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Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority—Report for 2020-21


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Annual Report 2020-21

GREAT BARRIER REEF MARINE PARK AUTHORITY

© Commonwealth of Australia (Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority) 2021

Published by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

ISSN 0155-8072

This document is licensed by the Commonwealth of Australia for use under a Creative Commons By Attribution 4.0 International licence with the exception of the Coat of Arms of the Commonwealth of Australia, the logo of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, any other material protected by a trademark, content supplied by third parties and any photographs. For licence conditions see:

http://creativecommons.org/licences/by/4.0

This report can be viewed from www.gbrmpa.gov.au/about-us/corporate-information/annual-report

Prepared by: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA)

Designed by: Vetta Creative

All images: © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA) unless otherwise stated

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised this publication may contain names and images of deceased persons.

Printing standards

Printed on Pacesetter coated FSC Mix certified paper, which meets the printing standards for documents presented to the Australian Parliament. This report has been printed using environmentally responsible print techniques.

This publication should be cited as:

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 2021, Annual Report 2020-21, GBRMPA, Townsville.

ii Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Comments and questions regarding this document are welcome and should be addressed to:

Director Communications Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 280 Flinders Street (PO Box 1379) Townsville QLD 4810, Australia

Phone: (07) 4750 0700 Email: info@gbrmpa.gov.au www.gbrmpa.gov.au

TRADITIONAL OWNER ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority acknowledges the continuing Sea Country management and custodianship of the Great Barrier Reef by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Traditional Owners, whose rich cultures, heritage values, enduring connections and shared efforts protect the Reef for future generations.

‘Step of change’ by Juru Traditional Owner, Nicky Bidju Pryor © Bidju Designs 2018

Annual Report 2020-21 iii

Letter of transmittal

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority PO Box 1379 TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810

13 September 2021

The Hon Sussan Ley MP Minister for the Environment PO Box 6022 House of Representatives Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

In accordance with subsection 53(1) of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975, I am pleased to submit the annual report of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (the Authority) for the year ended 30 June 2021.

The report has been prepared for the purpose of section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), which requires an annual report be given to the entity’s responsible Minister for presentation to the Parliament.

The report has also been prepared in accordance with the requirements for annual reports for departments, executive agencies and other non-corporate Commonwealth entities, as approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsection 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999 and in accordance with the Resource Management Guide No. 135: Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities, updated by the Department of Finance in July 2021.

In accordance with section 10 of the PGPA Rule 2014 (Fraud Rule) and the Commonwealth Fraud Control Policy (Fraud Policy), the Authority has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans, and has taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud and investigate and recover the proceeds of fraud against the Authority.

In submitting this annual report, I would also like to acknowledge the continued hard work of the Authority’s staff in delivering against our purpose and objectives.

Yours sincerely

Josh Thomas Chief Executive Officer

iv Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Figure 1: Map of the Great Barrier Reef Region

Annual Report 2020-21 v

Table of Contents Letter of transmittal iv

PART 1 Introduction 1

About this annual report 2

Chief Executive Officer’s review 3

Reef health and monitoring 3

Managing the Reef 3

Our partnerships 4

Our people 6

PART 2 Overview 7

About the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 8

Accountable authority 9

Responsible ministers 9

Legislative framework 9

Amendments to legislation during 2020-21 9

Finances overview 10

Staff overview 10

PART 3 Performance 13

Accountable Authority statement 14

Guide to the annual performance statements 15

Performance information analysis: Outcome 1, Portfolio Budget Statement 16 The Reef is protected 16

Sustainable use of the Reef 18

The Reef is understood 19

Program areas 20

Target tracking 20

Program area 1: Enhancing Reef resilience by providing expert knowledge to advise key decision-makers on managing, reducing or avoiding significant threats to the Reef 21 Performance results 21

Corporate result 1.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 22 Corporate result 1.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 23 Program area 2: Enhancing Reef resilience through innovation, management and regulation of the Marine Park and our in-field presence 26

Performance results 26

Corporate result 2.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 27 Corporate result 2.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 27 Corporate result 2.3: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 36 Program area 3: Enhancing Reef resilience through partnerships, collaboration and education 40

Performance results 40

Corporate result 3.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 41 Digital communication highlights 2020-21 44

Corporate result 3.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 47

vi Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Program area 4: Supporting a high-performing organisation 51

Performance results 51

Corporate result 4.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 52 Corporate result 4.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 53 Corporate result 4.3: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement 55

PART 4 Management and accountability 57

Corporate governance 58

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Board 58

Senior executive 62

Audit and Risk Management Committee 64

Advisory committees 67

Asset management 68

External scrutiny 68

Australian National Audit Office reports 68

Management of human resources 68

Managing and developing employees 68

Workplace agreements 69

Employee statistics 69

External service providers 70

Purchasing 70

Consultants and contracts 70

Grants 71

Procurement initiatives to support small business 71

Senior executive remuneration 72

PART 5 Finances 73

2020-21 Financial Statements 74

Table of Contents - Notes 86

PART 6 Appendices 111

Appendix A: Agency resource statement and resources for outcomes 112 Appendix B: Staffing overview 114

Appendix C: Advertising and marketing 117

Appendix D: Freedom of information (FOI) 118

Freedom of information (FOI) operations 118

Appendix E: Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance 119 Appendix F: Papers and presentations by agency staff 2020-21 123

Appendix G: Queensland Government financials 124

Table of Contents - Notes 124

Appendix H: Corrections to the Annual Report 2019-20 137

PART 7 Acronyms and index 139

Acronyms 140

Glossary 141

List of requirements 142

Alphabetical index 148

Annual Report 2020-21 vii

Tables Table 1: Accountable authority 9

Table 2: Results against the performance information for Outcome 1 of the portfolio budget statement 15

Table 3: Program areas aligning with our corporate business 20

Table 4: Summary of performance results against Program area 1 21

Table 5: Summary of performance results against Program area 2 26

Table 6: Progress of routine permissions that have been streamlined 29

Table 7: Summary of performance results against Program area 3 40

Table 8: Summary of performance results against Program area 4 51

Table 9: Meetings of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Board 2020-21 61

Table 10: Senior executive and their responsible branches 62

Table 11: Remuneration and meeting attendance of Audit and Risk Management Committee 65

Table 12: Meeting schedule for the Audit and Risk Management Committee 66

Table 13: Staff diversity within the workforce during 2020-21 69

Table 14: Expenditure on consultancy contracts for the 2020-21 reporting period 70

Table 15: Expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts for the 2020-21 reporting period 71

Table 16: Senior executive remuneration 72

Table 17: Authority resource statement 112

Table 18: Expenses and resources for Outcome 1 113

Table 19: Ongoing employee overview, 30 June 2021 114

Table 20: Non-ongoing employee overview, 30 June 2021 114

Table 21: Ongoing employee overview (headcount), 30 June 2020 115

Table 22: Non-ongoing employee overview (headcount), 30 June 2020 115

Table 23: Workplace diversity figures, 30 June 2020 116

Table 24: Salary ranges by classification level 2020-21 116

Table 25: Expenditure for advertisting and marketing campaigns in 2020-21 117

viii Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Figures Figure 1: Map of the Great Barrier Reef Region v

Figure 2: Revenue by source 2020-21 (excluding Douglas Shoal remediation) 11

Figure 3: Expenses by category 2020-21 (excluding Douglas Shoal remediation) 11

Figure 4: Organisational structure as at 30 June 2021 12

Figure 5: Compliance effort and outcomes 24

Figure 6: Streamlining permissions project - condition review status 2020-21 30

Figure 7: Allegations of permissions non-compliance by risk level 31

Figure 8: Current permissions managed at 30 June 2021 32

Figure 9: Number of properly made applications in the reporting period 33

Figure 10: Number of permit application decisions made in the 2020-21 reporting period 34

Figure 11: Service charter analysis and number of processes underway 34

Figure 12: Map of reefs patrolled for crown-of-thorns starfish during 2020-21 39

Figure 13: Management modes of crown-of-thorns across 107 actioned target reefs 39

Figure 14: ReefHQ highlights 2020-21 42

Figure 15: Digital communicaiton highlights 2020-21 44

Figure 16: Distribution of Master Reef Guides along the Great Barrier Reef 44

Figure 17: Proportion of ‘controlled documents’ that were current during 2020-21 53

Figure 18: Proportion of internal audit actions/ recommendations that have been completed

each quarter during 2020-21 54

Figure 19: Proportion of the highest score possible for risk capability maturity, as determined by

Comcover 54

Figure 20: Corporate and operational planning process 63

Figure 21: Recorded permission non-compliances by allegation type during 2019-20

(Annual Report 2019-20) 137

Annual Report 2020-21 ix

x Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PART 1

Introduction

Annual Report 2020-21 1

Photographer: Jo Hurford © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

I N T R O D U C T I O N

ABOUT THIS ANNUAL REPORT

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority’s (the Authority’s) Annual Report 2020-21 complies with the requirements for annual reports outlined by the Australian Government Department of Finance in its Resource Management Guide No. 135: Annual reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities.

