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Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council—Report for 2017-18


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Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Cover image: Mary’s Bay looking towards Summercloud Bay

© Commonwealth of Australia 2018

ISSN 1832-5181

The contents of this Annual Report and Statement of Accounts are protected by the provisions of the Copyright Act 1968. The document is produced solely for the purposes of reporting to its members as required by law and the report or any part of this report must not be reproduced or published without the express written permission of the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council.

Address: Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Administration Building 5 Bunaan Close WRECK BAY JBT 2540

Publisher: Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council

Designer: LG2 designers

iii Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

iv Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

v Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Contents Statements vi

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1

Our Vision 1

Our Goals 1

Overview 2

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 3

Membership 3

Land Ownership/Management 9

Functions 10

Wreck Bay Village 11

Wreck Bay Community 11

Timeline 12

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 13

Board Members 18

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 19

WBACC Report 24

Chairperson’s Report 25

The year in retrospect 25

Governance 25

Community Service 27

Land Management 30

The Way Ahead 32

Chief Executive Officer’s Report 33

Funding Grants and other income 35

Contracts 36

Further Operational Activities with the Community 36

Compliance 37

The Future 38

Organisational Chart 39

WBACC Operations Report 2017-2018 40

Program Outcome Statement 40

Administration 51

Governance 52

Commonwealth Disability Strategy 54

Land Matters 54

Environmental Impact Management 55

Occupational Health and Safety 56

Community Programs 57

Community Liaison Office (CLO) Function 58

Training 58

Centrelink Agency 58

Jervis Bay Territory Networking 59

General Meetings of the WBACC 59

Audit Committee 59

Operational Activities 2017-2018 Financial Year 60

Wreck Bay Contract Services 60

Overview of Operational Activities 2017-2018 63

WBACC Financial Statement 68

Compliance Idex 95

Statements

1 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Our Vision Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community seeks to be a respected equal and valued part of a culturally diverse Australian society. By controlling and managing its own land and waters, the Community aims to become self-sufficient and able to freely determine its future and lifestyle. The Community desires to do this by protecting its interests and values while preserving for future generations its unique Identity, Heritage and Culture.

Our Goals To achieve this vision, Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council’s goals are:

h Sole Ownership of all lands and waters within Jervis Bay Territory

h Sole management of its freehold land and waters allowing for Community responsibility, empowerment and self determination

h Sole representation of all Community’s united and democratically agreed interests at all levels of Government and in all external dealings so as to protect Community members’ rights

h Environmentally sustainable development to allow a productive economic base for the Community by managing Booderee as an ongoing Park. The Community seeks to protect the land and water while earning income, creating jobs and achieving financial security

h Social and cultural development linked with appropriate cultural training and education, to improve Community empowerment and management, security and wellbeing, while preserving Community values

h Improve health, housing and living standards to levels at least comparable with good practice in other Australian communities, and

h Recognition and support from the wider Australian community and Government to achieve these worthwhile and positive goals.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council

Overview

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The Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council (the Council) is an incorporated statutory body which was established by the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 (Land Grant Act), which is Australian Government legislation and falls within the Ministerial responsibilities of the Minister for Indigenous Affairs. The Council commenced operations in March 1987 and is currently in its thirty first year of operation.

Membership At time of this report there are 399 Registered Members of the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council.

JANELLE ALI TEESHA ARCHIBALD AIMEE ARDLER

ALINTA ARDLER AMANDA ARDLER ANTHONY ARDLER

ATHOL ARDLER BEVERLEY ARDLER BILLIE-JO ARDLER

BRADLEY ARDLER CASEY ARDLER CHRISTOPHER ARDLER

CRAIG ARDLER DILLAN JAMES ARDLER ELIJAH ARDLER

EMMA ARDLER ERIC ARDLER JNR ERIC ARDLER SNR

ERICA ARDLER GERALDINE ARDLER IVERN ARDLER

JAMAHL ARDLER JOANNA ARDLER JOEL ARDLER

JOSH ARDLER JERUSHA CURTIS-ARDLER KAIN ARDLER

KAREN ARDLER KARLIE JOY ARDLER KEVIN ARDLER

KIMBERLEY ARDLER LANE ARDLER LEAH ARDLER

LEIGH ARDLER LISA ARDLER LORRAINE ARDLER

MIAMBA ARDLER MICHELLE CURTIS-ARDLER NATHANAEL CURTIS-ARDLER

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council

4 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

PAUL ARDLER SNR PAUL ARDLER JNR RAYMOND ARDLER

REBECCA ARDLER REUBEN ARDLER JNR REUBEN ARDLER SNR

RICHARD ARDLER RICK JOHN ARDLER SUSAN ARDLER

TANYA ARDLER TERRENCE ARDLER THERESA ARDLER

VIRGINIA ARDLER WAYNE ARDLER CALEB ARDLER-FINCH

KYLE ARDLER-LINDSAY JOEL ARDLER-MCLEOD KEIRAN ASSHETON-STEWART

HAYLEY BARRINGTON HELEN BARRINGTON NAOMI BARRINGTON

CHERYL BASSINDER SANDRA BLOXSOME BIANCA BRENNAN

LORNA BRIGGS MELANIE BRIGGS ROBERT BRIGGS

ANNETTE BROWN ASHLEIGH BROWN BAILEY BROWN

CHRISTINE BROWN CYNTHIA BROWN DAEN BROWN

DARREN BROWN DARYLL BROWN EVONNE BROWN

GAIL BROWN GEORGE BROWN SNR GEORGE BROWN JNR

GRAEME BROWN HAROLD BROWN JACKSON BROWN

JACOB BROWN JANNINE BROWN JASMIN BROWN

JEREMIAH BROWN JOHN M BROWN JOHN P BROWN

JOSEPH T BROWN JOSEPH BROWN JUSTINE BROWN

KEIRON SHAYNE BROWN KENNY BROWN KEVIN BROWN

KRISTY BROWN KYLE BROWN LEON BROWN

LESLIE BROWN LYNETTE BROWN MARGARET BROWN

MAXINE BROWN MEGAN BROWN MELISSA BROWN

MELLEAK BROWN MORGAN BROWN PATRICIA BROWN

PHILLIP BROWN RHONDA BROWN RUSSELL DAVID BROWN

SANDIE-LEE BROWN SHAYNE BROWN SHERYN BROWN

SIMON BROWN STANLEY BROWN STEVEN J BROWNJNR

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STEVEN JOHN BROWN SUE-ANN BROWN SYLVIA KAY BROWN

TEAGAN BROWN TERRENCE BROWN THOMAS BROWN JNR

THOMAS BROWN SNR TRACEY BROWN VERA BROWN

VIDA BROWN SNR VIDA BROWN JNR WENDY BROWN

WILLIAM BROWN VERONICA BROWN-ROBERTS ELIZABETH CAMBELL

GORDON CAMPBEL EILEEN CARBERRY ANDREW CARTER

ANTHEA CARTER DAVID CARTER JEAN CARTER

MARIE CARTER NICHOLAS CARTER PEGGY CARTER

SALLY CARTER SAMANTHA CARTER TONY CARTER

TRAE CARTER TYRONE CARTER WILLIAM CARTER JNR

ZAINE CARTER ANTHONY CHARLES PHILLIP CHARLES

ROSLYN E CRUIKSHANK RUTH DANE JEMMA DANN

KENNETH DANN KENNY DANN SNR PAULINE DELAUNEY

LOCHLAN DICKSON DOUGLAS DIXON PAMELA DIXON

RICHARD DIXON KAY ELLA IRENE ROSE ELLIS

ANNALISE FOSTER JUDY FOSTER LESLEY FOSTER

MATHEW FOSTER NATALIE FOSTER CLIVE FREEMAN JNR

JULIE FREEMAN MARKEETA FREEMAN CERRINA FREEMAN-MCDONALD

BRANDON GREEN COREY GREEN JASON GREEN

KYRA GREEN STEVEN GREEN TROY GREEN

JUDY HAIGH-CHAPMAN ADAM HAMPTON EILEEN HAMPTON

ERIN HAMPTON NATHANIAL HAMPTON-OLIVE MICHAEL HAMPTON

NEVILLE HAMPTON JNR NEVILLE HAMPTON SNR SHANA HAMPTON

WILLIAM HAMPTON BROOKE HIGGINS ELIZABETH HOSKINS

DEMI HOSKINS FIONA HYLAND KERRY JANSEN

6 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

MARGARET JOHNSON NICHOLAS KAVANAGH JANICE KELLY

KRISTIKA KUMAR-WILLIAMS ANTHONY LITTLE BELINDA LITTLE

NAOMI LOCKE ANGIE LONESBOROUGH NICKOLE LONESBOROUGH

PHILLIP LONESBOROUGH PHILLIP LONGBOTTOM JOHN MARKS

ROBYN MARKS BRYA MARTIN NATHAN MARTIN

JAMES MCKENZIE SARAH MCKENZIE ANGELINA MCLEOD

ARTHUR MCLEOD BERNARD MCLEOD BRETT MCLEOD

CAROLINE MCLEOD DALE MCLEOD DANE MCLEOD

DARREN MCLEOD DEAN JAMES MCLEOD DONNA MCLEOD

EILEEN MCLEOD ELAINE MCLEOD JNR GAVIN MCLEOD

GRACE MCLEOD IAN K MCLEOD SNR IAN MCLEOD JNR

IRIS MCLEOD ISAAC MCLEOD JEFREY MCLEOD

KANIKA MCLEOD KAYA MCLEOD KAYLENE SYLVIA MCLEOD

KYLIE LOUISE MCLEOD LESLIE SHAYNE MCLEOD MARK MCLEOD

MATHEW MCLEOD MAX J MCLEOD NARELLE MCLEOD

NATASHA MCLEOD PAUL MCLEOD RACHELLE MCLEOD

RODERICK MCLEOD RONALD MCLEOD RONALD (JIMMY) MCLEOD

SHANEAH MCLEOD TRACEY MCLEOD TY MCLEOD

VANESSA MARIE MCLEOD BRIANNA MCLEOD-COSGROVE AMETHYST MCLEOD-DOWNING

ELLIOTT MCLEOD-LUCK HAMISH MCLEOD-LUCK MARLENE MCLEOD-LUCK

NYAH MCLEOD-COSGROVE JAY MCLEOD-PERESAN DARIAN MCLEOD-SHERIDAN

COLIN (TOM) MOORE IRENE MOORE JULIE MOORE

PETER MOORE THOMAS MOORE URSULA MOORE

LESLIE MORGAN-ARDLER BELINDA MUNDY DENISE MUNDY

DYLAN MUNDY ERROL MUNDY GLEN MUNDY

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JACQUELINE MUNDY JAMES MUNDY JESSE MUNDY

JOEL MUNDY KEVIN MUNDY LUCINDA MUNDY

LUKE MUNDY MARK MUNDY MICHAEL JOHN MUNDY

SANDRA MUNDY CHELSEA MUNDY-CAMPBELL ALYSHA MUNDY-WILLIAMS

JAMAINE MUNDY-WILLIAMS KIYA MUNDY-WILLIAMS NICOLE MUNDY-WILLIAMS

NOELENE NUNN TYRONE NYE-WILLIAMS CATERINA PERRY-THOMAS

SHARON PERRY-THOMAS ALISON RAATH EMMA RAATH-PICKERING

IMERA RAATH CHARLES RAATH-ARDLER ANTHONY ROBERTS JNR

CYRIL ROBERTS JESSIKA ROBERTS JORDAN ROBERTS

KELSEY ROBERTS REUBEN ROBERTS RIVA ROBERTS

TILLY SCOTT VICTOR SHARMAN MATTHEW JOHN SIMMS

IESHA SIMPSON JOCOBY SIMPSON KAREN SIMPSON

TYSON SIMPSON-BROWN DOUGLAS STEWART JENNIFER STEWART

MAY STEWART NORMAN STEWART PETER STEWART

STEVEN STEWART WALTER STEWART DENNIS STEWART-GREEN

JAROD STUBBS DARREN STURGEON ELAINE STURGEON

JADE STURGEON JARRED STURGEON SHANE STURGEON

SKYE STURGEON TERRENCE STURGEON CINDY TALBOT

CLIFFORD THOMAS DENISE THOMAS MATTHEW THOMAS

PETER THOMAS RONALD THOMAS SARAH THOMAS

SHERESE THOMAS SONIA THOMAS DENNIS TOWERS

JOSEPH TURNER MELINDA TURNER SHARON TURNER

DAVID VALE LACHLAN VALE AMBER WAINE

DANIEL WAINE EBONY WAINE CHENOA WELLINGTON

ELIZA WELLINGTON FREDRICK WELLINGTON IVY WELLINGTON

8 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

JEFFREY WELLINGTON KYLIE WELLINGTON LORETTA WELLINGTON

MELINDA WELLINGTON MICHELLE WELLINGTON PAULA WELLINGTON

SAMANTHA WELLINGTON SHANNON WELLINGTON DEBRA WENT

HANNAH WENT DONYA WHADDY KEWANA WHADDY

LANCE WHADDY LAURA WHADDY LYNETTE WHADDY

ADRIAN WILLIAMS AMANDA WILLIAMS CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS

COREY WILLIAMS DANIEL WILLIAMS DOUGLAS WILLIAMS SNR

DOUGLAS JAMES WILLIAMS JNR EMMA-JANE WILLIAMS FAITH WILLIAMS

FIONA WILLIAMS GERALDINE WILLIAMS GLEN WILLIAMS

GREG WILLIAMS JAMES WILLIAMS JEFFREY WILLIAMS

JOSHUA WILLIAMS MELANIE WILLIAMS MICHAEL WILLIAMS

MITCHUM WILLIAMS PENNY WILLIAMS PRISCILLA WILLIAMS

REBECCA WILLIAMS REBECCA WILLIAMS ROBERT WILLIAMS JNR

ROBERT WILLIAMS SNR RODNEY WILLIAMS SHAKEELA WILLIAMS

SHANE WILLIAMS SHANNON WILLIAMS SHARON WILLIAMS

SHEENA WILLIAMS SONYA WILLIAMS STACEY WILLIAMS

TAMMY WILLIAMS TANIA WILLIAMS TIMIKA WILLIAMS

TRUDY WILLIAMS TYSON WILLIAMS WENDY WILLIAMS

DANIEL WILLIAMS-LOCKE KILLARA WILLIAMS-LOCKE LEE WILLIS-ARLDER

BRUCE YUKE CORAL YUKE

9 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Land Ownership/Management Establishment of Council under the Land Grant Act permitted granting of inalienable freehold title to 403 hectares of land in the Jervis Bay Territory (JBT) to the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community, in the name of Council. The land has been solely managed by the Council since 1987.

In the early 1990s, Council pursued further grants of land in the JBT, including the then Jervis Bay National Park and Australian National Botanic Gardens (Jervis Bay Annex) and, in 1995, amendments were made to the Land Grant Act and the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975, so that in October 1995 Council was granted title to both parcels of land. The land grant included a marine component within Jervis Bay itself.

Prior to the land grant, Council agreed to lease the Park to the Director of National Parks (Director) by way of a Memorandum of Lease being negotiated and signed. The lease is currently undergoing a review and is of 99 years in duration.

In 1996, a Board of Management (Joint Park Board) was established for Jervis Bay National Park (Park) and the Botanic Gardens with Wreck Bay Community representatives occupying five of the nine positions and in 1997 the name of the Park was changed to Booderee National Park to reflect Aboriginal ownership.

The current Joint Park Board comprises of twelve members with Wreck Bay Community representatives occupying seven positions. Wreck Bay Community representatives continue being elected from the Wreck Bay Council Board of Directors.

In total, the area of land and water owned by the Council in the JBT is approximately 68 square kilometres; about 90% of the land.

The remaining land in the JBT is managed by the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development, with the Department of Defence managing Defence Land.

