT 16

AIS EXECUTIVE REPORT 18

ABOUT US 20

Sport Australia 20

Australian Institute of Sport 21

THE AUSTRALIAN SPORTING ENVIRONMENT 22

HIGHLIGHTS 24

Sport Australia Highlights 24

AIS Highlights 27

Joint SportAUS/AIS Highlights 30

OVERVIEW & HIGHLIGHTS

John Wylie am

Chair

Chair’s report

Australia is a proud sporting country. Our sportsmen and women inspire and unite us like nothing else; we love to play, watch, barrack and argue over sport like no other nation on earth.

Sport Australia (SA) and the AIS are committed to building on this great sporting heritage and creating even better opportunities in sport and physical activity for future generations.

We’re starting by building stronger foundations, by strengthening awareness of physical literacy in schools, and increasing the opportunities for schoolkids to be active and exposed to new sports through the popular Sporting Schools program. It is an absolute priority that we help our children develop at an early age the basic movement skills and habits of activity that will benefit them throughout their lives.

We’re challenging sports to innovate and change, in order to succeed in the highly competitive modern sports marketplace. The business of sport, particularly in Olympic sports, is being challenged — just like almost any industry nowadays — by the forces of disruption, globalisation and ‘winner-takes-all’ economics, making the need for innovation and change ever more important. We believe that a willingness to reform and update traditional sports governance structures is a key element of this. To this end, we worked this year with a number of sports towards more nationally integrated management and governance structures which we believe will, in time, save them money, help deliver more sponsors, and improve their all-important digital capabilities — while keeping an energised and committed volunteer base and the vital and valued support of State Governments. Australian Sailing, under the great leadership of Matt Allen and Sarah Kenny, is proving this is possible.

We’ve posed the same challenge to ourselves, to do things differently and better. Consequently, we’ve continued to reduce costs in ASC operations, and reinvest the savings in sports. It’s a little-known fact that in the past seven years, the Average Staffing Level at the ASC has been reduced from 790 to 444 (a 44% reduction), while high performance grants to sports have increased from $106 million to $147 million. We’re proud of that.

We’ve sharpened our governance structure too, making both the SA and AIS teams now report directly to the SA Board. SA has been launched under its new brand focused on participation, physical activity and sports industry growth for the benefit of all Australians. This has enabled us to empower the AIS with greater autonomy to adapt quickly and succeed in the global elite sport environment.

We’ve continued to encourage sports to think laterally and diversify their revenue bases to reduce dependence on Government funding, which we believe will make them stronger movements in the long term. We’re proud of our leadership role in establishing the Australian Sports Foundation as a wholly separate organisation from the Australian Sports Commission [four] years ago. The ASF has flourished under its new structure and is doing an excellent job in helping sports raise more philanthropic support — one of the great underdeveloped opportunities in the Australian sporting landscape.

The AIS continues to innovate in its continuing search for even the tiniest competitive edge that can make the crucial difference for our athletes. It established this year a new cutting-edge sports technology and Artificial Intelligence capability under world-class leadership. A new Gold Medal Ready program has been established, in partnership with 33 of our greatest Olympic champions together with Australia’s Special Forces, to help our athletes perform at their best when it counts the most. An Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement team was also created, embedding 20 advisors in National Sporting Organisations and providing support for athletes in mental health, career guidance and connection with communities.

One of the AIS’s most important long-term roles is to enhance opportunities for talented young Australians to navigate the pathway from community sport to elite excellence. To this end, we were delighted this year by the commitment by the Commonwealth Government of significant new funding specifically for athlete pathways, the largest element of a $54 million funding boost announced in the financial year 2020 Budget. This will make an important long-term difference for many young Australians; it’s been an underinvested area for some time.

Helping the next generation is of course one of the most important roles of our State Institute partners, and we’ve been very pleased this year by a new spirit of partnership between the AIS and the State Academies and Institutes of Sport within the united and collaborative National Institute Network. The National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 signed this year is the first time that all Federal and State/Territory sports agencies have signed up to a joint and specific national high performance strategy.

We look forward to next year’s Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games with quiet optimism. We have amazing athletes who will do our country proud, and they’re being well supported.

Looking to the long term, we are committed to a renewal and modernisation of the main AIS campus site. The current site in Canberra has been a wonderful asset for Australian sport, but now nearly 40 years after being opened, it needs modernisation and renewal. Significant work took place on this project this year.

I thank the teams at Sport Australia and the AIS, led by CEOs Kate Palmer and Peter Conde respectively, for their passion and drive to improve Australian sport.

I thank outgoing Board members Deputy Chair Alisa Camplin, Kate Bates and Danni Roche for their outstanding contribution to the ASC and to Australian sport over many years. All will continue to serve and help Australian sport in years to come, I have no doubt. I’m also very pleased to welcome new Board members Amanda Laing, Kurt Fearnley, Pippa Downes, Andrew Ireland and Hugh Delahunty. All have an abiding love of Australian sport and a deep desire to contribute to its long term success.

John Wylie am Chair

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OVERVIEW AND HIGHLIGHTS

Kate Palmer am

Chief Executive Officer

Sport Australia

Executive report

A new brand and a well-defined mission has energised Sport Australia in 2018-19 and we are progressing with purpose to make Australia the world’s most active sporting nation.

In August 2018, the Sport Australia brand was unveiled in conjunction with the launch of the Australian Government’s first national sport plan — Sport 2030.

It has provided the Australian sport industry with a crucial long-term vision, and Sport Australia has been intent on achieving immediate results.

Our national Move It AUS campaign has raised awareness of the need to get more Australians moving more often, with a call to action to Find Your 30 minutes of physical activity every day.

This campaign has been complemented by a suite of new Move It AUS grants programs, working with national sporting organisations and broader physical activity providers, to drive participation in sport and physical activity.

The Community Sport Infrastructure grants program is delivering more than $100m to enhance more than 680 grassroots facilities across Australia. This is an investment in building stronger, healthier communities.

The $28.9m Participation grants program was launched to encourage organisations to deliver innovative programs that help break the down barriers to physical activity.

We want sport and physical activity to benefit Australians across every life stage, so the new $22.9m Better Ageing grants program is helping senior Australians 65 and older to get more active and socially connected.

Enhancing opportunities for Australian children to be more active is fundamental. Sporting Schools remains a flagship program and has now reached more than 7300 schools nationally with fun and free sporting opportunities. Sporting Schools continues to evolve and we are working closely with the education and health industries so that our leading work in Physical Literacy can encourage more active school environments.

An increase in funding to the Local Sporting Champions means we can now assist the sporting aspirations of more children than ever before. In the past 12 months, Local Sporting Champions grants have benefited more than 9000 children between the ages of 12-18 to attend state and national events.

Beyond our financial investment in sport, Sport Australia is building the capability of sport to create a robust and connected industry. In late 2018 we conducted a national series of roadshows, to not only present the work we are doing but listen to the needs of sport.

In addition to advising sport with governance reform, Sport Australia is supporting sports to transform and modernise their digital capability. This work will ensure a more connected Australian sports sector, while sport participants and members will be the benefactors.

Sport volunteers are the life blood of our industry and we acknowledge the difficulty for grassroots community clubs to raise funds. That is why Sport Australia has worked very hard with the Australian Sports Foundation and the 50-50 Foundation to launch the Play for Purpose charity raffle. It is an alternative funding source for sports and we intend to see it grow.

Safe and inclusive sporting environments are critical to the growth of our industry and we are reaching out for opportunities to engage with all Australians, highlighted by the launch of Guidelines for the inclusion of transgender and gender diverse people in sport.

Sport Australia was proud to partner with Paralympics Australia to launch a Para-Sport Equipment Fund, with an initial investment of $1m. The fund will be ongoing and enable more athletes with disabilities to have access to modified equipment such as wheelchairs and prosthetics.

Our AusPlay survey for 2018 showed a small increase in the overall number of Australians participating in sport and physical activity: 63.0 per cent participating in sport or physical activity at least three times per week compared to 59.9 per cent in 2016.

Thank you to all Australians for your passion for sport, for the supporters on the sidelines, and for everyone focused on finding their 30. We have accomplished much so far, but there is far more to do if we are to continue to get Australia moving and achieve our vision.

Kate Palmer Chief Executive Officer Sport Australia

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PETER CONDE

Chief Executive Officer

AIS

Executive report

The countdown to an Olympic and Paralympic year is always an exciting and challenging time to be working in high performance sport. Following a number of key strategic and operating improvements, the Australian Institute of Sport heads into 2019-20 with programs, systems and people mobilised and focussed on fulfilling our role to lead and enable the Australian high performance sector. While there is still much work to be done, we are focused on podium success at the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2020, and beyond.

Our Executive Team has undertaken significant work over the past 12 months, with evolved strategic priorities, an updated investment framework and a new operating model. These are all crucial to the whole system working towards the goal of building sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes.

In 2018-19 we continued to implement and refine the AIS structure to deliver better high performance outcomes, and in 2019-20, a new operating model provides us with the autonomy to have a single focus on high performance sport and better equip us to respond and lead in a dynamic high performance environment.

A Federal Government funding boost of $54.1m over two years announced in April’s budget is being directed to athlete pathways and wellbeing. We are committed to delivering multiple medallists over multiple cycles and in partnership with National Sporting Organisations and the National Institute Network, a focus on pathways will help us unearth and nurture the next Ian Thorpe, Sally Pearson or Liz Cambage.

It’s crucial that our high performance athletes embrace a holistic approach to their careers and lives and in this area, the AIS Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement initiatives continue with the rollout of a number of key programs. We have embedded 20 Athlete Wellbeing Managers in sports, on hand to provide guidance and support to athletes in areas ranging from mental health, to career guidance and community engagement. In March 2019 we launched the AIS Mental Health Referral Network — a group of specialist wellbeing practitioners who are just a phone call away to assist athletes and their support teams. We also partnered with Lifeline to establish the Community Custodians Program — twenty one athlete ambassadors working to create community awareness of mental health issues.

The pressure to perform at major competition is another major challenge for athletes and coaches and in this space we have partnered with Australian Army to introduce the Gold Medal Ready Program, a series of immersive programs and workshops with athletes preparing for Tokyo 2020. Working alongside Army Special Operations Training and the ‘Gold Medal Alumni’ — a group of gold medal-winning athletes and coaches — future Olympians are exposed to a wide range of experiences and knowledge from across the high performance realm, learning how to deal with mental and emotional challenges in unfamiliar surroundings.

We are making great strides towards a genuinely collaborative national high performance sport system. Our work with the National Institute Network (NIN) and key stakeholders has delivered the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024, tabled for release in late 2019, with an agreed set of KPIs to help us all to achieve future success. This is the first time all State and Territory Governments have agreed to a national plan and is a great step forward for Australian sport.

Like any period of change and evolution, there are still some tweaks to be made and creases to be ironed out, but I am confident with our passionate staff, refreshed goals and renewed sense of purpose we will continue to strive towards instilling pride and inspiration in all Australians through sport.

Peter Conde Chief Executive Officer AIS

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About us

Sport Australia

Our purpose

Sport Australia contributes to improving the health and wellbeing of Australians and making communities stronger through sport and physical activity.

How we operate

Sport Australia plays a central leadership role across the broader sport and physical activity sector, building collaboration, alignment and effectiveness. Sport Australia promotes and supports the development of a cohesive and effective national sport sector that creates opportunities for all Australians to participate and excel in sport.

The role of Sport Australia continues to evolve through taking a whole of sector view, understanding the systems in which we operate — both here and overseas, and by identifying the challenges and trends impacting the operation of the sport sector. We deliver our work in conjunction with our partners across the sport industry — sporting organisations, peak bodies, the Office for Sport and other Australian Government agencies, physical activity providers, as well as business and other sectors. We champion the value of sport, across Governments and the broader community.

Sport Australia invests in a wide range of national sporting organisations (NSOs) and national sporting organisations for people with a disability (NSODs) to empower the organisations to get Australians moving more often. The investments are targeted, through the use of data and assessments, to those organisations who are best placed to assist Sport Australia deliver on its purpose. In addition to providing funding, Sport Australia is focused on improving the capacity and capability of NSOs to create a sustainable and cohesive national sport sector.

Australian Institute of Sport

Our purpose

The purpose of the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) is to build sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes.

How we operate

In 2018-19, the AIS launched a new strategy, investment framework and operating model to ensure that it has a singular focus on high performance and can fulfil its role as a high performance system leader. The AIS works in partnership with the NIN, and NSOs as well as other key partners such as the Australian Olympic Committee, Australian Paralympic Committee and Commonwealth Games Australia. Decision making is collaborative, informed and transparent, and aimed at achieving strategic outcomes.

The AIS is responsible for high performance funding allocations, national programs, research and innovation, and along with the ACT Academy of Sport, for Canberra-based high performance services. The AIS drives and enables success in part through the strategic and transparent allocation of total integrated resources through collaborative, evidence and principles based investment in sports and athletes. This investment approach is designed to optimise sustainable performance outcomes.

The AIS leads the Australian high performance sport system, which has an agreed vision and success factors reflected in the national sport plan, Sport 2030 and in the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024.

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The Australian sporting environment

Perhaps it is the clean air, sunny days and open spaces or a way for different cultures to find common ground, but the idea of just getting out there and having a go has always brought out the best in Australians. We became known as a great sporting nation that punches above our weight. We are famous for producing some of the world’s best, our history is full of great sporting heroes and great sporting moments celebrated the world over.

But the environment in which we live is changing and will continue to change. The characteristics, habits and attitudes of our Australian society are evolving and so is the way in which Australians interact with sport. As a nation, we don’t get up, get out and get into nearly enough sport or physical activity. Data indicates that only 34.5 per cent of Australian adults aged 15 and above are meeting physical activity guidelines for their age group.1 For children, national data indicates only 19 per cent of Australian children and young people aged 5-17 years are meeting the recommended minimum one hour of physical activity a day.2

The Australian Government makes a significant contribution to Australian sport, and it is important that this investment reflects the value our society places on sport. Our participation in, and passion for, sport and physical activity creates significant benefits for Australia, driving a range of economic, health, educational and community benefits, as well as enhancing our international reputation.

Sport 2030, the Australian Government’s national sport plan, was released on 1 August 2018 by the Honourable Bridget McKenzie, the then Minister for Sport. The ASC’s revised strategy, launched in the Corporate Plan 2018-2022 published late August 2018, is aligned with the priorities outlined in Sport 2030 and reflects the ASC’s role in leading the implementation of Sport 2030 to create a more successful national sport sector.

In 2018-19, the ASC focused on positioning itself to deliver on its new strategy and the priorities outlined in Sport 2030. To reflect better our broadened role in sport and physical activity, the organisation launched a new operating brand in August 2018, Sport Australia, which represents sport participation, physical activity and sport industry development. This brand is about connecting with every Australian to inspire, educate and get them moving. Sport Australia is determined to help all Australians engage in sport and physical activity regardless of their age, background, or level of ability. For the first time, Sport Australia has engaged directly with the Australian public, through the Move It AUS campaign, a national physical awareness program which encourages all Australians to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active. Move It AUS recognises that how Australians interact with sport is changing and that preferences for greater flexibility and activities that fit their busy lifestyles are emerging.

1 Sport Australia (2019) Ausplay Data January 2018-December 2018, released on 30 April 2019.

2 Active Healthy Kids Australia (2016) Physical literacy: do our kids have all the tools? 2016 Report Card on physical activity for children and young people.

Just as the lifestyles of Australians are changing, so too is the sport industry. There is greater variety in the industry, and many levels of government and non-government support. The industry must transform to support sport and physical activity in the community more adequately, and to operate in an increasingly digital world.

Driving national behaviour change, to get more Australians moving more often, means that we must evolve too. To support both Sport Australia and the AIS to deliver on their objectives, a new operating model was introduced in January 2019, which enables Sport Australia to focus on participation, physical activity and sport industry growth for the benefit of all Australians and gives the AIS autonomy and independence for high performance outcomes.

High performance sport has evolved significantly in the four decades that have passed since the creation of the AIS. When it opened its doors the AIS was unique in its focus on high performance success and high performance training methods. As the AIS model delivered results for Australian athletes, it was replicated not only abroad, but by Australian states and territories and Australian sports. Every state and territory now has a separate institute or academy, professional sporting teams have their own high performance centres and programs to enable NSOs in becoming more capable. New technology has made access to high performance programs and the data and analytics that drives it easier than ever before. The AIS has therefore refocused its role on agile and efficient structures that enable athletes to access the latest information and innovation in high performance programs wherever and whenever they need it.

On the international stage, competition is continually intensifying and improving, and as we fast approach the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic games, we must optimise all of the resources available to maximise our outcomes. The AIS must continue to play a key leadership role in the high performance sports system, while promoting the ethics and integrity of which our nation can be proud.

Sport and physical activity contribute around $83 billion to the Australian economy every year and supports many other industries indirectly.3 Through greater participation in sport, we will create a greater pool of talent that will go on to have more success on the podium and produce our sporting legends of the future.

Sporting achievement is good for Australia.

Sport matters.

3 Boston Consulting Group (2017) Intergenerational Review of Australian Sport 2017.

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Highlights

Sport Australia Highlights

AusPlay State of Play

The AusPlay survey is Australia’s largest and most comprehensive sport and physical activity survey, funded and led by Sport Australia. For the first time, in April 2019, AusPlay revealed Australia’s top 20 sports and physical activities along with detailed ‘State of Play’ reports on each.

Recreational activities like walking, fitness/gym, swimming, running and cycling top the list, with football at number six being the most popular organised sport for Australian participants.

The first three years of AusPlay recorded an increase in the overall number of Australians participating in sport and physical activity: 63% of Australians interviewed in 2018 had participated in sport or physical activity at least three times per week compared to 59.9% in 2016.

AusPlay provides invaluable data to help inform governments at all levels, sporting organisations and physical activity providers. It assists the sport sector to understand the participation landscape more clearly and identify strategies to grow participation.

Governance Reform

Sport Australia leads governance reform through the One Management project, which involves supporting NSOs to transition to a whole of sport business model incorporating the three operating model streams of strategy, workforce and financial management.

The One Management project is being implemented with pilot sports: Cycling, Water Polo, Diving, Golf, Hockey, Netball, Paddle, Rowing, Surfing, Sailing, Ski & Snow, Swimming and Triathlon.

Nine of the selected pilot sports have approved an implementation plan for One Management reform.

Sport Australia’s Governance Principles were reviewed and updated through consultation with the sector.

Governance Education programs were conducted across four capital cities.

A strategic roadmap was co-designed with NSOs for people with disability to advance the sector and realise an agreed vision and mission.

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Move It AUS Campaign

The Move It AUS campaign was launched in August 2018 as Australia’s national physical activity awareness campaign to address declining levels of physical activity in our community. The call to action is to encourage all Australians to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active.

The campaign platform is supported by the Find Your 30 website which offers practical ideas on how all Australians can Find Your 30 — thirty minutes of heart rate raising exercise per day.

The second wave of the campaign that launched in February 2019 specifically targeted parents, and was planned to reach 95 per cent of the target audience, representing approximately 7.8 million Australians.

Beyond the platform delivered by Sport Australia, Move It AUS has been supported by NSOs and commercial partners to a media value of more than $1.4m in its first eight months.

During the in-market period from August 2018 to June 2019, campaign awareness was 34 per cent, above the industry benchmark of 28 per cent.

Research has found that those aware of the Move It AUS campaign were significantly more likely to achieve 150+ minutes of exercise in a normal week.

Since the launch of the campaign there have been over 1.5 million visits to the Sport Australia website; 236,000 views to the Find Your 30 website; 1.23 million internet searches for Move It AUS and Find Your 30 and had 24.6 million social media views.

AIS Highlights

High Performance Investment Framework

In late 2018 the AIS launched a new performance investment framework to provide longer term stability for NSOs and to enable agility and capacity to respond to shifting needs across the high performance landscape.

Funding for a majority of priority sports will be a combination of longer-term baseline funding that enables better planning and continuity, and contestable impact resourcing that provides the system a level of agility to seize new opportunities.

Using this approach, the majority of Olympic and Paralympic sports had their current funding levels guaranteed through to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics. Winter sports — Olympic and Paralympic — had full funding extended through to December 2020, and their baseline funding through to the 2022 Games in Beijing.

A contestable portion of funding was introduced to allow the AIS and NSOs to respond to and capitalise on new opportunities in performance.

The AIS also established a pool of strategic projects that will see investment into sports for targeted campaigns or provide project support ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics.

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Gold Medal Ready program

In late 2018 the AIS launched Gold Medal Ready in partnership with the Australian Army to assist Australian athletes deliver their best performance under pressure at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and beyond.

More than 150 athletes and coaches will participate in the program before the 2020 Olympics, with education, skill development, mentoring and specifically designed activities delivered in partnership with the Australian Army’s Special Operations Command.

A group of Olympic champions, known as the Gold Medal Alumni, is playing a crucial role in the program by sharing their experiences with athletes and coaches. The Gold Medal Alumni comprises athletes with a collective 80 Olympic Games appearances and 48 gold medals.

The program provides opportunities for Australia’s Olympic gold medallists to give back to the next generation of athletes, while building personal skills that will help them in their sport and post-sport careers.

Gold Medal Ready is delivered by the AIS Applied Technology and Innovation Team, and is aligned with our mission to lead and enable a united high performance system that supports Australian athletes and teams to achieve podium success.

Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement

The AIS continued its commitment to the high performance sector, developing system capability through mental health, conduct and professionalism, personal development, career and education and athlete engagement.

The AIS funded Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E) managers within 18 NSOs and has committed to extending this support to an additional seven NSOs. The national expansion of these services has enhanced direct support for athletes, and has also led to greater collaboration across Australia’s high performance sporting system.

The Mental Health Referral Network was launched in March 2019, providing funded for athletes to access AIS-endorsed psychologists and mental health practitioners across the country, with the program extending out to psychiatrists and neuropsychologists.

The AIS partnered with Lifeline to deliver the Lifeline Community Custodian program to help raise awareness of mental illness. Twenty-one elite athletes from a range of NSOs and the NIN are working as Custodians to help shine a spotlight on this important issue, share their own personal stories and get involved in community events supported by Lifeline around the country.

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Joint SportAUS/AIS Highlights

Women’s Talent Program

The Women’s Talent Program is a joint initiative of Sport Australia and the AIS, which is designed to address an under representation of women in high performance coaching and sport executive positions. These positions had been identified as requiring more depth and diversity in the Australian Sporting Sector.

The programs are funded in partnership with the Office for Women, and 17 coaches and 16 executives were selected from more than 250 applicants to participate in the inaugural programs. The programs have been intentionally designed to support women in identifying opportunities and removing barriers to transformation with a specific focus on 3 key areas; the participants’ sense of self, relationships with others and the sporting sector in which they operate.

At the launch of the programs at the Women in High Performance Coaching Forum, held in Canberra in March 2019, Sport Australia CEO Kate Palmer emphasised that while advances continue to be made for elite female athletes in Australia, the lack of opportunity for women in other areas of sport, particularly executive and HP coaching positions, was intolerable.

‘Despite the recent appointment of female CEOs in sports such as basketball, equestrian and water polo, of the 63 sports we fund, only 15 — less than a quarter — have female CEOs,’ Palmer said ‘Sport Australia will continue to advocate for progress’.

There is a similar story in high performance coaching. Of the 160 coaches accredited at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, only 15 — or 9 per cent — were female. That was down from 12 per cent at the London 2012 Olympics. AIS CEO Peter Conde has spoken about the lack of female high performance coaches being an issue across all high performance sport, and one that the AIS is determined to lead on behalf of the high performance sport system.

‘It’s encouraging to see female coaches from professional sporting codes embracing the opportunity to be part of these programs because we need a collective sport solution. Let’s challenge the status quo and address the very real issue about why a greater percentage of women are not progressing in high performance coaching roles’ Conde said.

The programs play an important role in identifying, developing, progressing and retaining talent that can challenge the status quo and increase diversity in sport.

AIS Sport Performance Awards

The fifth annual AIS Sport Performance Awards (ASPAs) were held on 13 December 2018. Almost 400 guests attended the event at The Star in Sydney to celebrate the outstanding individual and team achievements across the Australian high performance sport system.

Awards were presented across 11 categories for performances achieved during the 2018 calendar year, including the newly introduced Sport Australia Award. This award recognises the value of fair play and integrity and was won by 10,000m runners Celia Sullohern, Madeline Hills and Eloise Wellings, who helped define the spirit of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games by waiting at the finish line to embrace and congratulate the last-placed athlete, Lineo Chaka of the African nation of Lesotho.

Almost 20,000 Australians voted to determine the two public choice awards, with retiring Australian V8 driver Craig Lowndes leading the public vote for ABC Sports Personality of the Year and wheelchair racer Kurt Fearnley accepting the award for Best Sporting Moment on behalf of Australian Paralympic athletes.