This annual report includes the Authority’s annual performance statement, detailing its performance against criteria as published in the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment Portfolio Budget Statements 2020-21 and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Corporate Plan 2020-21 (Corporate Plan).

The annual report comprises seven parts:

1. Part 1 Introduction

Outlines the purpose and structure of the report and presents the Chief Executive Officer’s review of the Authority’s activities and performance for the 2020-21 reporting period.

2. Part 2 Overview

Provides corporate background to the Authority, including its role and functions, and a summary of financial performance and staff overview.

3. Part 3 Performance

Details the actions taken by the Authority in 2020-21 to meet its stated purpose of the long-term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Great Barrier Reef for all Australians and the international community through the care and development of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Marine Park), and reporting against key performance indicators outlined in the Authority’s performance documents.

4. Part 4 Management and accountability

Covers the delivery of the management framework that supports the effective functioning of the Authority, including corporate governance, statutory and advisory committees, management and training, workplace health and safety, asset management, corporate services and management of consultants.

5. Part 5 Finances

Delivers an analysis of financial performance and a detailed financial statement.

6. Part 6 Appendices

Comprises the Authority’s resource statement; staffing overview; information on advertising and marketing, freedom of information (FOI) and ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance; a list of staff papers and presentations; Queensland Government financials and correction of a material error in the previous annual report.

7. Part 7 Acronyms and Index

Includes a list of acronyms, a glossary, a list of requirements and an alphabetical index.

2 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Chief Executive Officer’s review I am pleased to submit the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority’s (the Authority) annual report, reviewing our activities and performance from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021.

This was a significant time for the Reef and for us as the lead managers of this incredible natural icon — managing a Reef under pressure, working with stakeholders severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and adjusting our programs accordingly.

I am delighted with our staff’s commitment to navigating this unique period in our history while continuing to deliver outcomes for the Reef by working in partnership with our stakeholders.

The Reef is precious to us all and continues to inspire us with its beauty and biodiversity. We are strongly committed to actions that build Reef resilience and encourage everyone to make a difference in alleviating pressures on the Reef through actions big or small.

Reef health and monitoring Understanding and reporting on Reef health is a critical component of our management. The Authority worked with science partners, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), to release the annual Reef Snapshot, summarising how the Reef has fared over the 2020-21 summer.

This summer, conditions were relatively benign, providing a window for coral recovery. Despite last summer’s reprieve, we recognise that events that cause disturbances on the Reef, such as marine heatwaves and cyclones, are becoming more frequent, leaving less time for Reef recovery. Climate change remains the greatest threat to the Reef, and it continues to escalate.

As part of the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program, our team developed and released a new online Reef Knowledge System. This system, now available on our website, provides Reef managers with information to support management decisions.

Our continued efforts to deliver effective and responsive marine park management is based on robust knowledge and is paramount to protecting the Reef.

Annual Report 2020-21 3

Managing the Reef

As an agency, we continued to work closely with our Australian and Queensland government partners to implement the actions outlined in the Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan (Reef 2050 Plan).

This plan — backed by an unprecedented $3 billion investment by both the Australian and Queensland governments — provides a framework for actions by government agencies, science, industry and community partners to protect and improve Reef health.

In August 2020, the Australian and Queensland governments released a draft of the updated Reef 2050 Plan for public comment. This update included a greater focus on climate change and its impact on the Reef and highlighted community partnerships and Traditional Owner aspirations.

Reef 2050

Position statements During 2020-21, we released two new position statements on threats facing the Reef: fishing and water quality. These position statements help inform key policies, positions and priorities of various organisations.

As an Authority, we recognise fishing is a long-established and important activity in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. While fishing activities

I N T R O D U C T I O N

are regulated within the Marine Park, some fishing practices continue to impact the Reef.

The water quality position statement acknowledges poor water quality as a major threat to the Reef, particularly inshore areas. Improving the quality of water entering the Marine Park is critical.

Reef Joint Field Management Program The expansion of the Reef Joint Field Management Program, conducted in partnership with the Queensland Government, continued to roll out in 2020-21, despite impacts from COVID-19. The program delivers practical and critical on-ground actions to protect and maintain well-functioning marine and island ecosystems that support economic, traditional and recreational uses of the Great Barrier Reef. This work plays a critical role in delivering a number of the Authority’s key activities including conservation, monitoring, incident response, providing recreation and tourism facilities and upholding compliance.

As part of the program’s expansion, a new 24m vessel, the Reef Resilience, was launched. The new vessel, based in Gladstone, will substantially increase our capacity for field operations across a massive area that is exposed to challenging weather conditions and can be difficult to access in less-capable vessels.

© Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA) and State of Queensland (QPWS)

4 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Conservation activities Delivering actions under the Reef Blueprint for Resilience (the Blueprint) and Reef 2050 Plan continue to be key priorities for the agency.

The Blueprint is designed around 10 key initiatives focused on delivering maximum benefits for Reef resilience. It outlines additional actions and innovative approaches the Authority will pursue with its partners to better support and protect coral reefs.

In December 2020, we released the Great Barrier Reef Interventions Policy, one of the initiatives from the Blueprint. This policy guides matters related to restoration or adaptation interventions within the Marine Park and Reef Coast Marine Park.

More broadly, the Blueprint revision has begun and a project plan for its development was completed.

We are working with our partners to improve the Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program, including its operational targets, reef prioritisation processes and on-water decision-making. Our world-class control program is considered one of the most scalable and feasible direct management interventions available to enhance the Reef’s long-term health and resilience in the face of climate change. Direct action to protect coral through crown-of-thorns starfish control complements other initiatives being developed under the Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program.

Our partnerships

Cultural knowledge and Traditional Owners We are working with Traditional Owners groups, strengthening and protecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage over the long-term.

Our Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee advises on ways to facilitate partnerships, enhance engagement and build capacity with Traditional Owners in the management of marine resources.

We have supported and empowered Traditional Owner groups to map areas of cultural value and help identify cultural information needs. This information will help inform management decisions in the Marine Park.

On-ground action is integral to the management of the Reef, particularly through incident response. To further support and empower Indigenous Rangers, we co-facilitated training to provide the opportunity to cross-pollinate traditional knowledge and expertise with western science to better protect traditional estates and, ultimately, the Great Barrier Reef.

We are building on existing work with Traditional Owners to develop a partnering framework. We aim to ensure the Authority genuinely embeds Traditional Owners and their knowledge in our policies and programs for a better-managed Reef.

International engagement This financial year saw the end of our three-year appointment as co-chair of the International Coral

Reef Initiative. During this time, we were a key party in knowledge sharing and capacity building for coral reef managers and policy makers globally. We will continue to play a leading role in the initiative, particularly for resilience-based management, and are proud to showcase Australia’s leading efforts in Marine Park management.

As part of showcasing the Reef internationally, we worked in collaboration with our colleagues from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, to create an exhibition for display in the Paris Aquarium. The panoramic photographic installation, Australia: A journey to the heart of the reef, highlights the Reef following the themes See the Reef, Love the Reef and Protect the Reef. The display was part of the broader ‘Australia now’ program, an initiative of the Australian Government celebrating Australia’s creative excellence, diversity and innovation. The exhibition was an exciting opportunity for us to highlight the work we do in protecting this world-renowned icon.

Supporting the tourism industry through COVID-19 We recognise the ongoing impacts of the global COVID-19 pandemic on Reef users and are committed to supporting affected industries.

To assist tourism operators, the Australian Government continued to waive the Environmental Management Charge (EMC) and permit-related fees until June 2022. The Authority also improved its EMC Online to make it easier for operators to submit logbooks. In doing so, the same high standard of permit assessment remains in place, ensuring Australia continues to meet its World Heritage Area obligations.

Drupella snail removal as part of the Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection Initiative © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 5

The Authority also managed the $3.2 million Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection Initiative, part of the Australian Government’s COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Fund to support regions, communities and industry sectors severely affected by the coronavirus crisis.

The project saw 17 marine tourism operators along the length of the Reef undertaking 1055 site visits for monitoring and maintenance. These activities help ensure that key tourism sites are properly maintained and ready to welcome guests as COVID-19 restrictions ease. The scale of the data collected from tourism operators as part of this initiative is the first of its kind.

The initiative provided a degree of business continuity for tourism operations and surety to frontline tourism jobs, supporting 4,815 employment days.

Reef HQ Aquarium and education Since December 2019, the Australian Government has committed $80.1 million to refurbish our national education centre, ensuring its ongoing viability as the global destination of excellence in tropical coral reef education. Reef HQ Aquarium closed to the public on 1 February 2021 to prepare the facility for the planned work with a likely reopening in 2023.

The announcement of the Authority’s new office location © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

The Reef Education team has continued to deliver its high-quality educational programs and experiences online, including the popular Future Leaders Eco Challenge for school students, teaching students across the world about the Reef and how they can share, learn, act and care for the Reef.

I N T R O D U C T I O N

Our people This year we announced the location of our future accommodation in Townsville. This follows decisions to ensure the majority of Authority staff are co-located with Reef HQ Aquarium, in fit-for-purpose offices. To ensure our new workplace is tailored to support our needs, we have worked closely with staff to investigate how we use our current spaces and how we will work in the future.