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Functions In accordance with the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986, Council has various functions within the main categories of land holding and management, provision of community services for its members and business enterprises.

The responsible Minister for the 2017-2018 reporting period is the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion MP.

Further to the Act, Council holds title to Aboriginal Land and exercises, for the benefit of the members of the Community, the Council’s powers as owner of Aboriginal Land and any other land owned by the Council. Council can also make representations to the Minister in relation to land Council considers should become Aboriginal Land, with one such representation currently with the Minister’s Office awaiting his views.

Community service type functions include, in consultation with the Minister, consideration of and, where practicable, taking action for the benefit of the Community regarding housing, social welfare, education, training or health needs of the members of the Community.

Further functions include protecting and conserving natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal land, engaging in land use planning relating to Aboriginal land and managing and maintaining Aboriginal land as well as conducting business enterprises for the economic or social benefit of the Community and any such functions conferred on Council by a provision of the Act, and any functions relating to the Community conferred on Council by the regulations.

11 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Village Wreck Bay Village is situated within the boundaries of the 403 hectares of the 1986 land grant in the JBT. It is located on the South Coast of New South Wales, approximately 2½ hours’ drive south of Sydney and three hours’ drive north east of Canberra.

The JBT is a non-self-governing Commonwealth Territory administered by the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD).

The village consists of 49 houses with a population fluctuating between 215 and 250 people. Facilities at Wreck Bay include an Administration Office, Community Hall, Children’s Day-Care Centre, bus shelter, fire shed and a Health Clinic. Other facilities include a Memorial Garden, children’s playground, tennis court and two common areas which are mainly used as children’s play areas.

Wreck Bay Community The Wreck Bay Community, or more specifically, Council, is the recognised owner of the land on the Bherwerre Peninsula and can be defined as being those who are the registered members of the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council and their families, the majority of whom live in the Wreck Bay Village, Jervis Bay Village and the towns and villages in the Shoalhaven. Other members also live intrastate and interstate.

Timeline

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Always Since time, Koori people have always used Bherwerre because of its rich diversity. It has always been a place of great significance to our people because of its unique location and its abundance of foods and medicines. It has provided us with an area where we can continue to pass on our traditional knowledge.

1800s Early Europeans are given estates on the South Coast of New South Wales which started the dispossession of land from the local Aboriginal people.

1830-1840 Local Aboriginal people listed in the record for distribution of blankets and rations.

1880s Aboriginal reserves established on the South Coast due to the dispossession of traditional lands.

1912 Naval College established at Jervis Bay.

1915 Commonwealth acquires the Bherwerre Peninsula; which becomes a part of the Australian Capital Territory. Efforts were made at that stage to relocate the Aboriginal Community at Wreck Bay.

1924 First school built at Wreck Bay.

1925 Aboriginal Protection Board of New South Wales accepts the Commonwealth’s offer to administer the Wreck Bay ‘reserve’ under the provisions of the New South Wales Aboriginal Protection Act 1909.

First manager appointed.

1929-1949 Fish Protection Ordinance 1929-1949 has a provision that excludes Aboriginal residents of the Territory from paying fishing license fees. Aboriginal initiative to establish a fishing industry in the region.

1930s First houses built on the reserve

1940 Aboriginal Protection Act 1940 reflects shift from protectionism to assimilation policies in New South Wales. Aboriginal people issued with ‘dog tags’. Cultural expression continued to be outlawed to fit in with the assimilation policy of the day.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council

14 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

1952 The boundary of the Wreck Bay Reserve marked out by Bob Brown, Archie Moore and Reg McLeod.

1954 Wreck Bay Reserve is gazetted under the provisions of the Aborigines Welfare Ordinance (Australian Capital Territory). Provision of the Aborigines Protection Act of New South Wales no longer applies.

1965 Aborigines Welfare Ordinance (Australian Capital Territory) is repealed, thus effecting the transfer of the ‘reserve’ from the Aborigines Welfare Board to the Commonwealth Department of Interior. At the same time, the reserve was abolished and declared an ‘open village’.

Assimilation policy of the day brought about attempts to house non-Aboriginals at Wreck Bay, which the Community opposed. Efforts were made to relocate the Community once again. Wreck Bay School was moved to Jervis Bay.

1965-1966 Wreck Bay Progress Association formed to counter the open village status and to secure land tenure, thus securing the community’s future.

1971 Proclamation under the Public Park Ordinance (Australian Capital Territory) of the Jervis Bay Nature Reserve over the majority of the Territory, including the non-residential land of the reserve.

1973-1974 The Wreck Bay Housing Company and the Wreck Bay Women’s Committee formed. Land Rights issues were the main issues for discussion between the Community and the Government.

1979 Blockade of the Summercloud Bay Road, which prevents the general public of access to the Summercloud Bay day visitor area. This action was taken as a result of the land ownership issue.

1985 Announcement by the Prime Minister of plans to transfer the Fleet Base and Armaments depot to Jervis Bay. The Wreck Bay people opposed this decision because of the impact to the Cultural and Natural environment of the region. The land rights movement accelerates.

1986 The Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 enacted.

1987 The Wreck Bay Community secure land tenure of 403 hectares of land via the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 and the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council is established.

1991 Public announcement of the Jervis Bay National Park is made.

1992 The Jervis Bay National Park is declared replacing the Jervis Bay Nature Reserve. The Wreck Bay Community is offered 2 positions on a Board of Management of the newly declared Park. The offer is rejected.

1993 Commonwealth announces that the armaments depot will be built in Victoria. The Native Title Act 1993 is enacted.

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1994 The Commonwealth Ministers for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Affairs and the Environment announce intention of a land grant of the Jervis Bay National Park to the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community. Amendments to the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 and the Australian National Parks & Wildlife Service Act 1975 amended to facilitate land grant.

1995 Amendments passed in both houses of Parliament and the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council is granted freehold title to Jervis Bay National Park. Park leased back to the Director of National Parks.

1996 The Jervis Bay National Park Board of Management is established which has a majority of Wreck Bay Community representatives on the Board. For the first time the Wreck Bay people have a real say on how traditional lands are managed.

1997 The Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council lodges a land claim for the remaining areas in the Jervis Bay Territory, which is not Aboriginal Land.

1998 To reflect Aboriginal ownership, the Jervis Bay National Park is changed to Booderee National Park.

1999 Wreck Bay Enterprises Limited is established.

2000 Interdepartmental Committee is established to look at a number of issues in Jervis Bay Territory, including the Wreck Bay land claim.

2002 WBACC re-negotiate Lease of Booderee National Park with Director of National Parks. WBACC commences financial support for trainees in Booderee National Park. Management Plan for Booderee National Park finalised.

2003 March: WBACC and Wreck Bay Enterprises Limited register Certified Agreement. Wreck Bay Health Clinic commences operation in new building. Amendments to legislation (Aboriginal Land Grant Act) for quorum for community meeting. Park Board membership increased from 10 to 12 with the Wreck Bay Community providing 7 of the 12 Board Members. December: Bushfires cause major damage to Booderee National Park November: Changes to the Aboriginal Land Grant passed in Parliament.

2004 March: Work on new subdivision in Wreck Bay Village commences. March: WBACC signs contract with Government to become Centrelink Agent and Access point.

2005 Work commenced on seven new houses that are funded through the National Aboriginal Health Strategy program May: WBACC signs Shared Responsibility Agreement (Housing) with the Queanbeyan ICC June: Five of the seven families move into new houses.

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2006 January: Review commenced on Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Strategic Plan. September: Four members of the Board resign.

2007 January: Minister seeks review of the Aboriginal Land Grant (JBT ) Act 1986. June: Review of the Aboriginal Land Grant (JBT ) Act 1986 completed and report provided to the Office of Indigenous Policy Co-ordination. December: Change of Government, new Minister is appointed.

2008 February: Board approves Rent/Lease document and tenants commence signing leases. June: Funding is approved by the Government to build a new Childcare Centre in Wreck Bay Village.

2009 Work commenced on the new Gudjahgahmiamia Childcare Centre.

2010 New Gudjahgahmiamia early education (Day-Care) building completed.

2012 Wreck Bay Enterprises Limited ceases to operate as a separate legal entity.

2013 September: Change of Government, new Minister is appointed.

2014 Board commences reviews on Village Town Plan, Strategic Plan, Business/ Operations Plan. Council files Petitions (x2) with Parliament. Second Plan of Management for BNP is approved.

2015 Board commences staff re-structure review, together with future SLAs discussions.

2016 Booderee National Park Second Plan of Management operating and Council Staff ‘Modern’ Awards approved for commencement.

2016 Aboriginal Land Grant (JBT ) by-laws 2005 repealed. Aboriginal Land Grant (JBT) by-laws 2016 commence operating. Aboriginal Land Grant (JBT ) Regulations 2006 repealed. Aboriginal Land Grant (JBT ) Regulations 2016 commence operating. Commencement of ‘Modern’ Award for Council and Contract Services Staff.

2017 Draft Village Community Plan developed.

2018 Defence Contamination testing proceeds on Park and Council land.

2018 Council to appear in High Court of Australia in legal proceedings.

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18 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Board Members

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Annette Brown Chairperson of WBACC: 2017 to date

Chair WBACC Nov 1998-Nov 2002, Jan 2015 to present

Board Member WBACC Nov 1998-Nov 2002

Board Member WBACC Nov 2006-Oct 2008, Oct 2010 to Dec 2014

Annette has been involved with both the Board and the administration of the Council for many years and has made a commitment to advance the Community in the areas of governance, land management and community services whilst protecting the unique arrangements within our community.

Julie Freeman Executive board member since October 1991

Julie is employed at Booderee National Park as an Interpretations officer. This is a role with responsibilities to both the Park and to the Community. Julie’s ability to interpret culturally appropriate stories and Park information to the public is widely recognised. She brings the cultural sensitivity and appropriateness to the Board to consider with all negotiations and opportunities.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council

20 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Beverley Ardler Board Member from January 2013 to January 2017 Secretary: January 2017 to date

Bev has been employed with the ACT Department of Education since 2000, and has a strong commitment to help our children through education and social and emotional development. She holds a degree in Social and Emotional Development and Wellbeing. She has a passion to help teach our children about their culture and feels that it is vital for the children to have a voice in our community.

Jeffrey McLeod Board member from January 2013 to date Secretary: January 2015 to January 2017

Jeff is a board member who was raised and lived on Wreck Bay all his life. He has worked in Nowra for 10 years and now works for WBACC in the Roads Department. He is passionate about anything regarding Wreck Bay issues.

Clive Freeman Board member from October 2010 to January 2013 and from January 2015 to date

Born in Yuin country, Clive has dedicated his life to the conservation of the world’s oldest surviving culture.  As an Aboriginal scientist he has combined an understanding of the Arts and Culture with a deep conservation ethic to enrich caring for country in both natural and cultural heritage management.

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Tom Brown Snr Board member from February 2017 to date Director: 2017 to date

Neville Jack Hampton Board member from February 2017 to date Director: 2017 to date

Darryn Sturgeon Board member from February 2017 to date Director: 2017 to date

Paul Mcleod Board member from February 2017 to date Deputy Chairperson: 2017 to date

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WBACC Audit Committee

Board Meetings 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018

Name Position Held

Meetings Held

Meetings Attended

Percentage Attended

Annette Brown Chairperson 31 30 97%

Paul McLeod D/Chairperson 31 29 94%

Beverley Ardler Secretary 31 31 100%

Jeff McLeod Director 31 31 100%

Clive Freeman Director 31 23 75%

Tom Brown Director 31 31 100%

Darryn Sturgeon Director 31 31 100%

Julie Freeman Director 31 30 97%

Neville Hampton Director 31 31 100%

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View from Cemetery Point

24 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

WBACC Report Chairperson’s Report 25

Chief Executive Officer’s Report 33

Organisational Chart 39

Council Operations Report 40

Wreck Bay Contract Services 60

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Chairperson’s Report

Dear Members With pleasure, I present to you our report for the 2017-2018 Financial year.

The year in retrospect Appreciation is directed to Council staff for their continual support and also registered members for the confidence they have in me as their ‘Chair’ for this current term, which shall expire in December, 2018. For the benefit of all, I am enthusiastic for the Board to continue pursuing results, positive in nature moving forward. I also thank my fellow eight Directors for the support that they have given to me in dealing with some very complex matters over the last twelve months.

Council is regulated by the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act, 2013 (PGPA Act), with the Executive Committee or Directors being the accountable authority under the PGPA Act with the accountable authority responsible for the annual report of operations. ‘Directors’ are the members of the executive committee pursuant to Section 28 of the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act, 1986 (Land Grant Act).

Identical to last year’s Annual Report approach, it is convenient to reference this report against a portfolio based structure. Wreck Bay Enterprises Limited is no longer referred to in the financial statement provided in this or recent reports, although it is still referred to as Council’s ‘Contract Services’ division.

Governance The governance portfolio responsibilities include grant control and reporting, policy development, financial reporting, annual reports, community liaison, by-laws, Wreck Bay and Booderee Board participation; together with human resources.

Our current by-laws came into effect on 1 April, 2016. They are, in nearly all respects, the same as the previous by-laws; with the enforcement options still being very restrictive,

Annette Brown Chairperson

26 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

unworkable and awaiting legislative reform and amendment; together with funding so that suitable rangers can be employed to operate under the said by-laws.

The Board continues negotiating with the Commonwealth regarding proposed amendments to the Land Grant Act. Both parties wish for reforms to the Act to cater for current and future aspirations of registered members. Before the changes are agreed to though, the Board will provide the proposed amendments to the Registered Members for their views.

Up until about seven years ago, the Board met monthly but the number of meetings every year thereafter have rapidly increased, with the Board meeting on thirty-one (31) separate occasions this financial year; dealing with items regarding new legislation and policies which affect WBACC, together with matters that may affect members and delivery of services in the organisation. As in the past, the Audit Committee of Council also held meetings providing financial and other relevant information at Board meetings. These required meetings again illustrate the Board’s increasing workload, due in large part to legislative, policy and accountability requirements.

The Directors, again, attended further necessary meetings regarding strategic and long term outcomes/developments, with the WBACC staff continually providing strong administrative support. Areas of focus included the development of a Corporate Plan for the years 2017-2021 and also the final draft of the Community Plan which is the forerunner to an updated Village Town Plan. It is expected that the Community Plan will be complete when there have been soil/geo-technical testing results which are required for future building projects within the Village; together with the location of the future Cemetery, which necessarily needs to be agreed to by the Registered Members. Four, two day Booderee Joint Management Board meetings were also held this year.

Policy, by-law development, implementation and enforcement remain priority projects for the community, with Council continually developing, expanding and adhering to requirements for good governance consistent with the Land Grant Act and the PGPA Act. The current three-year funding arrangement with the Commonwealth which concluded on 30 June, 2018; has been renewed for a further three (3) year term until 30 June, 2021, and has further funding earmarked for further policy development, Corporate Plans, Community Plans, Village Town Plan updates et cetera, which requires constant supervision of Council’s policies, procedures and Occupational Work Health Safety areas, such requirements the priority for effective and efficient discharge of Council’s legal and other responsibilities to its community and registered members alike.

Because of this, Council’s Policies and Procedures Manual, and Occupational Work Health and Safety policies and procedures are ‘living’ documents, continuously reviewed; cognisant of the increasing volume of legislative and policy requirements; together with new legislation et cetera, requiring Council’s frequent compliance with. In that vein, Council appointed its Human Resources Manager this year to take carriage of this ever increasing area.

Council partners the Commonwealth in the three-year Funding Agreement ending in the 2020-2021 financial year referred to above and known as ‘Indigenous Advancement Strategy’ (IAS), which consists of the program; namely: Jobs, Land and Economy. The program outcomes include: getting Indigenous Australians to work, getting remote jobseekers work ready through community and other activities and work experience; the

27 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

fostering of Indigenous business; assisting Indigenous Australians to generate economic and social benefits, including through the effective and sustainable management of their land; and assisting Indigenous Australians to progress land and sea claims and township leases under Commonwealth native title and land rights legislation. This program continues to give Council opportunities for its registered and community members.