Fearnley, who won gold in his final marathon for Australia at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, was chosen to carry the Australian flag in the closing ceremony to celebrate his personal achievement as well as the successful integration of para-sport into the Games.

‘Through the medium of sport, that is what our movement represents, hope. Hope that if sport can adjust to include those with disabilities, maybe community can follow,’ Fearnley said.

Cycling took out three major awards—High Performance Program of the Year (Cycling Australia), Male Athlete of the Year (Rohan Dennis) and Emerging Athlete of the Year (Luke Plapp). It was also a special night for the Fox family, with Paddle Australia athlete Jessica Fox and mother Myriam Fox named Female Athlete and Coach of the Year respectively.

Paralympic snowboarding gold medallist Simon Patmore was honoured with Para-performance of the Year after becoming the first Australian man to win a medal at a Summer and Winter Paralympics. The Australian Kookaburras were named Team of the Year, having taken out the Commonwealth Games and Champions Trophy in 2018.

Commonwealth Games Australia CEO Craig Phillips accepted the Award for Leadership for his role in a successful Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OVERVIEW AND HIGHLIGHTS

31 30

33 32

$131.3 MILLION

4,582 athletes

791 athletes

$20.3 MILLION

4 Sport Australia (2019) Ausplay Data January 2018 — December 2018, released on 30 April 2019.

$92.304M Move It AUS grants

Funding provided to

NSOs for HP sport

attended 179 HP

camps at the AIS

Athlete ambassadors in the AIS-Lifeline

Community Custodians program

received a total of

$13.99m through dAIS

162participants in Performance

People & Teams programs

8857young people received Local Sporting Champion grants

1,765,354 Sporting School attendances

Funding provided to

NSOs for participation

34.5% of Australian adults met physical activity guidelines 4

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OVERVIEW AND HIGHLIGHTS

comprised of Community Sport Infrastructure (CSI), Participation and Better Ageing grants.

33 32

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

35 34

STATEMENT BY THE COMMISSIONER — ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS 36

OUR PURPOSE 37

OUR PERFORMANCE 38

Getting more Australians moving more often 38

Building the capability of sport to create a robust, connected industry 46

Creating National pride and inspiration through international sporting success 51

ANALYSIS 56

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Leverrier Street Bruce ACT 2617 PO Box 176 Belconnen ACT 2616 ABN 67 374 695 240

+61 2 2614 1111 info@sportaus.gov.au sportaus.gov.au

36

Statement by the Commissioner — Annual Performance Statements

On behalf of the Board of the Australian Sports Commission, I am pleased to submit the Annual Performance Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

In my opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act and section 16F of the PGPA Rule.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the Commissioners.

Yours sincerely,

John Wylie am Chair Australian Sports Commission

23 September 2019

Our purpose

Our vision is for Australia to be the world’s most active sporting nation, known for its integrity, sporting success and world leading sports industry. The ASC is comprised of two entities: Sport Australia and the AIS.

As outlined in the ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, our purpose is to contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of Australians and making communities stronger through sport and physical activity.

This section reports on results achieved during 2018-19 against the purpose and performance criteria published in the ASC’s Corporate Plan 2018-22 and the Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19.

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have a direct impact on physical activity and physical

literacy levels

Building workforce capability across the sector

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Leading and enabling a united and collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes

to achieve podium success

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

These strategies are underpinned and enabled by a seventh, internally focused strategy of driving a leaner and more efficient organisation and building a strong workforce culture.

In 2018-19, work across these six strategic areas has shaped the ASC’s approach to achieving its outcome under the 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Outcome 1: Increased participation in organised sport and continued international sporting success including through leadership and development of a cohesive and effective sports sector, provision of targeted financial support, and the operation of the Australian Institute of Sport.

GETTING MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVING MORE OFTEN

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

CREATING NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

These outcomes are delivered through six important strategies:

The Corporate Plan 2018-22 provides three key outcomes:

37 36

Our performance

GETTING MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVING MORE OFTEN

Key activities

In 2018-19, Sport Australia focused on encouraging Australians of all backgrounds, ages and abilities to get involved in sport and physical activity, including through the delivery of the Sporting Schools program and the Move It AUS campaign, which encourages all Australians to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active.

Sport Australia continued to encourage participation in sport and physical activity through the provision of targeted investment and support to NSOs, and in 2018-19 launched the Move It AUS grants program, which provided funds to promote Participation, Community Sport Infrastructure and Better Ageing to organisations across Australia. Sport Australia has also focused on enhancing our research agenda, to consolidate data, information and knowledge to enable us to achieve our strategic priorities.

Key activities undertaken in 2018-19 included:

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

> Delivery of the Sporting Schools Program to 6,625 schools across Australia

> Development and implementation of a marketing program to support the Sporting Schools program operations

> Delivery of a national roadshow to engage with NSOs, Physical Activity Partners and Government to co-create a prioritised action plan for Sport Australia and partners aimed at ‘Helping Australians move throughout life’

> Development of the Schools Physical Literacy Framework in partnership with the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation and finalisation and release of the Australian Physical Literacy Framework, with the support of key stakeholders including the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, departments of education and leading Australian physical literacy researchers.

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

> Delivery of bi-annual data releases for AusPlay, a national population tracking survey, including publication of the State of Play report series and a focused report on older Australians’ participation in sport and physical activity

> Launch of the Sport Australia brand and Move It AUS national physical activity awareness program, encouraging all Australians to find time to be physically active

> Development and implementation of the Move It AUS grants program to enhance the understanding and benefits of regular physical activity and improve access to sport and physical activity opportunities.

Our results

Table 1: Our results against strategic priority: Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Performance criteria

Increase in physical activity levels by Australian children

Target Children in Australia aged 5 to 14 years participate in organised physical activity outside of school hours for at least 3.2 hours per week, on average

Result 3.97 hours

Supporting statement

The target of 3.2hrs was achieved in 2018-19, with AusPlay data showing children aged 5 to 14 participate for 3.97 hours on average.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 14. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19, program objective A, page 279.

Table 2: Our results against strategic priority: Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Performance criteria

An increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity in primary schools

Target 55 per cent of schools participating in the sporting schools program increase the number of hours dedicated to sport and physical activity, by at least 45 minutes, compared to the period prior to the introduction of the program

Result 30 per cent

Supporting statement

The target of 55 per cent was not achieved in 2018-19, with 30 per cent of schools on average reporting an increase of sport and physical activity of more than 45 minutes.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-19, page 14.

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AusPlay, first launched in October 2015, is a national population tracking survey funded and delivered by Sport Australia. AusPlay provides data on sport and physical activity participation for the Government, sport sector and Australian public, to help better understand the participation landscape and inform decision-making. In 2018-19, AusPlay published two releases, covering the 2017-18 financial year (released November 2018) and the 2018 calendar year (released April 2019).

The 2018 calendar year release shows that the average number of hours children aged 5 to 14 participate in organised sport and physical activity outside of school hours is 3.97 hours per week. This significantly exceeded the 2018-19 target of 3.2 hours and was higher than forward targets for the future three years. As a result, and in recognising that there is a limit to how much organised sport and physical activity children and their parents can afford in terms of time and money, the target has been redesigned for future periods. From 2019-20, the target will focus on increasing the percentage of children aged 5 to 14 who are active in organised sport or physical activity out-of-school hours for 3.2 hours per week or more. This target better reflects our strategic priority of getting greater engagement and involvement of youth and children in sport, and our broader focus of getting more Australians moving more often.

The Sporting Schools program continues to be Sport Australia’s key platform for embedding physical activity and increasing participation for children and youth in sport. Sporting Schools first commenced in 2015, and since then the total investment by the Australian Government in the program to 31 December 2019 will be $201 million. A further $41 million was announced in the 2019-20 Federal Budget and will fund the program through to 31 December 2020.

Sporting Schools continues to be in high demand across Australia, with a total of 5,890 primary schools and 735 secondary schools funded in 2018-19, well exceeding 2019 targets of funding 5,200 primary schools and 500 secondary schools. Total student attendances for 2018-19 was 1,765,354. This represented an increase of 6.4 per cent since 2017-18 and brings the total number of student attendances to 6.11 million since the Sporting Schools program commenced in 2015. At 30 June 2019, the Sporting Schools program had 8,303 schools registered, representing over 87 per cent of all schools across Australia.

In 2018-19, 57 per cent of funded primary schools reported that participating in the Sporting Schools program resulted in an increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity within their school. However, only 30 per cent of funded primary schools stated that involvement in the program increased the time dedicated to sport and physical activity by at least 45 minutes, in line with our target parameters. Schools reported that it was challenging to quantify this measure accurately, particularly as many schools have been participating in the Sporting Schools program for multiple terms, and no additional incentives have been available to schools to influence this outcome other than funding to deliver the existing program. As a result, and in recognising that there is a limited number of hours available within the confines of the Australian school curriculum, the target has been simplified for 2019-20 onwards to remove the time quantification of 45 minutes.

Case Study: Local Sporting Champions

In addition to Sporting Schools, in 2018-19 Sport Australia significantly expanded the Local Sporting Champions program. This program provides financial assistance for coaches, officials and competitors aged 12 to 18 participating in state, national or international championships.

As part of the 2018-19 Federal Budget announcement, the Local Sporting Champions Grant program received a total of $11.2 million increased investment over four years. The increased investment has allowed Sport Australia to implement two changes to benefit further Local Sporting Champion recipients:

> A recipient may receive a maximum of two grants per year, providing that one of the events attended is at the international level. Previously, a recipient could receive a maximum of one grant per year

> A recipient may receive, on top of the base grant of $500, additional top up if residing in a rural electorate ($50) and/or travelling support to the event ($100-$200).

In 2018-19, a total of 8,857 young Australians received Local Sporting Champion grants, compared to 5,844 in 2017-18. This included:

> 159 recipients receiving two grants

> 31 per cent of recipients receiving additional top up for residing in a rural electorate

> 74 per cent of recipients receiving additional top up for travelling support.

This program is helping to ensure that promising young Australians can stay engaged and involved with their chosen sports.

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Table 3: Results against strategic priority: Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

Performance criteria

Increase in Australians, aged 15 and above, participating in physical activity

Target An increase of 204,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group when compared to 2017-18

Result 217,000

Supporting statement

The target for 2018-19 has been achieved, with AusPlay data showing an increase of 217,000 Australians aged 15 and older meeting physical activity guidelines compared to the previous year.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 16. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19, program objective A, page 279.

Table 4: Results against strategic priority: Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

Performance criteria

Build awareness in all Australians, particularly parents, about the ways they can introduce sport and physical activity into daily living

Target 4 per cent of Australians recall the Move It campaign on a prompted basis

2 per cent of Australians recall the Move It campaign on an unprompted basis

Result 40 per cent prompted — average campaign awareness (phase 2)

23 per cent unprompted — average campaign awareness (phase 2)

Supporting statement

A baseline of an average campaign prompted (40 per cent) and unprompted (23 per cent) awareness has been established as this is the first year of this program. The latest Phase 2 (Feb to Jun 19) activity demonstrated an increase of 6 per cent for prompted awareness and 5 per cent for unprompted awareness.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 16.

The 2018 calendar year AusPlay release shows an increase of 217,000 Australians aged 15 and older meeting physical activity guidelines compared to the previous year. When factoring in population growth, this represents a greater than 1 per cent increase in Australian adults meeting the physical activity guidelines for their respective age group and exceeds the target of 204,000. AusPlay data shows that 90.3 per cent of Australian adults aged 15 and over participated in sport or physical activity at least once in the last 12 months, 82.4 per cent at least once per week and 63 per cent at least three times per week.

In 2018-19, Sport Australia launched the Move It AUS campaign, a national physical awareness program which encourages all Australians to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active. The Move It AUS campaign, launched across television, cinema, radio, out of home, digital, mobile and social and search channels, was the first direct to consumer physical activity awareness program undertaken by Sport Australia, enabling us to drive awareness of the importance of sport and physical activity within the Australian population. The Move It AUS campaign and the Find Your 30 messaging aligns with the Department of Health’s recommended Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for adults, and was planned to reach 95 per cent of the target audience, representing approximately 7.8 million Australians.

Advertising channel effectiveness (prompted awareness) for Move It AUS was on average tracking at 34 per cent over the span of Phase 1 of the campaign (August—December 2018) and at 40 per cent over the span of Phase 2 of the campaign (February—June 2019). Average unprompted awareness was 25 per cent in Phase 1, and 23 per cent during Phase 2.

Table 5: Move It AUS advertising channel effectiveness results

Phase 1

(Aug-Dec 2018)

Phase 2

(Feb-June 2018)

Prompted Campaign Awareness (Average) 34% 40%

Prompted Campaign Awareness (Peak) 37% 46%

Uplift in Prompted Campaign Awareness 3% 6%

Unprompted Campaign Awareness (Average) 25% 23%

Unprompted Campaign Awareness (Peak) 33% 28%

Uplift in Unprompted Campaign Awareness 8% 5%

Participation in sport and physical acivity by Australians aged 15 years and older

1x per week

3x per week

1x per year

20 30 40 10 50 60 0 100 80 90 70

2018 2017 2016

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As no baseline data existed prior to the commencement of the campaign in August 2018, it was not possible to measure the uplift awareness pre and post campaign, as per stated targets of 4 per cent prompted and 2 per cent unprompted uplift. Results have therefore been reported as the average campaign awareness against the peak recorded for the purpose of evaluation uplift in that period. As Table 5 shows, the uplift between peak prompted awareness and average awareness was measured at 3 per cent for Phase 1, and 6 per cent for Phase 2, and for unprompted awareness at 8 per cent for Phase 1 and 5 per cent for Phase 2, indicating that the campaign was successful in achieving an increase in prompted and unprompted awareness. Results from 2018-19 will be used as baseline data for future reporting against campaign awareness targets and an appropriate evaluation of uplift will be determined.

The campaign has achieved significant social media impact, with over 35 million views across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, and over two million searches of Move it AUS or Find Your 30. Advertising tracking research conducted by Kantar has also shown that the Move It AUS awareness program has driven an improvement in attitude and behaviours towards a number of key measures around sport and physical activity. Survey participants have reported a shift in physical activity participation, with an increase of 7 per cent in participants reporting exercising four or more times per week.

The Move It AUS campaign received a ‘Highly Commended’ award for Best Cause-Related Sports Campaign at the Mumbrella Sports Marketing Awards in July 2019, which recognised the impact and results of the program in its first year.

In parallel to the Move It AUS public campaign, Sport Australia launched the Move It AUS grants programs, including Better Ageing, Participation, and Community Sport Infrastructure. The objectives of the Move It AUS grant programs are to:

> Enhance the understanding and benefits of regular physical activity

> Improve access to sport and physical activity opportunities

> Enable regular engagement in sport and physical activity to:

— Get inactive people moving in their local communities

— Build awareness and understanding of the importance of physical activity across all stages of life

— Improve the system of sport and physical activity by targeting populations at risk of inactivity, across all life stages.

The Move It AUS grants program delivered investment of $28.9 million in Better Ageing and Participation grants to support 89 new community programs, with a combined expected reach of over 800,000 Australians. Grants of up to $2 million were allocated to implement new, local and community-based activities across Australia, targeting inactive sections of the population to build a more active Australia.

Sport Australia commenced payments against the Government’s $102.5m Community Sport Infrastructure grant program where over 680 recipients were announced as successful. This program supports small to medium scale projects up to $500,000 to improve local community sport infrastructure which will support greater community participation in sport and physical activity and offer safe and more inclusive community sporting hubs.

In 2018-19, Sport Australia provided over $19 million in participation funding to NSOs and continued to work closely with the sports industry to support participation growth. Sport Australia has also undertook a review of the participation funding model, and from 1 July 2019 will be implementing a new investment framework. Funding will be based on core funding and capability, to ensure Sport Australia can best assist NSOs to grow participation and build the capacity and capability of their sports.

Case Study: Move It AUS — San Souci Football Club

The Australian Government has invested more than $152 million to help Australians of all ages get more active through the Move It AUS Community Sport Infrastructure grants program, the Move It AUS Better Ageing grants program and the Move It AUS Participation grants program. One grant recipient under the Community Sport Infrastructure grant was the San Souci Football Club.

During a visit to the San Souci Football Club to open their new facilities, Prime Minister Scott Morrison discussed our Move It AUS grants programs and explained why keeping active is important for all Australians. Prime Minister Morrison says the Community Sport Infrastructure grants are not just an investment in bricks and mortar, but an investment in local communities.

‘It’s the discussions you have around the BBQ or the tuckshop on the weekend when you’re working with other parents or along the sidelines. That’s where communities come together and that’s why you’ve got to make these investments and we’re just so pleased to do it, and to have the partnership with Sport Australia who are delivering this, I think is just tremendous.’

The San Souci Football Club received a Move It AUS Community Sport Infrastructure grant of $50,000, which was used to build new facilities, including a new clubhouse. Melissa Robertson, the San Souci Football Club President said:

‘To get a grant is just amazing, before we had the canteen, one little change room and a store room. It was extremely old and rundown. Now we have the clubhouse to rival the Taj Mahal.’

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BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

Key activities

In 2018-19, Sport Australia focused on leading and supporting the sport industry to get Australians moving and help athletes perform at the highest level. Our focus has been on assisting our sport partners to evolve and move towards more efficient systems of governance and management, including through the One Management program, and continuing to set an example for integrity issues in sport, including child safety, diversity and inclusion.

In accordance with upholding these principles of good governance and child protection, Sport Australia is working cooperatively with the National Child Safety Office, NSOs and other national and state Government bodies to provide a leadership role to enable and support the sports industry for children’s safe participation in sport. This work also involves assisting sporting organisations’ navigation of and participation in the National Redress Scheme. Sport Australia invested significant resources into digital modernisation in 2018-19 through the Technology Roadmap project, including digital transformation of the ASC business and extending this capability out to the sport sector to be leveraged.

Key activities undertaken in 2018-19 included:

Building workforce capability across the sector

> Establishment of the One Management project to support sports to improve their operating model by integrating the sport’s strategy, finances and workforce

> Completed Phase 1 of the review of the sport governance principles, including publication of a report outlining the insights from the co-design workshops conducted through industry consultation

> Development of guidelines for the inclusion of transgender and gender diverse people in sport, in partnership with the Australian Human Rights Commission and the Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports

> Conduct of educational workshops to share best practice and build capability for coaches, officials and paid administrators across the sector

> Launch of the Play for Purpose charity raffle.

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sport sector

> Development of a cloud-based platform to integrate NSOs’ digital applications to allow them to consolidate the data from across their sport and better understand their customers

> Development of a data analytics platform to support increased data use and insight generation by NSOs

> Development of the SportAUS Connect platform, a shared platform to connect the sectors’ organisations and software vendors, and piloted with one sport, as part of the One Management Program

> Delivery of digital strategy workshops and guidance to improve sector capability.

Our results

Table 6: Our results against strategic priority: Building workforce capability across the sector

Performance criteria

Improving the organisational capability of targeted national sporting organisations (NSOs)

2017-18 target

Average overall score on Sport.Scan for 23 targeted NSOs is at least 75 per cent

Result 73 per cent

Supporting statement

The average overall score for 23 targeted NSOs was 73 per cent, just short of the target of 75 per cent. Two of the 23 NSOs did not complete all requested information by the due date which has impacted results. Excluding these two NSOs, the overall score was 74 per cent.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 22. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19, program objective A, page 279.

Table 7: Our results against strategic priority: Building workforce capability across the sector

Performance criteria

Improving the financial performance and capability of national sporting organisations (NSOs)

2017-18 target

Less than 15 per cent of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated overall as ‘Higher Risk’ under the annual financial assessment tool

Result 8 per cent

Supporting statement

The annual financial assessment resulted in 8 per cent of NSOs/NSODs rated as Higher Risk

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 22.

Sport Australia has continued to implement improvements to Sport.Scan, the self-assessment tool used to measure the progress and maturity of an NSO’s organisational capability. Sport.Scan is conducted as a part of the Annual Sport Performance Review (ASPR) process undertaken by Sport Australia, which covers the 23 sports that receive the largest share of Sport Australia funding. In 2018-19, the average overall score on Sport.Scan for the 23 targeted NSOs was 73 per cent, just short of the 75 per cent target. Two NSOs did not fully complete the Sport.Scan tool, which impacted results. In 2019-20, Sport Australia will be undertaking a review of Sport.Scan, with a greater emphasis on organisational behaviours which support the development of organisational capability.

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To support NSOs in improving their organisational capability, Sport Australia conducted a range of educational workshops, including:

> Company Director Training to increase the understanding of best practice governance

> One Management Forum to support exchange of relevant information, and provide examples and lessons from sports that have progressed One Management implementation

> NSO Integrated Learning Experiences workshops to support NSOs in the development and implementation of child safe policies.

A key focus for organisational capability has been the rollout of the One Management project, to support sports which operate under a federated governance model to achieve a central approach to management. The One Management project, currently targeting 12 NSOs, aims to transition sports to a whole of sport business model across strategy, workforce and financial management, resulting in more efficient management processes, improved decision-making and a reduction in administration and overhead costs. To reflect Sport Australia’s focus on the One Management project, our future performance criteria will be updated to reflect the implementation of One Management.

Sport Australia continued to work closely with NSOs and NSODs on improving financial performance and financial capability. The ASPR includes an annual financial assessment tool, which reviews the financial position, financial performance and financial capability and management of funded NSOs. The ASPR process informs the level of monitoring frequency and support provided by Sport Australia to NSOs, with those rated as ‘higher risk’ being frequently monitored to ensure good financial management practices. In 2018-19, 8 per cent of NSOs were rated as ‘higher risk’, well below the target of 15 per cent. To support NSOs in improving their financial capability, Sport Australia led the Sport Finance Network to connect NSO CEOs, CFOs and finance staff, including workshops held in five locations across Australia. The objective of the workshops was to build finance networks across the sector and facilitate learning and the sharing of contemporary financial practices.

A significant area of focus for Sport Australia is supporting sports to be less reliant on government funding by increasing external revenue sources. In 2018-19, Sport Australia endorsed the Play for Purpose Charity and Sports Raffle, as a fundraising opportunity for Australian sporting organisations. Play for Purpose is a collaboration between the 50-50 Foundation, Tabcorp’s Charitable Games Division and the Australian Sports Foundation, aiming to raise money for charitable grassroots sporting projects. Play for Purpose is 100 per cent not-for-profit and is free for clubs to participate, with 50 per cent of the ticket contribution directly supporting the sporting club and the remaining portion of ticket sales used to fund the $500,000 worth of prizes in the raffle. The first combined Play for Purpose Charity and Sports Raffle went on sale on 18 December 2018 and as at 30 June 2019 there were 195 sporting clubs registered with Play for Purpose.

Table 8: Our results against strategic priority: Improving the digital capability of the

Australian sports sector

Performance criteria

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Target 30 per cent of NSOs completing the organisational development tool, Sport.Scan, have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

10 per cent of NSOs completing the organisational development tool, Sport.Scan, have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

Result 62 per cent of NSO’s completing Sport.Scan achieved an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

14 per cent of NSO’s completing Sport.Scan achieved an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

Supporting statement

The digital maturity model is based on the responses from 21 sports to 9 questions from the Sport.Scan survey. It measures the level of maturity the NSO has in place to develop and implement their digital strategy. Both targets were achieved.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 23.

Sport Australia has put significant resources into improving the digital maturity of the sport sector, and in leading the industry by embracing digital solutions. Results from Sport.Scan show that 62 per cent of NSOs completing Sport.Scan achieved an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above, with 14 per cent achieving a score of 60 or above, achieving our stated targets.

Sport Australia has supported sports in the development of digital strategies, a key foundation for digital maturity. Sport Australia has delivered Design Thinking led workshops with 20 sports, which included participation from across the sport sector, including NSOs, state sporting organisations, sporting clubs and consumers. In total, 30 sports have now undertaken this process since 2017.

In 2018-19, we commenced work to adapt digital infrastructure built for Sport Australia to support sport requirements, as a part of the broader Technology Roadmap program. This includes the design and development of a sport customer relationship management system, known as the Partner Portal, to drive efficiencies and improve capability for sports. The Partner Portal provides a unified experience and access point for sport partners to engage and exchange data with Sport Australia, the AIS and other sector partners. Sport Australia also worked with two sports to establish a data analytics platform, to bring together data from multiple sources and support sports in strategic decision-making. An example of this was the longitudinal analysis of an athlete and their pathway over time, overlaid with ABS population density data to identify acquisition and retention opportunities for the sport.

Sport Australia also developed SportAUS Connect, a cloud-based integration platform to connect sport sector organisations and software vendors, and successfully delivered a pilot implementation with Cycling Australia. The pilot included integration with the Cycling Australia website, membership, race entry and customer relationship management platforms. The SportAUS Connect platform will be further developed and implemented with sports in the One Management program in 2019-20, to help enable sports to respond to consumers’ needs in the digital world.

