Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Australian Sports Commission (Sport Australia)—Corporate plan for 2019-23


Download PDF Download PDF

Australian Sports Commission Acknowledgement of Country

The Australian Sports Commission acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the lands on which it stands and pays its respects to their Elders past, present and emerging.

The Australian Sports Commission recognises the outstanding contribution that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make to sport in Australia and celebrates the power of sport to promote reconciliation and reduce inequality.

From our Chair Sport and physical activity is vital to a prosperous Australia. It has enormous influence on our health, education, social, economic and diplomatic outcomes.

This is why the Australian Sports Commission remains steadfast in our vision: to make Australia the world’s most active sporting nation, known for its integrity, sporting success and world-leading sports industry.

Driving national behaviour change, to get more Australians moving more often, means we must continually evolve too. We have made significant progress in the past year and this won’t stop.

We have enacted a new operating model, which enables our Sport Australia entity to focus on participation, physical activity and sport industry growth for the benefit of all Australians. It empowers the Australian Institute of Sport with greater autonomy to succeed in the competitive global sport environment, especially with the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics on the horizon.

Australia’s commitment, outlined in the Australian Government’s national sport plan, Sport 2030, is to reduce physical inactivity by 15 per cent by 2030. It is a huge challenge, but one that Sport Australia enthusiastically accepts.

Sport Australia aims to reach all Australians, although an emphasis on children is essential for generational change.

The national Sporting Schools program is a key platform to address childhood inactivity. We have funded 7300 schools and recorded more than 5.2 million attendances since its launch in mid-2015. We will continue to look at ways to maximise the impact of Sporting Schools and link it with our important work in physical literacy. By teaching our children to run, throw, jump or kick, we can put them on the path to better lives.

Sport Australia’s programs continue to benefit broader community health and wellbeing. We are investing in areas such as community sport infrastructure, older Australians and participation initiatives.

There is no success without integrity, and Sport Australia is working with the Government to establish Sport Integrity Australia, a national agency targeting match fixers, doping and other forms of corruption in Australian sport. Sport Integrity Australia will also provide an important tribunal service to sport. We will continue to encourage environments that are inclusive and welcoming. Increasing diversity in our industry is critical and we want to make sport the benchmark for a more equitable society.

All this work is emphasised by our national behaviour change campaign, Move It AUS. Our call to action is to ‘Find Your 30’ minutes of physical activity every day, and enjoy the benefits.

We will continue to build the capability of the sport industry, addressing governance reform to bring out the very best in our sporting organisations. The One Management project looks at helping sports align their strategy, workforce and financial management.

The AIS, in partnership with the National Institute Network (NIN) and national sporting organisations (NSOs), is aligning Australia’s high performance sport strategy too. The National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 will signal the first time that all Federal and State/Territory sports agencies have signed up to a joint high performance strategy.

Enhancing athlete pathways and athlete wellbeing are primary areas of focus, keys to creating long-term sustainable success.

Together with the Government we are considering options for the future of the AIS campus in Canberra so that we have a world-class facility to match this high performance strategy and our ambition.

From backyards to benchmark international events, we believe unquestionably in the power of sport and physical activity to reflect the very best in our culture and to be a powerful vehicle for change.

John Wylie am Chair Australian Sports Commission

1

The Australian Sports Commission Board is pleased to present the Corporate Plan 2019-23, which covers the period of 2019-20 to 2022-23. It has been developed in accordance with the requirements under paragraph 35(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and paragraphs 23 and 25 of the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989.

This Corporate Plan has been developed to meet the requirements of the Corporate Plan and Annual Operational Plan as required under paragraph 26 of the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989.

3

Contents

About us 6

Our focus 8

The Australian sporting environment 10

Our operating model 12

Sport Australia 12

More Australians move more often 16

Building the capability of sport to create a robust, connected industry 2 4

Australian Institute of Sport 32

National pride and inspiration through international sporting success 38

Our capability 46

Managing our risks 50

Our planning framework 51

4

5

About us The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is the Australian Government agency responsible for supporting and investing in sport and physical activity.

Our vision is for Australia to be the world’s most active sporting nation, known for its integrity, sporting success and world leading sports industry.

We were established in 1985 under the Australian Sport Commission Act 1989 and operate in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The ASC is governed by a Board of Commissioners appointed by the Minister for Sport. The Board determines the ASC’s overall direction, decides on allocation of resources and policy for delegated decisions and is accountable to the Minister for Sport.

The ASC unites two entities; Sport Australia — responsible for driving the broader sport sector including participation, physical activity and industry growth and the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) — leading our high performance sport system.

From grassroots right up to the pinnacle of elite international competition, we work together with the sport industry and the wider community to champion the role sport can play in engaging every Australian.

Our Corporate Plan 2019-2023 aligns with Sport 2030 — the Australian Government’s strategic sports plan launched in August 2018.

6

7 7

Our focus Our focus is to improve the health and wellbeing of all Australians, and make communities stronger through sport and physical activity. From grassroots right up to the pinnacle of elite international competition, we work together with the sport industry and the wider community to champion the role sport can play in engaging every Australian regardless of age, race, gender, cultural background and physical ability. Sport and physical activity moves us all.

We are delivering three key outcomes: We will deliver these outcomes through seven important strategies:

ƚ embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

ƚ increasing awareness and reach in areas which have a direct impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

ƚ building workforce capability across the sector

ƚ improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

ƚ leading and enabling a united and collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

ƚ evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

ƚ driving a leaner and more efficient organisation and building a strong workforce culture.