Further, the Board and Council staff continues its strong working relationship with Indigenous Community Volunteers (ICV), whose representatives continue to be of great support with vital knowledge of requirements for good governance, particularly. An outstanding example of such assistance relates to the development of the Community Plan which should be completed next financial year, subject to geo-technical testing and other results and the Cemetery option alluded to above; and be the forerunner to a refreshed Village Town Plan. The current draft Community Plan incorporated such subjects as Culture & Environment, Communications & Transport, Housing & Services, Community & Governance, Recreation & Sport, Health, Education & Training, the Cemetery, Economy & Employment and Safety & Security, together with other relevant subjects.

The top priorities under the Plan include: fostering cultural mentoring, enforcing Locked Gates, upgrading mobile phone coverage, reviewing and improving postal services, addressing issues for lease management and payment of rent, improved Board communication, acceptable water quality, facilitate job and business skills training, together with fire emergency safety.

Financial and statutory reporting continues improving with Council adhering to its statutory requirements; together with compliance requirements consistently executed correctly. Council and the Day Care staff entered into separate agreements with the Board regarding the implementation of ‘Modern’ Awards; which took effect as of and from 1 July 2016, being the ‘Australian Government Industry Award, 2016’ and the ‘Children’s Services Award, 2010’ and appear to be successful in their respective operation, being subject to the Fair Work Act, 2009 and the Fair Work Commission. These awards clearly articulate and spell out workers’ rights and obligations and responsibilities of the Council as the employer.

Community Service The responsibility for housing, education, health, early childhood and recreational activities lies with Council’s Community Services portfolio and remains a high priority portfolio for future community development.

Housing continues to be a serious concern for the Board, registered members and community members alike. The continuing deteriorating state of some houses places demand on Council’s resources, particularly with effecting repairs and maintenance. This, coupled with the consistent lack of funding for housing from the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD) which previously had been used to effect emergency repairs particularly, continues to impact upon Council’s resources. The Board continues being very concerned about the limited Council income being received from rentals and the overall expenses that Council has to find to maintain the residences—it is simply unstainable at present and requires review.

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In that light, the Board approved new policies and other initiatives for better maintenance, management and collection of revenue relating to the houses at Wreck Bay. This has been of limited success with the Board and the Commonwealth in a partnership authorising spending on repairs and maintenance on houses in the Village. This program concludes in December, 2018 at this stage.

With an audit of Village housing in November, 2014; a consciousness that measures needed to be taken to restrain the deteriorating housing stock in the community was considered by the Board. A draft Housing Management Plan (HMP) was developed with the Board and senior management. The draft plan will be subject to consultation with registered members before the Board considers approving it or not, although this will not be for some time due to a High Court hearing which is expected to take place in September this year wherein it is being argued that the Residential Tenancy legislation of the Australian Capital Territory, in some respects, does not apply to the Land Grant Act and residents/tenants at Wreck Bay Village.

Clarity needs to be found regarding the legal status of houses, tenants, the Council and the Commonwealth regarding housing in the Village, and whether the status quo is still relevant or needs revamping based on, in some circumstances, judicial determinations. It is expected that, with the High Court judgement, this will hopefully give direction, guidance and opinions for the Board members so that they and the Registered members alike are, thereafter, in a much clearer position regarding the legal status of housing and leasing in the Village, now and for future generations.

Gudjahgahmiamia early childhood centre continues as a dominate partner in preparing our children to thrive and develop as toddlers and, thereafter, developing into future leaders of the community. Gudgahgahmiamia Multifunctional Aboriginal Children’s Services continues catering for up to 29 children and continues being funded with a grant from the Department of Education and contributions from WBACC, parents’ fees and fundraising activities. Further, enrolments for 2017-18 have been steady with the largest demand for care still in the nursery room. Various families who do not have reliable transport are very grateful for the pick-up and drop-off bus.

In July, 2017 the children and staff performed the song heads, shoulders, knees and toes in Dhurga and English at the Wreck Bay NOAIDOC Flag Raising Ceremony. The children, families and staff then jointed in the fun of the Carnival.

To celebrate National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day, 2017, Council bought each child at the Centre a book. They were very well received by the children and their families.

In July, 2017 the Centre received an amazing donation of resources from Illawarra Aboriginal Corporation/Warrigal Employment Skills Development Program. It was a mix of indoor and outdoor equipment with a focus on supporting children with sensory needs and transition to school skills.

During the year the Centre has had regular visits from the Early Childhood Policy and Regulation Unit in Canberra and provided them with written evidence that the Centre is consistently meeting the ACT Children’s Services standards.

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In August, 2017, the Centre submitted its Quality Improvement plan to NSW/ACT BBF program, Department of Education and Training.

The Centre participated in Paint the Shoalhaven Red, Black and Yellow in September by reading stories to a magic egg. Staff from the Health Clinic visited the Centre and talked to children about keeping their ears healthy. Also, members of the Fire Brigade visited giving the children fire fighter hats and activity books.

In September, 2017 the Centre was evacuated and closed for one day because of the large bush fire in Wreck Bay and the Territory as well. The efforts of the Centre staff together with WBACC staff was most commendable for their terrific teamwork. A special mention is made of the Fire Fighters as well who worked so hard protecting the Wreck Bay Community.

During this financial year, Council staff and the Director, with the support of PwC, worked through the process of the Centre moving away from being a Budget Based Funded centre to becoming a Child Care Subsidy funded centre.

In December the Centre, with the support of Council, submitted its business plan and CCCF funding application form to the Department of Education and Training. The application included the purchase of a new day care bus. In April, it was notified of the success of the funding application.

The Centre’s Christmas Party disco night was very popular with most of the families attending and bringing Uncles, Aunties and Grandparents to watch the ‘big kids’ graduation ceremony. The Centre was also able to show the families the children’s favourite dances.

From January, 2018, the Centre supported families in preparing for the move to CCS funding and Noah’s Ark Early Intervention Service and its staff continue to develop respectful and supportive relationships with the children, families and Staff at the Centre and the Community. Having a Noah’s Ark Early Childhood Teacher come to the Centre weekly to support the children and staff is a very valuable service. The teacher is able to work with children and staff over time to develop skills and helpful strategies.

The Dental team visited the Centre to check the children’s teeth in November, 2017 and again in May, 2018. The Dental team commented how the condition of the children’s teeth had improved over the years and said how well the families are helping children look after their teeth.

Council has continued its support for the Centre; providing money for new resources, with many of the resources selected being chosen to support our children’s sensory needs and interest in science.

Jervis Bay Primary School continues its high national ratings and Council applauds the areas that educators perform, ensuring children have as smooth as possible transition through the levels of development and education. Encouragingly also, there still remains a high percentage of Wreck Bay youth remaining at High School, and successfully then enrolling in Tertiary or TAFE education.

South Coast Illawarra Health Service continues providing health services to the community with various additional non-government service providers—NGOs. The Community, Council and such service providers continue exploring, developing and participating in health and wellness programs and strategies to assist improving health outcomes for our people.

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The draft community plan explores these areas as well as substantial meetings/workshops this year between the Board and DIRD and other Commonwealth Departments and ACT authorities regarding Service Delivery of these and many other services within the Territory. This assessment process involving the Board and Community should hopefully develop a more fluent, efficient and organised approach to not only medical/health provision within the Territory and the Village but also with service delivery of other facilities. It is expected that a paper on what is referred to as ‘Jervis Bay Co-design workshops’ will be available toward the end of 2018, specifically highlighting the delivery of services and ‘ways forward’.

The Board continues looking at options for additional recreational facilities from discussions with the Commonwealth and the desires of the Community as indicated in the draft Community Plan and other forums. Although our people are traditional fishing people there are other recreational and engagement options continually being explored by Council.

Although the Second Plan of Management was approved in December, 2014; which established a framework for how our Park lands will be managed in the foreseeable future. It is to be reviewed shortly together with a review of the Staff Structure itself at Booderee National Park and also the actual lease in existence between Council and Parks Australia so that the requirements within the said Plan of Management are fulfilled in a timely and efficient manner. The ultimate object of sole management is still the main aim for the Board and it is a matter of deciding which is the best way of achieving this. It is expected that the various reviews and possible reforms will be completed within the next financial year, with implementation of the findings/recommendations shortly thereafter.

Land Management Cultural heritage, land planning, horticultural services, ground maintenance, cleaning services and weed/feral animal control are within the Land Management portfolio.

Our culture continues to be closely linked to land management of our lands as Cultural heritage is embedded in all who we are and what we do plus our connections to the land and sea. Through its connections including everyday life, cultural interpretations, community planning, involvement with Booderee National Park and development of its home lands and also the junior ranger program the community continues reflecting, expressing and exhibiting its clear connections to the land and sea. It is intended that more emphasis will be directed towards ‘Culture and Country’ and also more resources diverted to this most important of areas for Council and Community.

Roads and trails, cleaning services, horticultural services, infrastructure and ground maintenance continue to be provided by Council on a ‘fee for service’ basis with the Director of Parks Australia and Territory administration (DIRD). The various services provided to the Park and community is established in accordance with service level agreements (‘SLAs’); whereas the work contracted with DIRD is of an ad hoc nature being both seasonal and opportunistic. These extended ‘SLAs’ expire in October 2018, with an additional option for a further five years, subject to approval and negotiation, expiring in October 2023, with there being continued discussions for two further agreements as well, which, if agreed to, will

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commence, at this stage, in July, 2019. A component of such negotiations is the continued ‘flow on’ effect that the ‘Modern’ Awards and increased Council wages have had.

The said Modern Awards necessarily increased Council’s wages relating to penalty rates, overtime et cetera. and this has to be adjusted in any further SLAs negotiations with the Director of Parks Australia. If there is not sufficient allowance made for such Award increases, then it may be that some SLAs will be modified or reduced in hours worked by Council staff. The Board made the hard decision of not allowing employees to work on weekends and public holidays currently due to it costing Council too much. This can be changed pending negotiations with Parks Australia. Further, Parks Australia had unilaterally decided not to pay Council for continued Horticultural Services for Summercloud Bay and within the Village. This agreement was entered into in the early 1990s and despite constantly lobbying, submissions and discussions by the Board of Directors, Parks Australia management remain firm on cancelling for this service.

Council continues weed and site protection, with the main weed threat Bitou Bush remaining difficult to eliminate. In fighting this weed of national importance, ground control methods in attempting to control this problem which competes with native flora continue. This is very hard work but results show that even though this weed may never be eradicated, it is being managed.

Due to a very limited number of housing blocks in the community, the Board continues discussions with the Commonwealth regarding possible options. It is encouraging that hopefully the Land Claim will be finalised shortly regarding vacant land at least, with a further decision to be made relating to possible housing and associated facilities at Jervis Bay Village being considered by the Minister for Indigenous Affairs after the current High Court case judgement is delivered, hopefully in early to mid-2019. Depending on the judgment of the High Court, this may influence the Minister regarding a determination of the Land Claim regarding Jervis Bay Village, particularly pertaining to the housing located there.

It appears more likely than not that the Department of Defence has contaminated some Park land and possibly also land within the ‘403’. The Board of Council continues to work closely with the relevant parties to ensure transparency, fairness and correct procedures with the testing regime agreed upon et cetera. At this stage, it is expected that the testing of areas within the 403 and also Park will be completed in July-August this year. Hopefully, final test results provided by the Department of Defence will be made available to Council no later than October this year.

Once received, the test results will be forwarded to Council’s very eminent Professors and Scientists; for their views on the test results. It is anticipated that the Professors/Scientists will then attend upon the Board of Directors and also Community members to discuss the results and what happens thereafter regarding possible regeneration/rehabilitation of possible contaminated land/waters. Additionally, a copy of the final Defence Report and Council’s scientists’ views on such will be forwarded to Council’s lawyers employed in this matter for their legal views. The Board is acutely aware of the sensitivity of this matter for our Country and People and is taking very measured and cautions steps in this complex process.

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Another significant event happening this financial year with the lodgement of a Native Title Claim by the South Coast People. Council has become a party to the claim and has instructed lawyers accordingly to look after Council’s interests. Additionally, Council has applied for legal financial assistance from the Commonwealth to assist Council with its legal costs; further to the Native Title Respondent funding scheme. This is an on-going matter with substantial complexities.

The Way Ahead Council and the Community continually embraces positive changes for future generations, with critical examination and assessment by Board Directors made for strategic implementation in what is anticipated will be positive initiatives for this forthcoming year. Registered Members will be required in some instances, to approve these possible initiatives before they are thereafter acted upon.

Council continued with its support of members and their respective families, with programs in sport, rental bonds, business grants and tertiary educational grants et cetera. that are resourced from community funding and regularly updated and reviewed by the Board. It is expected that these grants will continue, subject to available funding.

There are many very complex issues before the Board presently. They relate to, from previous years, the Land Claim, proposed Land Act amendments and Regulations, Defence contamination, the Service Contract and associated SLAs with Parks Australia, a proposed Office of Joint Management concept, again with Parks Australia; review of the current lease with Parks Australia, housing issues awaiting a hearing in the High Court in September, 2018, delivery of services within the Territory, Council’s policies review including work, health and safety; and other significant matters; including more recently, the Native Title Claim with the South Coast People. I expect there to be clarity on most of these issues within the next twelve months; to be reported in next year’s Annual Report, by the then Chairperson.

As in previous years, the Board members and I are very appreciative of our Council staff for their continued hard work and assistance, together with the support provided from numerous service providers. By working together, we continue to build programs necessary to establish strong platforms and foundations in the community for the future.

Annette Brown

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Chief Executive Officer’s Report

The seventh year of my term as Chief Executive Officer of Council is completed. I am now in my eighth year and am retiring in October 2018. I appreciate the Executive Board Directors and Council staff for their loyal support in assisting me with the variety of duties associated with my position.

The previous financial year revealed some complex matters which should be resolved within this next twelve-month period, and which are significant to Council and Registered members alike. This, to a degree, has been enhanced by the stable affect that established partnerships with both Government and Non-Government organisations continue having with Council and the open communications between Council and such stakeholders.

Various opportunities for Registered Members and Community advancement exist, facilitated by the Board currently with some excellent groundwork laid by the previous Board and, when relevant strategic options are approved by the Board, those dealings will be forwarded to the Registered Members for their opinions, as a mandatory requirement under the ‘Land Grant’ Act, prior to approval of such dealings with Government; in most circumstances.

I appreciate the assistance provided to me by the current Board Directors, with their tenure in office expiring in December this year and a new Board being elected thereafter for a period of two years. I am also indebted to my staff without whose great assistance to me would have made my job so much more difficult.

There are several substantial matters needing to be resolved or determined this forthcoming financial year, requiring the substantial skill, time and judgment of all Board Directors, aware of the ramifications of their decisions and the ‘flow on’ effect that some decisions may have for the Community. Their position is one of great responsibility not just for the day to day matters for the community but also for future generations. I am very confident that all Directors will execute their duties to the highest degree; with compassion and common sense and, above all, with the best interests of the Community at heart. As with previous years, I continue having an excellent professional relationship with the Chairperson, Annette Brown, and rely upon her and the Directors’ combined wisdom and knowledge for the proper execution of my duties and responsibilities.

Mal Hansen CEO WBACC

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Matters to be canvassed this financial year as a ‘carry over’ from last year and which will culminate in decisions being made and directions being identified thereafter, include the following—determination of the Land Claim which is in excess of 20 years in age, amendments to the Land Grant Act, Service Delivery within the Territory, renewal of the Service Contract with Parks Australia and the current SLAs that flow from that agreement, review of the Lease for the Park with Parks Australia, High Court determination of housing aspects regarding the Community and other associated housing issues, alleged Defence Contamination and its possible impact upon the Community, the ‘403’ and the Park. The draft Community Plan which will then evolve into the Village Town Plan update, recent Native Title Claim by the South Coast People, together with a variety of other issues which may have influence upon the Community of Wreck Bay and also registered members in general.