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Case Study: SportAUS Connect

SportAUS Connect is an industry-wide platform, designed to support the transition to a digitally connected sport sector.

The sport sector is large, with around 50,000 organisations, many of which are small volunteer-run entities with little in-house digital technology. A rapidly changing and complex technology landscape has made it difficult for sports to consolidate, manage and secure their data, which is often stored in multiple systems across a sport.

Drawing on learnings from government, health and the higher education sectors, Sport Australia is establishing a digital platform delivery capability and has adopted cloud technology practices to develop SportAUS Connect.

SportAUS Connect is a digital platform that provides sports with the ability to integrate various applications and consolidate data from across their sport, to provide a seamless customer experience and enable the sport to connect with and understand their customers more clearly. This includes integrating functions such as customer relationship management, membership, and event and competition services.

After a successful pilot with Cycling Australia, Sport Australia is working with sports in the One Management program to build-out the SportAUS Connect platform in 2019-20.

CREATING NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

Key activities

Throughout 2018-19, the AIS continued to evolve its strategic priorities based on the agreed vision and success factors reflected in the national sport plan, Sport 2030, and the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024. The AIS has continued to implement an enhanced organisational structure and, along with the new enterprise operational model, will enable the organisation to lead the Australian high performance sector more effectively.

The AIS also defined new success measures, which include more sports consistently producing multiple medallists over multiple cycles, effectively inspiring the next generation, with a focus primarily on Olympic and Paralympic Games, along with Commonwealth Games.

Key activities undertaken in 2018-19 included:

Leading and enabling a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

> Development of a new performance investment framework, providing longer-term stability for NSOs and enabling the AIS to respond to shifting needs across the high performance landscape

> Development and launch of the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024, which was approved by National Institute Network Directors, endorsed by the Committee of Sport and Recreation Officers and referred to the Meeting of Sport and Recreation Ministers for final approval

> Invested in innovative solutions and technology for prioritised sports and promoted the growth of new knowledge and expertise for high performance sport

> Launched a revised model for sports science and sports medicine, including the appointment of National Network leads to plan, coordinate and deliver sports science and sports medicine expertise better to ensure Australia’s athletes get the right support at the right time

> Promoted success and high performance messaging within the Australian community, in partnership with NSOs and athletes, to enhance Australia’s reputation as a sporting nation.

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

> Established an Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement (AW&E) branch within the AIS and launched the AW&E Framework, with a commitment to developing sport-specific versions in 20 sports

> Provided funding and support to appoint 18 AW&E advisers in 2018-19, with a commitment to 20 NSOs to provide direct support to athletes

> Launched the National Mental Health Referral Network, to provide expert mental health support and advice to Australian athletes and coaches. Delivered the Lifeline Community Custodian program, in partnership with Lifeline, to help raise awareness of mental illness in communities around Australia.

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Our results

Table 9: Our results against strategic priority: Leading and enabling a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Performance criteria

Percentage of high performance funded sports rated by the AIS as achieving their benchmark targets

Target On average, 85 per cent of high performance funded NSOs’ performance targets are achieved

Result 87 per cent

Supporting statement

87 per cent of Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth NSOs achieved their 2018-19 performance targets.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 28. Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19, program objective A, page 278.

Table 10: Our results against strategic priority: Leading and enabling a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Performance criteria

Community perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success

Target Baseline metrics established through a Sport Australia Community Engagement Monitor regarding the public perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success

Result Significant progress

Supporting statement

Sport Australia and the AIS are developing a ‘Community Perceptions of Sport Survey’ that will be used to measure performance against this target. Initial results are expected from September 2019.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 28.

The AIS continued to support NSOs to achieve their performance targets and build capability within sports and more broadly across the sport sector. The AIS has developed a new engagement model with NSOs, to broaden access to resources, support and expertise within the AIS and the high performance system. To measure success, high performance targets are agreed between the AIS and each NSO at the beginning of each reporting cycle. Performance targets may include medal performances at benchmark events or other longer-term outcome-focused objectives. In 2018-19, 36 of 41 sports (87 per cent) achieved their performance targets, exceeding the target of 85 per cent. Sixteen sports met or exceeded medal targets, with cycling a standout performer, with a total of ten medals, six of which were gold, at 2019 world championship events.

In addition to a new engagement model, a key project designed to support NSOs to achieve performance outcomes was the development and launch of the new high performance investment framework. The new framework aims to provide longer-term stability for NSOs and introduces longer-term baseline funding across four year (Olympic) cycles, enabling better planning and continuity, and contestable impact resourcing that provides the system with a level of agility to seize new opportunities. Using this approach, the majority of NSOs have had current levels of funding guaranteed through to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. A strategic projects pool has also been established to be invested into sports for targeted campaigns or project support ahead of Tokyo 2020.

The Gold Medal Ready program was launched in August 2018, a joint initiative with the Australian Army to assist Australian athletes to deliver their best performance under pressure. Two camps were undertaken in 2018-19, with a total of 135 athletes, 19 coaches and 17 performance staff spanning 12 Olympic sports taking part. The program, along with other key initiatives such as the para sport equipment program and the team management program, are designed to enable a united, collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes and teams to achieve podium success.

Work has progressed in 2018-19 to measure and monitor community perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success. Sport Australia and the AIS are developing a Community Perceptions of Sport Survey, with exploratory research for the survey being conducted from June to August 2019. This research will inform the design of an ongoing tracking survey of community perceptions, and will be used to establish the baseline results. Results are expected to be available in September 2019, with quarterly reporting implemented in 2019-20.

Case Study: Team Management Program

The AIS Team Management Program is a collaboratively-designed series of modules to equip sport management teams with the mindsets, skills and behaviours important for success. The program recognises that being a member of a Management Team at a multi-sport event is varied and complex, and sports have identified that Performance Directors, Head Coaches and support staff would all benefit from learning more about how to successfully navigate their roles as part of that team.

The program, launched in March 2019, involves a number of modules delivered both face to face and through online channels. Each module has a specific focus, using the challenges and complexities posed before, during and post multi-sport Games experiences, and participants are challenged to work across sports to seek multiple perspectives and access different expertise and support in their roles.

Facilitated by the AIS Performance People and Teams area, the program will deliver to 18 Olympic and Paralympic sports and 45 participants over two programs running through to March 2020. The program delivers on the AIS strategic priority to build capability and capacity in our performance people.

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Case Study: Para-sport Equipment

The AIS Applied Technology and Innovation branch is leading work to identify and solve strategically important problems with technology and innovation on the ethical frontiers of sporting performance to support our athletes for podium success.

Two champion para-athletes Dylan Alcott (tennis, basketball) and Erik Horrie (rowing) have been at the forefront of two projects led by the team.

Ahead of the 2018 World Rowing Championships, the AIS was approached by the NSW Institute of Sport to develop a new seat design for para-athlete Erik Horrie.

A project team was setup to work on the design, including the AIS Applied Technology and Innovation team, Paralympics Australia and Toyota Australia (Olympic and Paralympic partner).

Para-rowing had four key parameters that were required to be met by the project team. The seat design had to be minimum weight possible, increase athlete stroke length, allow the athlete to produce more power, and reduce risk of a pressure injury to skin and muscle tissue.

The final design was used by Erik in the 2018 World Rowing Championship, where he went on to win the PR1 Men’s Single Scull in the chair’s first competitive outing.

The same team was also responsible for producing a custom-designed wheelchair for six-time tennis Grand Slam champion Dylan Alcott and his doubles partner Heath Davidson.

‘Quite early on we realised that the standard architecture of the wheelchair tennis chair that Dylan was using would not allow us to create a performance-based interface between the athlete and the frame,’ said AIS Senior Sport Engineer Matt Crawford.

The project team was also working on how to minimise pressure injuries, which required them to use a pressure map to identify the main points of contact, similar to what is used in automotive and aircraft seating and the disability sector.

Once the seat has been designed, the team used data, technology and engineering to fine tune the chair to maximise performance and comfort.

Table 11: Our results against strategic priority: Evolving a system wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

Performance criteria

Develop system capability to provide for athlete personal development and wellbeing

Target 75 per cent of NSOs receiving athlete wellbeing and engagement specific funding have a national framework in place that was developed in conjunction with the AIS.

75 per cent of NSOs receiving athlete wellbeing and engagement funding have appointed a National Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement Manager.

Result Achieved

Supporting statement

Of the 20 NSOs receiving Athlete Wellbeing & Engagement (AW&E) funding from the AIS, 18 NSOs (90 per cent) have appointed AW&E National Managers and 15 NSOs (75 per cent) have AW&E Frameworks.

Source: ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022, page 29.

Since the launch of the AW&E branch in June 2018, a number of initiatives have been launched aimed at providing NSOs with the necessary support and capability to improve athlete and coach personal development and wellbeing. This includes initiatives across mental health, conduct and professionalism, personal development, career and education, and athlete engagement.

Direct funding for AW&E initiatives was given to 20 NSOs, and of these 90 per cent have appointed AW&E National Managers, exceeding the target of 75 per cent. The AIS is continuing to work with two remaining sports to make appointments in the next financial year and has committed to extending this to 26 NSOs. The AW&E Manager roles report into the NSO High Performance Managers or CEOs to ensure that athlete wellbeing is considered when decisions are made within the high performance environment. The AW&E Managers are supported in their role through a national curriculum of professional development that includes a Certificate IV in Career and Development. The national expansion of these services has enhanced direct support for athletes, and has also led to greater collaboration across Australia’s high performance sporting system.

The AIS has also worked with funded NSOs to develop AW&E Frameworks. Fifteen of the 20 funded NSOs have an AW&E Framework endorsed by the AIS in place, meeting the target of 75 per cent, and a further two NSOs have drafted frameworks and are progressing with final sign off.

The Mental Health Referral Network was launched in March 2019, providing funded athletes and coaches with access to AIS endorsed psychologists and mental health practitioners across the country, with the program extending out to psychiatrists and neuropsychologists. The network currently has 27 clinical psychologists and eight psychiatrists contracted to provide expert mental health support and advice to Australia’s elite athletes and coaches. As of 20 June 2019 there has been over 100 referrals into the Mental Health Referral Network.

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Case Study: National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024

The AIS is committed to leading and enabling a united and collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success. In consultation with the National Institute Network, NSOs and Games delivery partners, the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 was developed to recognise the important role of all high performance system partners in providing opportunities for both aspiring athletes moving through the athlete development pathway and in fostering lifelong physical activity. The strategy is endorsed by the Committee of Australian Sports and Recreation Officers and has been referred to the Meeting of Sport and Recreation Ministers for final approval.

The release of the strategy signals the first time that all federal and state/territory sport agencies have signed up to a joint high performance strategy with focus on Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth Games outcomes.

The National High Performance Sport Strategy positions Australia’s high performance institutes, academies and national sporting organisations under a national framework, and strengthens relationships with government, communities, academic institutions, industry and the private sector, moving towards a common goal of national pride and Inspiration through international sporting success.

Analysis

The ASC underwent a year of significant transformation in 2018-19, with the launch of our new strategy in August 2018 and commencement of a new organisational structure following the 2017-18 strategic review. These changes have better positioned the organisation to deliver on our vision and purpose, and to support the Australian Government in delivering on the national sport plan, Sport 2030. Sport 2030 was launched in August 2018, and has significantly shaped the work of the ASC in 2018-19.

The ASC Corporate Plan 2018-2022 purpose for the ASC is to contribute to the health and wellbeing of Australians and make communities stronger through sport and physical activity. This new purpose represented a significant shift for the organisation, recognising the wider potential of sport and physical activity for the Australian public. To reflect better our broadened role in sport and physical activity, the organisation launched a new operating brand, Sport Australia, which represents sport participation, physical activity and sport industry development. Significant investment into the new brand and positioning of the organisation was undertaken as a part of the Move It AUS campaign.

The ASC, through Sport Australia, made significant progress in delivering on its purpose in 2018-19. For the first time, the organisation broadened its partnerships and funding approach beyond NSOs. The Move It AUS grant programs provided direct funding to a range of organisations and individuals, such as local sports clubs, local councils, not-for-profit organisations and private business. The Move It campaign and Move It grants program have underpinned our efforts to get more Australians moving more often.

In addition, Sport Australia continued to build partnerships with external organisations and government bodies, such as the Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, and the Australian Curriculum and Assessment and Reporting Authority, in the education and physical literacy space, and with the Australian Human Rights Commission and the Coalition of the Major Professional and Participation Sports on issues of sport integrity and diversity. These partnerships, along with our work in the governance space, and a significant focus on digital transformation of the sport sector, are helping to build the capability of the sport industry. The Technology Roadmap project, a broad-reaching digital modernisation project, has focused on transforming both the ASC business and the sport sector. Projects such as SportAUS Connect are delivering industry-wide solutions to lead the transition to a digitally connected sport sector. Work continued on implementing an enhanced AIS organisational structure and to support both Sport Australia and the AIS to deliver on their purposes. As such, new operating model was approved by the Board in January 2019, giving the AIS autonomy and independence for high performance outcomes. The AIS and Sport Australia have separate CEOs who report to the ASC Board.

The AIS continues to be the Australian leader for high performance sport. Following on from the launch of the Corporate Plan and organisational restructure, the AIS undertook an extensive consultation across the high performance sport sector to develop the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024, representing the first joint high performance strategy across all federal, state and territory sport agencies. The AIS, having led a transition to a more united and collaborative high performance sport system, also redefined its own purpose, success measures and focus. The new AIS purpose is to build sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes.

As the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games draw closer, the AIS continued to deliver on creating national pride and inspiration through international sporting success. While 2018-19 did not see any major international sporting events such as the Olympics or Commonwealth Games, Australian athletes or teams demonstrated great success at world championship events, with 27 new world champions crowned this year. The AIS has worked with athletes and NSOs to promote this success and enhance both the community perception and Australia’s reputation as a sporting nation. In 2019-20, the AIS will for the first time look to measure how Australians feel about our international sporting success, through the Community Perceptions of Sport Survey, to enable a better understanding of the pride and inspiration that we draw from sport.

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59 58

OUR ORGANISATION ABOUT THE ASC 60

Our history 60

Our organisation 60

Organisational structure 61

Our people 62

Work health and safety 65

Notifiable incidents 65

Reconciliation Action Plan 66

CORPORATE PARTNERS 67

OUR OPERATIONS 68

Operational highlights 68

Site management 70

Environment and heritage 71

AUTHORITY AND DIRECTIONS 73

Legislation requirements 73

Ministerial direction 74

BOARD AND COMMITTEES 75

Board appointments 75

Board members 75

Board activity 82

Board committees 84

GOVERNANCE 86

Planning and accountability 86

Risk management 87

Internal audit 88

Fraud 88

Compliance 88

Indemnities and insurance 88

EXTERNAL SCRUTINY 89

Reports by the Australian National Audit Office 89

Reports by the Commonwealth Ombudsman 89

Decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner 89

Judiciary 89

Privacy 89

Freedom of information 89

OUR ORGANISATION

About the ASC

Our history

The ASC is a corporate Commonwealth entity within the Australian Government’s Department of Health portfolio. It was established on 13 September 1984, when the then Prime Minister, the Honourable Bob Hawke, and Minister for Sport, the Honourable John Brown, announced the membership of the Commission and its terms of reference. The ASC was formally established by the Australian Sports Commission Act 1985.

In August 1987, the Australian Government announced its decision to rationalise federal assistance to Australian sport. As a result, the AIS—first established as a public company under the Australian Capital Territory’s Companies Ordinance in 1981—was amalgamated with the ASC. The ASC subsequently became the principal Australian Government agency responsible for sport in accordance with the revised Australian Sports Commission Act 1989.

Our organisation

The ASC has staff and offices across Australia, including headquarters at the AIS campus in Bruce, Canberra, as well as five regional offices and two high performance centres. The AIS campus is a 65-hectare multipurpose facility with sporting, administration, commercial and residential functions. The offices in Brisbane and Perth closed by 31 July 2019, with the Adelaide office scheduled for closure by 31 December 2019.

In 2018-19, the Board approved a new operating model for Sport Australia and the AIS. This enables Sport Australia to focus on participation, physical activity and sport industry growth while giving the AIS autonomy and independence for high performance outcomes. Sport Australia and the AIS each have a CEO who reports directly to the Board.

Organisational structure (as at 30 June 2019)

Sport Strategy

& Investment Director Alex Newton

Australian Institute

of Sport

Chief Executive Officer Peter Conde

Sport Business General Manager Andrew Larratt

Corporate

General Manager Luke McCann

AIS Operations Chief Operating Officer Rob Medlicott

Sport

Partnerships Executive Director Robin O’Neill

Integrity

Deputy General Manager Kate Schildberger

AIS Site Services Deputy General Manager Sue Minter

Digital Strategy

& Insights Deputy General Manager Wing Cheung

Performance People & Teams Director Darlene Harrison

Site Commercial Director Sam Ceravolo

Applied Technology & Innovation Director Ian Burns

AIS Site Strategy Project Director Luke Jansen

Participation &

Physical Activity Deputy General Manager James Ceely

Business

Operations Deputy General Manager Geoff Howes

Marketing Deputy General Manager Fiona Boughton

Athlete Wellbeing & Engagement Director Matti Clements

AIS Site Strategy Deputy General Manager Fiona Johnstone

Sport Advisory Deputy General Manager Cameron French

Finance Deputy General Manager/CFO Peter Dunlop

Strategic

Communications & Media Deputy General Manager

Brooke Sawyer

Performance Networks & Partnerships Director Dean Kenneally

People & Culture Deputy General Manager Alison Halpin

Brand Strategy

& Partnerships Director Tracey Hutson

Marketing, Customer Insights

& Analytics General Manager Louise Eyres

Australian Sports Commission

and Sport Australia Chief Executive Officer Kate Palmer

Australian Sports Commission Board

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Our people

The ASC has a highly adaptable, capable and diverse workforce. During quarter one of 2018-19, the ASC was in the final stages of transition following the organisational restructure conducted in 2017-18. As at 30 June 2019, we have 464 full time equivalent staff employed on an ongoing, non-ongoing and casual basis.

The ASC Enterprise Agreement 2016-2019 came into effect on 19 February 2016 with a nominal expiry date of February 2019. The Agreement provides ASC staff with competitive remuneration and employment conditions. A two-year Determination to extend the Enterprise Agreement arrangements was approved by the CEO, Kate Palmer, on 15 January 2019. The Determination, which applies salary increases to the minimum and maximum salary ranges, was applied from 21 February 2019.

The ASC also offers staff several additional benefits not included under the Enterprise Agreement, including:

> annual influenza immunisations

> free skin cancer checks provided by Spotscreen

> a free, confidential employee assistance program for employees and their immediate families

> access to flexible working arrangements

> free onsite car parking (Canberra)

> priority access to the on-site childcare centre (Canberra)

> access to the on-site gymnasium and aquatic centre (Canberra).

Employees may also make use of a range of salary sacrifice benefits, including additional superannuation, leased motor vehicles and child care.

The ASC is continually working to ensure that athletes, staff and others in our care have appropriate protection and support. From 1 July 2018, the ASC became a participating institution in the National Redress Scheme.

Following the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, the ASC engaged the Australian Childhood Foundation to undertake an independent review of the ASC’s current operations and services against child safe standards. As a result, the ASC has developed the Child Safe Sport Framework and is progressing with an implementation plan for recommendations made in the report.

Table 12: Employees by classification*

Classification Female (%) Male (%)

Executive 40 60

ASC 8 47 53

ASC 7 47 53

ASC 6 38 62

ASC 5 52 48

ASC 4 62 38

ASC 3 37 63

ASC 2 32 68

ASC 1 47 53

Childcare workers 92 8

Total 48 52

*FTE employees excluding Board, casual and locally engaged staff.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OUR ORGANISATION

65

Australian Sports Commission staff

Note: Full-time equivalent employees excluding Board, casual and locally engaged staff.

Employee age breakdown

Under 30 11%

30-39 37%

40-49 31%

50-59 17%

60+ 4%

Years of service

0-6 months 14%

7-12 months 12%

1-2 years 7%

2-5 years 20%

5-10 years 19%

10-15 years 17%

15+ years 12%

2015-16

2014-15

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

200 100 300 0 600 500 400

Fixed term part time Ongoing part time Fixed term full time Ongoing full time Casual employment

Work health and safety

The ASC Work Health and Safety (WHS) Policy outlines the ASC’s commitment to providing a safe and healthy workplace for staff and visitors and our approach to the continuous improvement of health and safety. The WHS Policy and operations are overseen by the ASC Work Health and Safety Governance Forum and the WorkSafe Committee.

The WHS Governance Forum provides leadership and strategic oversight of workplace health and safety management systems and employee rehabilitation. The forum is responsible for ensuring compliance and overseeing performance reporting, including periodic reporting to the ASC Executive and the ASC’s Finance, Audit and Risk Committee.

The WorkSafe Committee is an operationally focused consultative forum which comprises employee Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) and senior management. The committee meets regularly and three HSRs from the committee are also members of the WHS Governance Forum.

Key initiatives during 2018-19 included:

> continued monitoring and review of the WHS and rehabilitation management systems performance reporting

> continuation of the early intervention scheme which had a positive impact on the Comcare premium

> focus on psychological and wellbeing training

> provision of education and training on first aid, fire warden, emergency response accompanied by emergency exercises

> completion of the annual program of WHS-related training and workplace hazard inspections.

Notifiable incidents

A total of two incidents arising from the conduct of ASC business were reported to the regulator during 2018-19. It was determined that the ASC had ensured, as far as reasonably practicable, the health and safety of workers and others, and no further action was required. No incidents occurred that required investigation in 2018-19 under Part 10 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OUR ORGANISATION

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67

Reconciliation Action Plan

The ASC’s Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) was endorsed by Reconciliation Australia in February 2019. The ASC continued to develop and grow its RAP, with the support of Reconciliation Australia, as a tool to help the organisation build positive relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. The RAP is a practical plan for action built on relationships, respect and opportunities.

The ASC continues to commit to the Australian Government’s goal to make significant and measurable improvements in Indigenous health and wellbeing, and understands that sport plays an important role in achieving this goal. Key RAP activities for 2018-19 included:

> the appointment of Andrew Larratt, General Manager Sport Business as the RAP Chair

> establishment of a RAP Steering Committee, comprising senior staff, to promote and drive the RAP actions

> becoming a member of Supply Nation to assist in improving supplier diversity in its procurement practices

> development of an Acknowledgement of Country wording for corporate and wider sport use.

The RAP includes as a key objective that the ASC work closely with our system partners to increase the involvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in sport, through its programs and services.

Corporate partners

The ASC has a strong history of successful commercial partnerships with a range of high-profile Australian consumer brands. Most of these partnerships are built on two key elements:

> Brand endorsement — the opportunity to leverage the power of the AIS brand to endorse consumer products

> Product validation — testing provided by the AIS research team, to enhance ongoing product development and validate product claims.

The ASC is delighted to partner with organisations who share a similar passion for sport and a commitment to driving innovation and excellence.

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Our operations

Operational highlights

Technology Road Map

In 2018-19, the ASC implemented a technology and digital modernisation program across Sport Australia and the AIS. The work focused on digitally transforming business services and operations, bringing the organisation to the forefront in engaging and collaborating digitally, and in providing information insights.

Key projects included:

> implementation of cloud-based office productivity software and hybrid-cloud back-office services, which combined with modern security intelligence enables us to work wherever and whenever we need to, while collaborating with partners more easily

> development of a new analytics platform, which provides timely access to decision-making data, bringing existing data sets together to provide a more holistic view of the ASC, and combining this with third-party data to give insights into sport system performance.

In line with our strategic priority to improve the capability of the sport sector, the ASC has now commenced a program to extend the capability built internally under the Technology Roadmap out to the sport sector. This project aims to help our partners better focus on their customers and improve their use of customer data and engagement tools.

Top rating for AIS Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre — Exceeding National Quality

In August 2018, the AIS Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre achieved one of the highest ratings under the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education, receiving the rating of ‘Exceeding the National Quality’.

The centre has already been awarded the Excellent rating from the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA), which is the highest national standard that a childcare service can achieve under ACECQA’s National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education and Care.

The Centre is one of 47 education and care services which currently have the Excellent rating nationwide, and one of only 16 services nationwide to have achieved the Excellent rating more than once.