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

CREATING NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

GETTING MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVING MORE OFTEN

8

OUR VISION: Australia is the world’s most active sporting nation, known for its integrity, sporting success and world-leading sports industry.

OUR STRATEGIC PRIORITIES

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement

of children and youth in sport

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which have a direct

impact on physical activity and physical literacy levels

Building workforce capability across the sector

Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Leading and enabling a united and collaborative high performance

system that supports Australian athletes to achieve podium success

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for

athletes to engage with and inspire the community

Driving a leaner and more efficient organisation and building a strong workforce culture

9

MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVE MORE OFTEN

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREA TE A ROBUST,

CONNECTED INDUSTRY

NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNA TIONAL

SPORTING SUCCESS

10

The Australian sporting environment Perhaps it was the clean air, sunny days and open spaces. Or a way for different cultures to find some common ground. But the idea of just getting out there and having a go has always brought out the best in Australians. We are known as a great sporting nation that punches above our weight. We are famous for producing some of the world’s best, our history is full of great sporting heroes and great sporting moments celebrated the world over.

But the environment in which we live is changing and will continue to change. The characteristics, habits and attitudes of our Australian society are evolving and so is the way in which Australians interact with sport. As a nation, we don’t get up, get out and get into nearly enough sport or physical activity. We are determined to help all Australians become more active, from the young to the young at heart. It could be a game of backyard cricket, getting involved in a local sports club, or aspiring to reach the pinnacle of your sport to represent Australia.

Data indicates that only 34.5% of Australian adults aged 15 and above are meeting physical activity guidelines for their age group, and following the peak from 9-11 years old a significant number of young people stop playing organised sport.1 For children, national data indicates only 19% of Australian children and young people aged 5-17 years are meeting the recommended minimum one hour of physical activity a day.2

Research into the sports market tells us Australians are increasingly time poor, have limited budgets, and are consumed by new digital ways of interacting and socialising. With these changes, new preferences are emerging; Australians want greater flexibility, more tailored products, and activities that fit their busy lifestyles.

We want everyone in Australia to be able to engage in sport and physical activity regardless of their age, background, or level of ability. From those having their first go, to those competing at the highest level.

Just as Australians’ lifestyles are changing, so too is the sport industry. There is greater variety in the industry, and many levels of government and non-government support. We aim to increase consistency and reduce inefficiencies across the sector, to transform the industry to better support sport and physical activity in the community.

High performance sport has evolved significantly in the four decades that have passed since the creation of the AIS. When it opened its doors the AIS was unique in its focus on high performance success and development of sport science and high performance training methods. As the AIS model delivered results for Australian athletes, it was replicated not only abroad, but by Australian states and territories and Australian sports.

Now, every state and territory has a separate institute or academy, professional sporting teams have their own high performance centres and programs, NSOs have become more capable and new technology has made access to high performance programs and the data and analytics that drives them easier than ever before.

1. Sport A ustralia (2019) Ausplay data January 2018 - December 2018, released on 30 April 2019.

2. A ctive Healthy Kids Australia (2016) Physical literacy: do our kids have all the tools? 2016 Report Card on physical activity for children and young people.

3. Boston Consulting Gr oup (2017) Intergenerational Review of Australian Sport 2017.

11

Rather than replicating the role of state and territory institutes, the AIS will now focus on agile and efficient structures that enable athletes to access the latest information and innovation in high performance programs, wherever and whenever they need it.

On the international stage, competition is continually intensifying and improving, and as we fast approach the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic games, we must optimise all of the resources available to maximise our outcomes.

Sport and physical activity bring people together and promotes social inclusion and cohesion. It builds character and teaches important life lessons like persistence, resilience and teamwork. It helps young Australians to be more active, producing better results at school and ingraining healthy life long skills and habits. It generates social change.

Sport and physical activity contribute around $83 billion of economic, health and education value for the Australian economy every year.3 Through greater participation in sport, we’ll create a greater pool of talent that will go on to have more success on the podium and produce our sporting legends of the future.

SPORTING ACHIEVEMENT IS GOOD FOR AUSTRALIA SPORT MATTERS

12

SPORT AUSTRALIA

13

SPORT AUSTRALIA

14

Our purpose

Sport Australia will contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of Australians and making communities stronger through sport and physical activity.

How we operate

Sport Australia plays a central leadership role across the broader sport and physical activity sector, building collaboration, alignment and effectiveness. Sport Australia promotes and supports the development of a cohesive and effective national sport sector that creates opportunities for all Australians to participate and excel in sport.

Sport Australia will continue to evolve its role, taking a whole of sector view, understanding the systems in which we operate both here and overseas, and the challenges and trends which will impact on the operation of the sport sector. We will deliver our work with our partners across the sport industry - sporting organisations, peak bodies, the Office for Sport and other Australian Government agencies, physical activity providers, business and other sectors. We will champion the value of sport across Governments and the broader community.

Sport Australia invests in a wide range of NSOs and national sporting organisations for people with a disability (NSODs) to empower the organisations to get Australians moving more often. The investments are targeted, through the use of data and assessments, to those organisations who are best placed to assist Sport Australia deliver on its purpose. In addition to providing funding, Sport Australia is focused on improving the capacity and capability of NSOs to create a sustainable and cohesive national sport sector.

15

OUR PURPOSE: Sport Australia will contribute to improving the health and wellbeing of Australians and making communities stronger through sport and physical activity.

MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVE MORE OFTEN

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A R OBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

Embedding physical activity through greater engagement and involvement of children and youth in sport

Increasing awareness and reach in areas which hav e a direct impact on physical

activity and physical literacy levels

Building workforce capability acr oss

the sector

Improving the digital capability of the A

ustralian sports sector

ACTIVE COMMUNITIES

1. Implement an enhanced Sporting Schools program that delivers sustainable outcomes for all children

2. Establish a Research Centre for Sport and Physical Activity to solve industry challenges through

shared knowledge, data and analytics

ACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS

3. Support the development of active places and spaces infrastructure

4. Develop inclusion and diversity sport impact statements which guide priority outcomes areas

ACTIVE AUSTRALIA

5. Deliver a physical activity awareness program across the nation to support Sport 2030

6. Increase awareness and reach of the Move It AUS platform to achieve Sport Australia’s physical

activity targets

ACTIVE INDUSTRY

7. Transform the sport business model

8. Reform the governance and management of the National Sport Disability sector

9. Support the development of a Sport Industry Growth Plan

10. Create a shared data and analytics platform for sport

11. Market Play for Purpose to achieve scale in 12-months

DRIVING A LEANER AND MORE EFFICIENT ORGANISATION AND BUILDING A STRONG WORKFORCE CULTURE

16

MORE AUSTRALIANS MOVE MORE OFTEN

17

MORE THAN 90 PER CENT OF AUSTRALIAN ADULTS HAVE AN INTEREST IN SPORT, YET LESS THAN HALF OF THE POPULATION ARE PARTICIPATING.4 THIS IS OUR GREAT OPPORTUNITY.

Sport Australia aims to convert interested bystanders into active participants and become the world’s most active nation. This has the potential to be Australia’s most important sporting result, because success will mean healthier, happier and more productive communities.

At Sport Australia we want to encourage and help Australians of all backgrounds, ages and abilities to get involved in sport and physical activity and to realise the many benefits.

4. Boston Consulting Gr oup (2017) Intergenerational Review of Australian Sport 2017

18

19

Active Australia — Moving a nation

Sport Australia will lead action around sport and physical activity, continuing to focus on getting the least active Australians moving. We will target an increase of 207,000 Australian adults meeting physical activity guidelines in 2019-20, and a further 211,000 in 2020, giving practical effect to achieving Australia’s commitment to the World Health Organisation target to reduce inactivity by 15% by 2030.

We understand Australians are busier than ever, struggling to find time to prioritise sport and physical activity. Our ‘Move It AUS’ campaign, launched in August 2018, encourages everyone to find 30 minutes a day to be physically active. We continue to engage with the broader Australian community through media channels, Sporting Schools grants, partnerships with State and Territory Departments and other funded initiatives. In 2019-20 we will focus on increasing the physical activity levels of Australians and we will continue to reinforce the Move It AUS platforms and amplify these through NSOs, State and Territory Governments and other partnerships.

Active Environments — Opportunities for all

Sport Australia recognises that to get more Australians moving more often we need the right environments which provide opportunities and access for everyone. In 2019-20 we are therefore focusing on two key areas; infrastructure and inclusion.

Sport Australia will support the development of active places and spaces infrastructure, to ensure that every Australian has a safe, inclusive local place to play sport and be active. We want to ensure that investment in sport infrastructure is coordinated and drives tangible social, health and economic benefits for local communities, and that sports facilities and spaces are utilised efficiently.

Sport Australia will continue to set an example for sport around diversity, inclusion and important social issues such as gender equality. We want sports to embrace social inclusion, reduce isolation and to play a role in building cohesive and connected communities. To guide this, in 2019-20 we will develop inclusion and diversity sport impact statements which guide priority outcome areas.

Active Communities — Generational change

Sport Australia will focus on building partnerships with our community stakeholders, including government, industry, the education sector and the wider Australian community. In 2019 we will partner with government and industry to establish a Research Centre for Sport and Physical Activity, and will work to provide a stronger national focus on our sector’s collective expertise, knowledge resources and collaborative efforts in addressing Australia’s physical inactivity crisis. Sport Australia will prioritise our research and insights program to support investment in community sport and physical activity and to help inform business and policy decisions. We are also focusing on ensuring data and insights are accessible to both the sector and wider community, such as through the AusPlay survey, and through ongoing investment in our digital platforms and information dissemination channels.

Sport Australia continues to prioritise its work with schools, recognising that active communities begin with connecting our children with movement and establishing lifelong physical activity habits. Sport Australia wants every school, every class and every child active every day. We will continue to deliver the highly successful Sporting Schools program, which expanded to include high schools in 2017-18. Sporting Schools enables children to sample different sports, for fun and for free, giving every child the chance to find an activity they can connect with. In 2019-20, Sport Australia will encourage schools to embed sport and physical activity into their daily routine, to deliver outcomes for all children and get the least active children moving.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: EMBEDDING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY THROUGH GREATER ENGAGEMENT AND INVOLVEMENT OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH IN SPORT

Performance criteria for 2019-20 and beyond

Performance Measure Increase in children, aged 5-14 years, participating in physical activity

Measurement Methodology The physical activity rates of children in Australia are measured through AusPlay. AusPlay is a continuous national population tracking survey with fieldwork happening throughout the year. It is reported biannually. As part of the survey parents/guardians are asked the participation rate of their

children in organised physical activity outside of school hours.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

30% of children in Australia aged 5 to 14 years participate for at least 3.2 hours per week in organised physical activity outside of school hours.

35% of children in Australia aged 5 to 14 years participate for at least 3.2 hours per week in organised physical activity outside of school hours.

n/a* n/a*

*Additional work is being undertaken in 2019-20 to develop a broader long term target to measure physical activity rates of children inclusive of school and outside of school hours.