These ‘big ticket’ items which need the skill, patience and dedication of the Board, who are being ably assisted by experts in some of the items. Such experts are secured by Council and the Board and Board Directors await advices being provided by those persons before formulating/assessing their own respective views on some of these vital issues. In reality, it will be a very challenging and dynamic year for Council as it travels towards completion of the Community’s vision of Sole Management, self-sufficiency, self-determination and self-reliance.

As well as these major issues, there continue to be other urgent matters which require action regarding the Board, Council and Community members, including long term desires for Booderee National Park and Parks Australia’s involvement in this quest towards sole management, the continuous redefining of relationships with Council’s various other stakeholders based on government policies; and, most significantly, the future destiny of Council, registered members and the Community of Wreck Bay itself.

Forward thinking opportunities continue being assessed by the Council and Board in the context of ‘IAS’, ‘Closing the Gap’, ‘Building Blocks’ and ‘COAG’ with opportunities available to Council through these and associated processes. The Government established innovation of ‘IAS’ examines Indigenous Advancement Strategy, namely, Incorporating Jobs, Land and Economy; Children and Schooling; Safety and Wellbeing; Culture and Capability and Remote Australia Strategies. The Board is acutely aware of these principles and, in turn, its responsibilities in advising Registered Members regarding these and other strategies or future proposals.

Members’ views conveyed to me continue to be dealt with in a timely and effective manner. Members’ issues provided to me in a variety of areas, including community housing, possible economic development avenues and future job prospects, are attended to to the best of my ability and with resolve, including, where required, referring such matters to the Board of Directors for their respective opinions. I place an enormous emphasis upon Cultural heritage and education also as I consider they are fundamental to current and future generations. My ‘door’ continues to remain open to registered members and other community members; together with my staff.

I continued being an advocate for the benefit of the Community and Registered members in the last financial year of my tenure; hoping that this will result in continuing positive changes and directions for Council and the Community alike, in time to come.

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Consistent with previous reports and for the sake of completeness, I now concentrate on providing information relating to the following sub headings: Funding Grants and Other Income, Contracts, Further Operational Activities with the Community, together with Compliance.

Funding Grants and other income As with last year, grants received this financial year came from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C); for administration and management of Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council (WBACC) under the ‘IAS’ funding scheme; together with the Department of Education in assisting the operating of Wreck Bay Gudjahgahmiamia early education day-care centre under the Multi Aboriginal Community Service (MACS) scheme pertaining to Budget Based funded services. In addition, Council continues receiving funding from the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD); for land council outcomes; together with other Local Government functions, due to DIRD arranging contracts to provide various services as part of its local government responsibility. Council also continues to receive a small income from operating a Centrelink agency at Council’s office located at Wreck Bay.

With respect to PM&C, the current three-year funding arrangement (IAS funding) concluded in June 2018; and it was paramount to Council because it gave Council the time frame to plan forward regarding projects needed to be undertaken; together with reviews, strategies employed et cetera. A further three-year grant was recently executed; which commence as of 1 July, 2018; expiring on 30 June, 2021.

Council continues beneficial partnerships with various Commonwealth Departments and other funding organisations, both government and non - governmental (NGOs); to secure outcomes in line with ‘Closing the Gap’ initiatives; thus ensuring future initiatives are subsequently realised for both current and most important future Wreck Bay generations.

Council received annual lease payments from the Director of National Parks; together with sharing of entry and camping fees from Booderee National Park (‘BNP’); this funding being utilised for short falls in grant funding; and also providing a range of services, programs and outcomes that would otherwise not be funded. The leasing arrangements between Council and Parks will continue being reviewed by the Board this forthcoming financial year and, subject to agreement in principle, will be placed before the registered members for their consideration, after thorough consultation.

Booderee National Park continues receiving favourable reports as a unique and very desirable destination/location; with the ‘flow on’ effect of increased income from gate takings and camping fees alike; reflecting the Park’s visitation and profile increased awareness. This continued increasing positive trend encourages development, support and future prospects of registered members and community members alike regarding the status of the Park; being at all times aware that, ultimately, Council’s objective is to solely manage and be responsible for the Park.

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Contracts The ‘Contract Services’ division of Council continues providing services for fees with the Director of National Parks at BNP, through Service Level Agreements—‘SLAs’; in addition to the Territory, Community and other service organisations in various ways; based on requirements. The reason for this division’s existence is the provision of community member job opportunities; with further opportunities for training and professional development; while examining the costs components to be in line with Council’s budget; particularly when referencing the Board approved ‘Modern’ awards and automatic wage increases.

There is a five-year Service Contract with BNP (from which the SLAs flow); with such contract expiring in October, 2018; with an option to renew the said contract for another five-year contract period after that time; however, exercise of the option will depend on certain criteria being satisfied and include, mainly, the requirement for Council to comply with legislative and policy adherence/formats; most importantly relating to work, health and safety and other areas. If the option is exercised and approved the Service Contract will expire in October, 2023; thus providing security of tenure and revenue for numerous years into the future; thus enhancing opportunities for addressing long term planning, community plans, corporate plans et cetera.; again, in consultation with registered members.

The five service level extended agreements (SLAs) currently exist as a consequence of the five-year Service Contract (to be known in the future as the ‘Head Agreement’) with negotiations continuing for possibly two further SLAs operating as of and from 1 July, 2019 (again, subject to financial viability, Council capacity and other matters) which could then see seven SLAs operating as of then. Those two possible new SLAs relate to the Camping, Park Use and associated services; including possibly the Visitors Centre operation and, further, the Botanic Gardens. The current extended SLAs, regarding performance, are reviewed quarterly; with the major emphasis on Work, Health and Safety practices and procedures.

The Second Plan of Management for BNP has been operating for over three years. The Plan guides and directs Park operations and policies; acknowledging and highlighting the strong cultural significance of the land and waters to Wreck Bay people. Further, it references specific activities and opportunities necessary for the long term goals and aspirations of current and future generations of Wreck Bay members; with the pursuit of Sole Management of the Park by Registered Members of Council becoming a reality.

Further Operational Activities with the Community Council seeks to assist with community development; together with improving service provision within Wreck Bay community.

Of serious moment is Community housing, with lack of resources which are badly needed for repairs and maintenance work; together with an increasing list of other housing concerns reflecting the current state of community housing. PM&C continues negotiating with the Board on an appropriate way forward on this sensitive item; with numerous options being

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examined. To that end, Council, by using its own resources and after securing a grant from PM&C continues its Restoration and Maintenance program for community housing under the Advancement of Rights to Land and Sea Commonwealth programme (ARLS). The project will conclude in December, 2018; and must include making houses safer by targeting water damaged areas, replacing gutters and fascia, window replacements, kitchen upgrades and also bathroom upgrades.

Whilst there are tourism opportunities for community members to establish individual tourism products and/or, as an alternative, community owned enterprises; Council provides business support with funding directed at supporting members in establishing viable businesses; with Council’s financial assistance packages used towards business requirements like insurance, registration or professional support et cetera. As with all financial assistance provided by Council though, this is reviewed every year or so with new policies being developed and existing ones amended or revoked; depending on Council’s then financial status and circumstances.

With the main priority given to Community and Registered Members’ children regarding education; Council continues its emphasis on the importance of the scholarship scheme it operates providing tertiary scholarships for members for completion of full time University undergraduate qualifications. As more students complete Year 12, it is expected children attending full time University studies will increase. Hence, it is expected that more applicants will apply for University scholarships with the number of such scholarships increasing in the future as well; based on Council’s capacity to fund such scholarship.

Compliance As a Commonwealth Entity, Council has various compulsory statutory and/or other compliance requirements it needs to adhere to; including the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (‘PGPA’ Act). In that respect, the Executive Committee (or Board Directors) are referred to or defined as the ‘accountable authority’ and thus responsible for the preparation and content of the annual report of Council’s operations. ‘Directors’ are defined as the members of the executive committee in the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act, 1986.

In regard to the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines, I state that during this reporting period, I have no knowledge of any evidence being found relating to any fraud within the organisation. In addition, I am of the honest and reasonable belief that appropriate and necessary measures continue operating to ensure fraud is minimised; although even though I am always vigilant I am also realistic in that there is always room for improvement including that of our processes and accountability aspects, which are constantly reviewed ensuring that fraud should not occur. This responsibility is always monitored and evaluated.

I will always adhere to the strict legal obligation placed upon me in the event of fraud; pursuant to Guideline 1.6 issued by the Australian Institute of Criminology and also regarding the Police, in that suspected fraud matters are required to be reported to the appropriate authorities for possible future prosecution.

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The Future Evolving demanding challenges and current issues will be at the forefront for the next twelve months. Council staff must continue remaining focused on priorities given by the Board via the CEO and Senior Management. We must continue to persevere regarding reducing council costs but, at the same time, continue with the production of quality work efficiently and cost effectively. Various items the Board is currently involved with will require Council staff to implement for, consequently, the advancement of the Community and Council. I am very appreciative of my staff; together with the Board Directors; without which my role would be difficult to perform in a professional and, yet, understanding manner; culminating in positive results.

Regarding the Board, I am very familiar with numerous ‘big ticket’ items being currently addressed. These, like last year, include the Land Claim, Legislative reform, By-law enforcement, Housing, Petitions, future SLAs, options to renew the current SLAs, economic viability and opportunities; together with Joint Board and sub-committee responsibilities. The Board has, as usual, a full complement of matters to address and deal with and, like last year, there has been an increase in the number of Board sitting days/meetings held this year compared to the past. This demand will continue to increase but has to so that the Board can stay abreast of the ‘big ticket’ issues that consistency and regularly affect Council and the Community now, so the Community can be better equipped in the future. I thoroughly acknowledge the characteristics that the Chairperson and Directors have displayed in their dedication in the execution of their respective increasing duties and responsibilities.

Further, I appreciate the significant partnerships with various funding departments; together with support networks. It is important for Council’s continued development; providing substantial input into the future of registered members and families. Council is the registered members and accountable to them, with Staff and Directors being the carriage for which members normally can express their views. Both staff and Directors are sensitive to members’ desires and talk with them as much as possible. This is essential when ‘big ticket’ matters are discussed by the Board; representing the Council or, in reality, as the representatives of the Registered Members; with respect to Government. The Board Directors are very much aware of the need for thorough communication and in-depth consultation with registered members as part of their duties as Directors.

I am thankful to the Board and Members for permitting my continuation in the role of CEO to continue to date. When I retire from my position in October, 2018; I hope there are many matters that have been concluded by that time with a clearer picture emerging regarding the Council and Community’s future. I really desire that the aspirations of the Council are fulfilled and that I have been of some assistance to those wishes being fulfilled.

As with last year, I wish everyone all the very best for the future. Like all of you, I am very much aware that this is such a unique place.

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Board CEO

HR Manager

Accountant

Deputy CEO

Office Manager

Community Liaison Officer

Services group

h Works Supervisor

h Works Services Officers x 13

h Entry Station Officers x 2

Day care

h Director Child Care

h Early Childhood Workers x 5

h Cook

h Driver

Casuals Pool

Depending on need

Admin Officer

Trainee Receptionist

Admin Officer

Organisational Chart

40 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

WBACC Operations Report 2017-2018

Program Outcome Statement WBACC receives no receive annual appropriations but received a three (3) yearly grant under the program ‘Advancement of Rights to Land and Sea’ (ARLS) instead. The grant was administered with the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C), with the current grant for three years expiring on 30 June 2018. It is noted that a subsequent three (3) year grant has been recently approved.

The outcomes and objectives of the program for the 2017-2018 year were to:

Recognise rights of Indigenous people to their lands and waters; and Provision of effective governance and delivery of services by Indigenous organisations in accordance with the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 via:

h Provision of effective administration support to the WBACC Board, effecting efficient and effective operating of the WBACC office and Community facilities, in addition to providing secretariat support to the WBACC Board;

h Ensure delivery of community services with reference to agreed standards;

h Contribute to develop and implement staff training strategies; and

h Manage Service Level Agreements (SLAs) with Wreck Bay Contract Services (Council’s contracts division) ensuring land management activities are conducted and completed further to the terms of the respective individual agreements.

The Council Corporate Plan for 2017-2021 was a guiding instrument for Council’s operations this financial year and, in accordance with the Public Governance and Performance Act, 2013 (PGPA Act) Council, in its capacity as a Commonwealth entity, pursuant to Section 39 of the Act; is required to prepare Annual Performance Statements and include those statements in its Annual Report.

Council’s Annual Report reports through the Annual Performance Statements section, on the results actually achieved against the targets, goals and measures Council established at the beginning of a reporting year, in this instance July, 2017 to June, 2018 inclusive, in its Corporate Plan.

The Statements combine relevant non-financial performance information into one place (the Annual Report)—much as the financial statements consolidate financial performance information in the one place; again, the Annual Report. The aim is to improve the readability of this information and provide a clear line of sight between planned performance for the reporting period (the financial year), as outlined in the Corporate Plan of Council, and actual performance over the reporting period.

41 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

For that purpose, the Annual Performance Statements to be provided below, are provided further to Section 39(1)(a) of the PGPG Act for the 2017-2018 financial year and accurately presents Council’s performance in accordance with Section 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Council’s purposes are separated into various sub-headings. Against each sub-heading will be the Results which will include the Name and description of the Performance Criterion, the Source and the Results against the Performance Criterion.

We, Annette Brown, Chairperson of Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council and Malcolm Hansen, Chief Executive Officer, as the Accountable Authority, present the following Annual Performance Statements of Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council, as required under paragraph 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act, 2013 (PGPA Act). In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with Subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

With respect to the purposes of Council, under the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986, at section 6, Council has a number of main functions:

h To hold title to Aboriginal Land;

h Make representations to the Minister in relation to land that the Council consider should become Aboriginal Land and in relation to other matters relevant to the Act;

h To manage and maintain Aboriginal Land, including to protect and conserve natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal Land and Engage in land use planning;

h Provide services to Community members, including, in consultation with the Minister, taking action for the benefit of the Community in relation to housing, social welfare, education, training or health needs of the Community members; and

h Conduct business enterprises for the economic/social benefit of the Community.

Provide more housing and improve living standards. Performance criterion (1) Number of new blocks for development; (2) Number of new houses built; (3) Reduction of number of new applicants; (4) Number of houses repaired; (5) Improvement of living conditions; and (6) Reduction in the number of reported repairs required.

Criterion source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 14.

Results against the Performance criterion

1. There were no new blocks for development identified, due to lack of resources to assess the viability of adding new areas for housing development with the Village. Previous reports indicate that there is little land within the Village suitable for development because of likely subsidence and also cultural heritage concerns. The requirement for an updated Village Town Plan is reliant, to some extent, upon identification of suitable blocks, if appropriate, to be incorporated into the Plan. In that respect, a draft Community Plan has been adopted in principle, identifying both possible residential and also commercial zonings but will await geo-technical reports

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regarding suitability; anticipated to occur next financial year, which should, hopefully, identify possible new blocks.

This Community Plan (as the first step to an updated Village Town) should be operating in late 2018-early 2019. Also, a comprehensive Housing Management Plan, including a maintenance plan for the housing stock, continues being examined and assessed by Council via the Executive Board and is expected to be completed during 2018-2019. It is, like the Community Plan, currently in draft form. Further, there is uncertainty regarding the legal status of current leases operating, which will be resolved by a court determination in late 2018-early 2019.

2. There were no houses built during 2017-2018. This was again due to lack of financial resources to service such work, lack of available identified land for such housing within the Village and concerns over the legality of leases currently in existence.