The AIS Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre is a work-based service offering care for children aged under five. The service is available to parents employed at the ASC and NSO staff and athletes who work on site.

tour participants

131,000

visits to the AIS

campus in Bruce

total event

tickets sold

589,000 65,000

SITE SIZE > 65 HECTARES

38 Number

of buildings

and venues

Bruce > 35 Yarralumla > 1 Pizzey Park > 1

ETC > 1

NSOS ON SITE

19 16 > Bruce 1 > Yarralumla 1 > Pizzey Park

1 > ETC

80,000 total number of bed nights

INCLUDING 43,000 HIGH PERFORMANCE BED NIGHTS

customer

satisfaction

85%

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OUR ORGANISATION

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Site management

The ASC operates facilities, residential services and other activities for high performance NSO programs at the AIS Canberra campus. The campus is also used by a variety of community, sporting and commercial groups and is a popular national attraction for visitors. In addition, the ASC operates strategic sports training facilities at Pizzey Park (Gold Coast) and at Varese in Italy and operated from leased premises in Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. Offices in Brisbane and Perth were closed by 31 July 2019 and the Adelaide office will close by 31 December 2019.

In 2018-19, the ASC engaged in the development of an initial and detailed business case to present options to ensure that the AIS remains a source of pride, inspiration and international success. The initial business case was approved and work on the detailed business case commenced in November 2018. The detailed business case is due to be presented to Government for consideration in 2019-20.

Site operations continued to operate in increasingly ageing facilities with a focus on safety, compliance and meeting high performance sport outcomes. Critical infrastructure decision-making is being considered in conjunction with the likely long-term functionality of each of the assets. In 2018-19, the ASC undertook several key facility refurbishment projects in line with our strategic direction, including:

> retiling of the recovery centre pools to ensure WH&S safety

> design work for the replacement of mechanical systems for the Testing and Training Pool/Recovery Centre and Multi Sports Hall, with construction work leading up to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

> replacing the turf to training field 1

> replacing the aluminium composite panels to the facade of the Residence of Champions to mitigate a potential fire threat

> internal refurbishments of the AIS Rowing Centre (Yarralumla), including replacing the athlete kitchen and modifications to the gym layout and flooring

> modifications to the 3D printing and fabrication workshop in AIS Applied Technology and Innovation

> improvements to the physiotherapy and medical areas

> replacement of the Gerflor to the volleyball courts.

Environment and heritage

The ASC Environmental Management System is based on the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems (ISO 1401:2004). It comprises policy objectives, targets and procedures for monitoring and review. A fundamental goal of the ASC’s Environmental Policy is to comply with Australian Government environmental policies, initiatives and legislative requirements.

A recent focus on the development of an Energy Management Plan for the ASC has led to the instigation of an external audit on energy consumption at the ASC. The audit clearly identified the need for a strategic plan to guide improvement of the Building Management System (BMS) to incorporate monitoring and control of asset energy use. Furthermore, an increase in metering to gather data for analysis will provide a platform for setting energy targets for the future. This initiative will be fundamental for the design of any future campus developments.

During 2018-19, the ASC continued to monitor its energy and water usage and implemented specific environmental initiatives. Key activities included:

> continued lighting upgrades as part of project work or end of life replacement, to install energy efficient LED light fittings and improve lighting controls

> continued monitoring of water, gas and electricity usage

> continued identification as an accredited recycler by ACTSmart

> ongoing operation of the organic waste recycling program, which is breaking down 1,000kg of waste per week across four worm farms

> implementation of improved waste infrastructure to assist in waste segregation and minimise contamination of waste streams

> introduction of E-Waste and battery hazardous waste to the Sport Australia/AIS waste streams

> continued staff and visitor waste education which has resulted in high volumes of waste diversion through nine different waste streams, and has led to a further 2.2 per cent decrease in waste to landfill, with overall waste to landfill now at 29.7 per cent.

The ASC continued to enhance its capability to identify and manage its buildings and artefacts of heritage or cultural significance. In 2018-19, the ASC:

> continued operation of the Heritage and Culture Committee to oversee the ASC’s heritage commitments

> continued to review and add items to the ASC Heritage Collection

> continued publishing the online history of AIS scholarship holders, including completion of sections on swimming, netball, men’s football, athletics, basketball and gymnastics

> commenced work on developing and implementing displays for the Visitors Centre focusing on celebrating and recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander athletes

> installed a commemorative Sports and the Armistice display in the AIS Visitor Centre which attracted and informed large numbers of visitors to the site on the importance of sport as a catalyst for peace and healing

> installed State of Origin and Year of the World Cup displays in the AIS Visitor Centre

> carried out rectification works on the Sydney 2000 Wheelchair Basketballer statue.

No property with heritage values was acquired or disposed of during 2018-19.

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Authority and directions

Legislation requirements

The ASC’s enabling legislation is the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 (ASC Act), which defines the Commission’s role, corporate governance and financial management framework. As a corporate Commonwealth entity, the ASC is accountable to the Minister for Sport.

The ASC’s delivery of its outcomes is guided by its governance framework. This framework includes the ASC’s enabling legislation and other legislative instruments, managerial and organisational structures, corporate policies and strategies, and resource management practices.

The objects of the ASC are set out in section 6 of the ASC Act. They are:

(a) to provide leadership in the development of sport in Australia

(b) to encourage increased participation and improved performance by Australians in sport

(c) to provide resources, services and facilities to enable Australians to pursue and achieve excellence in sport while also furthering their educational and vocational skills and other aspects of their personal development

(d) to improve the sporting abilities of Australians generally through the improvement of the standards of sports coaches

(e) to foster cooperation in sport between Australia and other countries through the provision of access to resources, services and facilities related to sport

(f) to encourage the private sector to contribute to the funding of sport to supplement assistance by the Commonwealth.

The functions of the ASC are set out in section 7 of the ASC Act. They are:

(a) to advise the Minister in relation to the development of sport

(b) to coordinate activities in Australia for the development of sport

(c) to develop and implement programmes that promote equality of access to, and participation in, sport by all Australians

(d) to develop and implement programmes for the recognition and development of:

(i) persons who excel, or who have the potential to excel, in sport

(ii) persons who have achieved, or have the potential to achieve, standards of excellence as sports coaches, umpires, referees or officials essential to the conduct of sport

(e) to initiate, encourage and facilitate research and development in relation to sport

(f) to undertake research and development related to sports science and sports medicine

(g) to provide sports medicine services and sports sciences services to persons participating in programmes of the Commission

(h) to establish, manage and maintain facilities for the purpose of the Commission

(j) to collect and distribute information, and provide advice, on matters related to the activities of the Commission

Gas consumption (GJ)

2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

40,000

50,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0

Electricity consumption (kWh)

2010-11 2009-10 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

9,500,000

9,000,000

8,500,000

7,500,000

8,000,000

7,000,000

Water consumption (KL)

2010-11 2009-10 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

100,000

120,000

80,000

60,000

20,000

40,000

0

Note that icon water only estimated water consumption from 2014-2016, with actual water readings resuming on 1 January 2017.

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(k) for the purpose of fostering cooperation in sport between Australia and other countries, to provide access to persons from other countries to the resources, services and facilities of the Commission

(m) to raise money through the Australian Sports Foundation, or by other means, for the purpose of the Commission

(n) to administer and expend money appropriated by the Parliament, or raised in accordance with paragraph (m), for the purpose of the Commission

(p) to consult and cooperate with appropriate authorities of the Commonwealth, of the states and of the territories, and with other persons, associations and organisations in matters related to the activities of the Commission

(q) to provide advice on matters related to sport to the Australian Olympic Federation or other persons, bodies or associations

(r) to cooperate with national and international sporting organisations in aiming to foster a sporting environment that is free from the unsanctioned use of performance enhancing drugs and doping methods.

Ministerial direction

For the 2018-19 reporting period, two Ministers have been responsible for sport. Senator the Honourable Bridget McKenzie MP was Minister for Sport from 20 December 2017 to 29 May 2019. Senator the Honourable Richard Colbeck was appointed Minister for Sport on 29 May 2019.

Neither Minister McKenzie nor Minister Colbeck made any directions to the ASC under subsection 11(1) of the ASC Act during the reporting period.

No government policy orders were issued to the ASC under section 22 of the PGPA Act during the reporting period.

Board and committees

Board appointments

The ASC Board is the accountable authority under the PGPA Act. The ASC Act provides for between eight and 13 members, appointed by the responsible Minister, and the Secretary of the Department embracing the Federal Sport portfolio.

On 13 December 2018, the Board welcomed the appointment of four new members, including Ms Amanda Laing, Ms Pippa Downes, Mr Kurt Fearnley AO and Mr Andrew Ireland. Further, on 3 May 2019, The Hon. Hugh Delahunty was also appointed as a Commissioner of the Board. With the addition of these new members, the Board has a significant breadth of expertise and experience across a range of areas including sport, government, media, legal, banking, finance, and politics.

In July 2018, Ms Alisa Camplin Warner OAM resigned as a Commissioner of the ASC Board. Her resignation was effective prior to the first Board meeting of 2018-19, and therefore she did not attend any meetings during the financial year.

Ms Danielle Roche’s term as a Commissioner of the Board ceased in May 2019 and Ms Katherine Bates’ term as a Commissioner of the Board ceased in December 2018.

Board members

John Wylie am — Chair

John Wylie is Principal of investment firm Tanarra Group. He was previously CEO of the Australian business of global financial services firm Lazard; co-founded advisory and investment firm Carnegie Wylie & Company in 2000, which was acquired by Lazard in 2007; and was Chair of investment bank Credit Suisse First Boston in Australia. In these roles, Mr Wylie has advised companies and governments globally for over 25 years.

In addition to his role at the ASC, Mr Wylie is President of the Library Board of Victoria, a Trustee of the Rhodes Scholarship Trust at Oxford University. He was formerly Chairman of the Melbourne Cricket Ground Trust, and in that role chaired the MCG Redevelopment Steering Committee for the 2006 Commonwealth Games. He is a former board member and Honorary Treasurer of the Howard Florey Institute for Neuroscience and a former Director of CSR Limited.

Mr Wylie holds a Master of Philosophy degree from Oxford University where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a Bachelor of Commerce with First Class Honours from the University of Queensland. He was made a member of the Order of Australia in 2007.

He was appointed to the ASC Board on 10 September 2012 and is also Chair of the ASC Governance and Executive Performance Committee.

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Gabrielle Trainor ao

Gabrielle Trainor was a founding member of the Greater Western Sydney Giants and was appointed an AFL Commissioner in 2016.

A former lawyer, journalist and public sector executive, Ms Trainor has served on boards in the public and private sectors for more than 20 years across areas such as sports, infrastructure, urban development, public transport, tourism, construction, arts and culture, Indigenous advancement and welfare.

Ms Trainor was appointed to the ASC Board on 5 October 2017. At the August 2018 Board meeting it was agreed Ms Trainor be appointed as a member of the Governance and Executive Performance Committee.

Jennifer Morris oam

Jennifer Morris was appointed as a Non-Executive Director of Fortescue Metals Group in November 2016. Ms Morris is a former Partner in the Consulting Division of Deloitte, where she specialised in complex large-scale business transformation programs and strategy development. Ms Morris holds a senior position at the Minderoo Foundation as Chief Executive Officer of the Walk Free Foundation and part of her role is leading the Bali Process Government and Business Forum. She has senior corporate governance experience and is a former Director of the Fremantle Football Club and the Western Australian Institute of Sport. She was also the Chairperson of the Board of Healthway, the Government’s peak health promotion body.

Ms Morris was a member of the Australian Women’s Hockey team from 1991 to 2000, where she won Olympic gold medals at the Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. In 1997, she was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia. She is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a Fellow of Leadership WA, an affiliate member of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand, a member of the Vice Chancellor’s List, Curtin University, holds a Bachelor of Arts (Psychology and Journalism) received with Distinction and completed the Finance for Executives at INSEAD.

Ms Morris was appointed to the Board on 22 June 2015 and is a member of the Governance and Executive Performance Committee. Ms Morris’ tenure on the ASC Board was extended for a further 3 years in December 2018.

Andrea Mitchell

Andrea Mitchell has had a wide-ranging professional and voluntary career in the sport industry.

Through her work with the WA Department of Sport and Recreation in the areas of youth sport, organisational development and regional services, she has an extensive knowledge and understanding of the sport industry and the value of sport to the community.

Ms Mitchell has been President of Tennis West, a Director of Tennis Australia and a Director of the Hopman Cup. She has also served on boards for child safety, people with disability, aged care, and organising committees for international sporting events.

Ms Mitchell was elected to the WA Parliament in 2008 and served on committees and as the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Mental Health, Child Protection and Disability Services, before being appointed to Cabinet as the Minister for Mental Health and Child Protection.

Ms Mitchell was appointed to the ASC Board on 15 November 2017.

Andrew Plympton am

Andrew Plympton has a lifelong passion for sport, particularly sailing, where he has been competing at the highest level for more than 45 years. He has won a world championship and numerous national and state titles in international classes and ocean-racing yachts.

Mr Plympton has held a number of positions in sport administration, including chairman/president of Australian Football League (AFL) club St Kilda for eight years before retiring in 2000. He was the president of Yachting Australia for more than seven years and was elected to the Australian Olympic Committee in 2008. He is currently a director of the Australian Olympic Foundation Limited and is a member of the Audit Committee. He is Chairman of three ASX listed companies, a director of one, and director of an NZX company.

Mr Plympton was appointed to the ASC Board in January 2011 and is the Chair of the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee.

Danielle Roche oam

Danielle Roche is a former member of the Australian Women’s Hockey team, the Hockeyroos, and won a gold medal at the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games.

Ms Roche was a Director of Hockey Australia for seven years and holds a Master of Business Administration. She has been an external member of an advisory board to a strategic Government advisory group comprised of Deputy Secretaries and Department Heads of Defence Housing Authority and the Australian Department of Home Affairs and a Chairperson of the National Australia Day Council. She left Hockey Australia to take up a position on the St Kilda Football Club Board in 2012.

Ms Roche has held finance and commercial positions with Telstra and has also been a Director at UBS, a Partner at Evans and Partners, and a Director of a privately owned fraud and risk management business.

She was awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia in 1997 for her service to sport.

Ms Roche was appointed to the ASC Board on 4 May 2016. Ms Roche’s last meeting as a Commissioner of the ASC Board was 2 May 2019.

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Katherine Bates

Katherine Bates is a renowned international cyclist who has represented Australia at the highest levels of road and track cycling. Ms Bates now works in broadcasting and maintains a close involvement with the cycling community at the grassroots and elite levels. Ms Bates has a Bachelor of Business (Accounting) and has sat on several boards including Bicycle NSW, Cycling Australia Women’s Commission and Cycling Australia Athletes’ Commission.

On her retirement from professional cycling at the end of the 2011 season, Ms Bates turned her passion and knowledge of sport into a new career and is regularly seen on Australia’s major networks including Channel 7, 9, ABC, SBS and Fox Sports News.

In addition to her broadcasting duties, Ms Bates is highly sought after as a motivational speaker, and executive coach, where she applies the lessons and experience of elite sport to facilitate leadership development in the corporate environment.

Ms Bates was appointed to the Board on 22 June 2015 and is a member of the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee. Ms Bates’ term as a Commissioner of the ASC Board ceased as at 13 December 2018.

The Hon. Pat Farmer am

Pat Farmer is a multiple world record holder for endurance running. He has run from the North Pole to the South, and across Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam and North America. Mr Farmer served eight years as a Member of Australia’s Parliament, with three years as Parliamentary Secretary for Education, Science and Training.

Winner of ‘Achiever of the Year’ (2000), awarded by Prime Minister John Howard, Mr Farmer has raised millions of dollars for causes during his 20-year running career, including Lifeline, the Cancer Council, Australian Red Cross and Diabetes Australia.

Mr Farmer was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2015 for significant service to the community through fundraising support for charitable organisations, to ultra-marathons and to Parliament in Australia.

Mr Farmer was appointed to the Board on 7 November 2014.

Stephen Moneghetti am

Steve Moneghetti represented Australia in the marathon at four Commonwealth Games, winning gold (1994), silver (1990) and two bronze (1986 and 1998) medals. Mr Moneghetti achieved three top ten finishes in his four appearances at the Olympic Games (1988, 1992, 1996 and 2000). He also attended six World Athletics Championships, winning a bronze medal in the marathon event in Athens in 1997.

Mr Moneghetti was Mayor of the Commonwealth Games Village at the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games, and the Australian team’s Chef de Mission for the Delhi 2010 and Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. From 2001 to 2010 he served as Chair of the Board of the Victorian Institute of Sport, and also chaired the Victorian state review into physical and sport education in schools (the Moneghetti Report).

Mr Moneghetti is active in the corporate community and is currently a sports consultant with his own business. Mr Moneghetti is also on the executive board of the Victorian Olympic Council.

Mr Moneghetti received an Australian Sports Medal in 2000 and a Centenary Medal in 2001. In 2014 Mr Moneghetti was awarded an Order of Australia medal for significant service to athletics as a marathon runner, administrator and mentor to young athletes.

Mr Moneghetti was appointed to the Board on 22 June 2015 and is a member of the Governance and Executive Performance Committee. On 13 December 2018 Mr Moneghetti was appointed as the Deputy Chair of the ASC Board for a period of three years.

Pippa Downes

Pippa Downes is a respected Non-Executive Director with over 25 years of distinguished career achievements in the international business and finance sector. Pippa currently sits on the board of the Australian Technology Innovators (Infotrack, LEAP legal software), ALE Property Group, Windlab Limited, the ASX Clearing and Settlement companies, and the Sydney Olympic Park Authority. Ms Downes is a member of the ASX Disciplinary Tribunal and is a former Director of Swimming Australia and the Swimming Australia Foundation.

Ms Downes has had a successful international banking and finance career and has led the local derivative and investment arms of several of the world’s premier investment banks. Her most recent role was as a Managing Director and Equity Partner of Goldman Sachs in Australia. She is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and Women Corporate Directors and in 2016 was named as one of the Westpac/AFR’s 100 Women of Influence for her work in diversity.

She holds a Master of Applied Finance from Macquarie University and Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) from University of California, Berkeley. Ms Downes was a dual international athlete having been a member of the Australian swim team and represented Hong Kong at the International Rugby Sevens.

Ms Downes commenced as a Commissioner of the Board on 13 December 2018 and was appointed to the FAR Committee in February 2019.

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Kurt Fearnley ao

Kurt Fearnley is a three-time Paralympic gold medallist and two-time Commonwealth Games gold medallist.

His incredible athletics career for Australia spanned five Paralympic Games campaigns, culminating with his wheelchair marathon victory at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.

He has won more than 40 marathons, including New York, Chicago and London, and is the 2019 NSW Australian of the Year. In 2009, he crawled the Kokoda track in Papua New Guinea to raise awareness of men’s health.

Mr Fearnley is an icon and advocate for people with disabilities in sport and the broader community. He is a board member of the Australian Paralympic Committee, Newcastle Permanent Charitable Foundation and member of the International Paralympic Committee’s Athlete Advisory Council.

He was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2018, and the same year received an Honorary Doctorate from Griffith University for his contribution to sport and disability advocacy. He has a Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Human Movement from Charles Sturt University.

Mr Fearnley commenced as a Commissioner of the Board on 13 December 2018.

Andrew Ireland

Andrew Ireland is a former AFL player and former highly successful football administrator who was involved with several premierships throughout his career.

Mr Ireland joined the Sydney Swans in 2002 as General Manager of Football before taking over as CEO in September 2009, a role he held until his retirement in December 2018. Prior to these positions, he held the role of CEO at the Brisbane Bears and Brisbane Lions between 1990 and 2001.

Mr Ireland oversaw a strong and successful football program during his time at the Swans, along with outstanding growth in commercial areas of the club. He holds a Bachelor of Science, is a Graduate Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is a Life Member of the AFL, the Sydney Swans and the Brisbane Lions.

Mr Ireland was appointed commissioner of the ASC on 13 December 2018 and is a member of the Finance Audit and Risk Committee.

Amanda Laing

Amanda Laing is an experienced media executive who has worked across free to air television, subscription television, print, digital and video on demand, with particular expertise in the management and exploitation of content and rights, the structuring and negotiation of sports rights deals, and media mergers and acquisitions.

Ms Laing began her media career as General Counsel for ACP Magazines, with responsibility for the legal affairs of its businesses in Australia, New Zealand, South East Asia and the United Kingdom. She was then Group General Counsel across the magazine, television, digital, ticketing and events businesses of Nine Entertainment. Following the listing of the Nine business on the Australian Stock Exchange, Amanda was appointed Commercial Director and then Managing Director of Nine Entertainment Co. (owner of Channel 9). She was also on the Board of Nine’s subscription video on demand business, STAN.

Since leaving Nine Entertainment in mid-2017, Ms Laing has attended the Stanford University Graduate School of Business and currently consults to Foxtel on strategic media and commercial matters. In March 2018, Amanda joined the Australian Rugby League Commission.

Throughout her career Ms Laing has advised Boards on a broad variety of legal, regulatory and commercial issues and held Board positions with media companies and industry bodies.

Ms Laing commenced as a Commissioner of the ASC Board on 13 December 2018.

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty

Hugh Delahunty is a former AFL player and politician with extensive experience in board governance, sport policy, and professional and grassroots sport.

Mr Delahunty played for Essendon in the Victorian Football League in the 1970s and has played and coached sports including football, basketball, tennis, swimming and golf.

As Chairman of Commissioners at Mildura Rural City Council in 1995 and 1996 he oversaw the amalgamation of three councils and was the first mayor of the restructured Horsham Rural City Council.

Mr Delahunty was elected a Member of the Victorian State Parliament from 1999 to 2014 and served as Minister for Sport and Recreation and Minister for Veterans’ Affairs.

He served on the board of VicHealth from 2003 to 2010 and has a wide variety of experience and knowledge regarding regional and rural issues.

Mr Delahunty was appointed to the ASC Board on 3 May 2019.

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Glenys Beauchamp psm — Ex Officio

Glenys Beauchamp was appointed Secretary of the Department of Health on 18 September 2017.

Ms Beauchamp has had an extensive career in the Australian Public Service at senior levels with responsibility for a number of significant government programs covering economic and social policy areas. She has more than 25 years’ experience in the public sector and began her career as a graduate in the Industry Commission.

Prior to her current role, Ms Beauchamp was Secretary, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science (2013-2017) and Secretary of the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport (2010-2013). She has served as Deputy Secretary in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (2009-2010) and the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (2002-2009). Ms Beauchamp has held a number of executive positions in the ACT Government including Deputy Chief Executive, Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services, and Deputy CEO, Department of Health. She also held senior positions in housing, energy and utilities functions with the ACT Government.

She received a Public Service Medal in 2010 for coordinating Australian Government support during the 2009 Victorian bushfires, and has an economics degree from the Australian National University and an MBA from the University of Canberra.

Board activity

The Board met on six occasions in the 2018-2019 period, and also held a strategy session in June 2019.

In addition to a range of governance and compliance responsibilities such as the endorsement of the ASC’s Financial and Performance Statements, the Corporate Plan and the Annual Report, in 2018-19 the Board focused on:

> the future strategy development of the ASC to create a more active Australia and getting more Australians to move more often

> supporting the development of active places and infrastructure and encouraging active communities

> fostering partnerships with industry, government and the education sectors to promote generational change.

The Board also focused on strategies to enable a united and collaborative approach to high performance systems that support athletes to achieve international podium success.

To increase sports’ ability to deliver on strategic priorities and enhance their ability to grow, the Board has continued to focus its efforts on governance reform in sport and working closely with sport to drive accelerated adoption of contemporary, cost-effective governance structures.

The Board continues to retain a key focus on safe and ethical sport while ensuring that the organisation is adhering to national principles for child safe organisations. The Sport Australia Board Child Safe Commitment Statement outlines the strength of this position. The Board has been integral in providing governance oversight for the AIS Site Strategy project, including examining the redevelopment options for the AIS campus which represent the best investment strategy for athletes and sport in Australia.

With a view to improving pathways for talented young athletes, the Board has been heavily involved in seeking investment in a pathways funding program to promote the engagement, progression and retention of women and athletes in regional areas, to implement world leading sports technology to assist athletes on the talent pathway, and to provide mentoring in conjunction with Australia’s greatest sporting achievers.

Table 13: ASC Board meeting attendance

Name Position Meetings eligible to attend*** Meetings attended

John Wylie AM Chair 7 7

Andrea Mitchell Member 7 7

Andrew Plympton Member 7 7

Danielle Roche OAM* Member 6 6

Gabrielle Trainor AO Member 7 6

Jennifer Morris OAM Member 7 6

Katherine Bates** Member 2 2

Pat Farmer AM Member 7 7

Stephen Moneghetti AM Deputy Chair 7 7

Pippa Downes Member 4 4

Kurt Fearnley AO Member 4 3

Andrew Ireland Member 4 4

Amanda Laing Member 4 2

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty Member 1 1

Glenys Beauchamp PSM Ex-officio 7 7

* appointment ceased May 2019

** appointment ceased December 2018

*** includes the June strategy session

The Minister for Sport, Senator the Honourable Richard Colbeck, attended the June 2019 Board strategy session.