We are investing in our people with leadership development, 360º feedback and agility training to ensure our workforce has the right skills for the challenges on the Reef.

Looking ahead 2021-22 October 2021 marks 40 years of World Heritage listing for the Reef. We remain just as committed today as we have always been in delivering world-leading marine park management, and recognise the privilege it is to protect one of the world’s most iconic natural areas.

We ended this reporting year with the World Heritage Committee considering the Reef’s World Heritage status. The Committee’s decision in July to not list the Reef as World Heritage in danger will be covered in more detail in next year’s report.

We welcome any opportunity to brief the World Heritage Committee’s advisers on the health of the Reef and the enormous amount of work we, and our partners, are doing to protect and conserve this natural wonder. We will continue to support the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment by providing advice and assistance as the lead manager and technical adviser on the Reef.

With significant Commonwealth investment received this year and in previous reporting periods, we will continue to expand and develop our programs, including the Reef Joint Field Management Program, with our state government partners, and progress the exciting redevelopment of Reef HQ Aquarium.

As the Reef remains under pressure, we remain focused on leading efforts to ensure its long-term protection and resilience, especially through reducing the pressures of climate change, poor water quality, crown-of-thorns starfish and illegal fishing. The Authority’s public advice in relation to these pressures is clear, and we welcome ongoing government and other investment in addressing them. Reducing threats at all levels — global, Reef-wide, regional and local — together with sustainable, effective management actions to

improve the Reef’s health, recovery and resilience, are critical.

Science and innovation are essential to managing the Reef, and we will continue to use the best-available science to underpin our responsive management of the Marine Park. Our management will be informed by the Reef 2050 Plan, the Blueprint and the Great Barrier Reef Outlook Report 2019. Updates to the Blueprint is underway and will be progressed throughout 2021-22.

The Authority will continue to play a critical role in implementing of the updated Reef 2050 Plan, and leading the development of the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program to drive our adaptive management of the Reef.

Transforming our policy, planning and regulatory approach will further strengthen our adaptive management capability by delivering the policy and regulatory settings needed to ensure we remain an efficient regulator into the future.

Our communication and engagement activities will continue to underpin our brand and promote the important work the agency is doing to protect the Reef. We will focus on delivering messages that influence, empower and encourage everyone to play a role in protecting this magnificent ecosystem. Every effort, no matter how small, matters for ensuring a healthy Reef for future generations. We encourage people to ‘see the Reef, love the Reef and protect the Reef.

As we move into the new financial year, we remain committed to being a high-performing and agile organisation. We are embedding our shared organisational culture and highlighting our workforce skills, systems, processes and technologies. We are focused on upskilling our leaders to support staff and promoting the skills of our people.

Thank you to all our staff, partners and stakeholders who have worked with us to manage and protect the Reef. This year has brought with it some extraordinary challenges, along with exciting opportunities that I look forward to expanding on in the coming year.

Josh Thomas Chief Executive Officer

6 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PART 2

Overview

Photographer: Lady Musgrave Experience © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA) Annual Report 2020-21 7

O V E R V I E W

ABOUT THE GREAT BARRIER REEF MARINE PARK AUTHORITY

The Authority is a non-corporate Commonwealth entity and operates as a statutory agency under the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 (Marine Park Act). The Authority sits within the Australian Government Agriculture, Water and the Environment Portfolio and reports to the Minister for the Environment.

The Authority is responsible for managing one of the world’s premier natural resources, the Marine Park. The vision that drives the Authority’s work is ‘a healthy Great Barrier Reef for future generations’.

The Authority implements a range of policies and programs, management strategies and legislative measures to work towards its primary outcome or purpose:

The long-term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Great Barrier Reef for all Australians and the international community through the care and development of the Marine Park (Outcome 1).

The Authority uses a number of tools, including zoning plans, plans of management, permissions, policies and strategies, formal agreements and site management arrangements. Various management approaches are used, including education and awareness, planning, environmental impact assessment, monitoring, stewardship programs, habitat protection and restoration works, and compliance and enforcement.

Management is enhanced through partnership arrangements with Traditional Owners; local, state and federal government agencies; scientists; industries; businesses and the community. Traditional owners, industry and community advisory groups provide input into the management process.

The Reef Joint Field Management Program is funded and run by the Australian and Queensland governments. It undertakes activities to support the operational and day-to-day management of the Marine Park, the Queensland Government’s adjacent Great Barrier Reef Coast Marine Park and national park islands.

The Authority’s management program continues to build on its strong foundational arrangements already in place to protect the biodiversity and heritage values and provide for ecologically sustainable use. The Authority continues these arrangements and draws on the findings from successive five-yearly Great Barrier Reef Outlook reports to adapt its response and implement measures to strengthen the management and support the resilience of the Reef. The Authority’s actions to protect and manage the Reef contribute to delivering the Australian and Queensland governments’ Reef 2050 Plan.

To attain its purpose and achieve its goals, the Authority is structured under three branches (Figure 4) that work to deliver four main program areas as outlined in its Corporate Plan and Portfolio Budget Statement:

• Program area 1: Enhancing Reef resilience by providing expert knowledge to advise key decision-makers on managing, reducing or avoiding significant threats to the Reef.

• Program area 2: Enhancing Reef resilience through innovation, management and regulation of the Marine Park and our in-field presence.

• Program area 3: Enhancing Reef resilience through partnerships, collaboration and education.

• Program area 4: Supporting a high-performing organisation.

8 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Accountable authority Details of the accountable authority during the reporting period are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1: Accountable authority

Period as the accountable authority or member within the reporting period

Name Position title/Position held

Date of commencement Date of cessation

Josh Thomas Chief Executive Officer 18 March 2019 17 March 2024

Margaret Johnson Acting Chief Executive Officer 4 January 2021 6 April 2021

15 January 2021

16 April 2021

Simon Banks Acting Chief Executive Officer 6 July 2020 20 July 2020

Responsible ministers As Minister for the Environment, the Hon Sussan Ley MP was responsible for the Authority for 2020-21.

Minister Ley was supported by the Hon Trevor Evans MP, the Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management, and received advice on specific Reef-related issues from the Special Envoy for the Great Barrier Reef, the Hon Warren Entsch MP.

Legislative framework The Authority is established under the Marine Park Act as an Australian Government non-corporate statutory authority. The objects of the Marine Park Act are set out in section 2A and the specific functions of the Authority are defined in sections 7 and 7A.

The Marine Park consists of areas declared by the Great Barrier Reef (Declaration of Amalgamated Marine Park Area) Proclamation 2004 made under the Marine Park Act.

Other Acts administered by the Authority are:

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Environmental Management Charge—Excise) Act 1993

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Environmental Management Charge—General) Act 1993.

Regulations in force under the Marine Park Act are:

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 2019.

The Authority also administers the:

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003 and the following plans of management:

• Cairns Area Plan of Management 1998

• Hinchinbrook Plan of Management 2004

• Shoalwater Bay (Dugong) Plan of Management 1997

• Whitsundays Plan of Management 1998.

Following amendments to the Marine Park Act, which commenced on 29 October 2018, the Authority’s Board consists of seven members — a part-time Chairperson, five other part-time members and the CEO of the Authority.

The CEO is also the accountable authority of the agency for the purposes of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the agency head for the purposes of the Public Service Act 1999.

Amendments to legislation during 2020-21 The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment (Environmental Management Charge) Regulations 2020 commenced on 28 November 2020. Regulation amendments extend the waiver of the environmental management charge to 30 June 2021.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment (Waiver of Fees and Charges) Regulations 2021 commenced on 2 June 2021. Regulation amendments extend the waivers of the environmental management charge and permission-related fees to 30 June 2022.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment (No-Anchoring Areas) Regulations 2021 commenced on 26 June 2021. Regulation amendments enhance the Authority’s powers to declare and enforce no-anchoring areas throughout the Marine Park.

Annual Report 2020-21 9

O V E R V I E W

Finances overview In 2020-21, the Authority continued to successfully deliver key Reef initiatives.

These include the Reef Joint Field Management Program, the Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program, the Marine Monitoring Program, the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program, the Land and Sea Country Partnerships Program, the Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers Strategy and the Education and Partnerships Program.

The total operating revenue for 2020-21 was $101.892 million, compared to $91.353 million for 2019-20. Revenue by source is outlined in Figure 2.

During 2020-21, the Authority received additional operational appropriation, which included:

• $8.086 million to replace the environmental management charges that had been waived

• $3.200 million for Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection Initiative

• $11.885 million for upgrades to the Reef HQ Aquarium.

Own source income includes support for the continuation of the Authority’s work and measures to improve the outlook for the Reef, which are primarily funded from ‘related entities’ (bodies that either form part of, or are controlled by, the Australia Government), such as the Reef Trust (provided by the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment) and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

The Australian and Queensland governments also provided matching funding for the Reef Joint Field Management Program, which the Authority implemented in the Marine Park in partnership with the Queensland Department of Environment and Science, with the Queensland contribution included in own source income.