3. There was neither an increase nor reduction in the number of new or existing applicants.

4. There were sixteen houses repaired.

5. The repairs and other maintenance to the eleven houses repaired has improved living conditions for the occupants as repairs continued to focus primarily on bathrooms (wet areas), kitchens, flooring and gutters of those houses.

6. There continues to be a reduced number of reported repairs required with this expecting to continue over the next six (6) months of the repairs and maintenance program.

Analysis of performance

The main reason why no houses were constructed and more houses not repaired was due to financial limitations upon Council and its limited capacity to employ additional staff, again due to financial constraints. The legal uncertainty regarding leases contributed as well although this should be resolved in late 2018-early 2019.

Continue to maintain Good Governance Principles Performance criterion (1) External Audit findings; and (2) Audit Committee meetings.

Criterion source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 13.

Results against the Performance criterion

1. The Australian National Audit Office closing report confirmed that the financial statements of Council complied with Australian Accounting Standards and the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015, and also presented fairly the financial position of the Council as at 30 June 2018 and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended.

2. There were four meetings held by the Audit Committee for Council; namely on 31/10/2017, 20/3/2018, 23/4/2018 and 24/5/2018 wherein Neville ‘Jack’ Hampton, Tom Brown, Tony Federici, Rhonda Brown, Paul McLeod and Neville Hampton, who comprise of the Audit Committee, attended.

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Analysis of performance

Financial reporting and statutory reporting continue to improve with Council meeting its statutory requirements on time, together with necessary compliance requirements continually exercised appropriately by Council.

Maintenance of good Governance Principles continued and as new Executive Boards are elected the process of implementing Good Governance Principles continues. Further, the Board continues monitoring current policies adopted, developing new ones when required and amending or replacing older ones if no longer relevant.

Obtain Sole Ownership of Land and Waters of Jervis Bay Performance criterion (1) Additional SLAs (Service Level Agreements); (2) Joint Management of the Park; (3) Council staff re-structure; (4) Updating and instituting new Council Policies and Procedures; and (5) Legislative reforms to the Land Grant Act, together with the Land Claim lodged in 1997.

Criterion Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 11.

Results against the Performance criterion

1. Council continues negotiating two SLAs with Parks Australia for Booderee National Park. They relate to the Camping Grounds and Visitors Centre and also to the Botanic Gardens. If successful, it is anticipated the first SLA for the Camping Grounds and Visitors Centre will commence as of and from 1 July, 2019. Current SLAs (x5) are being re-negotiated pertaining to fees for services; as a consequence of increase in Council Staff wages and entitlements dues to the ‘Modern’ Award, which increased penalty rates, overtime, leave loading and similar provisions. A ‘log of claims’ further to the Service Contract was lodged with Parks Australia in December, 2016, but was disallowed. Further, the Service Contract between Council and Parks Australia is due for review for a possible option to renew the Contract for an additional five (5) years. That review should be completed in October, 2018. If renewed, the current SLAs would also continue in some form for that time frame of five (5) years as well, subject to negotiation.

2. Joint Management of Booderee National Park continued with four meetings held during the 2017-2018 financial year. These meetings were held regarding the second Plan of Management approved by the Minister for Environment. Further, the current lease between Council and the Director of Parks Australia is being reviewed with an anticipated conclusion date for negotiations in early to mid-2019. The proposal of an Office of Joint Management has been canvassed by the Board with a view to Council, at some stage, possibly being responsible for Cultural Heritage matters, Training, Community Liaison Office functions; with such areas being more clearly defined and a Unit or Cell being established and coming under Council’s umbrella. Discussions are continuing with a resolution hopefully by mid-2019 as well.

3. Council continues implementing new and existing policies and procedures and is a regular agenda item for Board meetings of Council. New policies were added and other current policies and procedures were refined or amended.

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4. The Executive Committee continues negotiating the Land Claim and also reform of the Land Grant Act with representatives from Prime Minister & Cabinet (PM&C). It is expected that a decision on the land claim will be made by the Minister for Indigenous Affairs by December, 2018; with a finalisation of the reform to the Act by June, 2019, for submission and thereafter to Parliament for determination of the proposed reforms, amendments et cetera.

Analysis of Performance

The Board’s submissions regarding the Land Claim are with the Minister for Indigenous Affairs for determination. It is expected a determination will be made in late 2018. Depending on the determination of land under the Claim, it is expected that the proposed reforms to the Land Claim Act will then be re-examined to see if there are any further requirements to look at in order to facilitate amendments to that Act. It is expected that the proposed amendments to the Land Claim Act will then be finalised no later than 30 June, 2019; subject to the views of the Registered Members beforehand and also the Land Claim itself.

Undertake Skills Analysis and Skills Training Performance Criterion (1) Number of staff who successfully completed specialised training; and (2) Review of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for key staff.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 16.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. School based apprenticeships with Council continued this year, together with diplomas in Children’s services. Little training support was provided however via the Booderee National Park training strategy with Parks Australia. Staff members engaged in TAFE courses regarding administration and accounting practices, and continued attending courses in work health and safety in the workplace.

2. Due to new employment contracts existing from 1 July, 2016, further to the ‘Modern’ Awards, KPIs are to be addressed annually by Council’s Human Resources Manager in consultation with the Deputy CEO and also CEO. This review will commence next financial year with individual employees expecting to be assessed in December, 2018.

Analysis of performance

Due to lack of staffing resources within Parks Australia who normally arrange specialised training, there has continued to be a reduction in staff who completed such training this financial year. The training officer position with Parks Australia continued being vacant for an extended period this financial year hence restricting training opportunities for Council staff. There is, however, a staff re-structure at Parks Australia which should give further training opportunities offered by Parks Australia proceeding, together with re-engaging Council staff, with such training opportunities hopefully being offered to Council staff in the financial year 2018-2019.

With Council’s employment of a Human Resources Manager (HRM) for the last twelve months; part of those duties has been to initiate skills and competency training and review

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and address KPIs for key staff for submission to the CEO, or the Executive Committee, in some circumstances. The Manager is responsible for personnel files, staff training in liaison with Parks Australia’s Training Officer, funding opportunities for developing staff skills and addressing each staff member’s efficiency and effectiveness in the organisation, and thereafter provide individual staff reports to the CEO for perusal and assessment.

Implement new Management Structure Performance Criterion (1) Number of new sub-committees; (2) Number of sub-committee members; (3) Training of Sub-Committee members; and (4) Ability of the Board and Management to deal with changes.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017- 2021, at page 13.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. No new sub-committees were formed this financial year.

2. Due to no new sub-committees formed there were no new sub-committee members.

3. No training was provided to new sub-committee members as none were formed.

4. Regarding dealing with changes, both Board and Senior Management continue employing consultants or request Government representatives attend Board meetings to explain relevant changes to government policies; legislative or other relevant requirements.

Analysis of performance

As no new sub-committees were formed this financial year, with the Board satisfied with its current sub-committees, it is expected no further sub-committees will be formed in the near future. If a requirement does arise though then the Board will decide at that time; aware of costs involved with sub-committees and also the relatively short tenure that Board members may actually be Board members, with some Board members not continuing to be so after two years in office consequent upon Council elections every two years occurring. This two-year office tenure is a constant restriction and currently being examined regarding reforms to the Land Grant Act.

A new management structure has been operating at Council through a revised and Board accepted ‘chain of command’ for the past two years, with the said Structure being achieved after considerable consultation between Staff and the Board of Council, with the assistance of a consultant. Since implementation, it continues achieving certainty regarding staff aspirations and career progression, wages and conditions and reviews Council’s activities; involving Council staff senior management.

Update Policies and Procedures Manual Performance Criterion (1) Number of additions/amendments to the Policies and Procedures Manual; (2) Signatures on the Register (to determine how many staff have read the Manual); and (3) Releasing the Manual to the Community Members.

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Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017- 2021, at page 13.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. There have been fifteen (15) additions or amendments to the Policies and Procedures Manual, including further policies approved by the Board this financial year.

2. The staff have signed the Register and confirmed they have read the Manual with new policies or amended policies being brought to the attention of staff that the instruments affect, together with Community members if such new or amended policies affect them.

3. The Manual is available to Community Members, being accessible at the Council Office at Wreck Bay Village and the Works Office at Jervis Bay Village.

Analysis of Performance

Council’s policies and procedures constantly evolve, based on legislative and/or policy directions or decisions. The Board continues reviewing policies every 3 months, time permitting with their meetings. Also, the CEO brings to the Board urgent policies needing to be addressed, amended or repealed. The appointed HRM has carriage of policies and procedures for Council this financial year so that policies and procedures are updated or, alternatively, new ones recommended for Board approval.

Provision of Services to Community Members Performance Criterion (1) Housing - refer to Annual Performance Statements sub-heading 1 - ‘ Provide more housing and improve living standards’; (2) Number of youth completing High School, Number of youth attending TAFE or other Tertiary Institutions, Number of applicants for scholarships and Number of scholarships offered; (3) Increase in the number of health care services provided, Improvement of Community Members health, Increase in life expectancy; and (4) Number of children attending Day Care Centre, Number of qualified staff, Development training of staff, Number of health checks provided, Securing additional funding.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 13.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. See previous criterion for housing.

2. There are currently no numbers available re: number completing High School, or number attending TAFE or other Tertiary Institutions, although it appears that it is consistent with numbers that attended such institutions last year. Regarding full-time Tertiary Scholarships there were three applicants successful in obtaining tertiary scholarships for study at University.

3. No increase in number of health care services provided from last year and no ability to quantify improvement in Community Members’ health or actual increase in life expectancy from last year due to needing more time for statistical purposes to assess results for clear patterns to emerge.

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4. Same numbers as last year for children attending, same number of qualified staff, same number of training completed for staff and similar number of health checks provided. Additional funding was not able to be secured this financial year, with a changing regime to take effect next Financial Year.

Analysis of Performance

As with last year, it is difficult to give an accurate number of students at High School, TAFE or other Tertiary Institutions as such information is not always volunteering from students or families; even after their individual consent maybe obtained to release such information. Such information should be pursued from the individual tertiary institutions but there is a privacy issue which could restrict Council from obtaining such information. The lack of statistical information continued to also apply to (3) above regarding life expectancy and health again, due to privacy restrictions. It is felt a clearer picture will emerge after some years of statistical research/analysis. It is too early to make any substantiated remarks regarding these matters after just two years. Again, however, subject to privacy, such information should be available from Government Health institutions, Departments et cetera.

Creation of Employment Opportunities Performance Criterion (1) Number of new Employees; (2) Number of casuals being made

Permanent and (3) Number of jobs created.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 15.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. One new permanent employee was selected to work with Council this year. This is, again, an Administrative Assistant position.

2. No New casuals were made permanent this financial year.

3. One new job was created this financial year.

Analysis of Performance

Subject to financial resources, it is expected that a permanent Works Manager will be employed next financial year. Although no new casuals were made permanent this year, there continues to be a reduction in the number of casuals employed by Council with a continuing emphasis upon short term part-time permanent staff being appointed instead, due to expenses associated with the ‘Modern’ Award. It is expected though that there will be a requirement for more staff being employed by Council based on negotiations for two further Service Level Agreements with Parks Australia for the camping sites within Booderee National Park and the Visitors Centre; and, later on next year, the Botanic Gardens; together with implementation of the Office of Joint Management hopefully next Financial Year, if agreed to between Council and Parks Australia.

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Develop Existing Production Base Performance Criterion (1) Number of SLAs; (2) Increase in services provided under the existing SLAs; (3) Increase in visitation to the Park; (4) Increase in positive coverage of the Park; and (5) Percentage of own source revenue.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 15.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. There are five SLAs between Council and Parks Australia. This is the same number since 2012.

2. There has been no increase in services provided under the existing SLAs; although it is expected there will be an increase in the number of actual SLAs, subject to negotiation, between Council and Parks Australia next financial year thus increasing the number of SLAs to seven with the ‘flow on’ effect of increasing services provided and a higher percentage of own source revenue for next financial year, together with increased employment opportunities for Community members performing duties attached to the possible two new SLAs.

3. Advice indicates there has been an increase in visitation to the Park this financial year although specific figures are, as yet, not available from Parks Australia. This will, again, be reported in this year’s Parks Australia Annual Report.

4. Like (3) above, this information is not available although observations over the last year indicated that there has been, again, favourable media coverage for the Park. Again, more details should be provided from the Annual Report compiled by Parks Australia.

5. Percentage of own source revenue is similar to last financial year at about 60%. This is expected to increase in the event that the two further SLAs come into force although this will not occur or operating until, at this stage, 1 July, 2019. There may also be additional increases next financial year based on current negotiations between Council and Parks Australia on the existing five SLAs for an increase in the fees for services; due to Council’s ‘Modern’ Awards for its staff, which increased the amount of overtime and penalty rates payments et cetera. to Council staff; which, it is hoped, will be offset by increases in fees payable by Parks Australia to Council after the current negotiations have been concluded in approximately October, 2018.

Analysis of Performance

The number of current SLAs remain at five. Much will depend next financial year upon the successful negotiations of two more SLAs for Council. This should mean an increase in services provided and hence an expected increase in the percentage of own source revenue. Accurate information relating to increases in visitation to the Park this financial year and also increases in positive coverage of the Park cannot be provided but should be provided by Parks Australia upon examing its Annual Report of proceedings.

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Environmentally Sustainable Performance Criterion (1) Energy use within the Council offices; (2) Fuel consumption; (3) Bitou Bush program results; (4) Compliance with EPBC Act; (5) Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Internal Audit results (conducted every two years); and (5) Environmental Register.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017- 2021, at page 12.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. Council staff reduced the amount of energy used in its offices by way of electricity. This is continually annually monitored.

2. Fuel consumption for Council vehicles was reduced regarding the number of litres used; be it diesel or petrol. This part of Council’s operations, like electricity usage, is monitored with weekly regarding readings and assessments of fuel.

3. The Bitou Bush program has provided success in restricting this noxious week from Council’s land. One setback again this financial year was the unavailability of the supervisor of the weeds team. Council used additional staff to combat this weed more efficiently.

4. It is required that, in accordance with section 516A of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (‘EPBC Act’) that Australian Government organisations detail their environmental performance and contributions to Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD). The following provides an overview of Council’s environmental activities and operations regarding the EPBC Act.

ESD Reporting Requirements How Council’s activities accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

Council’s response Council continue developing and updating environmental policies relating to measures required to improve ecological sustainability. Policies will be reviewed every second year with Council’s environmental risks being assessed and surveyed at the project, program and portfolio level, containing requirements within the said proposed policies. Council expects producing an Environmental Legal and Other Requirements Register next financial year, and, additionally, Environmental Management Systems (EMS) audits will be assessed by Council’s Auditors every second year with the next one anticipated for 2018-2019.

Outcomes contributing to ecologically sustainable development.

Council’s response The anticipated Council Environment Management Program will give positive messages and enhance ecologically sustaining development specifically for improved animal management and pest control and reducing waste management issues and environmental impact; increasing use of renewable energies and managing effects of climate change and emphasising tidal inundation and erosion.

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Environmental impacts of operations Council’s response: Commitment to managing its own operations and contractors is a top priority of Council in order to reduce adverse environmental impacts and also enhance protection of the environment. To that end, there were no adverse environmental impacts due to Council’s activities in 2017-2018.

Measures taken to minimise environmental impacts

Council’s response: Council continues assessing its employees, suppliers and contractors to ensure they comply with Council’s Environmental Policy and management systems, together with establishing conservation measures at Council’s offices, Council required Contractors’ compliance with environmental regulatory requirements and necessary environmental performance requirements, where appropriate, with Council streamlining the required compliances; together with managing and reporting upon environmental incidents and irregularities, if applicable.

In this way, Council continues to evaluate environmental performance indicators, such as energy usage at Council’s offices, respective fuel consumption and vehicle performances. It is anticipated Council will adopt appropriate technologies for travel reduction and page-based filing systems shortly.