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Board committees

Finance, Audit and Risk Committee

The ASC Finance, Audit and Risk Committee (FAR Committee) provides independent advice and assurance to the Board on matters relating to ASC financial management and strategic planning, efficiency, physical assets, risk management and all aspects of internal and external audit, compliance matters and NSO finances.

During the reporting period the Committee, chaired by Andrew Plympton, continued to have a focus on reviewing and reporting on NSO finances, reviewing the ASC’s financial statements, reviewing the appropriateness of the ASC’s annual performance statements, monitoring the ASC’s PGPA Act legislative compliance, risk management, cyber security, oversight of the ASC’s capital and infrastructure projects, the Child Safety Implementation Plan, the AIS site strategy and business case, Technology Roadmap project and overseeing the internal audit program.

Katherine Bates finished her term on the FAR Committee in August 2018 and was replaced by Pippa Downes who commenced in February 2019.

Robert Dalton was reappointed as an independent member on 1 May 2019.

The FAR Committee met on five occasions during 2018-19.

Table 14: ASC Finance, Audit and Risk Committee meeting attendance

Name Position Meetings eligible to attend Meetings attended

Andrew Plympton Chair 5 5

Katherine Bates Member 2 2

Pippa Downes Member 2 2

Robert Dalton* Member 5 5

*Independent member

Governance and Executive Performance Committee

The ASC Governance and Executive Performance Committee (GEP Committee) provides independent advice to the Board on better practice corporate governance for the ASC and NSOs, and on executive performance and remuneration issues.

During the reporting period the GEP Committee:

> managed the performance reviews for both the Sport Australia and AIS CEOs

> provided guidance for the refreshed ASC employee performance management framework designed to incorporate contemporary best-practice thinking and drive excellence across the organisation

> supported the implementation of a refreshed CEO performance framework

> provided ongoing oversight of the Athletes Advisory Committee addressing athlete issues within the high performance sporting community

> further advanced governance reform adoption and implementation for NSOs

> coordinated the independent review of the ASC Board operations

> continued to monitor the Board and ASC senior management conflict of interest process.

The GEP Committee met four times in 2018-19.

Table 15: ASC GEP Committee meeting attendance

Name Position Meetings eligible to attend Meetings attended

John Wylie AM Chair 4 4

Jennifer Morris OAM Member 4 4

Steve Moneghetti AM Member 4 4

Gabrielle Trainor Member 3 2

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Governance

Planning and accountability

The ASC’s planning and accountability approach supports the organisation to deliver effective outcomes upon outcomes and meet legislative responsibilities as set out in the PGPA Act and the ASC Act.

The ASC is currently implementing a practical, consistent and timely approach to strategic planning, as part of the broader strategic review which was undertaken in 2017-18. Key elements of the strategic planning framework include the development and implementation of a new organisational performance management framework and an enterprise-wide approach to reporting.

The ASC planning and reporting framework is based on the principles of continuous improvement and the requirements set out in the PGPA Act and ASC Act. Key elements of the ASC planning and reporting framework include the annual cycle of planning, an enterprise-wide approach to performance reporting and annual external reporting through the Annual Performance Statements.

The Corporate Plan is our primary planning document and covers a rolling four-year period. This is complemented by the Portfolio Budget Statements, division planning and the employee performance management framework. The 2018-2022 Corporate Plan published in August 2018 outlined the new strategic direction for Sport Australia and the AIS following the launch of Sport 2030 and the organisational review undertaken in 2017. Looking ahead, the ASC has developed a 2019-2023 Corporate Plan, which refines and updates the 2018-2022 Corporate Plan.

Reporting against performance measures occurs internally and externally. Reporting allows the Board, management and staff to monitor progress towards achieving our organisational objectives, the range of work delivered and the impact it has made to the Australian public. Internal reporting, including Board and Executive-level dashboards, bring together relevant organisational performance results, operational data and organisational health and financial information. These reports are designed to aid in decision-making and provide an enterprise-level view of performance across the seven strategic priorities. External reporting is conducted through the Annual Performance Statements in the Annual Report.

Risk management

During 2018-19, the ASC undertook an extensive program to update and revitalise its approach to risk management to improve the way that the organisation manages its strategic, enterprise and other risks. This included a full review and development of an updated Risk Management Policy and Framework and a Risk Assessment Process. The ASC’s Risk Management Framework is consistent with the principles of the PGPA Act and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy and is based on current best practice. The Risk Management Framework assists the organisation to monitor and manage the risks involved in its activities to optimise opportunities, minimise adverse consequences and to use risk to innovate.

The ASC also developed and published a Risk Appetite Statement in 2019, which identifies the risk trade-offs to implement our strategy and support well informed decision-making. It is designed to help the organisation understand what constitutes acceptable risk taking to take advantage of opportunities that arise.

The risk management refresh program also involved an enterprise wide-consultation process to refresh and update the Enterprise Risk Register and Strategic Risk Register. The Enterprise Risk Register was updated to align with our seven strategic priorities and the revised operating model, and reflects our approach to managing risks that threaten the achievement of our outcomes. The Enterprise Risk Register identifies the different types of risks, and the relevant monitoring and controls that mitigate risks to align with our defined risk appetite and tolerances.

The ASC achieved a risk maturity level of ‘Advanced’ in the 2019 Comcover benchmarking program, an increase from the 2018 program, when the ASC achieved ‘Integrated’.

Other key risk management activities undertaken during 2018-19 included:

> Regular reporting on risk management to the FAR committee

> Internal audit program

> PGPA Compliance monitoring and reporting.

In 2019-20, the ASC will continue to embed the new Risk Management Framework. To enable us to measure our risk culture, the ASC included risk management in the 2019 staff engagement survey — conducted in July 2019 — that provided greater transparency on how risk is understood across the ASC. The results of this survey are being used to inform a new risk management staff training package, which is being delivered through the new Enterprise Learning and Leadership program.

INPUTS PLAN MEASURE REPORT

PERFORMANCE MEASURES (PBS & INTERNAL)

ANNUAL REPORT (INCLUDING ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS)

BOARD & EXECUTIVE DASHBOARD

INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW

BUDGET

PORTFOLIO BUDGET STATEMENT (PBS)

CORPORATE PLAN

DIVISION PLANS

INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN

ASC PRIORITIES

DIVISION PRIORITIES

SPORT 2030

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Internal audit

The ASC’s internal audit program provides independent, management-orientated advice on the ASC’s operations and performance. The objective of internal audit is to:

> provide assurance to the ASC Executive and the FAR Committee that the key risks to achieving the ASC’s objectives are being appropriately mitigated and our internal controls are effective

> assist management to improve business performance.

During 2018-19, an internal audit was conducted on the ASC’s on-boarding processes. The audit examined the effectiveness and appropriateness of the current on-boarding approach and sought to identify improvements to streamline processes and reduce duplication. The focus of the internal audit was the process and practices used to on-board new employees who commenced between 1 January 2018 and 31 December 2018.

Throughout the year the FAR Committee oversaw implementation of internal audit recommendations, including the Athlete and Child Safety Implementation Plan resulting from an audit into child safety practices at the ASC.

Fraud

The ASC continued to fulfil its requirements in relation to fraud control, taking all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud and to investigate, and to the extent possible, recover the proceeds of fraud against the ASC. The ASC has a documented fraud risk assessment and fraud control plan, and has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes to meet the specific needs of the ASC.

During 2018-19, the ASC commenced a review of its fraud control plan and fraud risk assessment and continued to implement recommendations from the 2017-19 Fraud Control Plan to strengthen internal controls. The ASC also made updates to its online fraud control training and further promoted the fraud awareness training package to new staff members. During the reporting period, there were no identified instances of fraud.

Compliance

The ASC utilises a combination of self-reporting and periodic review to monitor and report on compliance. Any instances of non-compliance with PGPA legislation are reported to the ASC Executive and the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee. The ASC mitigates non-compliance through the publication of delegation schedules and Financial Management Instructions to support decision-making.

For the 2018-19 reporting period, the ASC did not have any significant issues reported to the Minister for Sport or the Minister for Finance that related to non-compliance with the finance law.

Indemnities and insurance

The ASC is insured through the Australian Government’s self-managed fund, Comcover. Insurance includes directors’ and officers’ liability cover to the extent permitted by the PGPA Act. The entire premium is paid by the ASC. In 2018-19, the ASC did not give any indemnity to either current or former officer of the ASC.

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External scrutiny

The ASC’s operations are subject to scrutiny from a number of external bodies, such as the Australian National Audit Office, the Commonwealth Ombudsman and the Australian Information Commissioner. This section reports on audits, reviews, inquiries and legal actions relevant to the ASC in 2018-19.

Reports by the Australian National Audit Office

In 2018-19, the Australian National Audit Office did not table in Parliament any reports involving the ASC.

The ASC is currently subject to one performance audit by the Australian National Audit Office, Award of funding under the Community Sport Infrastructure Program, which is expected to be tabled in Parliament in 2019-20.

Reports by the Commonwealth Ombudsman

The Commonwealth Ombudsman did not release any reports during 2018-19 that involved the ASC or that had, or might have, a significant impact on the ASC’s operations.

Decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner

The Australian Information Commissioner did not make any decisions that involved the ASC in 2018-19.

Judiciary

There were not any judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals during 2018-19 that had, or may have, significant impact on the operations of the ASC.

Privacy

In 2018-19, the ASC did not receive any complaints that it had breached the privacy of an individual.

In 2018-19, the ASC did not report any breaches under the Notifiable Data Breaches scheme.

There were two breaches of privacy recorded by the ASC in 2018-19 which affected 48 internal staff. Both incidents were the result of payroll delivery errors by an external service provider. The ASC immediately remediated the issues and all affected staff were informed. The ASC subsequently received compensation from the external service provider.

Freedom of information

The ASC received 15 Freedom of Information requests in 2018-19. Four requests were granted in full, three were granted in part, three were refused, two were withdrawn and three are ongoing.

Processing times were met in all completed requests.

As defined by section 8(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 1982, the ASC continued to publish on its website the information required by the Information Publication Scheme.

89 88

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 OUR ORGANISATION

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

91 90

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL OUTCOMES 92

Financial outcomes 92

Financial position 93

Asset management 93

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT 94

STATEMENT FROM THE CHAIR OF THE BOARD, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 96

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 97

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

91 90

Summary of financial outcomes

Financial outcomes

The ASC incurred an operating loss of $40.322m in 2018-19, primarily relating to the timing of revenue associated with the Community Sport Infrastructure (CSI) grant program.

The CSI program was a new $102.500m program announced by the government in 2018-19. $42.500m of revenue associated with this program will be recognised in 2019-20 with the first tranche of funds received on 2 July 2019. This timing loss has no impact on the ASC’s ongoing financial position.

Table 16: 2018-19 results to 2017-18 and to the 2018-19 Original Budget estimates

Actual 2018-19 $m

Actual 2017-18 $m

Variance $m

Actual 2018-19 $m

Original Budget

2018-19 $m

Variance $m

Income 402.1 299.1 103.0 402.1 336.2 65.9

Expenses 442.4 314.2 128.2 442.4 346.0 96.4

Surplus/(Deficit) (40.3) (15.1) (25.2) (40.3) (9.8) (30.5)

Note: Original Budget figures are based on the 2018-19 Portfolio Budget Statements.

Key elements to the financial statement results are primarily associated with revenue from Government and grants expenses. The increase in revenue since 2017-18 is primarily due to the new measures introduced in 2018-19, such as Community Sporting Infrastructure, Better Ageing and increased High Performance funding. The overall increase in grant expense was mainly due to increased infrastructure and high performance grants in line with government measures.

The overall ASC performance against the Original Budget position is detailed with the Statement of Comprehensive Income in the financial statements.

Financial position

Key indicators defining the health of the ASC’s financial position are demonstrated by its ability to sustain its net asset base, pay debts as they fall due in the short term and maintain prudent levels of assets to cover long-term liabilities. The ASC is committed to managing within resources provided by government and remains in a positive net asset position as at 30 June 2019.

Asset management

The ASC holds financial and non-financial assets. Financial assets include cash, receivables and term deposits.

Non-financial assets support the operations of the ASC and include land and buildings, computing software and hardware and infrastructure, plant and equipment. Consideration of whole-of-life asset management is undertaken in the context of the ASC’s strategic direction to ensure investments in assets support the achievement of the ASC’s objectives.

93 92

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Sport

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Sports Commission for the year ended 30 June 2017:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Australian Sports Commission as at 30 June 2017 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Australian Sports Commission, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2017 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Statement of Changes in Equity; • Cash Flow Statement; and • Notes to and forming part of the financial statements, comprising significant accounting policies and other

explanatory information.

Basis for Opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Australian Sports Commission in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997 (the Code). I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Australian Sports Commission the Board is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and

the rules made under that Act. The Board is also responsible for such internal control as the Board determines is necessary to enable the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Board is responsible for assessing the Australian Sports Commission’s ability to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Board is also responsible for disclosing matters related to going concern as applicable and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

Independent auditor’s report

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 19 National Circuit BARTON ACT Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for Youth and Sport

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Australian Sports Commission (‘the Entity’) for the year ended 30 June 2019:

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2019 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following statements as at 30 June 2019 and for the year then ended:

• Statement by from the Chair of the Commission, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer; • Statement of Comprehensive Income; • Statement of Financial Position; • Cash Flow Statement; • Statement of Changes in Equity; and

• Notes to and forming part of the financial statements, comprising a Summary of Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates and other explanatory information.

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by the Auditor-General and his delegates. These include the relevant independence requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor-General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As the Accountable Authority of the Entity, the Board is responsible under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of annual financial statements that comply with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Board is also responsible for such internal control as the Board determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

In preparing the financial statements, the Board is responsible for assessing the ability of the Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Board is also responsible for disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate.

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of the financial statements.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

• identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control; • obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures

that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Entity’s internal control; • evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority; • conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of

accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and • evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the

disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

Australian National Audit Office

Josephine Bushell Senior Director

Delegate of the Auditor-General

Canberra

23 September 2019

95 94

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Financial statements

Leverrier Street Bruce ACT 2617 PO Box 176 Belconnen ACT 2616 ABN 67 374 695 240

+61 2 2614 1111 info@sportaus.gov.au sportaus.gov.au

Statement from the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2019

3

Budget Actual Actual

2019 2019 2018

$'000 NET COST OF SERVICES Notes $'000 $'000

EXPENSES

62,271 Employee benefits 1.1A 55,451 61,056

48,294 Suppliers 1.1B 57,727 43,672

210,519 Grants 1.1C 306,629 182,770

24,944 Depreciation and amortisation 2.2A 21,749 23,260

- Impairment loss allowance on financial instruments 1.1D 4 27

- Write-down and impairment of other assets 1.1E 463 197

- Loss from sale of assets - 147

- Resources provided free of charge 88 2,700

- Other expenses 1.1F 340 354

346,028 Total expenses 442,451 314,183

OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue 19,572 Sale of goods and rendering of services 20,641 22,316

492 Contributions from Government entities 2,266 3,189

2,052 Interest 3,202 3,053

587 Rental income 603 599

- Other revenue 1,008 1,748

22,703 Total own-source revenue 27,720 30,905

Gains

- Reversals of impairment losses 4 225

- Gain from sale of assets 59 -

- Total gains 63 225

22,703 Total own-source income 27,783 31,130

323,325 Net cost of service 414,668 283,053

313,479

Revenue from Government (corporate Commonwealth entity payment) 374,346 267,904

(9,846) Surplus/(Deficit) (40,322) (15,149)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to Net cost of services - Changes in asset revaluation reserve 15,597 1,216

- Total other comprehensive income 15,597 1,216

(9,846) Total comprehensive income / (loss) (24,725) (13,933)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

97 96

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2019

4

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Expenses

Employee benefits ($6.820m less than budget) - this is predominantly due to a decrease in average staffing numbers (47 staff) and the corresponding impact on employee provisions.

Suppliers ($9.433m greater than budget) comprises increases in the following:

Contractors - additional costs to fill key employee positions as the impact of the restructure that commenced in 2017-18 was finalised ($2.200m)

AIS Site Project - expenditure associated with the development of a Detailed Business Case for the ASC Site redevelopment. $1.963m was provided for at the 2019-20 Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO).

Sports Sector Support - expansion of new programs focussing on Athlete Wellbeing and Pathways, and High Performance outcomes leading up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics ($3.841m)

MoveitAUS campaign primarily relates to costs associated with the expansion of the campaign in 2018-19.

Grants ($96.110m greater than budget) - additional grant expenditure was incurred in 2018-19 due to measures announced after the Budget was published. These included measures introduced at MYEFO, comprising the Community Sporting Infrastructure (CSI) Round 2 grant program ($30.300m), and High Performance funding for Sport 2030 ($25.104m). Further, as part of the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements, an additional $42.500m was announced as an expansion of the CSI program. The initial portion of this funding was received on 2 July 2019 as part of the Supply Bill, with the balance expected to be received in full in the first half of 2019-20.

Income

Sale of goods and rendering of services ($1.069m greater than budget) - increase in commercial revenue and cost recovery activity ($1.288m).

Contributions from Government entities ($1.774m greater than budget) - additional one-off contributions were received during 2018-19 from Federal and State Government agencies to support sporting initiatives, including MoveitAUS, Play by the Rules and the National Sports Tribunal Funding program.

Interest ($1.150m greater than budget) - due to an increase in the average interest rate received on invested funds during the financial year.

Revenue from Government (corporate Commonwealth entity payment) ($60.867m greater than budget) - funding for additional measures were introduced at MYEFO which included the CSI Round 2 grant program ($30.300m), High Performance funding for Sport 2030 ($25.104m), and the Detailed Business Case for the AIS Site redevelopment ($1.963m).

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2019

5

Budget Actual Actual

2019 2019 2018

$'000 ASSETS Notes $'000 $'000

Financial Assets

7,655 Cash and cash equivalents - on hand and deposit 3 11,849 7,005

6,298 Trade and other receivables 2.1A 9,294 8,588

45,000 Term deposits 3 45,000 75,000

624 Loans 2.1B 610 632

59,577 Total financial assets 66,753 91,225

Non-financial Assets

213,042 Land and buildings 2.2A 205,845 203,813

12,588 Infrastructure, plant and equipment 2.2A 10,809 10,862

4,352 Intangibles 2.2A 5,553 2,326

682 Inventories 477 690

3,697 Prepayments 2,017 1,550

234,361 Total non-financial assets 224,701 219,241

293,938 Total assets 291,454 310,466

LIABILITIES Payables

2,216 Suppliers 2,577 3,938

26 Grant payables 9,097 92

1,716 Other payables 2.3 2,525 4,271

3,958 Total payables 14,199 8,301

Provisions

12,579 Employee leave provisions 4.1 11,526 12,512

67 Property make-good and lease incentive 254 309

12,646 Total provisions 11,780 12,821

16,604 Total Liabilities 25,979 21,122

277,334 Net Assets 265,475 289,344

EQUITY

152,135 Contributed equity 152,135 151,279

193,836 Asset revaluation reserve 210,649 195,052

(68,637) Retained surplus / (accumulated deficit) (97,309) (56,987)

277,334 Total Equity 265,475 289,344

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the year ended 30 June 2019

4

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income

Expenses

Employee benefits ($6.820m less than budget) - this is predominantly due to a decrease in average staffing numbers (47 staff) and the corresponding impact on employee provisions.

Suppliers ($9.433m greater than budget) comprises increases in the following:

Contractors - additional costs to fill key employee positions as the impact of the restructure that commenced in 2017-18 was finalised ($2.200m)

AIS Site Project - expenditure associated with the development of a Detailed Business Case for the ASC Site redevelopment. $1.963m was provided for at the 2019-20 Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO).

Sports Sector Support - expansion of new programs focussing on Athlete Wellbeing and Pathways, and High Performance outcomes leading up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics ($3.841m)

MoveitAUS campaign primarily relates to costs associated with the expansion of the campaign in 2018-19.

Grants ($96.110m greater than budget) - additional grant expenditure was incurred in 2018-19 due to measures announced after the Budget was published. These included measures introduced at MYEFO, comprising the Community Sporting Infrastructure (CSI) Round 2 grant program ($30.300m), and High Performance funding for Sport 2030

($25.104m). Further, as part of the 2019-20 Portfolio Budget Statements, an additional $42.500m was announced as an expansion of the CSI program. The initial portion of this funding was received on 2 July 2019 as part of the Supply Bill, with the balance expected to be received in full in the first half of 2019-20.

Income

Sale of goods and rendering of services ($1.069m greater than budget) - increase in commercial revenue and cost recovery activity ($1.288m).

Contributions from Government entities ($1.774m greater than budget) - additional one-off contributions were received during 2018-19 from Federal and State Government agencies to support sporting initiatives, including MoveitAUS, Play by the Rules and the National Sports Tribunal Funding program.

Interest ($1.150m greater than budget) - due to an increase in the average interest rate received on invested funds during the financial year.

Revenue from Government (corporate Commonwealth entity payment) ($60.867m greater than budget) - funding for additional measures were introduced at MYEFO which included the CSI Round 2 grant program ($30.300m), High Performance funding for Sport 2030 ($25.104m), and the Detailed Business Case for the AIS Site redevelopment ($1.963m).

99 98

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2019

6

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents ($4.194m greater than budget) - due to the timing of grant payments and reduced expenditure on replacement of infrastructure, plant and equipment.

Non-Financial Assets

Land and buildings ($7.197m less than budget) - due to the decision to scale back land and building investments on the Bruce site in Canberra until the Detailed Business Case for future of the AIS Site is finalised.

Liabilities

Grant payables ($9.071m greater than budget) - the ASC recognised payables associated for contracts executed but not paid prior to year-end for approved grants. These predominantly relate to the CSI grant program.

Australian Sports Commission CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2019

7

Budget Actual Actual

2019 2019 2018

$'000 Notes $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received 20,651 Sale of goods and rendering of services 27,607 24,606

- Contributions from Government entities 2,266 3,189

313,479 Receipts from Government 374,346 267,904

2,000 Interest 3,503 2,742

- Net GST received 23,094 17,441

336,130 Total cash received 430,816 315,882

Cash used

(63,022) Employees (56,437) (59,048)

(48,294) Suppliers (67,424) (47,244)

(210,519) Grants (321,227) (196,658)

(321,835) Total cash used (445,088) (302,950)

14,295 Net cash from (used by) operating activities (14,272) 12,932

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received

-

Proceeds from sales of infrastructure, plant and equipment 249 940

64 Repayments of loans and interest 22 2,294

64 Total cash received 271 3,234

Cash used

(28,578) Purchase of infrastructure, plant and equipment (12,011) (11,903)

(28,578) Total cash used (12,011) (11,903)

(28,514) Net cash from (used by) investing activities (11,740) (8,669)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received 856 Appropriations - contributed equity 856 1,069

856 Total cash received 856 1,069

856 Net cash from (used by) financing activities 856 1,069

(13,363) Net increase (decrease) in cash held (25,156) 5,332

66,018

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 82,005 76,673

52,655

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 3 56,849 82,005

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2019

6

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position

Financial Assets

Cash and cash equivalents ($4.194m greater than budget) - due to the timing of grant payments and reduced expenditure on replacement of infrastructure, plant and equipment.

Non-Financial Assets

Land and buildings ($7.197m less than budget) - due to the decision to scale back land and building investments on the Bruce site in Canberra until the Detailed Business Case for future of the AIS Site is finalised.

Liabilities

Grant payables ($9.071m greater than budget) - the ASC recognised payables associated for contracts executed but not paid prior to year-end for approved grants. These predominantly relate to the CSI grant program.

101 100

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2019

8

Budget Variances Commentary

Cash Flow Statement

Operating cash received

Receipts from Government ($60.867m greater than budget) - funding for additional measures were introduced at MYEFO which included the CSI Round 2 grant program ($30.300m), High Performance funding for Sport 2030 ($25.104m), and the Detailed Business Case for the ASC Site redevelopment ($1.963m).

Contributions from Government ($2.266m greater than budget) - increased funding was received during the financial year from both Federal and State Government entities to support Play by the Rules, MoveitAUS and the National Sports Tribunal program.

Operating cash used

Employees ($6.585m less than budget) - predominantly due to a decrease in average staffing numbers (47 staff).

Suppliers ($19.130m greater than budget) - comprises increases in Supplier expenditure and decreases in Supplier and Other Payables. Further increase is due to GST on expenditure, which is not grossed up in the budget.

Grants ($110.708m greater than budget) - additional grant expenditure was incurred in 2018-19 due to measures introduced since the original budget. These measures include the expansion of the Community Sport Infrastructure (CSI) grant program; new High performance grants to National Sporting Organisations (NSOs) for Sport 2030; and additional one-off funding for Paralympics Australia.