Performance Measure An increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity in primary schools

Measurement Methodology Sport Australia surveys funded schools each term. Schools are asked to indicate the increase in time (in minutes/hours) the school dedicated to sport and physical activity as a result of the funding provided.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

60% of funded primary schools report an increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity.

62.5% of funded primary schools report an increase in the time dedicated to sport and physical activity.

n/a* n/a*

*The Sporting Schools program commenced in 2015 and is currently funded until 31 December 2020.

20

21

What we will do

Implement an enhanced Sporting Schools program that delivers sustainable outcomes for all children

ƚ Invest in established physical activity partners to support schools to deliver against the School Physical Literacy Framework

ƚ Identify schools that are delivering exemplary environments against all eight components of the School Physical Literacy Framework

ƚ Introduce a tiered recognition model which is promoted nationally to build brand equity in the program 

ƚ Seek long-term co-investment from government and corporate partners to enable generational change

Deliver a physical activity awareness program across the nation to support Sport 2030

ƚ Increase the awareness of the importance of physical activity with an initial focus on getting children and families active

ƚ Develop a Move It package for distribution and release to schools

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: INCREASING AWARENESS AND REACH IN AREAS WHICH HAVE DIRECT IMPACT ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PHYSICAL LITERACY LEVELS

Performance criteria for 2019-20 and beyond

Performance Measure Increase in Australians, aged 15 and above, participating in physical activity

Measurement Methodology The AusPlay survey measures Australians’ physical activity levels. Under the current physical activity guidelines each age group has a recommended level of daily activity. The measure is calculated by estimating the number of Australians who meet or exceed their respective

age group’s physical activity guidelines.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

An increase of 207,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group when compared to 2018-19.

An increase of 211,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group when compared to 2019-20.

An increase of 214,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group when compared to 2020-21.

An increase of 216,000 Australians aged 15 or more meeting current physical activity guidelines for their age group when compared to 2021-22.

Performance Measure Build awareness in all Australians, particularly parents, about the ways they can introduce sport and physical activity into daily living

Measurement Methodology Research tracking of the national Move It AUS behaviour change campaign advertising through an online survey, which measures the impact of the campaign messaging.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

4% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on a prompted basis.

2% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on an unprompted basis.

5% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on a prompted basis.

3% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on an unprompted basis.

6% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on a prompted basis.

4% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on an unprompted basis.

7% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on a prompted basis.

5% of Australians recall the ‘Move It’ campaign on an unprompted basis.

22

What we will do

Increase awareness and reach of the Move It platform

ƚ Work with State and Territory Departments to develop creative assets to integrate into state-based sport and physical activity platforms

ƚ Partner with State and Territory Departments and the Sport and Physical Activity Alliance to activate World Activity Day across Australia

ƚ Develop a strategic communication plan

Establish a Research Centre for Sport and Physical Activity to solve industry challenges through knowledge, data and analytics

ƚ Lead the development of the Australian Physical Activity Alliance

ƚ Develop and implement a strategy to support an increase in physical activity

ƚ Enable full access to industry data and insights, analytic tools and resources to reduce inactivity in Australia

Support the development of active places and spaces infrastructure

ƚ Support infrastructure investment as a key enabler for sport and physical activity participation

ƚ Lead a national plan and action agenda for the delivery of sport and physical activity infrastructure

ƚ Maximise active infrastructure by supporting development of national sport plans, priorities and standards

ƚ Develop the case for cooperative funding models for investment through design innovation and impact statements

ƚ Promote learning from the community sport infrastructure grant program to revive and activate built and open spaces

Develop inclusion and diversity sport impact statements

ƚ Create diversity and inclusion Impact Statements for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, people with disability, LGBTIQ+ and First Nations people

ƚ Lead the development of an integrated approach to investment in sport and physical activity for women and girls

23

24

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

25

BUILDING THE CAPABILITY OF SPORT TO CREATE A ROBUST, CONNECTED INDUSTRY

SPORT AUSTRALIA STRIVES TO KEEP BUILDING AN AUSTRALIAN SPORT SYSTEM THAT IS STRONG AND SUSTAINABLE

26

There are close to 12 million Australians who participate in sport annually, with a further 3.4 million involved in sport through volunteering, coaching, officiating, administration and other non-playing roles.5 It is estimated that sport generates 2-3% of our national GDP and 220,000 people are employed across the sport sector.6

We will invest as partners with sporting organisations, empowering sports to take ownership of their decisions and holding them accountable for their returns on investment.

5. Sport Australia (2019) Ausplay data January 2018 - December 2018, released on 30 April 2019

6. Boston Consulting Group (2017) Inter generational Review of Australian Sport 2017

Active Industry — Transformation

Sport Australia is focused on transforming the sport industry, and helping sports to use contemporary business models. We will continue to assist sports partners have more efficient systems of governance and management. The One Management project involves supporting NSOs to transition to a whole of sport business model focusing on areas such as strategy, workforce and financial management.

Sport Australia will support the Department of Health to develop a Sport Industry Growth Plan, to identify improvements in research and innovation, productivity, international competitiveness and commercial outcomes. Through the Plan, Sport Australia will continue to focus towards building workforce capability, and improved employment opportunities in sport and recreation.

Modern technology continues to disrupt and revolutionise the world of sport and Sport Australia must set the standard digitally. Sport Australia will create SportAUS Connect, a shared platform to connect the sector’s organisations and software vendors through data and analytics, to help enable sports to respond to consumers’ needs in the digital world. To help attract, maintain and retain participants, sports will be supported to embrace the greater use of digital solutions and design their services to make it easier for participants to find, book, pay and engage in sport.