Additionally, in 2020-21, the Authority received $7.472 million from the Great Barrier Reef Foundation for the Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program.

In total, own source income for 2020-21 was $26.198 million, $9.530 million less than in 2019-2020. This is primarily due to finalisation of grants from government and industry partners for Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers and, Crown of Thorns Starfish Control.

The operating expenses for managing the Marine Park in 2020-21 was $87.865 million compared to $79.282 million in 2019-20. The expenses by category are outlined in Figure 3.

The Authority’s end of financial year position for 2020-21 was a $13.133 million surplus. This is primarily due to the re-appropriation of prior year funds that were repealed at 1 July 2020.

Staff overview The Executive Management Group consists of the CEO and three Senior Executive Service Band 1 officers who lead the following branches:

• Corporate Services

• Strategic Policy and Partnerships

• Reef Protection

The headcount of Authority employees was 246 at 30 June 2021, increasing from 226 at 30 June 2020. Details on the workforce profile at 30 June 2021 are included in Appendix B. The employee headcount figure for 30 June 2021 includes both ongoing and non-ongoing employee positions.

10 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

3%

Other

Reef HQ

Industry partner

Related entity

Queensland Government

Special appropriation

Commonwealth appropriation

6%

16%

13%

61%

1% 0%

Figure 2: Revenue by source 2020-21 (excluding Douglas Shoal remediation)

3% 4%

27%

37%

29%

Write down and impairment of assets

Depreciation and finance costs

Field management by Queensland

Suppliers

Employee

Figure 3: Expenses by category 2020-21 (excluding Douglas Shoal remediation)

Annual Report 2020-21 11

O V E R V I E W

Organisational structure

12 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Chief Executive Officer and Accountable Authority

Chief Operating Officer Corporate Services General Manager Reef Protection

General Manager Strategic Policy and Partnerships

Director People and Technology

Director Policy and Planning

Director Finance

Director Environmental Assessment and Protection

Director Legal Services

Director

Field Management Strategy

Director Reef HQ and Property Services

Director

Field Management Operations

Director Science for Management

Director

Strategic Direction and Partnerships

Director

Communications

Director Reef Education and Engagement

Chief Scientist Director Reef Interventions

Minister responsible for the environment

Audit Committee

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Board

Figure 4: Organisational structure as at 30 June 2021

PART 3

Performance

Photographer: Mark Fitzpatrick © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 13

P E R F O R M A N C E

ACCOUNTABLE AUTHORITY STATEMENT

I, as the accountable authority of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, present the 2020-21 annual performance statement of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, as required under paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). In my opinion, this annual performance statement is based on properly maintained records and accurately reflects the performance of the entity and complies with subsection 43(4) of the PGPA Act.

Josh Thomas Chief Executive Officer

Construction of boardwalk at North West Island as part of the Reef Joint Field Management Program © State of Queensland (QPWS)

14 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Guide to the annual performance statements The 2020-21 Corporate Plan aimed to create a stronger connection with the Portfolio Budget Statement and the Corporate Plan. Together, the Portfolio Budget Statement and the Corporate Plan complement each other to provide a consistent performance story, with the aim of having a clear line-of-sight from vision to action.

Outcome 1 in the Portfolio Budget Statement forms the purpose statement for the Authority, which is:

The long-term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Great Barrier Reef for all Australians and

the international community, through the care and development of the Marine Park.

This supports the Authority’s vision for a ‘healthy Great Barrier Reef for future generations’. The three pillars within the purpose statement are protection, sustainable use and understanding.

This section presents the results and analysis of performance against the Authority’s purpose statement. Table 2 outlines the 2020-21 targets for the Authority to achieve its purpose.

The performance information within the Portfolio Budget Statement is underpinned and delivered through the Authority’s key activities and delivery strategies. This table can be found on page 28 of the Corporate Plan.

Table 2: Results against the performance information for Outcome 1 of the portfolio budget statement

Strategic results Performance information 2020-21 Target 2020-21 Actual

The Reef is protected

Per cent of internally allocated short-term actions that are ‘on track’ or ‘completed’ in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Strategy for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Target - 75% 62% achieved

Proportion of Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap agreed actions for 2020-21 that are either ‘on track’ or completed.

Target - 85% 86% achieved

Sustainable use of the Reef

Proportion of effective key performance indicators (KPIs) identified in the Regulator Performance Framework Self-Assessment 2020-21.

Target - 100% of KPIs are ‘effective’ or ‘mostly effective’

Not completed

Proportion of Joint Field Management Program Annual Business Plan targets achieved or with significant progress 2020-21.

Target - 85% In progress

The Reef is understood

Identify priority knowledge gaps for Reef management. Develop revised Science for

Information Needs strategy by end 2020-21

In progress

Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program Business Strategy defines activities and includes a measurable Annual Business Plan for 2021-22

Target - Develop Business Strategy 2020-2025, which is endorsed by partners, and develop an Annual Business Plan for 2021-22

In progress

Annual Report 2020-21 15

P E R F O R M A N C E

Performance information analysis: Outcome 1, Portfolio Budget Statement The Reef is protected As part of its vision to provide a healthy Reef for future generations, the Authority is committed to providing long-term protection of the Reef. It is able to do this through several delivery strategies, including the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Strategy and the Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Strategy The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Strategy for the Marine Park has been in place for two years. It contains 30 short to long-term actions to keep the Indigenous heritage of the Reef strong, safe and healthy.

The implementation of strategy actions has progressed throughout 2020-21, with more than 90 per cent of actions underway, of which, 60 per cent are on track and 30 per cent are on track with limitations. Substantial progress on major foundational activities and additional resourcing led to significant achievements in implementing the strategy. The activities are a shared responsibility across the Authority and will be reported in more detail in relevant section areas of responsibility throughout the annual report. However, some key highlights are:

• Indigenous representation in governance of the Marine Park increased, with a new Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee appointed and Indigenous membership on the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee, Local Marine Advisory Committees and the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program Executive Group.

• The Authority commenced new partnerships to develop two new Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreements. The Authority began this program more than 15 years ago, partnering directly with Traditional Owner groups. The expansion of the program supports the identification of cultural authority and Sea Country boundaries, and provides capacity for Traditional Owner clan groups to engage in broader Marine Park management.

• The Authority invested in Traditional Owner-led Sea Country values mapping of almost 25 per cent of the Reef coastline. Nine of the marine resource agreement partners progressed in identifying and recording their Sea Country values. Sea Country values mapping is foundational to sharing information with

managing agencies to allow improved heritage management. The first publicly available product is from Mandubarra Traditional Owners and can be viewed on the Authority’s website.

• A suite of projects to support increasing Traditional Owner involvement in the Marine Park permissions system were progressed. These projects are multi-year and seek to transform the consideration of potential impacts on Indigenous heritage by inviting Traditional Owner clan groups with known cultural authority to provide advice on relevant Marine Park permit applications.

• Communication and education activities increased throughout 2020-21 to improve public awareness and promote the inherent rights and connection of Traditional Owners. Major funding was secured to embed Indigenous content throughout a co-designed Reef HQ Aquarium, which is currently under renovation.

While most actions are on track, 30 per cent are on track with limitations. This is primarily due to resourcing constraints on engagement outside existing programs to broaden external partnerships to include other Traditional Owner groups. The Authority is actively pursuing options to address these limitations, which will increase the likelihood of meeting the target of 75 per cent actions on track in future years.

Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap The Authority’s Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap (the Roadmap) has been in place since 2019. The Roadmap aims to better protect key Great Barrier Reef values, enable ecologically sustainable use and work with Traditional Owners and partners, including the tourism industry. It is a significant undertaking that will deliver cohesive forward planning that is more risk-based, strategic, efficient and adaptive.

The implementation of the Roadmap is progressing well with substantial achievements actioned in 2020-21. The full implementation of the Roadmap will be progressed over several years. The Roadmap can be viewed on the Authority’s website as an interactive diagram. The Roadmap is updated to reflect work that has commenced or is completed, and as new areas of work are added.

The Roadmap covers significant areas of the Authority’s regulatory approach, including:

16 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

• Marine Park policy (e.g. future-focused intervention and permit guidance, tourism and other Marine Park use and protection policies)

• the Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreements program

• implementation of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Strategy and, development of further co-management opportunities

• permissions streamlining

• Marine Park planning (including zoning, plans of management and site planning).

The Roadmap comprises five key themes of work: knowledge, risk, Traditional Owners, tools and resilience. Work on the knowledge stream has been slower than the other streams. To date, work to collate Marine Park value and use information for planning purposes has been limited to targeted issues and locations. Broader understanding of Marine Park use changes has not progressed due to other priorities. The Authority is actively pursuing projects with the Science for Management section to address some of these limitations.

Knowledge stream A number of projects continued to collate Marine Park values and Marine Park use information for planning, with a continued focus on targeted issues and locations to assist site planning and permit assessments.

Sea Country values mapping projects were conducted in all nine Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreements regions to assist in understanding the cultural values of specific Traditional Owner Sea Country estates.