Investing cash used

Purchase of infrastrucutre, plant and equipment ($16.567m less than budget) - this is largely due to a number of key projects being put on hold pending the outcomes of the detailed business case for the Bruce site in Canberra.

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the year ended 30 June 2019

9

Retained surplus (accumulated deficit)

Asset revaluation reserve Contributed equity/capital Total equity

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

2019

2018

2019

2018

2019

2018

2019

2018

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period

(56,987)

(41,838)

(58,791)

195,052

193,836

193,836

151,279

150,210

151,279

289,344

302,208

286,324

Adjusted opening balance

(56,987)

(41,838)

(58,791)

195,052

193,836

193,836

151,279

150,210

151,279

289,344

302,208

286,324

Comprehensive income Surplus (Deficit) for the period

(40,322)

(15,149)

(9,846)

-

-

-

-

-

-(40,322)

(15,149)

(9,846)

Other comprehensive income

-

-

-15,597

1,216

-

-

-

-15,597

1,216

-

Total comprehensive income

(40,322)

(15,149)

(9,846)

15,597

1,216

-

-

-

-(24,725)

(13,933)

(9,846)

Contributions by owners Departmental capital budget funding

-

-

-

-

-

-

856

1,069

856

856

1,069

856

Total transactions with owners

-

-

-

-

-

-

856

1,069

856

856

1,069

856

Closing balance as at 30 June

(97,309)

(56,987)

(68,637)

210,649

195,052

193,836

152,135

151,279

152,135

265,475

289,344

277,334

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy

Equity injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Australian Sports Commission CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the year ended 30 June 2019

8

Budget Variances Commentary

Cash Flow Statement

Operating cash received

Receipts from Government ($60.867m greater than budget) - funding for additional measures were introduced at MYEFO which included the CSI Round 2 grant program ($30.300m), High Performance funding for Sport 2030 ($25.104m), and the Detailed Business Case for the ASC Site redevelopment ($1.963m).

Contributions from Government ($2.266m greater than budget) - increased funding was received during the financial year from both Federal and State Government entities to support Play by the Rules, MoveitAUS and the National Sports Tribunal program.

Operating cash used

Employees ($6.585m less than budget) - predominantly due to a decrease in average staffing numbers (47 staff).

Suppliers ($19.130m greater than budget) - comprises increases in Supplier expenditure and decreases in Supplier and Other Payables. Further increase is due to GST on expenditure, which is not grossed up in the budget.

Grants ($110.708m greater than budget) - additional grant expenditure was incurred in 2018-19 due to measures introduced since the original budget. These measures include the expansion of the Community Sport Infrastructure (CSI) grant program; new High performance grants to National Sporting Organisations (NSOs) for Sport 2030; and additional one-off funding for Paralympics Australia.

Investing cash used

Purchase of infrastrucutre, plant and equipment ($16.567m less than budget) - this is largely due to a number of key projects being put on hold pending the outcomes of the detailed business case for the Bruce site in Canberra.

Australian Sports Commission STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the year ended 30 June 2019

9

Retained surplus (accumulated deficit)

Asset revaluation reserve

Contributed equity/capital

Total equity

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

Actual

Actual

Original Budget

2019

2018

2019

2018

2019

2018

2019

2018

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period

(56,987)

(41,838)

(58,791)

195,052

193,836

193,836

151,279

150,210

151,279

289,344

302,208

286,324

Adjusted opening balance

(56,987)

(41,838)

(58,791)

195,052

193,836

193,836

151,279

150,210

151,279

289,344

302,208

286,324

Comprehensive income Surplus (Deficit) for the period

(40,322)

(15,149)

(9,846)

-

-

-

-

-

-(40,322)

(15,149)

(9,846)

Other comprehensive income

-

-

-15,597

1,216

-

-

-

-15,597

1,216

-

Total comprehensive income

(40,322)

(15,149)

(9,846)

15,597

1,216

-

-

-

-(24,725)

(13,933)

(9,846)

Contributions by owners Departmental capital budget funding

-

-

-

-

-

-

856

1,069

856

856

1,069

856

Total transactions with owners

-

-

-

-

-

-

856

1,069

856

856

1,069

856

Closing balance as at 30 June

(97,309)

(56,987)

(68,637)

210,649

195,052

193,836

152,135

151,279

152,135

265,475

289,344

277,334

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy

Equity injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year. 103 102

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

11

Overview

Basis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:

• the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

• Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and are in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Significant Accounting Judgments and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

a) The fair value of buildings has been taken to be the depreciated replacement cost as determined by an independent valuer. The ASC uses this valuation methodology as the buildings are purpose built and may in fact realise more or less than the market value.

b) The ASC assesses impairment of all assets at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the ASC and to the particular asset that may lead to impairment. If an impairment trigger exists then the recoverable amount is restated.

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

New Australian Accounting Standards

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. All new/revised standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the signing of the financial statements by the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, and are applicable to the current reporting period, did not have a material effect on the ASC’s financial statements.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

The following standards listed below were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board prior to the signing of the financial statements, but not yet effective. These new or revised standards will be adopted and their implementation is not expected to have a material financial impact on the ASC, although they will require enhanced disclosure in future reporting periods:

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

12

Standard Effective for

reporting periods beginning on or after:

Nature of impending changes and likely impact on application

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers [for not-for-profit entities]

1 January 2019 The ASC does not have any revenue currently meeting the criteria of this Standard.

AASB 16 Leases 1 January 2019 The ASC has assessed the impact of this Standard on its leases that are now disclosed from 1 July 2019 on the balance sheet as a right of use asset and corresponding lease liability. This change had an immaterial effect on the net assets of the ASC.

AASB 1058 Income for Not-for-Profit Entities 1 January 2019 The standard replaces the majority of income recognition requirements for public sector not-for-profit

entities under AASB 1004 Contributions. The ASC has assessed the impact of this Standard and the effect is immaterial.

AASB 2018-19 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Right-of-Use

Assets of Not-for-Profit Entities

1 January 2019 This standard provides a temporary option for not-for-profit entities not to measure right-of-use assets arising under concessionary leases at initial recognition at fair value. The ASC does not have any current leases that meet the criteria of this Standard.

Events after the Reporting Period

There were no events occurring after reporting date which would significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the ASC.

105 104

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

13

Note 1: Departmental Financial Performance This section analyses the financial performance of Australian Sports Commission for the year ended 2019.

Expenses

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 1.1A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 42,599 44,947

Superannuation Defined contribution plans 4,677 4,657

Defined benefit plans 1,988 2,599

Leave and other entitlements 4,444 4,474

Separation and redundancies 1,743 4,379

Total employee benefits 55,451 61,056

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and Relationships section.

Note 1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services Contractors and consultants Contractors 6,340 4,268

Consultants 3,996 4,057

AIS Site Project 2,232 1,486

Sports Sector support 6,925 4,487

Advertising and Media MoveitAUS campaign 6,511 1,511

Other 1,802 245

Travel 2,966 2,507

AIS Property Costs 16,737 16,048

Communications and IT 3,529 3,302

Other 5,299 4,190

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 56,337 42,101

Other suppliers Operating lease rentals in connection with: Minimum lease payments 1,390 1,571

Total other suppliers 1,390 1,571

Total suppliers 57,727 43,672

Operating Lease Commitments

The ASC in its capacity as lessee has obligations for offices, accommodation, motor vehicles and the lease obligation under the Heads of Agreement for the European Training Centre in Varese, Italy. The lease payments the ASC has for offices are subject to annual increases in accordance with upward movements in the Consumer Price Index. The lease obligation for the European Training Centre is based on the final construction costs for the facility. With respect to motor vehicle leases there are no renewal or purchase options available.

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows: Within 1 year 1,238 1,226

Between 1 to 5 years 723 1,963

More than 5 years - -

Total operating lease commitments 1,961 3,189

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

14

Accounting Policy

All leases in the ASC are operating leases, as the risks and benefits are shared with the lessor. Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 1.1C: Grants Public sector: Australian Government entities (related parties) - 90

State and Territory Governments 19,698 20,643

Local Governments 24,851 -

Private sector: Non-profit organisations 242,354 146,133

Other private sector - -

Other 19,726 15,904

Total grants 306,629 182,770

Note 1.1D: Impairment Loss Allowance on Financial Instruments Impairment of financial instruments 4 27

Total impairment loss allowance on financial instruments 4 27

Note 1.1E: Write-Down and Impairment of Other Assets Non-financial assets: Write-down and impairment - land and buildings 111 51

Write-down and impairment - infrastructure, plant and equipment 147 107

Write-down and impairment - intangibles 197 26

Write-down and impairment - inventory 8 13

Total write-down and impairment of assets 463 197

Note 1.1F: Other Expenses Sponsorship in kind 333 334

Other 7 20

Total other expenses 340 354

107 106

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

15

Note 2: Departmental Financial Position This section analyses Australian Sports Commission assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships.

Financial Assets

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 2.1A: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables Goods and services 2,494 5,819

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 6,558 2,244

Interest 246 547

Total goods and services receivables 9,298 8,610

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 9,298 8,610

Less impairment loss allowance: Goods and services (4) (22)

Total goods and services supplied or rendered (net) 9,294 8,588

Operating lease commitments receivable

The ASC in its capacity as lessor has rental agreements with National Sporting Organisations to access specified facilities and services at various locations. The ASC also leases the Canberra Stadium and associated parking facilities to the ACT Government. The leases to the National Sporting Organisations are not subject to annual increases. The lease payments for the Canberra Stadium are subject to annual increases in accordance with upward movements in the Consumer Price Index.

Commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows: One year or less 811 816

From one to five years 603 1,410

Over five years - -

Total operating lease commitments receivable 1,414 2,226

Reconciliation of the impairment allowance account Opening balance (22) (50)

Amounts written-off 17 27

Amounts recovered and reversed 3 (49)

Decrease (increase) in impairments recognised in net surplus (2) 50

Closing Balance (4) (22)

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

16

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 2.1B: Loans Cycling Australia 1,399 1,421

Australian Paralympic Committee - -

Total loans (gross) 1,399 1,421

Less impairment allowance: Cycling Australia (789) (789)

Total loans (net) 610 632

Reconciliation of impairment allowance account: Opening balance (789) (789)

Increase in impairments recognised in net surplus - -

Closing balance (789) (789)

Cycling Australia Ltd Loan

The ASC has two loans receivable from Cycling Australia, which were provided to assist them with restructuring and other financial assistance.

In a prior year, the ASC recognised an impairment allowance in connection with the loans. The ASC has assessed the impairment allowance and has determined that it remains appropriate as at 30 June 2019. The ASC continues to work closely with Cycling Australia to address the financial situation.

Accounting Policy

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, other receivables and loans that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest that are not provided at below-market interest rates are classified as subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Loans and other receivables that are provided on more favourable terms than the borrower could obtain in the market place contain a concessional discount. The ASC does not adjust the fair value for the concessional component unless it is considered material.

Concessional loans are measured at fair value at initial recognition and classified as subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, adjusted for any loss allowance.

Impairment

All financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period. When recovery of a financial asset is assessed as unlikely, an impairment allowance is made. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the assets carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an impairment allowance, recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

109 108

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

19

Revaluations of infrastructure, plant and equipment

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated in the Overview. An independent valuer conducted a desktop review of infrastructure, plant and equipment as at 30 June 2018, and a revaluation of land and buildings as at 31 May 2019.

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant, equipment and intangibles

The ASC had $1.026m outstanding contractual commitments for infrastructure, plant, equipment and intangibles as at 30 June 2019 (2018: $0.400m). Contractual commitments primarily relate to equipment purchases. The ASC expects all contractual commitments to be settled within 12 months.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17

Non-Financial Assets

Note 2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Buildings, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment and Intangibl

es

Land

Buildings &

land

Improvements

Total land, buildings &

land

improvements

Infrastructure

,

plant &

equipment

Purchased software

Internally developed software

Total

Computer Software

Total

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

As at 1 July 2018 Gross book value

10,000

538,662

548,662

25,701

6,152

4,416

10,568

584,931

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment

-

(344,849)

(344,849)

(14,839)

(4,928)

(3,314)

(8,242)

(367,930)

Net book value 1 July 2018

10,000

193,813

203,813

10,862

1,224

1,102

2,326

217,001

Additions By Purchase

-

3,966

3,966

3,568

264

-

264

7,798

by internal development

-

-

-

-

-

4,213

4,213

4,213

Depreciation and amortisation

-

(17,420)

(17,420)

(3,276)

(397)

(656)

(1,053)

(21,749)

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income

2,030

13,567

15,597

-

-

-

-

15,597

Revaluations recognised in net cost of services

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Write

-down and impairments recognised in net

cost of services

-

(111)

(111)

(126)

(197)

-

(197)

(434)

Other movements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Disposals

-

-

-

(131)

-

-

-

(131)

Written

-down value of assets transferred to

National Sporting Organisations

1

-

-

-

(88)

-

-

-

(88)

Written

-down value of assets sold

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other movements

-derecognition of makegood

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Net book value 30 June 2019

12,030

193,815

205,845

10,809

894

4,659

5,553

222,207

Net book value 30 June 2019 represented by Gross book value

12,030

576,946

588,976

26,706

5,986

8,629

14,615

630,297

Accumulated

depreciation/amortisation and

impairment

-

(383,131)

(383,131)

(15,897)

(5,092)

(3,970)

(9,062)

(408,090)

Total as at 30 June 2019

12,030

193,815

205,845

10,809

894

4,659

5,553

222,207

The above carrying values include work in progress costs for buildings and land improvements $1.705m (2018: $1.345m) and computer software $3.784m (2018: $0.819m). 1 Transfer of infrastructure, plant and equipment to National Sporting Organisations. During 2018-19, the ASC transferred ownership of sporting equipment to one (2017-18: 11) National Sporting Organisation (NSO), consistent with the ASC’s long-standing role to build the capacity and autonomy of NSOs, and support our athletes.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

17

Non-Financial Assets

Note 2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Buildings, Infrastructure, Plant and Equipment and Intangibl

es

Land

Buildings &

land

Improvements

Total land, buildings &

land

improvements

Infrastructure,

plant &

equipment

Purchased software

Internally developed software

Total

Computer Software

Total

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

As at 1 July 2018 Gross book value

10,000

538,662

548,662

25,701

6,152

4,416

10,568

584,931

Accumulated depreciation/amortisation and impairment

-

(344,849)

(344,849)

(14,839)

(4,928)

(3,314)

(8,242)

(367,930)

Net book value 1 July 2018

10,000

193,813

203,813

10,862

1,224

1,102

2,326

217,001

Additions By Purchase

-

3,966

3,966

3,568

264

-

264

7,798

by internal development

-

-

-

-

-

4,213

4,213

4,213

Depreciation and amortisation

-

(17,420)

(17,420)

(3,276)

(397)

(656)

(1,053)

(21,749)

Revaluations recognised in other comprehensive income

2,030

13,567

15,597

-

-

-

-

15,597

Revaluations recognised in net cost of services

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Write

-down and impairments recognised in net

cost of services

-

(111)

(111)

(126)

(197)

-

(197)

(434)

Other movements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Disposals

-

-

-

(131)

-

-

-

(131)

Written

-down value of assets transferred to

National Sporting Organisations

1

-

-

-

(88)

-

-

-

(88)

Written

-down value of assets sold

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other movements

-derecognition of makegood

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Net book value 30 June 2019

12,030

193,815

205,845

10,809

894

4,659

5,553

222,207

Net book value 30 June 2019 represented by Gross book value

12,030

576,946

588,976

26,706

5,986

8,629

14,615

630,297

Accumulated

depreciation/amortisation and

impairment

-

(383,131)

(383,131)

(15,897)

(5,092)

(3,970)

(9,062)

(408,090)

Total as at 30 June 2019

12,030

193,815

205,845

10,809

894

4,659

5,553

222,207

The above carrying values include work in progress costs for buildings and land improvements $1.705m (2018: $1.345m) and computer software $3.784m (2018: $0.819m). 1 Transfer of infrastructure, plant and equipment to National Sporting Organisations. During 2018-19, the ASC transferred ownership of sporting equipment to one (2017-18: 11) National Sporting Organisation (NSO), consistent with the ASC’s long-standing role to build the capacity and autonomy of NSOs, and support our athletes.

111 110

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

20

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of infrastructure, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than the threshold for the asset’s sub-class, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total or are purchases of computer equipment).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make-good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the ASC where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the ASC’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the make-good recognised.

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class Sub-Class

Land Market selling price

Land improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Building (excluding leasehold improvements) Depreciated replacement cost Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Infrastructure, plant and equipment

Market selling price and depreciated replacement cost

Following initial recognition at cost, infrastructure, plant and equipment are carried at fair value. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised through operating result. Revaluation decrements for a class of asset are recognised directly through the operating result except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its re-valued amount.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

21

Intangibles

The ASC’s intangibles comprise purchased and internally-developed software.

Purchases of intangibles are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than the threshold of the asset’s sub-class, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the ASC’s software are 3 to 7 years (2018: 3 to 7 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2019.

Depreciation

Depreciable infrastructure, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the ASC using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each sub-class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset Class Sub-class 2019 2018

Buildings Buildings 3 - 75 years 3 - 75 years

Land improvements Land improvements 15 - 40 years 15 - 40 years

Leasehold improvements Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Furniture, fittings, plant and equipment

4 - 25 years 4 - 25 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Computer hardware 3 - 5 years 3 - 5 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Marine fleet 2 - 20 years 2 - 20 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Motor vehicles 2 - 10 years 2 - 10 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2019. Where indicators of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

Derecognition

All assets are derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

20

Accounting Policy

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of infrastructure, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than the threshold for the asset’s sub-class, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total or are purchases of computer equipment).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make-good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the ASC where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the ASC’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the make-good recognised.

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class Sub-Class

Land Market selling price

Land improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Building (excluding leasehold improvements) Depreciated replacement cost

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Infrastructure, plant and equipment

Market selling price and depreciated replacement cost

Following initial recognition at cost, infrastructure, plant and equipment are carried at fair value. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised through operating result. Revaluation decrements for a class of asset are recognised directly through the operating result except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its re-valued amount.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

21

Intangibles

The ASC’s intangibles comprise purchased and internally-developed software.

Purchases of intangibles are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than the threshold of the asset’s sub-class, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the ASC’s software are 3 to 7 years (2018: 3 to 7 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2019.

Depreciation

Depreciable infrastructure, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the ASC using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each sub-class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset Class Sub-class 2019 2018

Buildings Buildings 3 - 75 years 3 - 75 years

Land improvements Land improvements 15 - 40 years 15 - 40 years

Leasehold improvements Leasehold improvements Lease term Lease term

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Furniture, fittings, plant and equipment

4 - 25 years 4 - 25 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Computer hardware 3 - 5 years 3 - 5 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Marine fleet 2 - 20 years 2 - 20 years

Infrastructure, plant and equipment Motor vehicles 2 - 10 years 2 - 10 years

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2019. Where indicators of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

Derecognition

All assets are derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

113 112

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

22

Payables

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 2.3: Other Payables Wages and salaries 423 418

Superannuation 54 52

Unearned income 1,091 1,028

Separation and redundancies 857 2,660

Other 100 113

Total other payables 2,525 4,271

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

23

Note 3: Cash Flow Reconciliation

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Statement of Financial Position to Cash Flow Statement Statement of Financial position items comprising cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 11,849 7,005

Term deposits 45,000 75,000

Total cash and cash equivalents per Cash Flow Statement 56,849 82,005

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

24

Note 4: People and Relationships This section describes a range of employment and post-employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

Employee Provisions

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 4.1: Employee Provisions Leave 11,526 12,512

Total employee provisions 11,526 12,512

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for short-term employee benefits (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the ASC is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the ASC’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave and annual leave has been determined by reference to standard parameters provided by the Department of Finance. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and general pay increases.

Separation and redundancy

A liability is recognised for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The ASC recognises a liability for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations or when an offer is made to an employee and is accepted.

Superannuation

Staff of the ASC are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap), Australian Super, CARE Superannuation, CBUS Industry Super Pty Ltd, Health Employees Super Trust (HESTA), Media Super (MEDIA) and Labour Union Co-operative Retirement Fund (LUCRF).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The remaining funds are defined contribution schemes.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The ASC makes employer contributions to the employee superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the ASC’s employees. The ASC accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the year.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

25

Key Management Personnel Remuneration Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any Director of that entity. The ASC has determined the key management personnel to be the Commissioners, ASC Executive and the Portfolio Minister. Key management personnel remuneration is reported in the table below:

2019 2018

$ $

Short-term employee benefits 2,422,867 2,354,838

Post-employment benefits 189,634 247,336

Other long-term employee benefits 54,396 212,500

Termination benefits - -

Total key management personnel remuneration expenses 2,666,897 2,814,674

The total number of key management personnel (noting this includes board members) in the above table is 23 individuals (2018: 22). The total number of substantive key management positions (noting this includes board members) in the above table is 18 individuals (2018: 18). The variance between these figures reflects commencements and cessations of senior management personnel throughout the year.

The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the ASC.

Note 4.2 is prepared on an accruals basis and excludes short-term acting arrangements (less than three months).

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Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

26

Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships

The ASC is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the ASC are Key Management Personnel (KMP) (refer definition at Note 4.2) and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with Commonwealth controlled entities

During the year, the ASC had arrangements with government entities including the Department of Health to assist with the delivery of the ASC's activities and programs. The income received from government entities is disclosed as 'Contributions from Government entities' in the Statement of Comprehensive Income. All expenses paid to government entities are under normal terms and conditions.

Loans to Key Management Personnel related entities

There were no loans made to KMP or related entities.

Contributions to related organisations

Contributions are made to various sporting organisations as part of the ASC’s normal course of business. They were approved and made on normal terms and conditions.

KMP are required to register conflicts of interest in any sporting organisations. KMP are not part of decisions where there is a real or perceived conflict. The table below represents payments made during the period the KMP were related to the entity.

Entity Key Management Personnel 2019

$’000

2018

$’000

Sports Australia Hall of Fame Chief Executive Officer1

Ms Louise Eyres 155 25

Olympic Winter Institute Ms A Camplin-Warner OAM 2 - 3,367

Paralympics Australia Mr Kurt Fearnley AO3 11,506 -

Australian Football League Ms G Trainor AO 263 450

Australian Rugby League Commission Ms A Laing 4 425 -

Sailing Australia Ms K Bates 5 4,601 10,171

There were also payments to KMP to reimburse costs incurred on behalf of the ASC. These and the transactions referred to above were conducted with conditions no more favourable than would be expected if the transactions occurred at arm’s length.

Individual KMP may hold professional engagements with related parties. Such engagements are not reported in this note as they are not required to be disclosed as related party transactions under Australian Accounting Standards.

Transactions reported for KMP are limited to direct interests where holdings are greater than 50%.

Transactions exclude GST where relevant.

1

Ceased to be related to the Sports Australia Hall of Fame in November 2017. 2 Ceased to be related to the ASC in July 2018. 3

Became related to the ASC in December 2018. 4 Became related to the ASC in December 2018. 5

Ceased to be related to the ASC in December 2018.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

27

Note 5: Managing Uncertainties This section analyses how the Australian Sports Commission manages financial risks within its operating environment.

Financial Instruments

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 5.1A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets under AASB 139 Loans and Receivables Cash and cash equivalents - 7,005

Trade and other receivables - 5,797

Interest receivable - 547

Loans - 632

Total loans and receivables - 13,981

Investments held-to-maturity Investments under s59 of the PGPA Act - 75,000

Total investments held-to-maturity - 75,000

Financial Assets under AASB 9 Financial assets at amortised cost Cash and cash equivalents 11,849 -

Trade and other receivables 2,490 -

Interest receivable 246 -

Loans 610 -

Investments under s59 of the PGPA Act 45,000 -

Total financial assets at amortised cost 60,195 -

Total financial assets 60,195 88,981

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities at amortised cost Suppliers 2,577 3,938

Grant payables 9,097 92

Other payables 2,525 4,271

Total financial liabilities at amortised cost 14,199 8,301

Total financial liabilities 14,199 8,301

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9

Financial asset class

Notes

AASB 139 original classification

AASB 9 new classification

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000 $'000

Cash and cash equivalents

Loans & Receivables

Amortised Cost 7,005 7,005

Trade and other receivables

2.1A Loans &

Receivables

Amortised Cost 5,797 5,797

Interest receivable 2.1A Loans &

Receivables

Amortised Cost 547 547

Loans 2.1B Loans &

Receivables

Amortised Cost 632 632

Investments under s59 of the PGPA Act

Investments held-to-maturity Amortised Cost 75,000 75,000

Total financial assets 88,981 88,981

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Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

28

Reconciliation of carrying amounts of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 AASB 139 carrying amount at 1

July 2018 Reclassification Re-measurement

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Financial assets at amortised cost Loans & Receivables Cash and cash

equivalents 7,005 - - 7,005

Trade and other receivables 5,797 - - 5,797

Interest receivable 547 - - 547

Loans 632 - - 632

Investments held-to-maturity Investments under s59 of the PGPA Act 75,000 - - 75,000

Total financial assets 88,981 - - 88,981

Note 5.1B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets Financial assets at amortised cost Impairment of financial instruments (4) (27)

Interest revenue 3,202 3,053

Net gains/(losses) on financial assets at amortised cost 3,198 3,026

Net gains/(losses) on financial assets 3,198 3,026

Accounting Policy

Financial assets

With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, the ASC classifies its financial assets into the following categories:

a) Financial assets at amortised cost; b) Financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and c) Financial assets at fair value through profit and loss.