This will allow for a deeper engagement with participants and fans, resulting in improved commercial outcomes. We will also continue to focus on increasing the functionality of Sport Australia digital channels, to help more Australians connect and engage with our messaging to be more active.

Sport Australia wants every sporting organisation in this country to grow, and to be less reliant on government funding by increasing external revenue sources. To support this, Sport Australia has endorsed the launch of Play for Purpose, an online not-for-profit raffle operated by the 50-50 Foundation, which provides a fundraising platform for grassroots sporting clubs and charities. In 2019-20, Sport Australia will market Play for Purpose through the sport industry, to provide a new, sustainable source of revenue for sports clubs. Sport Australia wants to see 500 sporting clubs utilising Play for Purpose by 2020.

Sport Australia endorses the need to increase philanthropic funding for sport, and to reduce the number of NSOs that are reliant on Government funding. We strongly support the role of the Australian Sports Foundation (ASF) as the peak body for philanthropic giving to sport, and are working with ASF to increase charitable contributions to Australian sport at all levels. Sport Australia will encourage all sporting organisations — from grassroots to regional, state or national bodies — to engage with the ASF as a key means to improve financial sustainability.

Inclusive sport continues to be a significant focus for Sport Australia. In addition to our focus on diversity and inclusion, our focus in 2019-20 will be on reforming the governance and management of the National Sport and Disability Sector. We want to ensure that there are clear pathways and opportunities for Australians of all abilities, and for the sector to be a powerful advocate for people with disability.

27

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: BUILDING WORKFORCE CAPABILITY ACROSS THE SECTOR

Performance criteria for 2019-20 and beyond

Performance Measure Improving the organisational capability of targeted NSOs

Measurement Methodology Project reporting provides an assessment of NSOs’ achievement of pre-defined criteria in each of the work streams: strategy, workforce and finance.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

Four sports transition to a whole of sport business model incorporating the three operating model streams of strategy, workforce and financial management.

Eight sports in total transition to a whole of sport business model incorporating the three operating model streams of strategy, workforce and financial management.

Twelve sports in total transition to a whole of sport business model incorporating the three operating model streams of strategy, workforce and financial management.

n/a*

* The One Management project is currently funded until December 2022.

Performance Measure Improving the financial performance and financial capability of NSOs

Measurement Methodology Rating of each directly funded NSO or NSOD using the Annual Sports Performance Review (APSR). An organisation’s ASPR financial assessment risk rating is based on a weighted combination of measures of financial position/performance taken

from audited financial statements.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

<15% of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated as “Higher Risk” or “Extreme Risk” under the annual financial assessment tool.

<15% of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated as “Higher Risk” or “Extreme Risk” under the annual financial assessment tool.

<13% of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated as “Higher Risk” or “Extreme Risk” under the annual financial assessment tool.

<10% of assessed NSOs and NSODs are rated as “Higher Risk” or “Extreme Risk” under the annual financial assessment tool.

* In 2019- 20, the methodology for the financial assessment risk rating will be revised to be based solely on financial statements, for consistency and robust benchmarking across sports. It is anticipated that this will result in an increase in “high risk” ratings in the short term, and to reflect this the target has been maintained at 2018-19 levels for the forward 2 years.

28

What we will do

Transform the sport business model

ƚ Commence the business transformation of targeted sports

ƚ Extend the business transformation model to sports that demonstrate readiness

ƚ Update the Sport Governance Principles and apply standards and performance expectations to funding

ƚ Set and implement minimum criteria for core and impact funding 

ƚ Define and implement the consequences for non-compliance with core funding standards

Reform the governance and management of the National Sport Disability Sector 

ƚ Develop a shared vision and strategy for disability sport in Australia

ƚ Establish a new operating model to support NSODs

Support the development of a Sport Industry Growth Plan

ƚ Work with the Department of Health to deliver an Australian Sport Industry 10-year Roadmap

29

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: IMPROVING THE DIGITAL CAPABILITY OF THE AUSTRALIAN SPORTS SECTOR

Performance criteria for 2019-20 and beyond

Performance Measure Improving the digital capability of the Australian sports sector

Measurement Methodology Sport Australia completes Sport.Scan for 23 targeted NSOs, an organisational capability assessment tool. The digital maturity for each NSO is assessed via Sport.Scan. Each question is measured by either a five point scale or four point scale to determine the level of maturity the NSO has in place to

develop and implement their digital strategy. Scores are between 0-90.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

30% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

10% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

40% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

20% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

50% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

25% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

60% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 50 and above.

30% of NSOs completing Sport.Scan have an overall digital maturity score of 60 and above.

What we will do

Create a shared data and analytics platform for sport

ƚ Develop and implement the SportAUS Connect digital platform with 12 sports in the One Management program

ƚ Identify the next group of sports ready to implement SportAUS Connect

ƚ Establish a Community of Practice for sports and partners on digital and data analytics, to drive higher capabilities in sport

Market Play for Purpose to achieve scale in 12-months

ƚ Equip NSOs and Peak bodies with marketing support to drive the sign up of sporting clubs to Play for Purpose

ƚ Continue to activate the Play for Purpose program across all Sport AUS social media channels

30

31 31

32

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF SPORT

33

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF SPORT

34

Our Purpose

The AIS, having led a transition to a more united and collaborative system, has redefined its own purpose, success measures, and focus. Our purpose is to build sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes, and our success measures will be to see more sports consistently producing multiple medallists over multiple cycles; effectively inspiring the next generation.