Risk stream Using the agency’s risk management framework, a process for assessing the Authority’s tolerance for the consequences and identifying a fit-for-purpose approach to the management of threats, pressures and uses on the Marine Park ecosystem, biodiversity and heritage values has been completed. These risk tolerance assessments and fit-for-purpose management analysis will inform recommendations for improving the Authority’s risk-based approach to Marine Park management. This project enables the development of better guidance around how the Authority accepts and manages risk to the health of Marine Park values.

The ongoing permit condition review to streamline and reduce the complexity of permissions is progressing with more than 700 permit conditions reviewed and recommendations made on 219 of these conditions. The intent of this project is to reduce the complexity and length of permits.

The review has identified that over 50 per cent of routine tourism permit conditions can be removed following completion of further policy and planning work.

Traditional Owners stream The Authority has operated a highly successful Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreements program for more than 15 years, partnering directly with Traditional Owner groups to assist in developing and delivering their Traditional Owner-led agreements. There are currently nine accredited agreements supporting 17 clan groups, covering approximately 23 per cent of the Reef coastline. The Authority commenced new partnerships to develop two new agreements. Moreover, one Indigenous Land Use Agreement brings the total approximate coverage of agreements to 25 per cent.

The Marine Resource Agreements groups have demonstrated effective governance of Sea Country management over the year, and have been supported by the Authority to deliver several cultural mapping and education activities. These Sea Country activities have been delivered in strong partnership with key stakeholders, including Australian and Queensland government agencies.

Implementation of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Strategy for the Marine Park is well underway. Actions under the Strategy contribute to all four program areas of the Authority’s Corporate Plan and make a significant contribution to nine outcomes of the Reef 2050 Plan. The majority of actions are on track with significant foundational activities resourced and underway.

Scoping options to improve co-management within the current legislative framework is being progressed. A best practice literature review and analysis of Traditional Owner aspirations has been completed and will inform further work during 2021-22, including engagement with the Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee.

Participants at the Mandubarra Cultural Values Launch © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 17

P E R F O R M A N C E

Tools stream In consultation with a broad range of stakeholders, the Authority developed and released a draft sustainable Tourism Management Action Strategy for public consultation in February 2021. This strategy will guide the review, development and implementation of more responsive, contemporary tools for managing tourism in the Marine Park. The feedback received during public consultation was supportive of the concept of an overarching tourism strategy and, broadly, its intent and content. All feedback was subsequently used to inform the development of the revised strategy. The sustainable Tourism Management Action Strategy is expected to be finalised in 2021-22.

An audit of existing Authority external policies has been completed, and a review of select policies and rationalisation of the Authority’s external policy environment is underway, guided by the draft Tourism Management Action Strategy and risk tolerance projects.

A gap analysis of the current policy and planning tools was completed, including an in-depth analysis of plans of management and identifying multiple options for improvement.

The John Brewer Reef Site Plan was completed and made publicly available on the Authority’s website following a period of public consultation.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 2019 were amended to enforce no-anchoring areas Reef-wide and enable them to be declared through a notifiable instrument—a tool not previously used by the Authority. All no-anchoring areas within the Townsville—Whitsundays Management Area are now enforceable.

Authority-wide understanding of our management tools has been supported by the development of a comprehensive training package.

Communication of our management tools continued throughout 2020-21 with reviews of web content, zoning map content updates and the Whitsundays Recreational User Guide.

Resilience stream Following public consultation, the Authority finalised and is now implementing the Policy on Great Barrier Reef Interventions to guide matters related to restoration or adaptation interventions within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and the Great Barrier Reef Coast Marine Park. This policy is available on the Authority’s website.

Two guidelines to support applying existing discretionary clauses within plans of management were finalised and placed on the Authority’s website, and have been used during permissions assessment processes.

Sustainable use of the Reef The Authority is committed to ensuring that the Reef is used sustainably and ecologically. It achieves this through a number of delivery strategies and programs, including the Reef Joint Field Management Program.

Reef Joint Field Management Program The Reef Joint Field Management Program is delivered by the Authority and Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS). It provides practical, on-ground actions to protect and maintain well-functioning marine and island ecosystems, and supports ecotourism opportunities and commercial industries. The program’s core activities include delivering conservation actions, monitoring ecological and heritage values, responding to incidents, educating and engaging with World Heritage Area users and upholding compliance.

The program has been undergoing a significant five-year expansion. The program’s expansion will continue as planned with joint funding of more than $38 million by 2021-22 and staff resourcing will equate to approximately 186 people.

The program’s annual business plan targets are underway with significant progress made in 2020-21.

Technology transformation program The Reef Joint Field Management Program Strategy Group responded to the Periodic Review Report 2017 by commencing the technology transformation program. The Authority doubled its investment and efforts in the Reef Joint Field Management Program. As a part of this contribution, two staff commenced in the Reef Protection Branch in January 2021.

The technology transformation program’s initial collaborations with the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) have led to the co-funded

Reef Joint Field Management Program, testing the underwater unmanned vessels as part of the technology transformation program © State of Queensland (QPWS)

18 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

development of ReefScan technologies (AIMS) for benthic monitoring and initial trials of above, on and underwater unmanned vessels (QUT) for benthic monitoring, incident response and mooring maintenance. Early-stage collaboration with the Australian Maritime Safety Authority is underway to assess the suitability of automatic identification system technology as a potential solution for the expansion of vessel tracking within the World Heritage Area.

The coming year (2021-22) will see the development of a five-year technology transformation program strategy to prioritise the technological improvements to be explored and adopted. The strategy will detail the expected timeframes of the process steps, including scoping, collaboration, trials and implementation of each project element. A key priority of the technology transformation program is to ensure that data collection on World Heritage values and threats and compliance management will be undertaken using technologies capable of near real-time efficient and effective data capture, storage, analysis, integration, reporting, sharing and use in decision-making.

Supporting Traditional Owners and Land and Sea Rangers During the 2020-21 financial year, two contractual work placement arrangements and a part-time work placement were established within the Reef Joint Field Management Program in partnership with Darumbal Enterprises and the Yintjingga Aboriginal Corporation. Facilitating Traditional Owners working on country and gaining experience as marine parks rangers is a key objective of the Indigenous work placement arrangements developed by the Reef Joint Field Management Program. Work placements are strengthening two-way cross-cultural information and skills sharing with Traditional Owner groups in the Reef. There are plans to expand these work placements in other parts of the Reef Joint Field Management

Capacity building for Indigenous Rangers strategy incident management training © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 19

Program and with additional Traditional Owner groups during the 2021-22 financial year.

Finalising visitor infrastructure works on North West Island North West Island (105ha), located within the Capricornia Cays National Park offshore Gladstone, is a very popular camping destination, and is a key turtle rookery, supporting an extensive Pisonia grandis forest important for nesting seabirds. Over time, the footprint of the campgrounds have expanded outside the designated areas and there was a management need to reduce visitor impacts to protect the Pisonia habitat and associated seabird nesting areas. The three toilets on the island also needed replacing and upgrading. Working with our Reef Joint Field Management Program partners, QPWS, a detailed site plan was developed and implemented. This multi-year project saw walkways and camping areas delineated using rope and bollards, and the toilets replaced with three accessible facilities using low-maintenance materials. The Program, together with the Gidarjil Development Corporation and Gidarjil Sea Country Rangers, assisted with all elements of the works.

The island also had a large infestation of introduced mice, which prey on seabird eggs and generally disturb fragile island ecosystems. An eradication program was implemented that used aerial broadcasting of baits across the island. The Reef Joint Field Management Program undertook the baiting program while the island was closed for the infrastructure upgrades. Gidarjil Sea Country Rangers also assisted with the pre and post-monitoring of mice. Treatments are now complete, with permanent stations in place for ongoing monitoring over the next couple of years.

Project funding is through Reef Trust as part of the Curtis Island indirect offsets.

Regulator performance framework self-assessment 2020-21 Due to changes in reporting on regulatory functions through the PGPA Act process that commenced on 1 July 2021, the Authority is currently reviewing its approach to this reporting. A regulator performance framework self-assessment was not required for 2020-21.

The Reef is understood The Authority is committed to ensuring the Reef is understood and achieves this through its publications, engagements and materials as the leading voice of the Reef.

P E R F O R M A N C E

Science and knowledge needs The Authority has a publicly accessible Science Information Needs 2014-2019 document available on its website. This required an update following the release of the Outlook Report 2019 and a priority monitoring gaps assessment that occurred in 2020-21. A clearer strategy was also needed following feedback that the original document was not engaging to the research community. In 2020, the Authority began updating the Science and Knowledge Needs for Management document (formally known as Science Information Needs 2014-2019), focusing on a shorter, succinct product that communicates: 1) how the Authority values science and how it is used to inform our management, 2) our priority science and knowledge gaps and 3) guidance on how science and knowledge providers should engage with the Authority to deliver collective impact. The primary purpose of this document is to summarise the Authority’s priority information needs for a wide research/knowledge provider audience to help support high-level discussions with research organisations, agency heads and key stakeholders.