The classification depends on both the ASC’s business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics of the item at initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the ASC becomes party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon a trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. The financial asset is held in order to collect contractual cash flows; and 2. The cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Australian Sports Commission NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

29

Financial Assets at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets, and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit and Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified at fair value though profit and loss where the financial assets either do not meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (an irrespective of having been invoiced).

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30

Note 6: Other Information Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Note 6.1: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

Assets expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 68,727 92,923

More than 12 months 222,727 217,543

Total assets 291,454 310,466

Liabilities expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months 18,873 13,401

More than 12 months 7,106 7,721

Total liabilities 25,979 21,122

Assets Held in Trust

Gary Knoke Memorial Scholarship Trust Account

Purpose - The Gary Knoke Memorial Scholarship Trust Account was used for the provision of scholarships to eligible persons nominated by Athletics Australia. These monies were not available for other purposes of the ASC and were not recognised in the financial statements. The balance of the account, along with ongoing administrative responsibility for both the trust and the Scholarship, was transferred to Athletics Australia as at 30 June 2018.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Total amounts held at the beginning of the reporting period - 45

Receipts - 1

Payments - (46)

Total amounts held at the end of the reporting period - -

Promoters Trust Account

Purpose - The ASC operates a Promoters Trust Account into which it deposits monies received in the course of conducting events at the ASC. These monies are held until such time as the events are completed and all costs associated with the events have been finalised. The remaining funds are then apportioned between the promoter and the ASC in accordance with the terms of each agreement. These monies are not available for other purposes of the ASC and are not recognised in the financial statements.

2019 2018

$'000 $'000

Total amounts held at the beginning of the reporting period 564 693

Receipts 3,159 1,867

Payments (3,102) (1,996)

Total amounts held at the end of the reporting period 621 564

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

The Australian Sports Foundation Ltd (ASF) was established in 1986 to raise funds for the development of sport in Australia. The ASF is a Commonwealth Company governed by the PGPA Act and is not a subsidiary of the ASC.

Section 48(a) of the ASC Act requires that the ASC’s annual report must specify the financial transactions and the state of affairs of the ASF.

In 2018-19, the ASF prepared and published an Annual Report in line with PGPA Act requirements. Details of the ASF operations and a range of financial and performance information can be found in the ASF’s Annual Report and have not been reproduced here.

For copies of the ASF Annual Report, refer to the foundation’s website asf.org.au or contact the distributions officer:

Australian Sports Foundation Leverrier St Bruce ACT 2617 PO Box 176 BELCONNEN ACT 2616 Tel: 02 5112 0990 Email: info@asf.org.au Website: asf.org.au

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS FOUNDATION

125 124

127 126

APPENDIXES & REFERENCES APPENDIX 1: HIGH PERFORMANCE RESULTS 128

World champions 128

APPENDIX 2: ASC AWARD RECIPIENTS 132

AIS Sport Performance Awards 132

ASC Media Awards 134

APPENDIX 3: FUNDING TO SPORTS 135

APPENDIX 4: MANDATORY DATA TABLES 140

Accountable Authority details 140

HR Statistics (2018-19 vs 2017-18) 142

Key Management Personnel Remuneration 146

APPENDIX 5: CONTACT OFFICERS 152

Chair/ASC CEO/AIS CEO 152

Distribution officer 152

APPENDIX 6: SUMMARY OF COMPLIANCE 153

SHORTENED FORMS 157

INDEX 158

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Appendix 1: High performance results

World champions

Australia celebrated 27 new world champions in 2018-19. Australia had 13 able-bodied athletes or teams and 14 Paralympic athletes or teams crowned as world champions. A further four able-bodied and 10 para athletes and teams who won world championships in 2017-18 continue to be the reigning world champions where their sports have not held benchmark events during the reporting period.

Table 17: 2018-19 world champions at benchmark events

Sport Event Athlete

Athletics 100m Hurdles Sally Pearson

Canoe/kayak — Slalom K1 Jessica Fox

Canoe/kayak C1 Jessica Fox

Cycling — Road Road Race Rohan Dennis

Cycling — Track Women’s Points Race Alexandra Manly

Cycling — Track 3Km Individual Ashlee Ankudinoff

Cycling — Track Men’s Team Pursuit Sam Welsford

Kelland O’Brien

Leigh Howard

Alexander Porter

Cameron Scott

Cycling — Track Women’s Team Pursuit Annette Edmondson

Ashlee Ankudinoff

Georgia Baker

Amy Cure

Alexandra Manly

Cycling — Track Women’s Team Sprint Kaarle McCulloch

Stephanie Morton

Cycling — Track Men’s Scratch Race Sam Welsford

Sport Event Athlete

Rowing Four — Men’ Jack Hargreaves

Joshua Hicks

Alexander Hill

Spencer Turrin

Rowing Four — Women’s Molly Goodman

Sarah Hawe

Lucy Stephan

Katrina Werry

Squash Doubles Men Cameron Pilley

Ryan Cuskelly

Squash Doubles Women Donna Lobban

Christine Nunn

Squash Doubles Mixed Donna Lobban

Cameron Pilley

Surfing World Surf League Stephanie Gilmore

Swimming 200m Backstroke Emily Seebohm

Winter Halfpipe Scott James

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Table 18: 2018-19 world champions at benchmark events (Paralympic disciplines)

Sport Event Athlete

Athletics — Para Shot Put F38 Cameron Crombie

Athletics — Para 5000m T54 Madison De Rozario

Athletics — Para 100m T35

200m T35

Isis Holt

Athletics — Para 1500m T38 Deon Kenzie

Athletics — Para 100m T38 Evan O’Hanlon

Athletics — Para 100m T42 Scott Reardon

Athletics — Para Javelin Throw F38 Jayden Sawyer

Athletics — Para 800m T36

400m T36

200m T36

James Turner

Athletics — Para Marathon Michael Roeger

Canoe — Para Canoe single VL2 200m

Kayak single KL2 200m

Curtis McGrath

Canoe — Para Kayak single KL3 200m Amanda Reynolds

Canoe — Para Canoe single VL2 200m Susan Seipel

Cycling — Para Scratch Race (C5)

Road Race (C5)

4Km Pursuit

Alistair Donohoe

Cycling — Para 500m Time Trial Amanda Reid

Cycling — Para 500m Time Trial

3Km Pursuit (C3)

Paige Greco

Cycling — Para 3Km Pursuit (C2) Darren Hicks

Cycling — Para 3Km Pursuit (C3)

Scratch Race

David Nicholas

Sport Event Athlete

Cycling — Para Time Trial (H1)

Road Race (H1)

Emilie Miller

Rowing — Para PR1 Men’s Single Scull Erik Horrie

Sailing — Para Keelboat (Men) Christopher Symonds

Sailing — Para Keelboat (Open) Matthew Bugg

Shooting — Para PT1 Trap SG-S Mixed Scottie Brydon

Triathlon — Para Women’s PTWC5 Race Emily Tapp

Winter — Para Alpine Skiing Super Combined Melissa Perrine

5 PTWC is the sport class for paratriathlon. Athletes in the PTWC class are wheelchair users.

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Appendix 2: ASC Award recipients

AIS Sport Performance Awards

Female Athlete of the Year

Jessica Fox — Canoeing

Jessica created history in 2018, becoming the most decorated female slalom paddler of all time. She won six straight World Cup races in 21 days in June and remained unbeaten in the C1 category. The 24-year-old then wrapped up the season with double gold in the women’s K1 and C1 at the 2018 ICF Canoe Slalom World Championships.

Male Athlete of the Year

Rohan Dennis — Cycling

Rohan became the first Australian man since Cadel Evans in 2009 to hold a world championship title on the road, taking out the Individual Time Trial at the UCI World Championships in Austria. The 28-year-old’s 2018 season included topping the podium in six more time trials including at the Giro d’Italia and the Vuelta a España.

Award for Leadership

Craig Phillips — Commonwealth Games Australia

Craig has been CEO of Commonwealth Games Australia since July 2015, driving a number of key initiatives for the organisation and its stakeholders. He was a member of the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games Corporation Board, which helped deliver the successful home games. He continues to contribute to the high performance system and continually works towards the best deal for athletes.

High Performance Program

Cycling Australia

A dominant performance at the Commonwealth Games, including 10 gold medals on the track, was complemented by outstanding performances on the road. A new high performance strategy helped refocus the way Cycling Australia staff and athletes work, with the Australian Cycling Team Podium Potential Track Academy helping riders transition from its high-performance network to the Australian Cycling Team podium program.

Service to Sport

Dick Telford

Dick is a Professorial Fellow at the University of Canberra’s Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UC-RISE). He is a former Australian Rules footballer and teacher, and was the first sports scientist employed by the AIS. His team at UC-RISE is researching physical literacy through their well-published Australian Lifestyle of our Kids (LOOK) Study. Dick is campaigning to get more physical education and physical activity into government schools.

Sport Australia Award

Celia Sullohern, Madeline Hills and Eloise Wellings — Athletics

The three Australian 10,000m runners waited at the finish line, five minutes after the race had been won, to cheer on, embrace and congratulate the last-placed athlete, Lineo Chaka of Lesotho, in what became an act of sportsmanship that defined the spirit of the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. The gesture was described as ‘all class’ and ‘sportsmanship at its best’.

Para Performance of the Year

Simon Patmore — Snowboard

Simon became the first Australian man to medal at Winter and Summer Paralympics. He was also Australia’s first gold medallist at a Winter Paralympics since 2002 when he took gold in the Men’s Snowboard Cross SB-UL at PyeongChang, where he also claimed bronze in the Men’s Banked Slalom SB-UL. He had previously won bronze in the men’s 200m at the London 2012 Paralympics.

Emerging Athlete of the Year

Luke Plapp — Cycling

Luke, 17, medalled in both the UCI World Junior Track and Road Championships in 2018. He also took gold in the Points Race and Madison (with partner Blake Quick) at the U19 Track World Championships and was part of Australia’s bronze-medal Teams Pursuit. On the road, he was second at the U19 World Championships in the Individual Time Trial.

Team of the Year

The Australian Kookaburras — Hockey

The Kookaburras returned to the world No. 1 ranking after winning the elite World League Final in December 2017. They won gold at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, before winning the prestigious Champions Trophy in July, competing against the top six teams in the world. Other titles won were the International Festival of Hockey and Azlan Shah Cup.

Coach of the Year

Myriam Fox — Canoe Slalom

Myriam, a former world champion paddler, is one of the most successful canoe slalom coaches in the world and national coach of Paddle Australia’s highly successful women’s canoe slalom program. All of her athletes achieved career best results across the World Cup series and the world championships across both the women’s K1 as well as the women’s C1 in 2018.

The ABC Sports Personality of the Year Award People’s Choice

Craig Lowndes — Motorsport

A three-time V8 Supercar champion and five-time Barry Sheene Medallist, Craig added a seventh Bathurst 1000 victory to his already-bulging CV before retiring at season’s end. Craig took the lead on lap 135 of 161, and—with partner Steven Richards—eventually won by six seconds in race-record time.

Sporting Moment of the Year People’s Choice

Kurt Fearnley and Para-sport integration — Commonwealth Games

Para sports provided numerous highlights from the first Commonwealth Games to boast a fully-integrated program, yet nothing surpassed the inspiration of Kurt, when the seventime world champion added T54 wheelchair marathon gold to his 1500m silver. Kurt described the Commonwealth Games as ‘the most inclusive event that our nation has ever hosted’.

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ASC Media Awards

The 16th annual ASC Media Awards were held in Melbourne on 7 February 2019, recognising excellence in sports journalism and broadcasting and the role of the media in connecting Australians with sport. The awards focus on analytical and insightful reporting and the presentation of sport and sporting issues, with the ultimate aim of fostering improved coverage of key issues within sport.

Fourteen awards were presented, including the Lifetime Achievement Award.

Table 22: ASC Media Awards recipients

Award 2018 Winner

Lifetime achievement award for contribution to sports journalism Dennis Cometti

Best reporting of an issue in sport Leo Schlink, The Herald Sun

Best coverage of sport by an individual — broadcast Lucy Zelic SBS

Best coverage of sport by an individual — print media Andrew Webster, The Sydney Morning Herald

Best coverage of sport by an individual — digital media Michael Chammas, NRL.com

Best coverage of a sporting event by a media organisation Seven Network, Commonwealth Games 2018

Best coverage of sport for people with disability Matthew Carmichael, Seven Network

Best coverage of inclusive sport The Outer Sanctum Podcast, ABC

Best profiling of an athlete, team or coach — broadcast media Andy Maher, SEN Afternoons

Best profiling of an athlete, team or coach — print media Will Swanton, The Australian

Best sports journalism from rural, regional or suburban media Mackenzie Colahan, Central and North Burnett Times

Best sports photography Ryan Pierse, Getty Images

Best contribution to sport by an organisation through digital media PlayersVoice

Best analysis of the business of sport John Stensholt, Max Mason,

The Australian Financial Review

Appendix 3: Funding to sports Table 19: NSO/NSOD

6 2018-19 funding

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Paralympics Australia 12,819,780 300,000 459,100 13,578,880

Archery 962,685 100,000 90,950 1,153,635

Athletics 9,125,985 450,000 170,000 9,745,985

Australian Football 0 225,000 0 225,000

Badminton 410,000 325,000 10,000 745,000

Baseball 505,000 650,000 0 1,155,000

Basketball 6,304,038 475,000 1,085,500 7,864,538

BMX 0 250,000 200,000 450,000

Bocce 0 50,000 0 50,000

Bowls 727,200 725,000 735,000 2,187,200

Boxing 1,064,500 50,000 0 1,114,500

Paddle (Canoeing) 6,111,552 200,000 433,500 6,745,052

6 National Sporting Organisation for People with Disabilities

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Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Cricket 197,749 225,000 6,000 428,749

Cycling 11,416,071 750,000 435,000 12,601,071

Diving 2,786,195 115,000 10,000 2,911,195

Equestrian 2,729,206 450,000 238,000 3,417,206

Fencing 0 50,000 15,000 65,000

Football 2,335,943 1,025,000 1,169,000 4,529,943

Golf 959,500 650,000 676,250 2,285,750

Gymnastics 2,386,322 550,000 1,205,892 4,142,214

Hockey 6,319,757 1,005,530 700,000 8,025,287

Ice Racing 0 50,000 20,000 70,000

Judo 489,252 100,000 0 589,252

Karate 0 100,000 0 100,000

Lacrosse 0 100,000 0 100,000

Modern Pentathlon 235,098 0 0 235,098

Motor Sport 0 200,000 0 200,000

Motorcycling 0 100,000 10,000 110,000

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Mountain Bike 0 0 125,000 125,000

Netball 2,420,368 475,000 295,000 3,190,368

Olympic Winter Institute 3,952,645 0 0 3,952,645

Orienteering 0 100,000 0 100,000

Polocrosse 0 50,000 0 50,000

Pony Club 0 150,000 87,500 237,500

Rowing 9,232,010 200,000 595,500 10,027,510

Rugby League 0 425,000 375,000 800,000

Rugby Union 2,971,129 650,000 550,000 4,171,129

Sailing 8,201,000 650,000 173,273 9,024,273

Shooting 2,600,250 200,000 60,000 2,860,250

Skate 610,115 0 0 610,115

Ski & Snowboard 1,981,078 500,000 160,000 2,641,078

Softball 1,705,855 450,000 110,000 2,265,855

Squash 530,000 450,000 434,423 1,414,423

Surf Life Saving 197,749 650,000 284,326 1,132,075

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Surfing 1,763,253 525,000 445,000 2,733,253

Swimming 15,819,505 812,000 843,698 17,475,203

Artistic Swimming (Synchro) 49,645 0 0 49,645

Table Tennis 782,574 275,000 183,000 1,240,574

Taekwondo 571,004 200,000 60,000 831,004

Tennis 321,965 225,000 6,000,000 6,546,965

Tenpin Bowling 0 525,000 175,000 700,000

Touch Football 0 721,094 145,000 866,094

Triathlon 2,987,286 450,000 485,000 3,922,286

University Sport 504,822 50,000 225,000 779,822

Volleyball 2,135,646 637,500 140,000 2,913,146

Water Polo 3,691,927 200,000 0 3,891,927

Waterski & Wakeboard 0 100,000 0 100,000

Weightlifting 362,600 50,000 0 412,600

Sport High Performance Participation Other Total Wrestling 0 50,000 0 50,000

NSO TOTALS 131,278,259 19,041,124 19,620,912 169,940,295

Sport Inclusion Australia 0 100,000 2,102,500 2,202,500

Blind Sports 0 65,000 0 65,000

Deaf Sports 0 85,000 0 85,000

Disability Sports 0 210,000 217,000 427,000

Disabled Wintersport 0 60,000 0 60,000

Riding for the Disabled 0 100,000 0 100,000

Special Olympics 0 545,000 0 545,000

Transplant 0 70,000 0 70,000

NSOD TOTALS 0 1,235,000 2,319,500 3,554,500

OVERALL TOTALS 131,278,259 20,276,124 21,940,412 173,494,795

Notes:

a. High Performance includes — High Performance (incl. $3,700,000 to Swimming for 2019/20 activities), Paralympic High Performance, Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement, Performance Support, Competitive Innovation Fund, Tokyo Enhancement Projects, and other high performance related one-off initiatives (incl. $9,000,000 to Paralympics Australia). Investment to Modern Pentathlon and Skate includes grants made directly to elite athletes and coaches.

b. Participation includes — Participation (incl. $225,000 to Volleyball for 2019-20 activities) and Impact Funding

c. Other includes — Business Development and One Management grants, Women Leaders in Sport, National Sport Tribunal Advice funding program, Community Sport Infrastructure grants, Move It Aus — Better Ageing grants, Move It Aus — Participation grants and other one-off initiatives (incl. $6,000,000 to Tennis).

141 140

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Appendix 4: Mandatory Data Tables Accountable Authority details Table 20: Period as the accountable authority or member Name Qualifications of the Accountable Authority

Experience of the Accountable Authority

Position Title/ Position held Executive/ Non-Executive

Date of

Commencement

Date of cessation

Number of meetings of the board of the company John Wylie AM See page 75 See page 75 Chair 10/09/2012 - 7

Steve Moneghetti See page 79 See page 79 Deputy Chair 22/06/2015 - 7

Andrea Mitchell See page 76 See page 76 Member 15/11/2017 - 7

Andrew Plympton See page 76 See page 76 Member 18/01/2011 - 7

Danielle Roche See page 76 See page 76 Member 04/05/2016 02/05/2019 6

Gabrielle Trainor AO See page 77 See page 77 Member 05/10/2017 6

Jennifer Morris OAM See page 77 See page 77 Member 22/06/2015 - 4

Katherine Bates* See page 78 See page 78 Member 22/06/2015 13/12/2018 2

Pat Farmer AM See page 78 See page 78 Member 07/11/2014 7

Name

Qualifications of the Accountable Authority

Experience of the Accountable Authority

Position Title/ Position held Executive/ Non-Executive

Date of

Commencement

Date of cessation

Number of meetings of the board of the company Glenys Beauchamp PSM See page 82 See page 82 Ex Officio 7

Ms Pippa Downes See page 79 See page 79 Member 13/12/2018 4

Mr Kurt Fearnley AO See page 80 See page 80 Member 13/12/2018 3

Mr Andrew Ireland See page 80 See page 80 Member 13/12/2018 4

Ms Amanda Laing See page 81 See page 81 Member 13/12/2018 2

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty See page 81 See page 81 Member 03/05/2019 1

*appointment ceased December 2018

143 142

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

HR Statistics (2018-19 vs 2017-18) Table 21: All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW 1 - 1 3 - 3 - - - 4

Qld - - - - - - - - - -

SA - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 4 - 4 7 - 7 - - - 11

WA - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

ACT 121 5 126 110 23 133 - - - 259

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

TOTAL 126 5 131 122 23 145 - - - 276

Table 22: All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2018-19)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW 5 - 5 - 2 2 - - - 7

Qld 4 - 4 - - - - - - 4

SA 4 - 4 1 - 1 - - - 5

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 9 1 10 7 2 9 - - - 19

WA - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

ACT 52 4 56 42 14 56 - - - 112

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas 5 - 5 1 1 2 - - - 7

TOTAL 79 5 84 52 19 71 - - - 155

145 144

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Table 23: All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2017-18)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

Qld - - - - - - - - - -

SA 1 - 1 - - - - - - 1

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 3 - 3 2 - 2 - - - 5

WA - - - - - - - - - -

ACT 116 3 119 92 25 117 - - - 236

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas - - - - - - - - - -

TOTAL 120 3 123 - - 120 - - - 243

Table 24: All Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2017-18)

Male Female Indeterminate Total

Full time

Part

time

Total male

Full time

Part

time

Total female

Full time

Part

time

Total

indeterminate

NSW 4 - 4 2 - 2 - - - 6

Qld 8 - 8 2 - 2 - - - 10

SA 5 - 5 2 2 4 - - - 9

Tas - - - - - - - - - -

Vic 6 - 6 10 2 12 - - - 18

WA 1 - 1 2 - 2 - - - 3

ACT 49 6 55 40 5 45 - - - 100

NT - - - - - - - - - -

External Territories - - - - - - - - - -

Overseas 5 - 5 2 1 3 - - - 8

TOTAL 78 6 84 60 10 70 - - - 154

147 146

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Key Management Personnel Remuneration Table 25: Key Management Personnel During the reporting period ended 30 June 2019, the ASC had 23 executives who meet the definition of key management personnel (KMP). Their names and the length of term as KMP are summarised below: Name Position Term as KMP John Wylie AM Chair of the Commission Full year

Alisa Camplin-Warner Deputy Chair of the Commission Part year — ceased on 11 July 2018

Stephen Moneghetti AM

7

Deputy Chair of the Commission Part-year — appointed 13 December 2018

Andrew Plympton AM Commissioner Full year

Patrick Farmer AM Commissioner Full year

Jennifer Morris OAM Commissioner Full year

Danielle Roche Commissioner Part-year — ceased 3 May 2019

Gabrielle Trainor AO Commissioner Full year

Andrea Mitchell Commissioner Full year

Katharine Bates Commissioner Part-year — ceased 12 December 2018

7 Stephen Moneghetti was promoted to Deputy Chair of the Commission upon cessation of Alisa Camplin-Warner. Name Position Term as KMP Amanda Laing Commissioner Part-year — appointed 13 December 2018

Phillipa Downes Commissioner Part-year — appointed 13 December 2018

Andrew Ireland Commissioner Part-year — appointed 13 December 2018

Kurt Fearnley AO Commissioner Part-year — appointed 20 December 2018

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty Commissioner Part-year — appointed 4 May 2019

Kathryn Palmer AM Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Sport Australia Full year

Peter Conde Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Australian Institute of Sport Full year

Robert Medlicott

8

Chief Operating Officer (COO), Australian Institute of Sport Part-year — appointed 1 February 2019

Andrew Larratt General Manager, Sports Business Full year

Louise Eyres General Manager, Marketing, Customer Insights and Analysis Full year

Carolyn Brassil General Manager, Corporate Part-year — ceased 5 October 2018

Peter Dunlop General Manager, Corporate Part-year — acting during period 8 October 2018

and 18 March 2019

Luke McCann General Manager, Corporate Part-year — appointed 18 March 2019

8 The COO was a newly created position during the year with a single occupant of this role.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Table 26: Key management personnel remuneration for the reporting period

In the notes to the financial statements for the period ending 30 June 2019, the ASC disclosed the following KMP expenses:

Note 4.2: Key management personnel remuneration for the reporting period

2019 $

Short-term benefits:

Base Salary 2,277,198

Bonus 96,397

Other benefits and allowances 49,272

TOTAL SHORT-TERM BENEFITS 2,422,867

Superannuation 189,634

TOTAL POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS 189,634

Other long-term benefits:

Long service leave 54,396

TOTAL OTHER LONG-TERM BENEFITS 54,396

TOTAL KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL REMUNERATION 2,666,897

Table 27: Key management personnel remuneration for the reporting period (disaggregated)

Short-term

benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other

long-term benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances Superannuation contributions

Long service

leave

John Wylie AM Chair of the Commission 92,376 8,776 101,152

Alisa Camplin-Warner Deputy Chair of the Commission 2,655 252 2,907

Stephen Moneghetti AM Deputy Chair of the Commission 58,631 5,570 64,201

Andrew Plympton AM Commissioner 62,190 5,908 68,098

Patrick Farmer AM Commissioner 46,193 4,388 50,581

Jennifer Morris OAM Commissioner 46,193 4,388 50,581

Danielle Roche Commissioner 39,441 3,747 43,188

Gabrielle Trainor AO Commissioner 46,193 4,388 50,581

Andrea Mitchell Commissioner 46,193 4,388 50,581

Katharine Bates Commissioner 24,576 2,335 26,911

Amanda Laing Commissioner 24,877 2,769 27,646

151 150

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Short-term

benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other

long-term benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses

Other

benefits and allowances Superannuation contributions

Long service

leave

Phillipa Downes Commissioner 27,646 3,639 31,285

Andrew Ireland Commissioner 24,877 2,363 27,240

Kurt Fearnley AO Commissioner 24,877 2,195 27,072

The Hon. Hugh Delahunty Commissioner 5,771 548 6,319

Kathryn Palmer AM CEO Sport Australia 398,386 19,737 20,531 13,527 452,181

Peter Conde CEO AIS 336,356 18,375 35,181 25,000 11,490 426,402

Robert Medlicott COO AIS 77,571 10,994 2,397 90,962

Andrew Larratt GM Sports Business 323,171 20,531 10,777 354,479

Louise Eyres GM MCIA 330,935 34,170 20,531 11,117 396,753

Carolyn Brassil GM Corporate 59,461 24,115 13,059 96,635

Peter Dunlop GM Corporate 102,084 13,635 2,687 118,406

Luke McCann GM Corporate 76,545 14,091 9,699 2,401 102,736

TOTAL 2,277,198 96,397 49,272 189,634 54,396 2,666,897

Table 28: Senior Executive Remuneration

Short-term

benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long- term benefits

Total

remuneration

Remuneration band

Number

of Senior Executives

Average base salary

Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average

superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

$0-$220,000 14 134,940 787 17,128 2,970 155,825

$220,001-$245,000 4 199,841 976 28,405 3,620 232,842

$245,001-$270,000 1 223,204 15,750 20,531 2,041 261,526

$295,001-$320,000 1 294,405 883 20,531 2,321 318,140

TOTAL 20

Table 29: Other Highly Paid Staff

Short-term

benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits

Total

remuneration

Remuneration band

Number

of Senior Executives

Average base salary

Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average

superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

$245,001-$270,000 1 213,709 1,952 32,978 6,550 259,115

$320,001-$345,000 1 285,416 1,571 40,450 10,015 337,452

TOTAL 2

153 152

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Appendix 5: Contact officers

Chair/ASC CEO/AIS CEO

Australian Sports Commission Leverrier Street BRUCE ACT 2617

or

PO Box 176 BELCONNEN ACT 2616 Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Fax: (02) 6214 1836

Distribution officer

Governance Australian Sports Commission PO Box 176 BELCONNEN ACT 2616 Tel: (02) 6214 1111 Fax: (02) 6214 1836 Email: publications@sportaus.gov.au

Appendix 6: Summary of Compliance

The ASC is bound by legislative requirements to disclose certain information in its annual report. The main requirements are detailed in the PGPA Act, Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) and the ASC Act.