5. It is anticipated an Environmental Legal and Other Requirements Register (referred to at (4) above) will be in place next financial year: 2018-2019, subject to available funds.

Analysis of Performance

Council complies with section 516A of the EPBC Act. Further, it complies with ESD reporting requirements and expects to have the other necessary recommended compliance requirements in place next financial year. Of great relevance is there has been minimal environmental impact this financial year due to thorough assessing/monitoring by Council staff of environmentally related activities.

Representation at Government Performance Criterion (1) Number of representatives; and (2) Extent of representation.

Performance Source Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Corporate Plan 2017-2021, at page 12.

Results against Performance Criterion

1. There have been numerous representatives to Australian Government Departments this financial year. Representations have continued being made to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) over land claims and amendments to the Land Claim Act, Department of Defence regarding possibly pollution, Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD) regarding service delivery and leases within Jervis Bay Village, together with possible pollution aspects; and Parks Australia relating to review of the 99-year lease between Council and Parks Australia; together with a review of the Services Contract, SLAs fees, future management of the Park and lease dispute concerns.

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These representations have resulted from Wreck Bay Board Directors meetings with representatives from the relevant Government departments; where the Directors placing their views, on behalf of the registered members, ‘on the table’ for consideration. In that respect, there have been 13 meetings this financial year to discuss relevant subjects; with communications on subjects referenced above.

2. Representations are forwarded to senior officers of the relevant Government Departments; with dialogue conducted at Board meetings with such representatives and followed up, normally by correspondence from the Board Chairperson with responses received from government departments. The Board is continuously kept informed of changes or responses by the relevant Departments in pursuing the objectives of the matters canvassed.

Analysis of Performance

There are numerous discussions on a regular basis with various government departments over these items and it is envisaged there will be resolutions and clear ways forward regarding all such matters by the conclusion of the 2018-2019 financial year.

This completes the Annual Performance Statements requirement under the PGPA Act. The next part relates to relevant activities and responsibilities of Council; in accordance with the Land Grant Act and other legislative and policy necessities.

WBACC administers numerous functions according to its Land Grant Act requirements. Council invests funds received from the lease of its lands to the Director of National Parks into funding shortfall areas and programs, thus providing opportunities to assist Registered Members of Council and community members alike.

The following summarises outcomes and outputs that the Council and Board achieved this financial year using a variety of government grant funds and, sometimes, its own resources. Outcomes are divided into the following: Administration, Governance, Commonwealth Disability Strategy, Land Management, Community Services, Community Liaison; together with other relevant areas.

Administration Council employed 29 permanent staff, part time staff and casuals during the year, when required. Council Administration division had ten staff including a Chief Executive Officer, Deputy Chief Executive Officer (formerly General Manager—Council), Human Resources Manager, Chief Financial Officer/General Manager—Contract Services, and three clerical support staff. Gudjahgahmiamia Early Education Centre has eight staff, including a Director, two team leaders, two assistants, two trainees, together with one bus driver/handyman.

Council continued to receive funding from numerous Departments, including the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) for the purposes of Administration and Land management; Department of Education for the Early Education Centre; Department of ACT Family Services for a Family Support Worker; and the Department of Human Services for the Centrelink Agent/Access Point facility. In addition, the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (DIRD) provided funding for Local Government

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and Land Council purposes; with the Department of the Environment for Community Liaison functions relating to joint management of Booderee National Park.

A primary requirement for Council Administration is to assist the Board meet its’ statutory and other requirements, maintaining and, where possible, strengthening current partnerships; together with, when the opportunity arises, develop new partnerships with both government and non-government agencies that may assist Council achieve outcomes for both Community and Registered Members.

Council provides services to the Community; with such services varying from direct assistance to referral advice; with this year’s assistance in the following:

h Early Education/Child Care Centre;

h Casual employment opportunities;

h Office service facilities including internet access;

h Postal services;

h Support for Education and Sport including scholarships;

h Employment traineeships;

h Support for health services;

h Provision of housing including bond assistance;

h Children school holiday recreation programs;

h Organised community functions;

h Advocacy service; and

h Centrelink Agency.

Governance Council complies with the requirements further to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act, 2013 (PGPA Act), in preparing its Annual Report.

This Annual Report of Operations was approved by the Directors at a meeting of the Board Directors on 24 September 2018, and referred to in a letter signed by the Chairperson of the Board of Directors and dated 24 September 2018, to the Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion. The Directors’ responsibilities include preparation and the contents of the said Annual Report of Operations.

The Finance Minister did not grant a written exemption to the Directors of Council from any requirement of these Orders.

The responsible Minister for this financial year being reported on was Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion, Minister for Indigenous Affairs.

There were no directions issued by the responsible Minister, or other Minister, under the enabling legislation of the Council or other legislation during the reporting period. There were no general policies orders that applied to WBACC during the reporting period under s. 22 of the PGPA Act.

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Executive meetings are scheduled for the third Monday of each month, where possible; together with extra meetings if necessary. The Executive Board met officially thirty-one times during the past year; due to the complex number of matters addressed.

Four Joint Management meetings of Booderee National Park were held during the past year with a second ten-year plan of management (2nd Plan of Management) developed and acted upon to guide management of the Park.

Executive Sub-Committees met during the year. Two sub-committees operated under portfolios of Community Service and Governance; with the Community Service sub-committee responsible for health, education, early childhood programs, housing, youth & sport programs, drug and alcohol programs, family support services; together with aged and home care services. The Governance sub-committee focused again on policy development and implementation, by-laws and strategic planning. Further, the legal sub-committee continued examining the provisions of the Services Contract with BNP and the Park lease for an anticipated lease review shortly; together with recently assented to Commonwealth legislation, amendments or proposed amendments to current Commonwealth legislation; particularly the Land Grant Act, the by-laws and Regulations.

Governance training was again provided to Executive Directors and senior staff during the year and is expected to, next financial year, extend to non-Board participants of sub-committees and community members; subject to funding and Indigenous Community Volunteers (ICV) able to assist.

Corporate governance practices of Council continued focusing upon education and performance review processes for Directors; together with ethics and risk management policies being addressed. Policies were developed and approved by the Board; including continued emphasis on corporate governance practices of Council and the Executive Committee; noting recently approved legislative and financial directions/policies being introduced.

Further, with the assistance from Indigenous Community Volunteers (ICV), further Ethics and risk management policies will be developed by the Directors next financial year. Further, the major task of developing a Community Plan as the first step towards updating the Village Town Plan has been completed with a ‘draft’ Community Plan already approved after substantial community consultation.

During this financial year there have been no changes to Council’s enabling legislation or any other legislation directly relevant to its operation.

There were no judicial decisions or administrative tribunal decisions that had a significant impact on Council’s operations this year. Further, no adverse reports about Council by the Auditor-General, Commonwealth Ombudsman, a Parliamentary Committee or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner, were received.

No indemnities were given to Council’s officers against a liability; legal or otherwise, including premiums paid or agreed to be paid for insurance against an officer’s liability for legal costs.

OH&S policies continues revision and implementation; being a ‘living’ document, having originally been approved by the Board in 2013. The OH & S committee again met on a very

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regular basis to identify issues. Work, Health and Safety continues to be a subject of vital importance to the Board; noting the very high level of legal responsibility that it entails.

The Audit Committee, operating pursuant to the PGPA Act; met regularly; according to its Charter. Council continued investing revenue obtained from leasing Booderee National Park to the Director of National Parks into community services and programs that are not funded from existing grants and partnerships. The Audit Committee’s role therefore, continues to be twofold; reporting to the Board against government funding sources and ensuring that Council’s investments are targeted and appropriate.

Community liaison (CLO) meetings between WBACC senior staff and Booderee National Park continue on a regular, informal basis. It is considered an important communication tool and opinions for Community, Council and Park management. Council, as owners of the Park, lease it to the Director of National Parks. The Community and Council therefore have strong interest in how the Park is being managed for current and future generations. The functions and objectives of meetings are also important to Park management in order to provide guidance via WBACC administration to community members and registered members alike; together with obtaining information from the community perspective to provide important decision making within the Park. The current CLO agreement expires in December, 2018; with an option for a further extension of the said agreement expiring in June, 2020; subject to satisfactory negotiations between Council and Parks Australia.

Further to section 17BE(h) of the PGPA there were not any non-compliance issues for this financial year and, in accordance with section 17BE(p) of the PGPA there were no significant events reported to the Minister in the financial year; in accordance with section 19 of the PGPA Act.

Commonwealth Disability Strategy Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies report on performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin.

Land Matters Unsealed roads and walking tracks within the 403 hectares are maintained with Community access to land and sea being an important social and cultural requirement within Wreck Bay. Wreck Bay people are traditional fishermen with many traditional fishing areas and cultural sites being accessed from the Wreck Bay 403 hectares. Work involving maintaining roads and tracks is contracted to Contract Services; the wholly owned subsidiary of WBACC, thus maintaining critical employment in a location of consistently high unemployment.

Bitou Bush eradication programs continued with limited success. Bitou Bush is a weed of national significance; having been originally introduced into the Territory for the purpose of stabilising sand dunes however, sadly, the weed spread throughout coastal areas of the Park and onto community land. It grows aggressively and challenges plants which provide traditional sources of bush tucker or used for cultural practices.

55 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Sea Spurge is another infestation being dealt with as funding becomes available. Funding is, however, not a direct grant into the Jervis Bay Territory. It is, as previously, allocated throughout the NSW coastline with funding being accessed indirectly through Shoalhaven Council and Booderee National Park.

As Wreck Bay is located within a high risk bush fire zone, it is important to continue to maintain a well drilled organised bush fire team. The community achieves this by retaining its own bush fire facility attached to the NSW rural bush fire service.

Environmental Impact Management

Environmental sustainability It is compulsory, pursuant to Section 516A of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (‘EPBC Act’) that Australian Government organisations detail their environmental performance and contributions to Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD). The following provides an overview of Council’s environmental activities and operations relating to the EPBC Act.

ESD Reporting Requirements h How Council’s activities accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

Council’s response Council continues developing an updated environmental policy outlining measures to improve ecological sustainability. The policy is reviewed bi-annually, with Council’s environmental risks managed at the project, program and portfolio level, and contained within the proposed policy. Council will soon provide an Environmental Legal and Other Requirements Register. Additionally, Environmental Management System (EMS) audits will be conducted by the Council’s Auditor every two years; with the next audit anticipated for 2018-19.

h Outcomes contributing to ecologically sustainable development.

Council’s response Council’s proposed Environmental Management Program will contribute to ecologically sustainable development and improve animal management and pest control, reduce waste management issues and environmental impact; increase usage of renewable energies and manage effects of climate change; particularly tidal inundation and erosion.

h Environmental impacts of operations.

Council’s response Council is committed to managing its operations and contractors in order to reduce adverse environmental impacts; protecting the environment. There were no recorded adverse environmental impacts as a consequence of Council’s activities in 2017-18.

h Measures taken to minimise environmental impacts.

Council’s response Council continues requiring employees, contractors and suppliers to comply with Council‘s Environmental Policy and environmental management systems by

56 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

implementing conservation measures at Council’s offices, requiring contractors’ compliance with relevant environmental regulatory requirements and minimum environmental performance requirements; in addition to managing and reporting of environmental incidents.

Council continues evaluating environmental performance indicators; including energy use in Council offices, fuel consumption and vehicle performance. Further, Council intends adopting appropriate technologies for travel reduction and its need for page-based filing systems.

Work Health and Safety 1. Consequent upon the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 commencing on 01 January, 2012; an audit report was prepared for WBACC Board regarding practices, policies required and implementation of recommendations contained in the Report. This

Report continues being addressed by the Board with the necessary requirements adhering to the legislation; being implemented in a timely and frequent basis, so that Council complies with the Act.

2. In accordance with the Act, Council’s Annual Report requires provision of details regarding the following

(a) Health and safety management arrangements of Council.

Council’s response Council continues its responsibilities under the Act with a Health and Safety Committee, consisting of Council staff, responsible for development and implementation of strategies to protect employees against risks to their health and safety. The Committee works, consistent with policies in place; regarding work place health and safety. The Human Resources Manager (HRM) remains the lead staff employee with this responsibility.

There were no accidents or dangerous incidents during the year that occurred from Council’s undertakings requiring giving of notices under the Act.

No investigations during the year regarding Council undertakings were implemented and there were no notices given to Council pursuant to the Act during this financial year.

The Health and Safety Committee manage Council’s occupational health and safety policy and operational areas. Staff are informed of current issues and receive occupational health and safety publications from Comcare. Council trained staff undertake duties as first aid officers, fire wardens and occupational health and safety officers.

(b) Initiatives taken during the year to ensure the continued health, safety and welfare at work of employees and contractors of Council.

Council’s response Council has a current injury management strategy which includes arranging for onsite flu vaccinations and a healthy lifestyle program; available to all employees. Further, Council has a Preventing Bullying and Harassment Policy and trained Harassment Contact Officers to provide employee support. Council engages the Commonwealth Rehabilitation Services to provide short-term, confidential counselling services to employees, if necessary. Further, Council is an Equal Employment Opportunity

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(EEO) employer; maintaining Australian Public Service Values. Council provides a workplace free from discrimination. Council staff receive updated information on key developments in human resources including EEO, harassment free workplaces and workplace diversity. Staff has access to publications from the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC), the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) and other related agencies.

Additionally, Council continues promoting industrial democracy with regular management, program area and staff meetings. When appropriate, Council consults with employees on major work place changes and develops guidelines and policies applying to employment conditions. Council’s HR Manager is delegated by the CEO to undertake this and related duties.

Further, the Privacy Commissioner did not issue a report on Council pursuant to Section 30 of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth); with no personal privacy complaints being made against Council during the reporting period.

Health and safety outcomes (including the impact on injury rates of employees and contractors of the Council) achieved as a consequence of initiatives referred to at paragraphs (a) and (b) above.

Council’s response No injuries were sustained by employees or contactors during this financial year; this result being attributable to strong policies and management; together with employee awareness of workplace dangers.

In addition, Council staff attended Fraud Awareness workshops regarding awareness and knowledge about fraud and its effects on Council. Further, Council uses a range of computer based training products to help staff with computer programs, customer services skills and telephone techniques. Additionally, staff has the opportunity of attending training courses; including in program and project management training, career development, cross cultural awareness training, indigenous career trek workshops, leadership training and effective writing skills. These are arranged with Council’s HR Manager.

Community Programs School holiday programs were, again, available in Wreck Bay during 2016-17. Council continues, as in previous years, with adopting a proactive program funded from its own resources; ensuring children of the community were not disadvantaged with lack of programs over school holidays.

NAIDOC week programs were, again, held during July, 2015. NAIDOC Week is a very important event to the people of Wreck Bay and celebrations each year are organised to reflect and enhance the yearly chosen theme. The celebrations cater for all demographics within the community; with celebrations commencing with a symbolic flag raising ceremony; open for all Indigenous people from the region plus Territory residents and invited guests.

Gudjahgahmiamia Early Education and Day Care facility continues being licensed and catering for up to 29 children. The Centre is funded via a Multi Aboriginal Community

58 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Service (MACS) grant from the Department of Education with also contributions from WBACC, parent fees and ongoing fund raising activities.

WBACC continues its MOU with Noah’s Ark; an organisation providing early childhood support programs within the Shoalhaven region. Services continue being delivered in the community through the Community Clinic and the Early Childhood Centre.

Health services to the community are supplied through Illawarra Area Health, Waminda and Aboriginal Medical Service. Wreck Bay community has a modern clinic building and negotiates regular services being provided within the community from the respective service providers. A General Practitioner visits the community one day per week and other specialised medical services continue being offered.