The development of the new Science and Knowledge Needs for Management document is progressing well and near completion. The new revision sets out the Authority’s four overarching science and knowledge themes and associated priority information needs. These priority areas will form the focus of collaboration opportunities with science and knowledge providers. Priorities were informed by the Outlook Report 2019 and emerging needs identified by Authority staff.

Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program The Authority is the lead coordinator of the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program, a joint partnership involving key Australian Government environmental management and science agencies (Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment; AIMS; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the Integrated Marine Observing System); and the Queensland Government. Traditional Owner representatives also form a key part of the program’s governance. In addition to showing how the Reef 2050 Plan is performing against its objectives, the program provides an online portal (the Reef Knowledge System) that integrates information to inform and guide management decisions in a rapidly changing world. This long-term initiative is critical to supporting resilience-based management and complementing evidence-based reporting about the Reef.

The Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program Business Strategy 2020-25 is in progress and expected to be endorsed by the governance

group in September 2021. The Annual Business Plan 2021-22 is complete and was endorsed by the governance group in July 2021. The Annual Business Plan 2021-22 defines performance measures mapped to defined outcomes in the Business Strategy 2020-25.

During 2020, the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program transitioned to new governance arrangements and a Program Management Office was established. A Priority Monitoring Gaps Prospectus was developed to address critical data gaps and these are now being progressed by a large body of science providers with funding support from the Australian Government’s Reef Trust Partnership with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation.

The Reef Knowledge System (pilot) was released to Reef managers and the public in October 2020, providing access to interactive maps to explore a wide range of Reef information. The prototype of the system demonstrates how integrated monitoring can inform resilience-based management.

Program areas The performance information within the Portfolio Budget Statement is underpinned and delivered through the Authority’s key activities and delivery strategies. These activities and delivery strategies form four program areas that guide our core business in the Corporate Plan 2020-21 (outlined in Table 3).

Table 3: Program areas aligning with our corporate business

Program area 1

Enhancing Reef resilience by providing expert knowledge to advise key decision-makers on managing, reducing or avoiding significant threats to the Reef

Program area 2

Enhancing Reef resilience through innovation, management and regulation of the Marine Park and our in-field presence

Program area 3

Enhancing Reef resilience through partnerships, collaboration and education

Program area 4 Supporting a high-performing organisation

Target tracking In the Corporate Plan 2020-21, many of the targets and performance criteria have been redefined. For this reason, tracking data may be unavailable as trends are yet to be seen.

20 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Program area 1: Enhancing Reef resilience by providing expert knowledge to advise key decision-makers on managing, reducing or avoiding significant threats to the Reef

As the lead management agency for the Marine Park, the Authority has a critical role in providing expert technical knowledge and policy advice to decision-makers to help deliver and influence actions in avoiding, mitigating and managing threats to the Reef. The Authority’s position statements on key threats to the Reef, along with ongoing involvement in the review and delivery of the Reef 2050 Plan, enable the Authority to influence responses to key Reef threats.

Information is collected through various programs and draws on a range of sources. These include a diverse range of knowledge from Traditional Owners, scientists, stakeholders and Authority staff, which informs management decisions and provides evidence-based advice to the government, the public and stakeholders. Information is shared with various stakeholders, through publications such as the Reef summer snapshot and Marine Monitoring Program reports, along with briefings and engagement opportunities.

Annual Report 2020-21 21

Performance results The results against performance criteria for Program area 1 are outlined in Table 4.

Table 4: Summary of performance results against Program area 1

Corporate result Performance information

2020-21 Target

2020-21 Actual

1.1 Expert knowledge is shared

1.1.1: Progress, outcomes and key learnings in the remediation process for Douglas Shoal Project are shared externally

Establish methodology and baseline

In progress

1.1.2: Chief Scientist provides formal advice to key stakeholder groups 70% / 12 key stakeholders

92% of 13 key stakeholders

1.1.3: Improvement in the trust level sentiment score through a sample survey of stakeholders 7.2 Not completed

1.1.4: Number of synthesis products delivered 5 5 (one summer

snapshot and four Marine Monitoring Program reports)

1.2 Expert knowledge is used

1.2.1: Proportion of active policies, strategies and position statements that address high or very high risks to the Reef as identified in the Outlook Report 2019

60% 60% achieved

1.2.2: Percentage of planned compliance days completed 80% of 910 dedicated

compliance days

1059 compliance days achieved

116% of the planned compliance days completed

1.2.3: Information needs identified by the Authority are covered by knowledge systems Establish methodology

and baseline

In progress

Criteria source: Performance indicators recorded in the Authority’s chapter in the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements p. 314 and in the Authority’s Corporate Plan 2020-21 pp. 30-31.

P E R F O R M A N C E

Corporate result 1.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following information supports corporate result 1.1: Expert knowledge is shared. These activities relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic result: The Reef is understood.

Douglas Shoal Environmental Remediation Project The Douglas Shoal Environmental Remediation Project is the first of its kind for the Authority. It aims to remediate the damage to the shoal caused by the grounding of the bulk carrier Shen Neng 1 in 2010.

It is important that knowledge gained during the project is made available externally to help decision-makers domestically and internationally manage threats or impacts to the Reef. Knowledge is shared through updates, technical reports and project progress reports, which are published on the Authority’s website. This information is also important in guiding proposed remediation activities and demonstrating responsible planning for remediation activities.

Engaging with key stakeholders The Authority’s engagement with key stakeholders is critical for ensuring efforts are focused on the areas of greatest impact and that we are well coordinated with other organisations involved in Reef protection. As part of this, the Authority facilitates the exchange of information between producers (for example researchers and information holders) and decision-makers (for example Reef managers, government and stakeholders).

In early 2020-21, a list of 12 key stakeholders who were considered a high priority for briefings from the Authority’s Chief Scientist was defined. Over the year, the list was re-evaluated and resulted in 13 high priority stakeholders. Of these identified stakeholders, 12 (92 per cent) were provided with at least one briefing during the year.

Briefings included updates on the Authority’s major projects, Reef health updates and management activities within the Marine Park.

The Authority provided high-quality and well-considered advice to the Minister for the Environment; the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment and other parliamentary stakeholders throughout 2020-21.

International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) and international engagement Since mid-2018, the Authority has led Australia’s role as co-chair of the ICRI Secretariat, in partnership with the governments of Indonesia and Monaco. ICRI is the major international forum on coral reefs and provides an important platform for knowledge-sharing and capacity-building for coral reef managers and policy makers.

The Authority demonstrates its commitment to the protection of the Reef and coral reefs worldwide through its longstanding role within ICRI and supports the sharing of knowledge and expertise by encouraging active engagement by coral reef countries involved in the initiative.

The Unites States of America will take over the Secretariat co-chair responsibilities in late 2021. The Authority will continue to play a leading role in ICRI, particularly through the ICRI ad hoc Committee on resilience-based management.

The Authority is also committed to supporting Australian Government marine priorities, including the Commonwealth Blue Charter and the World Heritage Marine Programme.

Stakeholder research As part of the Authority’s engagement with stakeholders, the Authority engages an external research consultancy firm to conduct an annual ‘brand awareness’ survey with a representative demographic of the Australian Census population. The survey is conducted during the second half of the financial year and last year’s score results provided a methodology baseline result. This year, the survey was postponed due to unforeseen events. The survey will be conducted in the first half of the 2021-22 financial year. The survey results are used to inform the Authority’s communication and engagement strategies and activities. This include the overarching communication and engagement strategy aimed at positioning the Authority to inspire and enable people to take action to ensure

Staff workshops to develop the communications strategy © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

22 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

a healthy Reef for future generations through its position as the trusted voice of the Reef.

Delivering synthesised products The Reef Snapshot: Summer 2020-21 provides a concise, easy to understand summary of how the Reef has fared over the past summer, what this means for coral and the actions being taken to help coral health. It is a joint initiative of the Australian Government’s lead management and science agencies for the Reef: the Authority, AIMS and CSIRO. The snapshot is an important synthesis product providing a summary of Reef health monitoring conducted each year. It is based on the latest available science and information at the time of writing, and sets the scene for more comprehensive reports that are released later in the year.

The Authority’s corporate website page for the snapshot had 1300 page views between the release date (27 April 2021) and 15 June 2021. The snapshot’s e-Library page was viewed 822 times.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Monitoring Program surveys and reports on the health of inshore coral, seagrass and water quality every year. The program has been established for more than 15 years.

Monitoring information was collected and synthesised over several months by partners at AIMS and James Cook University (JCU), and published by the Authority in four technical reports

Reef Snapshot Summer 2020-21 report © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 23

for inshore coral, seagrass, pesticides and water quality, and an annual Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual in our e-Library. The Authority synthesises the drivers, pressures and state of the inshore environment in the online Reef 2050 Water Quality Report Card. Results from the report card assess the effectiveness of the Australian and Queensland governments’ Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan (2018-2022), which is committed to improving the quality of water flowing into the Reef.