How we operate

In 2018-19, the AIS launched a new strategy, investment framework and operating model to ensure that the AIS has a singular focus on high performance and can fulfill its role as a high performance system leader. The AIS works in partnership with the National Institute Network (NIN), and NSOs as well as other key partners such as the Australian Olympic Committee, Paralympics Australia and Commonwealth Games Australia. Decision making is collaborative, informed and transparent, and aimed at achieving strategic outcomes. In mid 2019, the NIN supported the National High Performance Sport Strategy 2024 (NHPSS), which will be presented to all Sport Ministers early in 2019-20 for consideration. The NHPSS is an aligned high performance stategy that revolves around athletes, coaches and sports with the collective mission for sporting success at the highest level.

The AIS is responsible for high performance funding allocations, national programs, research and innovation, and along with the ACT Academy of Sport, for Canberra-based high performance facilities.

The AIS drives and enables success in part through the strategic and transparent allocation of total integrated resources through collaborative, evidence and principles based investment in sports and athletes. This investment approach is designed to optimise sustainable performance outcomes.

The AIS leads the Australian high performance sport system, which has an agreed vision and success factors reflected in the national sport plan, Sport 2030 and in the NHPSS 2024.

Our focus

The AIS focus is on delivering the key outcome of national pride and inspiration through international sporting success. We work primarily with Olympic and Paralympic sports, along with Commonwealth Games sports, while also supporting other NSOs where our primary areas of expertise can have the most impact.

The AIS leads and enables a united and collaborative high performance sport system that supports Australian athletes to achieve international podium success. Along with NSOs and the NIN and partners, the AIS strives to do the big system-level things on the frontiers of ethical sporting performance that no other body is positioned to do.

OUR PURPOSE: Build sustainable winning systems for Australian athletes

NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

Leading and enabling a collaborative high performance system that supports Australians athletes to achieve podium sucess

Evolving a system-wide approach to athlete wellbeing for athletes to engage with and inspire the community

Establish strong fundamental conditions for success throughout

the system

Build system capability, particularly in NSOs and the NIN

Target investment for current and future cycles with performance

accountability

Execute the

big things on the frontiers of ethical sporting performance that

no other body is naturally positioned to do

Support athlete wellbeing and facilitate their engagement with communities

HIGH PERFORMANCE SYSTEM PARTNERS

NATIONAL INSTITUTE NETWORK NATIONAL SPORTING ORGANISATIONS

35

36

The National High Performance Sport Strategy

The NHPSS reflects several national system reviews completed in recent years which consistently identified the need for greater alignment and collaboration between partners of the high performance sport system as integral to future success. The following proposed National System Guiding Principles form part of the NHPSS and have been developed to define, progress and improve the national high performance sport system.

National System Guiding Principles

PRINCIPLE 1

A NHPSS developed by the AIS with the state and territory institutes and academies of sport (SIS/SAS) and in consultation with sport, will inform the Federal, State and Territory governments’ investment in this strategy.

PRINCIPLE 2

Sports have ownership for leading, developing and implementing their high performance plans to support the NHPSS.

PRINCIPLE 3

System partners within the high performance sport system will strive to provide a nationally consistent minimum level of resources to categorised athletes.

PRINCIPLE 4

The AIS will lead and enable a united and collaborative high performance system that supports Australian athletes to achieve international success.

37

PRINCIPLE 5

The SIS/SAS will support identified sports to develop and deliver high performance pathways for categorised athletes within their jurisdiction and available resources.

PRINCIPLE 6

The SIS/SAS and State and Territory Agencies for Sport and Recreation will work with sport to align support for athlete pathways in their jurisdiction that facilitate progression and development of athletes to categorised status.

PRINCIPLE 7

Decision making by system partners will be collaborative, informed and transparent.

38

NATIONAL PRIDE AND INSPIRATION THROUGH INTERNATIONAL SPORTING SUCCESS

39

THE AIS HAS IMPLEMENTED A NEW INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK TO DELIVER THE STRATEGIC AND TRANSPARENT ALLOCATION OF TOTAL INTEGRATED RESOURCES

From 1 July 2019, AIS investment will be allocated from two separate investment pools of funds — Baseline and Contestable. Baseline funding will provide stability and continuity for sports to deliver their high performance strategy and certainty for future cycles. Contestable funding provides the agility and flexibility to top up funding to sports for genuine new opportunities.

The AIS has prioritised a high level of focus on athlete wellbeing and engagement to ensure that Australian athletes can learn, thrive, and contribute to the community during their time in high performance sport and in life afterwards. Delivering across five streams, the programs will support athletes in finding the right balance between wellbeing, engagement in activities outside of training and competition and the requirments of elite sport.

Equally, the AIS is leading the transformation of the Australia high performance workforce. Our focus is on recruiting, developing and improving the people who support the athletes; the coaches, performance directors and CEOs, and on helping them to create high performing teams. This will be supported through the establishment of a knowledge base of people and behavioural analytics, research, insights, impact, tracking and monitoring. The AIS will also facilitate professional networks in key performance service disciplines.

The world of high performance sport changes quickly and the AIS is leading a collaborative sports research, applied technology and innovation program. This focus is delivering performance advantage through clearly prioritised channels of research, multidisciplinary expert programs, technical expertise and solutions in areas where a unified or nationwide approach is appropriate. This includes engineering solutions for equipment development, the Gold Medal Ready program, and the Athlete Availability program, which takes an epidemiological approach to injury occurrence, response and mitigation. Australian athletes should compete with confidence, knowing they benefit from the best science and technology in the world.