Annual report compliance requirements—PGPA Act Page

reference

s39. (1) The accountable authority of a Commonwealth entity must:

a) prepare annual performance statements for the entity as soon as practicable after the end of each reporting period for the entity; and

b) include a copy of the annual performance statements in the entity’s annual report that is tabled in the parliament.

pp 36-56

S39. (2) The annual performance statements must:

a) provide information about the entity’s performance in achieving its purposes; and

b) comply with any requirements prescribed by the rules.

pp36-56

s46. The annual report must be given to the responsible Minister by the 15th day of the fourth month after the end of the period for the entity.

Annual report compliance requirements—PGPA Rule Page

reference

16F(1) In preparing the annual performance statements, the accountable authority of the entity must measure and assess the entity’s performance in achieving the entity’s purposes in the reporting period in accordance with the method of measuring and assessing the entity’s performance in the reporting period that was set out in the entity’s corporate plan, and in any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement, that were prepared for the reporting period.

pp 36-56

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Annual report compliance requirements—PGPA Rule Page

reference

16F(2) The following matter must be included in the annual performance statements for a Commonwealth entity

1. Statements

a) a statement that the performance statements are prepared for paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Act;

b) a statement specifying the reporting period for which the performance statements are prepared;

c) a statement that, in the opinion of the accountable authority of the entity, the performance statements:

i) accurately present the entity’s performance in the reporting period; and

ii) comply with subsection 39(2) of the Act.

2. The results of the measurement and assessment referred to in subsection (1) of this section of the entity’s performance in the reporting period in achieving its purposes.

3. An analysis of the factors that may have contributed to the entity’s performance in achieving its purposes in the reporting period, including any changes to:

a) the entity’s purposes, activities or organisational capability; or

b) the environment in which the entity operated;

that may have had a significant impact on the entity’s performance in the reporting period.

pp36-56

17BB The annual report must:

a) be approved by the accountable authority;

b) be signed by the accountable authority or a member of the accountable authority;

c) include details of how and when approval of the annual report was given;

d) state that the accountable authority is responsible for preparing and giving the annual report to the entity’s responsible Minister in accordance with s46 of the PGPA Act.

p 3

17BC The annual report must comply with the guidelines for presenting documents to the Parliament. Throughout

17BD Information included in the annual report must be relevant, reliable, concise, understandable and balanced, including through the following where practicable:

a) using clear design;

b) defining acronyms and technical terms (for example, in a glossary);

c) using tables, graphs, diagrams and charts; and

d) including any additional matters as appropriate.

Throughout

p 157

17BE The annual report must include:

a) details of the legislation establishing the body;

b)

i) a summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in the legislation;

ii) the purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan;

pp 73-74

c) the names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or responsible Ministers during the period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers

d) any directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the period;

p 74

Annual report compliance requirements—PGPA Rule Page

reference

e) any government policy orders that applied in relation to the entity during the period under s22 of the Act;

f) if, during the period, the entity has not complied with a direction or order, particulars of non-compliance;

p 74

g) the annual performance statements for the entity for the period;

h) a statement of any significant issue reported to the responsible Minister that relates to non-compliance with the finance law in relation to the entity;

i) if a statement is included under para (h)—an outline of the action that has been taken to remedy the non-compliance;

pp 36-56

p 88

j) information of the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity for the period, including:

i) the name of the accountable authority or members;

ii) the qualifications of the accountable authority or member;

iii) the experience of the accountable authority or member;

iv) for a member—the number of meetings of the accountable authority attended by the member for the period;

v) for a member—whether the member is an executive member or non-executive member;

pp 75-82

k) an outline of the organisational structure of the entity;

l) an outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity;

p 61

pp 8-9

m) information in relation to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the period; pp 82-88

n) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority for making a decision if:

i) the decision is to approve the entity paying for a good or service from another Commonwealth entity or a company, or providing a grant to another Commonwealth entity or company; and

ii) the entity, and the other Commonwealth entity or company are related entities; and

iii) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate value of those transactions is more than $10,000 inclusive of GST.

o) if the annual report includes information under para (n):

i) if there is only one transaction—the value of the transaction;

ii) if there is more than one transaction—the number of transactions and the aggregate value of the transactions;

pp 90-123

p) any significant activities and changes that affected the operations or structure of the entity during the period; p 60

q) particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals made during the period that have had, or may have, a significant effect on the operations of the entity; p 88

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Annual report compliance requirements—PGPA Rule Page

reference

r) particulars of any report on the entity given during the period by:

i) the Auditor-General, other than a report on audit of annual financial statements;

ii) a committee of either House or both Houses of Parliament;

iii) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner;

p 89

s) if the accountable authority has been unable to obtain information from a subsidiary of the entity that is required to be included in the annual report—an explanation of the information that was not obtained and the effect of not having the information on the annual report;

Not applicable

t) details of any indemnity that applied during the period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority of officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums pad, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs);

p 88

u) an index identifying where the requirements of section are to be found. pp 153-156

Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 requirements Page

reference

48(a)—Specify the transactions and state of affairs of the Australian Sports Foundation. p 125

48(b)—Include particulars of each direction given to it by the minister under subsection 11(1) that is applicable in relation to the period. p 74

48(c)—Include an assessment of the extent to which its operations during the period have implemented the relative operational plan. pp 36-57

48(d) Particulars of:

1. significant capital works (if any) undertaken by the Commission during the period;

2. significant acquisitions and dispositions of real property by the Commission during the period;

3. variations to the operational plan agreed to by the minister during the period.

p 70

Shortened forms

AIS Australian Institute of Sport

ASC Australian Sports Commission

ASF Australian Sports Foundation

ASPAs AIS Sport Performance Awards

ASPR Annual Sport Performance Review

AW&E Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement

ETC European Training Centre

FTE Full-time Equivalent

HSRs Health and Safety Representatives

IC Information Commissioner

IPC International Paralympic Committee

NSOD National sporting organisation for people with disabilities

NSO National sporting organisation

PA Paralympics Australia

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PGPA Public Governance, Performance and Accountability

RAP Reconciliation Action Plan

WHS Work health and safety

159 158

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

Index

A

abbreviations 157

ABC Sports Personality of the Year award 133

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 2, 66, 71

accountability 86

accountable authority details 140-141

Acknowledgement of Country 2, 66

ACT Academy of Sport 21

AIS see Australian Institute of Sport

AIS Sport Performance Awards see ASPAs

Alcott, Dylan 54

annual performance statements 35-57, 86

Annual Sports Performance Review (ASPR) 47, 48

Army Special Operations Training see Australian Army

ASC see Australian Sports Commission

ASC Enterprise Agreement 2016-2019 62

ASC Media Awards 134

ASPAs (AIS Sport Performance Awards) 31

ASPR see Annual Sports Performance Review

asset management 93

athlete wellbeing 15, 18-19, 29, 51, 55

see also Mental Health Referral Network

Athletes Advisory Committee 85

athletes with a disability see NSODs; para-sports

athletics 31, 133

Auditor-General’s report 94-95

audits 88, 89

AusPlay survey 17, 24, 39, 40

Australian Army 19, 28, 53

Australian Childhood Foundation 62

Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation 57

Australian Curriculum and Assessment and Reporting Authority 57

Australian Human Rights Commission 46, 57

Australian Information Commissioner 89

Australian Institute of Sport (AIS)

AIS scholarship holders online history 71

Applied Technology and Innovation branch 28, 54

Athlete Wellbeing and Engagement branch 15, 18-19, 29, 51, 55

Caretaker’s Cottage Childcare Centre 68

Executive report 18-19

facilities refurbishment 70

funding 18

high performance camps 33

highlights 27-31

history 71

key partners 21

Lifeline Community Custodians program 18, 29, 33

National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 15, 19, 21, 51, 56, 57

new operating model 18, 23

operation of 21

organisational structure 60-61

Performance, People and Teams branch 33, 53

purpose 21

redevelopment of 70, 82

role of 7, 21

support for NSOs 15, 33, 52-53

Visitor Centre displays 71

Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) 89

Australian Olympic Committee 21

Australian Paralympic Committee (APC) 21

Australian Physical Literacy Framework 38

Australian sporting environment 22-23

Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 7, 60, 73, 86

Australian Sports Commission (ASC)

accountability 86

Enterprise Agreement 62

external scrutiny 88

focus 7

functions of 73-74

governance 86-88

history 60

new operating model 14, 22, 23, 60

objects of 73

office closures 8, 70

organisational structure 60-61

overview 7

planning and accountability 86

site management 70

staff and program locations 8-9, 62-64, 70

vision 7, 37

see also Australian Institute of Sport (AIS); Sport Australia

Australian Sports Commission Board

activity 82-83

appointments 75

committees 84-85

members 76-82

Australian Sports Foundation Ltd (ASF) 17, 125

authority and directions 73-74

Award for Leadership 132

awards 31, 132-134

B

Bates, Katherine 15, 75, 78

Beauchamp, Glenys 82

benchmark events 52, 128-131

Best Sporting Moment 31

Better Ageing grants program 16, 32, 38, 44-45

broadcasting of sport see media; sports broadcasting

budget estimates 92

Building the capability of sport... outcome

case study 50

key activities 46

results 47-49

C

Camplin-Warner, Alisa 15, 75

canoeing 132, 133

cash flow statement 101-102

Chair’s Report 14-15

Chief Executive Officer’s report 16-17

child protection practices 46, 48, 62, 82

Child Safe Sport Framework 62

161 160

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

childcare centre 68

children’s sport 38, 39, 40

see also AusPlay survey; child protection practices; Local Sporting Champions grants; physical literacy; schools; Sporting Schools program; youth participation

Coach of the Year award 133

coaching and officiating 19, 28, 30, 41, 46, 51, 53, 55

Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports 46, 57

Colbeck, Richard (Minister for Sport) 74, 83

Comcover 87, 88

Committee of Sport and Recreation Officers 51

Commonwealth Games Australia 21, 31, 132

Commonwealth Games (Gold Coast, 2018) 31, 133

Commonwealth Ombudsman 89

Community Custodian Program see Lifeline Community Custodian Program

Community Perceptions of Sport Survey 52, 53, 57

Community Sport Infrastructure grants program 14, 16, 32, 38, 44-45, 92

Company Director training 48

compliance with PGPA legislation 87, 88

compliance summary 153-156

Conde, Peter 18-19, 30

contact officers 152

corporate governance see governance

corporate partners 67

Corporate Plan (2018-22) 22, 37, 56, 86

Corporate Plan (2019-2030) 86

Crawford, Matt 54

Creating national pride and inspiration... outcome

case studies 53, 54, 56

key activities 51

results 52-55

cycling 31, 132, 133

Cycling Australia 31, 49-50, 132

D

dAIS (athlete incentive funding program) 33

Davidson, Heath 54

Delahunty, Hugh 15, 81

Dennis, Rohan 31, 132

digital capability of NSOs 17, 46-50, 57, 68

disability sports see NSODs; para-sports

diversity in sport 17, 46, 57

Downes, Pippa 15, 75, 79

E

electricity usage 72

Emerging Athlete of the Year 133

employees see staff

energy usage 72

environmental initiatives 71-72

Environmental Management System 71

European Training Centre (Varese, Italy) 9, 70, 106

executive remuneration 86, 117, 151

executive reports 16-19

external scrutiny 89

F

Facebook see social media

facilities refurbishment 70, 82

Farmer, Pat 78

Fearnley, Kurt 15, 31, 75, 80, 133

Female Athlete of the Year 132

female athletes see women’s sport

50-50 Foundation 17, 48

Finance, Audit and Risk Committee 84

financial management 84

financial outcomes summary 92-93

financial statements 97-122

Find Your 30 campaign website 26, 43, 44

Fox, Jessica 31, 132

Fox, Myriam 31, 133

fraud 88

Fraud Control Plan 88

Freedom of Information Act 1982 89

freedom of information requests 89

funding of athletes see dAIS

funding of sports 21, 32, 57, 136-139

see also grants and grant allocations

fundraising raffle 17, 46, 48

G

gender diversity 17, 46, 57

Getting more Australians moving... outcome

case studies 41, 45

key activities 38-39

results 39-45

Gold Medal Alumni 19, 28

Gold Medal Ready program 15, 19, 28, 53

governance 86-88

Governance Education programs 15, 25

Governance and Executive Performance Committee 85

Governance Principles see Mandatory Sports Governance Principles

grants and grant allocations 32, 38

see also funding of sports

Guidelines for the inclusion of transgender and gender diverse people in sport 17

H

heritage 71

Heritage and Culture Committee 71

high performance investment framework 18, 27, 53

high performance sport

AIS camps 19, 33

coaching 30

evolution of 23

funding 21

investment framework for 18, 27, 53

mental health in 18, 29, 51, 55

results 128-131

women coaches in 30

highlights

AIS 27-31

Sport Australia 24-26, 30-31

Hills, Madeline 31, 133

hockey 31, 133

Horrie, Erik 54

human resource management see staff

human resources statistics 142-145

I

inclusiveness in sport 16, 17, 44, 46, 133, 134

indemnity insurance for officers and directors 88

163 162

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

independent auditor’s report 94-95

Indigenous Australians 2, 66, 71

Information Publication Scheme 89

Instagram see social media

insurance 88

integrity in sport 7, 15, 23, 31, 57

internal audit program 88

Ireland, Andrew 15, 75, 80

J

judicial decisions 89

junior sport see children’s sport; Sporting Schools program; youth participation

K

key activities

Building the capability of sport... 46

Creating national pride and inspiration... 51

Getting more Australian moving... 38-39

key management personnel remuneration 117, 146-151

key outcomes 37

Building the capability of sport... 46-50

Creating national pride and inspiration... 51-56

Getting more Australians moving... 38-46

Kookaburras (Australian men’s hockey team) 31, 133

L

Laing, Amanda 15, 75, 81

Larratt, Andrew 66

legislation requirements 73-74

letter of transmittal 3

Lifeline Community Custodian Program 18, 29, 33, 51

Lifestyle of our Kids (LOOK) Study 132

Local Sporting Champions grants 16, 32, 41

Lowndes, Craig 31, 133

M

McKenzie, Bridget (Minister for Sport) 22, 74

Male Athlete of the Year 132

mandatory data tables 140-151

Mandatory Sports Governance Principles (MSGP) 25, 46

marketing of sport 44-45

media 134

Meeting of Sport and Recreation Ministers 51

mental health 18, 29, 33, 51

Mental Health Referral Network 18, 29, 51, 55

Minister for Sport 22, 74, 83, 88

see also Colbeck, Richard; McKenzie, Bridget

ministerial directions 74

Mitchell, Andrea 76

Moneghetti, Stephen 79

Morris, Jennifer 77

Morrison, Scott (Prime Minister) 45

motorsport 31, 133

Move It AUS campaign 17, 22, 26, 38-39, 42-45, 56-57

grants program 14, 32, 38, 39, 44, 57

MSGP see Mandatory Sports Governance Principles

Mumbrella Sports Marketing Awards 44

N

National Child Safety Office 46

National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 15, 19, 21, 51, 56, 57

National Institute Network (NIN) 19, 21, 29, 51

National Redress Scheme 46, 62

national sporting organisations see NSOs

national sporting organisations for people with disability see NSODs

NIN see National Institute Network

notifiable WHS incidents 65

NSO Integrated Learning Experiences workshops 48

NSODs (national sporting organisations for people with disability) 20, 25, 139

NSOs (national sporting organisations)

athlete wellbeing in 15

capability building 46-50

child safe sport 46

digital capability of 17, 46-50, 57, 68

equipment for 14

funding for 20, 32, 38-39, 45, 53, 135-139

governance reform 15, 25, 46, 48

high performance programs 21, 33

support from AIS 15, 33, 52-53

workshops for 48-49

see also Annual Sport Performance Review; Community Sport Infrastructure grants program; SportAUS Connect; Sporting Schools program; Sport.Scan

O

office closures 8, 70

Office for Sport 20

Office for Women 30

officiating see coaching and officiating

Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo, 2020) 15, 18, 23, 27, 28, 51, 53, 57

Olympic Winter Games and Paralympics see Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games

One Management governance project 15, 25, 46, 48, 49, 50

operating environment 20-21

operational highlights 68-69

organisation chart 61

Outcome: Building the capability of sport...

case study 50

key activities 46

results 47-49

Outcome: Creating national pride and inspiration...

case studies 53, 54, 56

key activities 51

results 52-53

Outcome: Getting more Australians moving...

case studies 41, 45

key activities 38-39

results 39-45

Outcome 1 (Portfolio Budget Statements) 37

165 164

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

P

Paddle Australia 31

Palmer, Kate (Chief Executive Officer) 16-17, 30, 62

Para Performance of the Year 133

para-rowing 54

para-snowboarding 31

Para-Sport Equipment Fund 17

para-sports 15, 31

equipment for 17, 53, 54

funding for 135-139

Para Performance of the Year 133

world champions 130-131

see also NSODs; Olympic and Paralympic Games

para-tennis 54

Paralympics Australia 17

Participation grants program 14, 16, 32, 38, 44-45

Partner Portal 49

Patmore, Simon 31, 133

performance against deliverables

analysis 56-57

key outcome - Building the capability of sport... 46-50

key outcome - Creating national pride and inspiration... 51-56

key outcome - Getting more Australians moving... 38-46

performance highlights 128-131

Performance, People & Teams programs 33

performance statements 35-57

PGPA Act see Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

Phillips, Craig 31, 132

physical activity guidelines 22, 32, 42

for children 39, 40

Physical Activity Partners 38

physical literacy 15, 16, 37, 38-42, 42, 57

Physical Literacy project 15, 16

Pizzey Park high performance centre (Gold Coast) 69, 70

planning and accountability 86

Plapp, Luke 31, 133

Play for Purpose charity raffle 17, 46, 48

Plympton, Andrew 76

Portfolio Budget Statements (2018-19) 37, 86

privacy 89

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 36, 86, 87

R

raffle 17, 46, 48

Reconciliation Action Plan 66

recreational activities 24

recycling 71

refurbishment of facilities 70

regional areas 83

regional offices 8-9, 60, 70

related party disclosures 118

remuneration of key management personnel 117, 146-151

research 38

Research Institute for Sport and Exercise (UC-RISE) 132

risk management 87

Risk Management Framework 87

Roche, Danielle 15, 75, 76

Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse 62

S

San Souci Football Club 45

schools

sport and physical activity in 38, 39

see also children’s sport; Sporting Schools program

Schools Physical Literacy Framework 38

senior Australians 16, 32, 38, 44-45

shortened forms 157

site management 70

snowboarding 31, 133

social media 26, 44

Sport 2030 (national sports plan) 14, 17, 21, 22, 51, 56

Sport Australia

executive report 16-17

governance reform 25

highlights 24-26

new branding 16

operation of 20

organisational structure 60-61

overview 20

purpose 20

responsibilities 7

role of 20

see also Australian Sports Commission (ASC); Find Your 30 campaign; Move It AUS campaign

Sport Australia Award 31, 133

Sport Australia Board Child Safe Commitment Statement 82

Sport Australia Community Engagement Monitor 52

sport, community perceptions of 52, 53, 57

SportAUS Connect platform 46, 49-50, 57

sporting environment 22-23

Sporting Moment of the Year 133

sporting organisations see NSODs; NSOs

Sporting Schools program 16, 32, 38-39, 40

see also children’s sport; schools; youth participation

sports broadcasting 134

sports funding 21, 32, 57, 136-139

see also grants and grant allocation

sports governance principles see Mandatory Sports Governance Principles

sports integrity 7, 15, 23, 31, 57

sports journalism 134

sports medicine 51

sports science 51

Sport.Scan (organisational development tool) 47, 49

staff

ASC Enterprise Agreement 62

employment conditions 62

gender profile 63

location of 8-9

profile 63-64

statistics 142-145

work health and safety 65

State of Play report series 24, 39

statement by the Commissioner re annual performance statements 36

166

AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION — ANNUAL REPORT 2018-2019 APPENDIXES AND REFERENCES

statement of changes in equity 103

statement of compliance 88

statement of comprehensive income 97-98

statement of financial position 99-100

statement from the Chair of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer 96

strategic planning 84, 86

strategic priorities 37-57

Sullohern, Celia 31, 133

summary of compliance 153-156

summary of financial outcomes 92-93

Supply Nation 66

T

Team Management Program 53

Team of the Year 133

technology 16, 23, 50, 51, 54, 68

see also SportAUS Connect platform

Technology Roadmap project 46, 49, 57, 68

Telford, Dick 132

tennis 54

Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games see Olympic and Paralympic Games (Tokyo, 2020)

training

for high performance athletes 19, 23

for NSOs and NSODs 48, 49

for staff 48, 65, 87, 88

Trainor, Gabrielle 77

Twitter see social media

U

University of Canberra 132

V

volunteers 17

W

waste management and recycling 71

water usage 72

Wellings, Eloise 31, 133

Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games (Beijing, 2022) 15, 27

Women in High Performance Coaching Forum 30

women in sport 15, 30, 83

women’s sport 30, 132

Women’s Talent Program 30

work health and safety 65

Work Health and Safety Act 2011 65

Work Health and Safety Governance Forum 65

WorkSafe Committee 65

workshops, for NSOs and NSODs 48, 49

world champions 128-131

Wylie, John (Chair) 14-15, 75

youth participation 38, 39, 42, 43

see also child protection practices; children’s sport; Local Sporting Champions grants; Sporting Schools program