Monitoring has improved our scientific understanding of how the Reef is affected by pressures (such as cyclones, floods, rising ocean temperatures and land-based run-off). The Authority relies on monitoring data generated by this program to engage with stakeholders and inform management actions. Current and timely information is shared through publicly available web content, seminars, Reef Health updates, fact files for Marine Park rangers, briefings and responses to media enquiries. Coral data is available online at AIMS within two to three weeks of surveys. Information is circulated through podcasts, videos and social media. This supports the Authority’s capability and is a direct demonstration of how expert knowledge is used.

Corporate result 1.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 1.2: Expert knowledge is used. They relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic result: Sustainable use of the Reef

Policies, strategies and position statements addressing risks as identified in the 2019 Outlook Report Position statements clearly outline the Authority’s position on threats to the Reef outside its statutory control. They consider the impacts of threats and what is needed to address them, and are effective in supporting positive outcomes for the Marine Park. Actions needed to address threats include protection, conservation and restoration of coastal ecosystems critical for Reef health, actions to reduce plastic pollution and marine debris, and decreasing global greenhouse gas emissions to reduce the risks and limit the impacts of climate change on the Reef. Position statements help guide management responses for long-term protection and conservation of the Reef’s environment, biodiversity and heritage values.

This year, the Authority released two position statements, one on fishing and one on water

P E R F O R M A N C E

quality. Fishing is a long-established and important activity in the Marine Park. Fishing activities are regulated within the Marine Park. However, some fishing practices continue to have an impact on the Reef. The Authority seeks to ensure fishing is ecologically sustainable through an ecosystem-based approach and management actions that consider the cumulative impacts of fishing on all species and habitats within the Marine Park.

Poor water quality is a major threat to the Reef, particularly for inshore areas. Improving the quality of water entering the Marine Park is critical and urgent. The Authority supports actions that reduce pollutant loads from all land-based sources.

A total of 60 per cent (59 out of 98) of the Authority’s policies, position statements, strategies address at least one threat that is a high or very high risk to the Region’s ecosystem and heritage values, as identified in the Outlook Report 2019. Damage to reef structure is the most frequently addressed threat (34 per cent) followed by marine debris (25 per cent).

Compliance management surveillance The Reef Joint Field Management Program is the principal driver and coordinator of strategic and operational compliance management of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

Compliance management in the World Heritage Area is risk-based and involves assessing the

impact of illegal activities and the likelihood of them occurring regularly. This focuses resources to the best treatments (education, audits, surveillance and enforcement) for illegal activities, including the application of surveillance and investigations for those activities of highest impact and risk (such as illegal commercial and recreational fishing, shipping, poaching of dugongs and marine turtles, and damage to cultural and maritime heritage sites).

The 2020-21 financial year saw a continued increase in dedicated compliance patrol effort in the World Heritage Area with 1059 days delivered by the expanded Reef Joint Field Management Program and partners. This is more than 45 per cent above the key performance indicator of 728

Conducting aerial surveillance and enhancing compliance skills with Kuuku Ya’u Indigenous Complicance Rangers © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

24 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

800

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0

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1400

1600

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Outcome of reported offences

Offences reported and compliance days

Caution notices

Advisory letters GBRMPA/State

Infringement notices GBRMPA/State

Prosecutions

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2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021

Figure 5: Reef Joint Field Management Program - Compliance effort and outcomes

days. This surveillance output included vessel, aerial and land-based patrolling. Program partners for surveillance delivery include QPWS, Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol, Queensland Police Service, Maritime Border Command and Indigenous Ranger groups. More information on compliance efforts can be found in corporate result 2.2.

This increase in surveillance effort was delivered to treat the continued pressures of increased recreational use within the World Heritage Area, and the need to suppress and reduce the continued high levels of recreational fishing offences and control other high-risk illegal activities.

The increase in 2020-21 compliance days, shown in Figure 5, also saw a parallel trend in the number of reported recreational fishing offences. The total compliance offences for the reporting period can be found under corporate result 2.2.

The Reef Joint Field Management Program’s compliance surveillance and monitoring extends to vessel-tracking, in partnership with Queensland Fisheries. This work is consistent with the Queensland Sustainable Fisheries Strategy 2017-2027, with all commercial fishing vessels operating in the World Heritage Area now required to have vessel-tracking units. This has resulted in a significant improvement in the understanding of commercial fishing non-compliance and promoting assisted compliance for commercial fishing operators.

Reef knowledge In 2020, the Authority published a Priority Monitoring Gaps Prospectus, which reflected one of the project outcomes from the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program. This component of work was focused on developing a methodology for identifying knowledge requirements for ongoing reef management and progress reporting against the Reef 2050 Plan. The prospectus identified 11 priority gaps. Data from these projects will be integrated into the monitoring and reporting program as they become available to enable timely access to knowledge by decision-makers to inform management decisions.

The Reef Knowledge System (pilot) was released to Reef managers and the public in October 2020, and provides access to interactive maps to explore a wide range of Reef information. Many stakeholders were engaged in showcasing the Reef Knowledge System. Decision support priorities were scoped and planning was conducted to deliver fit-for-purpose decision support tools. Compliance risk modelling was completed to improve compliance planning and Reef protection. Release of the Reef Snapshot: Summer 2020-21 was powered by monitoring and reporting program datasets and partners. The Reef Knowledge

System will continue to be developed to provide access to data to support adaptive management, incident response and progress reporting against the Reef 2050 Plan.

The Resilient Reef Network Guidance tool forms one of the many decision support tools that will be produced from the monitoring and reporting program. The tool, allows managers to explore a range of pressures reefs have been exposed to (including cyclones, sea temperature, and flood waters) via maps and charts, and understand the recovery potential of reefs. This provides guidance on where management actions should occur, such as crown-of-thorns starfish control, further monitoring effort and compliance vessel scheduling.

Annual Report 2020-21 25

P E R F O R M A N C E

Program area 2: Enhancing Reef resilience through innovation, management and regulation of the Marine Park and our in-field presence

The Authority is the primary environmental regulator for protecting and managing the Marine Park. A combination of management tools and approaches are used to provide certainty about where use may occur, the types of activities permitted and the conditions under which activities may proceed. These tools include a Marine Park-wide zoning plan, plans of management, site-specific management arrangements, Traditional Usage of Marine Resource Areas, policies, permits, education, compliance and enforcement.

The Authority’s world-renowned regulatory framework and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003 manage the use of the Marine Park, protecting its values and enhancing its biodiversity benefits and resilience. In the face of known and emerging challenges, such as the effects of climate change, Reef management must

continually evolve to focus its effort on activities that address the highest risks and improve ecosystem resilience. To improve the Reef’s resilience, the Authority continually refines and focuses its regulatory efforts on activities presenting the highest risks, including implementing the Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap.

Compliance delivered through the Reef Joint Field Management Program is risk-focused and well-planned. Illegal fishing activity is deterred and detected by intelligence-driven patrols and deployment. Pressures in the Marine Park are managed by zoning plans that protect marine habitats and the species they sustain. The compliance program delivers on initiatives under the Blueprint and the Reef 2050 Plan to support Reef resilience.

Performance results The results against performance criteria for Program area 2 are outlined in Table 5.

Table 5: Summary of performance results against Program area 2

Corporate result Performance information

2020-21 Target

2020-21 in progress

2.1: Strategies and rules for a resilient Reef are made

2.1.1: New or amended policies presented to Reef Advisory Committees for advice Establish methodology

and baseline

Completed

2.1.2: Review and update Reef Blueprint and report against actions Final report against actions

in 2017 Blueprint

Develop revised Reef Blueprint

In progress

2.2 Rules for a resilient Reef are followed

2.2.1: Number of offences in the Marine Park per year 1100 15391

2.2.2: Increase in the uptake of online permissions and environmental management charge system

Establish methodology and baseline

Completed

2.2.3: Planned permissions and environmental management charge compliance activity completed

Establish methodology and baseline

In progress

2.2.4: Number of Marine Park compliance activities in each risk category Maintain or improve

Completed

2.2.5: Our permission system service level standards are met Establish methodology

and baseline

In progress

1 This figure now includes permissions compliance figures. These figures were not incorporated in the initial figure predicted in the 2020-21 Corporate Plan.

26 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Corporate result Performance information

2020-21 Target

2020-21 in progress

2.3 Innovate for a resilient Reef

2.3.1: Support for new research and development projects with contributions from the Authority

Establish methodology and baseline

In progress

2.3.2: Progress against remediation milestones to promote natural recovery at Douglas Shoal

Successful procurement of remediation contractor

In progress

2.3.3: Percentage of high-value reefs protected to achieve ecologically sustainable numbers of crown-of-thorns starfish

70% 55%

Criteria source: Performance indicators are recorded in the Authority’s chapter in the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements p. 314 and in the Authority’s Corporate Plan 2020-21 p. 30-31.

Corporate result 2.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 2.1: Strategies and rules for a resilient Reef are made. These relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic result: The Reef is understood.

Policies presented to the Reef Advisory Committee No new or amended policies were presented to the Reef Advisory Committee for advice in 2020-21. This financial year saw the inauguration of the Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee, while the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee was formed at the end of the 2019-20 financial year. The majority of items brought to these committees were to inform and advise new members of Authority business. This performance measure will be replaced by a new performance measure in future years.