Originally built around a centralised Canberra campus in 1981, the AIS will continue to hold its place as the heartbeat of Australia’s commitment to sport. The Canberra and European Training Centre sites will provide unique and impactful services to the high performance system, including NSO camps, pre elite programs, Centres of Excellence, altitude/environment programs and complex rehabilitation services.

40

41

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: LEADING AND ENABLING A UNITED AND COLLABORATIVE HIGH PERFORMANCE SYSTEM THAT SUPPORTS AUSTRALIAN ATHLETES TO ACHIEVE PODIUM SUCCESS

Performance criteria for 2019-20 and beyond

Performance Measure Percentage of high performance funded sports rated by the AIS as achieving their benchmark targets

Measurement Methodology High performance targets are agreed between the AIS and each NSO before each reporting period. The measure is determined by the number of performance targets achieved, divided by the number of performance targets identified prior to the reporting period. The figures are then averaged

across all of the high performance funded sports.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

On average, 85% of high performance funded NSOs performance outcomes are achieved. As per 2019-20 As per 2020-21 As per 2021-22

Performance Measure Community Perceptions of Australia’s international sporting success

Measurement Methodology A survey of the Australian population in which respondents are asked to answer questions regarding Australia’s high performance sport and the pride and inspiration that may be derived from it.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

Improvement* in public perception of Australia’s international sporting success as measured through the Sport Australia Community Engagement Monitor.

n/a* n/a* n/a*

*The level of ‘improvement’ targeted will be clearly articulated once a baseline metric has been established following completion of the 2018-19 survey.

42

What we will do

Establish strong fundamental conditions for success throughout the system

ƚ Clarify what a world-leading system looks like, clearly defining system roles and responsibilities

ƚ Secure adequate resources and world-leading facilities

ƚ Mandate and guide effective governance, including effective and efficient boards and provide appropriate tools for high performance managers

ƚ Assure quality, in both people and systems

Build system capability, particularly in NSOs and the NIN

ƚ Recruit and retain high performers, consistent with our principles and seeking diversity of experiences in and out of sport

ƚ Develop high potential staff in NSOs and the NIN

ƚ Template the systems and processes of gold medal winning organisations and share across the network

ƚ Support the network to build cultures of excellence

Target investment for current and future cycles with performance accountability

ƚ Analyse performances and identify potential, including further development of robust data platforms

ƚ Target funds to NSOs and athletes, and provide continuity to achieve success over multiple cycles

ƚ Ensure high quality strategic, operating and campaign plans

ƚ Focus on developing future-focused pathway strategies and capabilities to deliver within NSOs

Execute the big things on the frontiers of ethical sporting performance that no other body is naturally positioned to do, including through multi-disciplinary expert programs

ƚ Ensure athlete health and availability remains a priority

ƚ Help the system to learn faster than competitors

ƚ Apply learnings to solve cross-sport problems on performance under pressure

ƚ Embrace disruption and champion early adoption

43

44

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: EVOLVING A SYSTEM-WIDE APPROACH TO ATHLETE WELLBEING FOR ATHLETES TO ENGAGE WITH AND INSPIRE THE COMMUNITY

Performance criteria for 2019-20 and beyond

Performance Measure Develop system capability to provide for athlete personal development and wellbeing

Measurement Methodology An audit of the NSOs that received athlete wellbeing and engagement specific funding during 2019-20 will be conducted at the end of the 2018-19 financial year.

Targets 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23

All NSOs receiving athlete wellbeing and engagement specific funding implement priority recommendations from their respective national framework.

n/a* n/a* n/a*

*Additional work is being undertaken during 2019-20 to ensure appropriate medium and long term targets are developed for this performance measure.

What we will do

Support athlete wellbeing and facilitate their engagement with communities

ƚ Grow established program areas of mental health, career and education, and community engagement

ƚ Add health and wellbeing culture checks for NSOs in high performance

ƚ Build capability within NSOs to deliver and implement athlete wellbeing and engagement programs

45

Our capability

46

Our structure

The Board is the accountable authority under the PGPA Act. The Board has between eight and 13 members appointed by the Minister for Sport, and the Secretary of the Department embracing the Federal Sport Portfolio. The Board has two committees, the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee and the Governance and Executive Performance Committee.

In 2018-19, the Board approved a new operating model. This enables Sport Australia to focus on participation, physical activity and sport industry growth while giving the AIS autonomy and independence for high performance outcomes.

The ASC’s organisational structure is designed to reflect the new operating model and to enable the business to best deliver on its strategy.

The Corporate and Marketing, Customer Insights and Analytics (MCIA) areas support both Sport Australia and the AIS to deliver on their objectives. Our key business areas are:

Sport Australia

Sport Business

ƚ Participation and Physical Activity

ƚ Sport Capability

ƚ Safe, Fair & Inclusive Sport

MCIA

ƚ Digital Strategy & Insights

ƚ Marketing

ƚ Strategic Communications & Media

ƚ Brand Strategy & Partnerships

ƚ Site Commercial

Corporate

ƚ Finance

ƚ AIS Site Services

ƚ People & Culture

ƚ Business Operations

Office of the CEO

ƚ Sport Partnerships and Infrastructure

ƚ AIS Site Strategy

AIS

ƚ Sport Strategy and Investment

ƚ Performance Networks & Partnerships

ƚ People Performance & Teams

ƚ Athlete Wellbeing & Engagement

ƚ Applied Technology & Innovation

ƚ AIS Operations

47

Our people

The ASC employs staff from a broad range of backgrounds including former athletes, coaches, sports administrators and functional experts from both the public and private sector. This diversity and depth of experience fosters a pursuit of excellence and an environment of passion, professionalism, drive, daring innovation and resilience. The ASC has a funded average staffing level (ASL) of 491. Staff are employed under the Australian Sports Commission Enterprise Agreement. 