Community Liaison Office (CLO) Function The CLO function enables Wreck Bay Community participation in joint management activities and procedures at Booderee National Park through WBACC Senior Staff representation. The function is funded by the Department of the Environment, being an original commitment from the Commonwealth for the Community to enter into lease arrangements with the Director of National Parks.

The function allows for communication links between the Director of Parks Australia via Park management and Council, supporting Traditional Owner representatives on the Booderee National Park of Management. The function is to be reviewed at the end of 2018.

Training Training is very important for succession planning for the community; hence achieving a future position where it will solely manage its own land and waters. Council develops employment opportunities through its contract services division by providing several contracted services to Booderee National Park, together with a variety of services conducted for the Council administration, the early childhood centre and community itself.

Training is essential for the community to attain the ultimate goal of sole management.

Centrelink Agency Council continues a contractual relationship with Centrelink for provision of an Agency/ Access point for clientele to canvas matters with Centrelink relating to services available for them.

As a Centrelink Agent/Access point, Council Administration provides Centrelink forms, publications, telephone and facsimile services; being able to respond to most general enquiries and provide direct links to Centrelink staff, including specialists if further assistance is required.

As an Agent, Council provides access to internet services and assists clients with using self-help products, accepts claim forms and other documentation requiring lodgement

59 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

with Centrelink; and provide advice on Centrelink and other Government services and payments.

Jervis Bay Territory Networking Council maintains its obligation to various committees established to effectively plan and advocate for residents of Jervis Bay Territory. These committees include:

h Jervis Bay Territory Focus Group;

h Jervis Bay Territory Public Health and Environment Working Group;

h Jervis Bay Territory Justice Issues; and

h Jervis Bay Emergency Management Committee.

General Meetings of the WBACC There was no Annual General Meeting (AGM) of Council this financial year.

Audit Committee As required by the PGPA Act; the Council has an Audit Committee consisting of:

h Tony Federici: Senior Accountant (retired), Booth & Co, Nowra;

h Neville ‘Jack’ Hampton: Executive Board Member;

h Neville Hampton: Community Representative;

h Tom Brown Snr: Executive Board Member;

h Paul McLeod: Executive Board Member; and

h Rhonda Brown: Community Representative.

Committee Meeting dates were: 31/10/2017, 20/03/2018, 23/04/2018 and 24/05/2018.

Some of the responsibilities of the Audit Committee include assisting with:

WBACC responses to ANAO’s management letters; developing and monitoring Risk Management Plans for Council and its subsidiary—Contract Services; developing and monitoring Fraud Management Plans for Council and its subsidiary—Contract Services; and preparation of the annual audit program; 2018-19.

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Wreck Bay Contract Services

Operational Activities 2017-2018 Financial Year Consistent with the law few years, income from Contract Services continues to decline even with the organisation continuing to receive support from its major customers: Booderee National Park (‘BNP’), Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (‘DIRD’) and its parent organisation, WBACC.

Regarding Parks Australia, its apparently continually decreasing budget is concerning effecting the income generated by Contract Services in accordance with the respective Service Level Agreements; which, together with the effect of the ‘Modern’ Award for the benefit of Council workers regarding particularly penalty rates, overtime, leave loading et cetera. continues to be an additional expense to Council not seen in previous years.

This necessarily means that there has to be an hourly rate increase in the SLAs—fees for services under the respective agreements that Contract Services engage with Parks Australia in BNP as Council is having to pay ‘Modern’ Award rates which were not taken into account or reflected in the current SLAs—the rates in those agreements having remained the same since 2012. Consequently, Council proposed new rates in December, 2016 to Parks Australia but this was declined by that Department to date. Subsequently, Council staff do not now do either weekend or public holiday work as before as it is not economically viable or sensible to run at substantial losses through no fault of its own.

Targets were used for the five Departments to attempt achieving a ‘break even’ position, although not achieved due to the ‘Modern’ Award ramifications with Parks Australia, while maximising employment for community members; if possible.

Five Service Level Agreements (‘SLAs’) with BNP continue operating; namely:

h Roads and Fire Trails

h Cleaning

h Entry Station

h Horticulture; and

h Infrastructure

These five SLAs exist under a Contract for Services (the ‘head’ Agreement) entered into between Council and BNP in October, 2012. This Contract was for an initial period of three (3) years; extended for a further period of two (2) years, to now be in force, after a further extension, to October, 2018. The Contract may be extended for a further period of five (5) years to October, 2023; subject to a negotiated agreement between Council and Parks

61 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Australia relating to the terms and conditions of the document; including the rates for fees for services.

Therefore, upon the Contract being extended for another five-year term, expiring in October, 2023; the current SLAs that all under that Contract will also to October, 2023; subject to relevant performance indicators being met to an acceptable standard, and also other criteria, including agreed fees for services, during the ‘life’ of each SLA; with a continuing importance on work, health and safety compliance.

There continue to be negotiations ‘on foot’ between WBACC and BNP regarding an additional SLA for the provision of Camping, Park Use and associated customer services; including the Visitors Centre; with a possible future SLA thereafter being negotiated regarding the Botanic Gardens. This continues, as an example of the ‘sole management’ themes and aspirations being implemented in a positive and constructive way forward manner. Depending upon current negotiations, this could be in place as of 01 July, 2019.

Depending on negotiations with Parks Australia for the concept of ‘Office of Joint Management’ it could be that further SLAs might flow from this possible Office as well relating to Training, Cultural Heritage and other areas, including Community Liaison. It is hoped that there will be a definite ‘way forward’ with this concept coming to reality as of July, 2019; again reflecting the Community’s aspirations and desires for achieving sole management.

Council lodged a ‘log of claims’ with Parks Australia relating to the current SLAs and the fees that Council charge BNP under them. Due to there being a substantial increase in Council’s costs because of the ‘Modern’ Award being implemented for Council staff, this has had a ‘flow on’ effect for costs to Council via Contract Services, to adhere to the current SLAs. If this ‘log of claims’ is not resolved shortly then Council may then be involved with a formal dispute with Parks Australia over this and other issues.

Due to no increase in fees that Council, via Contract Services, charge for the current services under the SLAs since their commencement in 2012; it was necessary that a review was carried out so that elements such as the increase in wages expenditure by Council via overtime and penalty rates, pursuant to the Modern Award were identified; together with CPI increases and use of machinery costing, fuel et cetera. increases imposed on Contract Services to carry out the various duties and services under the current SLAs.

The identified costs incurred by Council and the proposed adjustment/increase in fees request to Parks Australia under the current SLAs have been with Parks Australia since December, 2016; but have been rejected by Parks at this juncture; therefore, the possibility of a formal dispute process taking place under the Lease between Council and Parks Australia is mostly likely.

Cash flow is managed daily with weekly WBACC supervisor meetings ad monthly SLA meetings with BNP staff; together with quarterly Service Agreement/Contract Manager meetings by senior WBACC Staff and BNP Staff although this latter meeting requirement has not occurred for a substantial period of time. There are also Senior Management meetings of WBACC on a monthly basis due to the high priority of operations being executed under the current SLAs.

62 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Work quotations are produced on an accrual accounting basis which generally increases the margin for each quoted job and project that are, thereafter, approved by customers.

Staffing levels remained consistent with last year with fourteen full time staff, four permanent part-time and additional from time to time and, during the peak season, additional casuals may be employed although reduced in number. Casuals continue being employed when extra work is taken on by Contract Services Departments or staff use annual leave entitlements. For this year, senior staff focused on in reducing the number of casuals replacing that area with short fixed term contracts; if possible, to reduce costs under the ‘Modern’ Award.

Employment levels are expected to remain the same over the next financial year; depending on the current SLA negotiations with Parks Australia.

Sales for 2017-2018 totalled $1,028,984 in comparison to $1,318,105 during 2016-2017. Even though there has been a decrease it is, like last year, expected to carry through into the future; depending on weather but also due to less income being generated from work with BNP. The weather decrease was again due to poor weather conditions from the last financial year and again this financial year with substantial levels of rain received in numerous months; therefore, work opportunities were again lost but carried forward under the three-year program. Several Departments concentrated on SLA work while others focused on available work under the Wreck Bay Community Council Land Management program; thus completing that aspect of the three-year program before the end of this financial year. Another three-year program has since been approved.

During the year Contract Services paid $1,027,228 in employee benefits. This compared to $1,283,197 last year. This remains an important injection in the form of salaries in the Community but it has decreased from last year by some $255,969 due, in no small part, to the ‘Modern’ Award ‘ripple effect’ on employees not now being able to work on weekends and/or public holidays.

During the financial year Contract Services operated in the absence of any Government grants or subsidies with this outcome consistent with the Community’s Vision Statement and Goals in becoming financially independent

63 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Overview of Operational Activities 2017-2018

Entry Station SLA

Entry Station Booths - the first entry point into Booderee National Park

The current Service Level Agreement is in force until October 2018, with a possible further five years, subject to performance indicators being met to an acceptable standard and agreement as to fees being ratified.

There was an increase in gate takings above previous years again and the closure of the outside lane helped capture extra income thus allowing Park staff to reduce the number of infringements issued.

Cleaning SLA The Cleaning Department Service Level Agreement is, like other SLAs, in force until October 2018; consistent with the Services Contract simultaneously expiring; with a possible five (5) year extension thereafter; again, depending on the terms and conditions reached between Council and Parks Australia.

With the Seasons (Peak, Shoulder and Low) identified within the SLA; Management must better permanent staff to manage over these periods; employing community members when needed over the Peak season; in particular, and being continually acutely aware of the rise in wages under the ‘Modern’ Award.

The Cleaning Department provides cleaning services to Wreck Bay Community Council by virtue of cleaning the Administration, Day Care, Hall and Community Centre Buildings in the community; as well as within BNP but does not now do weekend or public holiday work until further notice.

64 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Cleaners work to maintain the Visitors facilities throughout Booderee National Park

Horticulture SLA The Horticulture SLA similarly is in force to October 2018. This Department is involved in Booderee Botanic Gardens but all other duties such as trail clearance, weed control will be carried out either by ‘do and charge’ or quoted as a fee for service.

The Horticulture Department’s responsibilities also include the upkeep of Wreck Bay Community areas at Wreck Bay Village, including the Community Cemetery and the picnic area at Summercloud Bay. It remains to be seen how long this work will continue for as Park Australia has intimated that it is not prepared to continue with an agreement reached in 1992-3 with Council where in Council continued to maintain the picnic area plus upkeep of community areas. This could well mean a loss in employment of Council staff.

65 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Horticulture team carrying out road clearance work at Booderee Botanic Gardens

Roads and Fire Trails SLA The last five financial years have been difficult for the Department by not having the use of its own grader and roller. Hire costs are high; continually rising for plant and equipment but already factored into the SLA. This is reason why there has been a review of Council’s fees for services. Further, again bad weather and timing did not assist the Department in completing Capital Works programs in a timely manner.

The Roads Department continues the responsibility for Land Management and Municipal Services provided to Wreck Bay Community Council.

66 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Roads section carrying out drainage clearance works at Wreck Bay Village

Building—Infrastructure Maintenance SLA

Steel signs erected by the Building Section in various locations at Wreck Bay

The Building Department SLA is similar to the other four current ones, expiring in October 2018, and like the cleaning schedule, benefits from the set maintenance plan of BNP amenities when the season is either High, Low or Shoulder in mapping out yearly tasks.

67 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

The Building Department continues a strong working relationship with Booderee National Park as the section completes designated projects within the specified time and quality of service and workmanship is consistently outstanding.

Unfortunately, this financial year like last year, resulted in Capital Works with the Booderee National Park declining, leaving the Department with a lack of prioritised work. However, again like last year, Council assisted, providing Repairs and Maintenance work, not just for its housing and infrastructure, but also in Land Management.

Additionally, for the next six months there is the Repairs and Maintenance program relating to housing within Wreck Bay Village continuing. This means more work commitments for the Department.

Training Training has, again, this financial year been minimal due to all staff now reaching the required certifications for their staffing level and position; but also again due to difficulty with arranging further training with BNP. This concern continues to be addressed by Council’s Human Resources Manager so that staff and community, in some circumstances, have access to BNP provided training and training jointly with BNP staff.

The established Work Health and Safety Committee staff attended training and also refresher courses to improve their knowledge in their roles as Council’s Health and Safety Representatives. The training was carried out, again, in Canberra, consistent with respective Park SLA requirements; being paramount for Council staff, in general, being familiar with all aspects of work health and safety policies and requirements; in order for the current SLAs to, presumably, be renewed in October, 2018, subject to agreement, among other matters to increases in fees for services provided to BNP.

It remains to be seen whether there will be a reduction in hours proposed by Parks Australia to compensate it for higher fees due to Council’s requirements under the ‘Modern’ Award. This could well have a substantial effect on future Council employment and its relationship with Parks Australia. Council and Parks Australia are viewed by Council and Community as ‘joined at the hip’—a partnership and should not be viewed as purely commercial transactions between the parties or dictated by ‘value for money’.

68 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

WBACC Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2018 Certification 69-71

Statement of Comprehensive Income 72

Statement of Financial Position 73

Statement of Changes in Equity 74

Cash Flow Statement 75

Notes to the Financial Statements 76

Overview 76

1.1 Expenses 77-78

1.2 Own-Source Revenue 79-80

2.1 Financial Assets 81-82

2.2 Non-Financial Assets 83-85

2.3 Payables 86

3.1 Employee Provisions 87

3.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration 88

3.3 Related Party Disclosures 88

3.4 Remuneration of Auditors 89

4.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 90

4.2 Financial Instruments 91-92

4.3 Fair Value Measurements 93-94

69 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

70 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

71 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

72 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN : 62 564 797 956

Statement of Comprehensive Income For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses

Employee benefits 1.1A 2,210,008 2,377,671

Suppliers 1.1B 626,540 899,732

Occupancy expenses 1.1C 89,542 71,933

Community grants 1.1D 93,256 75,238

Depreciation 2.2A 402,455 406,502

Finance costs 1.1E - 1,551

Write-down and impairment of assets 1.1F 553 -

Other expenses 1.1G 708,351 592,303

Total expenses 4,130,705 4,424,930

Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue

Rendering of services 1.2A 2,021,751 2,220,089

Interest 1.2B 30,191 32,423

Gains 1.2C 17,640 -

Total own-source revenue 2,069,582 2,252,512

Revenue from Government 1.2D 1,986,417 1,950,896

Total revenue 4,055,999 4,203,408

Net (cost of )/ contribution by services (74,706) (221,522)

Surplus/(deficit) before income tax on continuing operations (74,706) (221,522)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation reserve (4,481,796) -

Total other comprehensive income (4,481,796) -

Total Comprehensive income/(Loss) (4,556,502) (221,522)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

73 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Statement of Financial Position As at 30 June 2018

ASSETS Note 2018 2017

$ $

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 2.1A 1,226,308 1,293,620

Trade and other receivables 2.1B 404,919 191,494

Other financial assets 2.1C 1,048,245 1,021,578

Total financial assets 2,679,472 2,506,692

Non-financial assets

Land and buildings 2.2A 54,577,360 59,381,365

Infrastructure, plant & equipment 2.2A 218,669 220,071

Total non-financial assets 54,796,029 59,601,436

Total assets 57,475,501 62,108,128

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 2.3A 117,573 186,754

Other payables 2.3B 257,013 271,762

Total payables 374,586 458,517

Provisions

Employee provisions 3.1A 308,166 300,360

Total provisions 308,166 300,360

Total liabilities 682,752 758,876

Net assets 56,792,749 61,349,251

EQUITY

Reserves 31,262,507 35,744,303

Retained surplus 25,530,242 25,604,948

Total equity 56,792,749 61,349,251

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

74 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Statement of Changes in Equity For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 25,604,948 25,826,470

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (74,706) (221,522)

Other comprehensive income - -

Total comprehensive income (74,706) (221,522)

Closing balance as at 30 June 25,530,242 25,604,948

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 35,744,303 35,744,303

Comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income (4,481,796) -

Total comprehensive income (4,481,796) -

Closing balance as at 30 June 31,262,507 35,744,303

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 61,349,251 61,570,773

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (74,706) (221,522)

Other comprehensive income (4,481,796) -

Total comprehensive income (4,556,502) (221,522)

Closing balance as at 30 June 56,792,749 61,349,251

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

75 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Cash Flow Statement For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

OPERATING ACTIVITIES $ $

Cash received Revenues from Government 2,239,883 2,366,102

Rendering of services 1,899,544 2,527,271

Interest 36,698 31,852

Total cash received 4,176,125 4,925,225

Cash used Community grants (75,999) (75,642)

Employees (2,299,484) (2,490,167)

Suppliers (1,551,683) (1,546,285)

Borrowing costs - (1,551)

Net GST paid (227,847) (208,622)

Total cash used (4,155,013) (4,322,267)

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 21,112 602,958

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment 18,000 -

Proceeds from investments - term deposit - -

Total cash received 18,000 -

Cash used Purchase of property, plant & equipment 2.2A (79,757) (128,648)

Increase in term deposit (26,667) (271,526)

Total cash used (106,424) (400,174)

Net cash from/(used by) investing activities (88,424) (400,174)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash used Repayment of loans - (66,615)

Total cash (used by) / from financing activities - (66,615)

Net cash from/(used by) financing activities - (66,615)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held (67,312) 136,169

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,293,620 1,157,451 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2.1A

1,226,308 1,293,620

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

76 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Overview

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by subsection 42 of Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with:

h Public Governance, Performance and Accoutability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

h Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

New Accounting Standards

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the

current reporting period did not have a material effect on the Council's financial statements.