In 2019-20, the ASC is continuing to improve our approach to workforce development and planning through Enterprise Learning and Leadership and Performance Management programs. In addition, we will continue to focus on delivering the core tools, technologies and insight to deliver high performance and participation outcomes.

The ASC is focused on building a high performing culture underpinned by our core values of Respect, Integrity, Teamwork and Excellence.

48

Our site

The ASC is administered from Canberra at the AIS Bruce campus. Other offices are located in Melbourne and Sydney, as well as the AIS European Training Centre in Varese, Italy.

The ASC maintains buildings, sporting facilities and specialised equipment to support the ongoing objectives of the organisation. Over 90% of our asset base relates to buildings and facilities operated at the AIS campus in Canberra and the European Training Centre in Italy.

AIS site revitalisation project

The AIS campus in Canberra is an Australian icon. It is symbolic of Australia’s commitment to sport and is a source of national inspiration. After almost 40 years, the AIS campus is aged and no longer meetings international standards. To remedy this, the ASC has presented an initial capital investment proposal to the Government. A subsequent detailed business case will be presented back to the Government in 2019-20 to present options to ensure that the AIS remains a source of pride, inspiration and international success. We will continue to work collaboratively with Government to progress the detailed business case for the future of the the AIS site.

2019-20 Budget and forward estimates

2019-20 Budget ($’000)

2020-21 Forward Estimate ($’000)

2021-22 Forward Estimate ($’000)

2022-23 Forward Estimate ($’000)

Revenue from government

346,353 280,254 232,208 224,030

Revenue from independent sources 22,287 22,033 22,028 22,024

Total Revenue 368,640 302,287 254,236 246,054

Grants 244,939 183,416 141,996 136,182

Other expenses 132,659 127,829 121,198 118,830

Total Expenses 377,598 311,245 263,194 255,012

Operating surplus (deficit)

(8,958) (8,958) (8,958) (8,958)

49

Managing our risks The ASC is committed to the effective identification, monitoring and management of risk. Our risk management framework is based on current best practice and the Commonwealth Risk Management Policy and assists the organisation to monitor and manage the risks involved in its activities to optimise opportunities, and minimise adverse consequences. We use the annual Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey as a tool to monitor the performance of our risk management function against the requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and PGPA Rule (2014).

Our newly developed Risk Appetite Statement identifies the risk trade-offs to implement our strategy and support well informed decision making. It helps us to understand what constitutes acceptable risk taking to take advantage of opportunities that arise.

Our Strategic Risk Register aligns with our seven strategic priorities and Corporate Plan. The register reflects our approach to managing risks that threaten the achievement of our outcomes.

This approach involves:

ƚ aligning risk management with our strategic priorities

ƚ embedding risk management within our planning and reporting processes

ƚ applying risk management processes to support decision making

ƚ understanding that risk is everyone’s responsibility.

The strategic risk register identifies the different types of risks, and the relevant monitoring and management of activities to align with our defined risk appetite and tolerances. The key themes of our risks are as follows:

Themes Description

Strategic

Risks that may be worth taking to achieve our strategic priorities

Enterprise

Risks that threaten the achievement of key business objectives

Organisational

Risks that may impact our culture, people, brand and reputation

Third party/partnerships Risks that are managed by third parties but have an impact on the achievement of Sport Australia’s objectives

Governance

Our Executive teams and the Finance, Audit and Risk Committee play an important role in the risk management process including identifying new risks, regularly identifying, monitoring and reviewing risks, and determining management and mitigation strategies. The ASC’s risk management process also informs the development and management of our internal audit program.

Underpinning this, risk management is embedded within our business planning processes, particularly at the division and branch levels and is incorporated into key ASC processes including procurement, funding decisions, management of key projects, internal audit, financial management, and work health and safety.

50

Our planning framework The ASC planning and reporting framework outlines how the organisation meets its legislative requirements and implements the annual cycle of planning, internal and external reporting. Our planning framework is based on the principles of continuous improvement and the requirements set out in the PGPA Act.

The Corporate Plan is our primary planning document and covers a rolling four year period. This is complemented by the Portfolio Budget Statements, division planning and the employee performance management framework.

Reporting against progress and performance measures occurs internally and externally. Reporting allows the Board, management and staff to monitor progress towards achieving our organisational objectives, the range of work delivered and the impact it has made to the Australian public. Internal reporting, including Board and Executive level dashboards, bring together relevant organisational performance results, operational data and organisational health and financial information. These reports are designed to aid in decision making and provide an enterprise level view of performance across the seven strategy priorities. External reporting is conducted through the Annual Performance Statements in the Annual Report.

INPUTS PLAN MEASURE REPORT

PERFORMANCE MEASURES (PBS & internal)

ANNUAL REPORT (including Annual Performance Statements)

BOARD & EXECUTIVE DASHBOARD

INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW

BUDGET

PORTFOLIO BUDGET STATEMENT (PBS)

CORPORATE PLAN

DIVISION PLANS

INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN

ASC PRIORITIES

DIVISION PRIORITIES

SPORT 2030

51

Leverrier Street Bruce ACT 2617 PO BOX 176 Belconnen ACT 2616 +61 2 6214 1111

SportAUS.gov.au