Taxation

The Council is exempt from all forms of taxation except for Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Events after the Reporting Period

There were no subsequent events that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the Council.

77 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE This section analyses the financial performance of the Council for the year ended 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

1.1: Expenses 1.1A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 1,686,733 1,901,857

Superannuation - Defined contribution plans 200,366 216,520

Leave and other entitlements 185,227 154,400

Director's fees 137,682 104,892

Total employee benefits 2,210,008 2,377,671

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and relationships section

1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Equipment hire 102,574 192,176

Contractors 234,217 310,158

Materials & supplies 205,635 268,688

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 542,426 771,023

Goods supplied 308,209 460,863

Services rendered 234,217 310,159

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 542,426 771,023

Other suppliers Workers compensation expenses 84,114 128,710

Total other suppliers 84,114 128,710

Total suppliers 626,540 899,732

1.1C: Occupancy Expenses Repairs & maintenance 7,393 5,197

Water rates 35,280 24,554

Other 46,869 42,182

Total occupancy expenses 89,542 71,933

78 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

1.1D: Community Grants Other grants and activities 93,256 75,238

Total community grants 93,256 75,238

1.1E: Finance Costs Finance leases - 1,551

Total finance costs - 1,551

Accounting Policy

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1.1F: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets Impairment of property, plant & equipment 553 -

Total write-down and impairment of assets 553 -

1.1G: Other Expenses Accountancy fees 155,381 172,765

Annual report printing 15,733 17,160

Audit fees 32,000 32,000

Bad debt provision 5,247 3,262

Bank charges 730 1,259

Board costs 7,225 6,482

Computer costs 16,536 18,053

Consultancy fees 7,956 6,225

Conference & travel expenses 12,359 39,251

Fines & penalties 391 3,300

General expenses 9,559 11,939

Insurance 69,527 59,348

Legal costs 198,632 48,741

Minor equipment replacement - 237

Motor vehicle expenses 76,980 64,204

Office supplies 37,428 36,795

Recruitment costs 3,182 5,625

Policy development project 19,096 26,540

Staff amenities 7,435 5,156

Telephone, fax & internet costs 24,567 22,667

Work, health and safety expenses 8,387 11,294

Total other expenses 708,351 592,303

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

79 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

1.2: Own-Source Revenue and Gains

Own-Source Revenue

1.2A: Rendering of Services Rendering of services 1,058,011 1,327,128

Housing rentals 53,939 49,174

Park lease - annual rental 304,823 300,839

- 25% of park income 478,065 458,217

Daycare fees 40,315 44,672

Other income 86,598 40,059

Total rendering of services 2,021,751 2,220,089

Accounting Policy

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised when:

h The risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

h The Council retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

1.2B: Interest Deposits 30,191 32,423

Total interest 30,191 32,423

Accounting Policy

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

1.2C: Other Gains Other 17,640 -

Total Grants 17,640 -

Accounting Policy

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has been passed to the buyer.

80 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

1.2D: Revenue from Government Australian Government Entities (related entity) 1,986,417 1,910,896

State Grants - 40,000

Total Revenue from Government 1,986,417 1,910,896

Accounting Policy

Revenue from Government

Revenue from Government is recognised when Council obtains control of the grant and it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to Council and the amount of the grant can be reliably measured.

If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before it is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

81 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

FINANCIAL POSITION

This section analyses the Council's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result.

Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

2.1: Financial Assets 2018 2017

$ $

2.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 1,226,308 1,293,620

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,226,308 1,293,620

2.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivable Goods and services 412,033 192,708

Total goods and services receivable 412,033 192,708

Other receivables Interest receivable 458 6,964

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 412,491 199,672

Less impairment allowance (7,572) (8,178)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 404,919 191,494

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2017: 30 days).

Accounting Policy

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments and that are not quoted in an active market are classified as 'loans and receivables'. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment.

82 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Reconciliation of the Impairment Allowance

Movements in relation to 2018 Goods and

services

Total

$ $

As at 1 July 2017 8,178 8,178

Amounts written off (5,703) (5,703)

Amounts recovered and reversed (1,650) (1,650)

Increase recognised in net cost of service 6,747 6,747

Total as at 30 June 2018 7,572 7,572

Movements in relation to 2017 Goods and

services

Total

$ $

As at 1 July 2016 4,916 4,916

Amounts written off - -

Amounts recovered and reversed (4,756) (4,756)

Increase recognised in net cost of service 8,018 8,018

Total as at 30 June 2017 8,178 8,178

Accounting Policy

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

2018 2017

$ $

2.1C: Other Financial Assets Term deposits 1,048,245 1,021,578

Total other financial assets 1,048,245 1,021,578

Term deposits are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Note 2018 2017

$ $

83 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956 Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018 2.2: Non-Financial Assets 2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment

Item Land

Buildings on freehold land Leasehold

improvements Computer Equipment Plant &

Equipment Furniture Vehicles TOTAL

As at 1 July 2017 Gross book value 47,533,500 12,034,000 236,172 63,964 454,432 87,275 461,163 60,870,506

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (300,852) (121,455) (40,444) (301,214) (81,560) (423,545) (1,269,070)

Total as at 1 July 2017 47,533,500 11,733,148 114,717 23,520 153,218 5,715 37,618 59,601,436

Additions Purchase - 7,091 16,599 3,643 50,762 1,662 - 79,757

Revaluations and impairment recognised in other comprehensive income (3,533,500) (971,296) - - 23,000 - - (4,481,796)

Depreciation - (300,854) (22,045) (8,804) (53,911) (2,211) (14,630) (402,455)

Disposals - - (359) (359)

Impairments recognised in net cost of services - - - - (467) - (87) (554)

Total as at 30 June 2018 44,000,000 10,468,089 109,271 18,359 172,243 5,166 22,901 54,796,029

Total as at 30 June 2018 represented by Gross book value 44,000,000 10,468,091 252,771 66,910 469,041 88,187 405,962 55,750,962

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (2) (143,500) (48,551) (296,798) (83,021) (383,061) (954,933)

Total as at 30 June 2018 44,000,000 10,468,089 109,271 18,359 172,243 5,166 22,901 54,796,029

No property, plant and equipment are expected to be sold or disposed within the next 12 months.

Revaluations of non-financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy as stated on note 2.2B. On 30th June 2018, an independent valuer conducted the revaluations of Land and Buildings.

84 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

2.2B:Accounting Policy Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $300, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

Revaluations

Following intial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets' fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extend that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to Council, using in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements of the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2018 2017

Building on Freehold Land 40 Years 40 Years

Leasehold Improvements 10 to 40 Years 10 to 40 Years

Plant and Equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 Years

85 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2018. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Council were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

86 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

2018 2017

$ $

2.3: Payables 2.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 117,573 186,754

Total suppliers 117,573 186,754

All supplier payables are expected to be settled within 12 months. Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

2.3B: Other Payables Wages and salaries 91,168 90,150

Superannuation 39,933 39,051

Rent received in advance (Park) 75,912 74,674

Grants income in advance - Australian Government Entities 50,000 67,888 Total other payables 257,013 271,764

87 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS

This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

3: Employee Provisions 2018 2017

$ $

Note 3.1A: Employee Provisions Leave 308,166 300,360

Total employee provisions 308,166 300,360

Accounting Policy

Liabilities for 'short-term employee benefits' and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value a the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. Employees have the opportunity to elect if they wish to have their personal leave balance paid out at the end of the financial year. For those who choose not to, the balance is provided for in the employee benefits.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied a the time the leave is taken, including the Council's employer superannuation contribution rates, to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been calculated using the Department of Finance's short-hand method; in assessing the on-costs and the probability factors for employees. The liability for long service leave takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

The Council's staff are members of the AMP Superleader Scheme, the Health Employees Superannuation Trust Australia (HESTA), Australian Super and LG Super.

Employer Contributions amounting to $199,483 (2017: $180,482) for the Council, in relation to these The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

88 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

3.2: Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the Council. The Council has determined the key management personnel to be the CEO and the Deputy CEO. Key management personnel remuneration is reported on the table below:

2018 2017

$ $

Short-term employee benefits 227,787 256,273

Post-employment benefits 52,396 23,086

Other long-term employee benefits 24,289 24,289

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 304,472 303,648

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are two (2017: two).

3.3: Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships:

The Council is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the Council are Directors, Key Management Personnel, Community Members, Portfolio Minister and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties:

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been seperately disclosed in this note.

89 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

The main functions of Council are land holding and management, provision of community services for its members and business enterprises. Therefore, community members transact with the Council in the daily operations. Such transactions include the payment of daycare fees, housing rental, receipts of scholarships, assistance payments, employment wages and participation in community activities that the Council put on. These transactions have not been seperately disclosed in this note.

The following transations with related parties occurred during the financial year:

2018 2017

$ $

- Directors fees paid to board members during the year. There is no balance outstanding at year end. 137,461 104,892

137,461 104,892

2018 2017

$ $

- William Brown, a community member, was employed as a contractor to carry out repairs on houses and to build the fence around the playground. These were arms lengths transactions paid at a commercial rate. There is no balance outstanding at year end.

- 8,040

- 8,040

3.4: Remuneration of Auditors Remuneration to the Australian National Audit Office for auditing the financial statements for the reporting period 32,000 32,000

32,000 32,000

No other services were provided by the ANAO.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

90 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES

This section analyses how the Council manages financial risks within its operating environment.

4.1: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Claims for damages or costs Total

2018 $

2017 $

2018 $

2017 $

Contingent liabilities

Balance from previous period 59,000 13,000 59,000 13,000

New contingent liabilities recognised 50,000 59,000 50,000 59,000

Liabilities realised (59,000) (13,000) (59,000) (13,000)

Total contingent liabilities 50,000 59,000 50,000 59,000

Net contingent liabilities 50,000 59,000

Quantifiable Contingencies

Council is currently a party to High Court of Australia proceedings relating to one (1) residential tenancy dispute. It is expected that this matter will be heard on the 12th September 2018 with judgement being handed down within 3 - 6 months thereafter. It is estimated that the total legal costs and disbursements in this matter will be approximately $50,000 payable after 30 June 2018 (2017 $59,000). Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

91 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

4.2: Financial Instruments 2018 2017

$ $

4.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial assets

Held-to-maturity investments

Term deposits 1,048,245 1,021,578

Total held-to-maturity investments 1,048,245 1,021,578

Loans and receivables

Cash and cash equivalents 1,226,308 1,293,620

Trade and other receivables 412,491 199,672

Total loans and receivables 1,638,799 1,493,292

Total financial assets 2,687,044 2,514,870

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors & accrued expenses 117,573 186,754

Rent received in advance (Park) 75,912 74,674

Grants in advance 50,000 67,888

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 243,485 329,316

Total financial liabilities 243,485 329,316

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

92 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Accounting Policy

Financial Assets

Council classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

- Loans and receivables;

- Held to maturity investments.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at thetime of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Financial assets held at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held to maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset's carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset's original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities 'at fair value through profit or loss' or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon 'trade date'.

Other Financial Liabilities

Other Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis. Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

93 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

2018 2017

$ $

4.2B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets

Held-to-maturity investments

Interest revenue 30,191 32,423

Net gains on held-to-maturity investments 30,191 32,423

Net gains on financial assets 30,191 32,423

The net income from financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss was $30,191 (2017: $32,423).

4.2C: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Interest expense - 1,551

Net losses on financial liabilities measured at amortised cost - 1,551

Net losses from financial liabilities - 1,551

There was no interest expense from financial liabilities not at fair value through profit or loss in the year ending 2018 (2017:nil)

4.3: Fair Value Measurements

Accounting Policy

Land and buildings are valued by an independent valuer using the market valuation method.

Leasehold improvements, other property, plant and equipment are valued using the depreciation replacement cost method.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

94 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

4.3A: Fair Value Measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period 2018 2017

$ $

Non-financial assets

Land 44,000,000 47,533,500

Leasehold improvements 109,271 114,717

Buildings on freehold land 10,468,089 11,733,148

Other property, plant & equipment 218,669 220,071

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 54,796,029 59,601,436

1. Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council did not measure any non-financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2018.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements For the period ended 30 June 2018

95 Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2017-2018

Compliance Index Requirement Reference Pages

Approval by accountable authority s. 17BB Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (PGPA Rule) iii

Enabling legislation PGPA Rule 17BE(a) 3, 10, 14, 15,

25, 40

Summary of objectives and functions PGPA Rule 17BE(b)(i) 1, 10, 41,

51, 89

Purpose of the entity PGPA Rule 17BE(b)(ii) 25-38

Responsible Minister PGPA Rule 17BE(c) 3, 10, 31,

44, 52

Ministerial Directions PGPA Rule 17BE(d) 52

General Policy Orders PGPA Rule 17BE(e) and (f ) 52

Annual Performance Statement PGPA Rule 17BE(g) 40-59

Significant non-compliance with Finance law PGPA Rule 17BE(h) and (i) 52

Information about the accountable authority PGPA Rule 17BE(j) 19-22

Organisational Structure and location PGPA Rule 17BE(k) and (l) 9, 39

Statement on Governance: Board Committees and their main responsibilities PGPA Rule 17BE(m) 54-56

Statement on Governance: Education and performance review processes; and ethics and risk management policies

PGPA Rule 17BE(m) 54

Related Entity Transactions PGPA Rule 17BE(n) and (o) 89

Significant events under Section 19 of the PGPA Act PGPA Rule 17BE(p) 53

Operational and Financial Results PGPA Rule 17BE(p) 40-59,

60-67, 69-71

Key changes to the entity’s state of affairs or principal activities PGPA Rule 17BE(p) NIL

Amendments to entity’s enabling legislation PGPA Rule 17BE(p) 53

Significant judicial or administrative tribunal decisions PGPA Rule 17BE(q) 53

Reports made about the entity PGPA Rule 17BE(r) 53

Obtaining information from subsidiaries PGPA Rule 17BE(s) 60-67

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers PGPA Rule 17BE(t) 53

Index of annual report PGPA Rule 17BE(u) 95

Other Legislation:

Work Health and Safety Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and

Safety Act 2011

56

Advertising and Market Research Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 NIL

Ecologically sustainable development s. 516A Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 55