Further reporting on the Reef Advisory Committee can be found in Part 4 Management and accountability.

The Great Barrier Reef Blueprint for Resilience The health and resilience of the Reef are under threat from climate change, land-based run-off, coastal development and other human-induced pressures. As a result of the significant coral bleaching events in 2016 and 2017, the Authority recognised that resilience actions needed to go beyond business as usual.

The Blueprint sets best practice standards across the Authority’s key program areas to support a more resilient Reef. It signals the actions the Authority will take with our partners to strengthen

the Reef’s resilience, its capacity to recover after disturbances and return to a healthy state, and the challenges it faces now and in the future.

The Authority conducted an internal review of the 2017 Reef Blueprint outcomes, which were used to guide the approach to a revision of the document. The Blueprint revision is underway and a project plan for its development was completed, setting out a detailed timeline for completion of the update to the Blueprint in 2021-22.

Corporate result 2.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 2.2: Rules for a resilient Reef are followed. These relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic results: The Reef is protected and Sustainable use of the Reef.

Dramatically enhancing compliance in the Marine Park The Reef Joint Field Management Program continued to enhance its compliance efforts in 2020-21 as recommended in the Reef 2050 Plan and the Blueprint.

During 2020-21, 1539 possible offences were reported from across the Commonwealth and Queensland jurisdictions of the World Heritage Area. This figure of possible offences is higher than the initial predicted figure of 1100. Incidents reported through the Reef Joint Field Management Program and the Authority’s Permissions Compliance team have been included in the stated figures, with 216 reports relating to permissions compliance matters. All received reports were reviewed and appropriate enforcement actions were applied, such as warnings, infringement notices and court proceedings.

Annual Report 2020-21 27

P E R F O R M A N C E

QPWS rangers and Authority compliance officers undertaking field compliance activities © State of Queensland (QPWS)

28 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

The Reef Joint Field Management Program operates as a joint initiative between the Federal and Queensland governments and operates under its own performance indicators. One of the performance indicators to measure the effectiveness of the compliance program is the number of dedicated compliance days undertaken during high-risk illegal recreational fishing periods, with a target of 50 per cent. These periods are defined as night-time, weekends, public holidays, school holidays and good weather periods (winds less than 10 knots). During 2020-21, 79 per cent of dedicated compliance days (837 out of 1059 days) were undertaken during high-risk illegal recreational fishing periods as mentioned in corporate result 1.2.

Permissions system

Regulatory framework The Authority’s permission system is established under the Marine Park Act, which states:

‘In order to achieve its objects, this Act regulates, including by a system or permissions, use of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park in ways consistent with ecosystem-based management and the principles of ecologically sustainable use’ (section 2A(3) (d)).

The Authority is responsible for administering permit applications, decisions and post-decision conditional approvals under the following legislation:

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Environmental Management Charge-General) Act 1993

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Environmental Management Charge-Excise) Act 1993

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 1983 and 2019

• Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003

• Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981

• Sea Installations Act 1987

Online permissions and environmental management charge system Online applications are currently available for permit applications (new and continuation) and transfer applications. Permit holders are able to complete some administrative processes online, such as managing vessel notifications. Applications for

Permissions compliance team launched ‘My Case Manager’ © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 29

processes such as variations, splits and mergers are received via email and initiated in the Reef Management System manually.

The Authority received 319 properly made permit applications in the reporting period. Of the application types that can be applied for online (new, continuations and transfers), more than 80 per cent have been successfully submitted online.

Measures to reduce administrative burden on permit holders since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic saw an increase of manually-initiated applications in 2020. Online applications have returned to more than 95 per cent in quarter four of the reporting period.

An automated process for Future Act Notifications under the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) was implemented in June 2021. This automation reduces processing time and minimises human error.

The environmental management charge is associated with most commercial activities, including tourism operations, non-tourist charter operations and facilities, operating under a permit issued by the Authority.

For most tourism operations, Marine Park visitors participating in a tourist activity are liable to pay the charge to the permit holder, who then remits the charge to the Authority.

For the entire reporting period, the Australian Government waived all environmental management charge obligations to support local tourism business and regional economies hardest hit during the COVID-19 pandemic. Despite waiving the environmental management charge, visitation numbers to the Marine Park continued to be submitted by permit holders via logbook returns throughout the entire reporting period, achieving an average 96.9 per cent submission rate for visitation data. Of the logbooks submitted, approximately 95 per cent were submitted online.

The most recent visitation numbers to the Reef indicate a decline of 66 percent for the January to March 2021 quarter against an eight year average for the same period.

Through the 2021-22 Budget, the Australian Government continues to support the tourism industry by extending the waiver of environmental management charge up to 30 June 2022 (previously 30 June 2021).

Table 6: Progress of routine permissions that have been streamlined

Routine type Scoping Drafting Review Approval System

Builds QPWS&P1 GBRMPA QPWS GBRMPA

Commercial research

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

COTS2 removal 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Drupella removal 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Tourism and Charter

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Barge 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Cruise ship 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Education 3 3 3 3 Pending Pending Pending

Large vessel 7 Managing agencies agreed not to pursue

Barge and Tourism 7 Managing agencies agreed not to pursue

Research and restoration

7 Managing agencies agreed not to pursue

1 QPWS+P = Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and Partners 2 crown-of-thorns starfish

P E R F O R M A N C E

Tailored Trochus

Tailored Crayfish and Tropical Rocklobster Tailored Aquarium Fish and Coral Routine COTS and Drupella Recreational Routine COTS and Drupella Commercial

Tailored Research

Routine Commercial Research Routine Education Tailored Education Tailored Barge

Routine Barge Tailored Facility Routine Cruise Ship Tailored Tourism & Charter Routine Tourism & Charter

0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400

Template

Number of Permit conditions

Conditions reviewed Conditions pending

Total Reviews

Total Pending

430

714

Figure 6: Streamlining permissions project — condition review status 2020-21

30 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Streamlining permissions In 2020-21 the Australian National Audit Office made seven audit recommendations, which focus on finalising practices and processes for a robust and transparent permission system.

The top two priorities, the development of more routine permits and the review of all permit conditions, are tracking well. Of the 10 potential routine permits outlined in Table 6 identified for development, only one is still pending approvals.

Expert working groups have compiled relevant information related to 714 permit conditions. Figure 6 shows these reviewed permit conditions compared to those still pending. This work has informed the preparation and consideration of 10 issue papers by the Joint Streamlining Steering Committee to resolve different expert opinions on issues identified and provide options for moving to our desired outcome of shorter, clearer and more enforceable permit conditions while ensuring the protection of the Marine Park’s values.

In 2020-21, the Authority released an educational product to help permit holders understand requirements for operating in the Marine Parks. The Guide for Current Permit Holders is available on the Authority’s website.

Permissions compliance As outlined in the Corporate Plan 2020-21, the Authority is committed to strengthening the monitoring and management of compliance risks associated with permissions.

The Annual Permissions Compliance Plan and associated risk assessment is the mechanism through which the Authority achieves this goal.

The Authority managed 216 allegations of permission non-compliance that were received during the reporting period, an increase of 2.8 per cent from the previous year. Figure 7 shows allegations of permission non-compliance received by risk level:

Annual Report 2020-21 31

High 19

High 18

High 16

Medium 13

Medium 12

Medium 11

Low 8

Low 5

Low 4

Low 3

Uncategorised

7% 3% 4%

9%

4%

41%

3%

5%

7%

6%

11%

Figure 7: Allegations of permissions non-compliance by risk level

• 16 per cent were rated as high risk, such as failure to submit a bond or comply with a management plan/schedule of works.

• 48 per cent were rated as medium risk, such as failure to comply with a mooring or facility notification approval.

• 29 per cent were rated as low risk, such as failure to submit a research report or display a mooring reference number.

Seven per cent of allegations of non-compliance were not risk rated as they related to new allegation types released with the My Case Manager compliance system in February 2021.

Permission compliance audits During the reporting period, the Authority planned to deliver three field audits in accordance with its Annual Marine Parks Permissions Compliance Plan. However, due to the impacts of COVID-19 and travel restrictions only one of the planned audits were completed. An additional unplanned site-specific field audit was also completed.

The Authority completed two permission compliance desk-top audits during the reporting period.

During the reporting period an increase in checks of permitted operations occured. This is attributed

to an increase in park surveillance by the Reef Joint Field Management Program.

For the entire reporting period, the Australian Government waived all environmental management charge obligations to support local tourism business and regional economies hardest hit during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, compliance activity on environmental management charge obligations has not been undertaken. The Authority provided updates and education messages on these changes via its external website and e-newsletters and by directly contacting permit holders on three occasions.

Permission compliance systems During February 2021, the My Case Manager module within the Reef Management System was released to support effective, transparent and appropriate management of allegations of non- compliance relating to Marine Park permissions. This module integrates with existing permission system functions and features. Coinciding with this system enhancement, the Authority finalised a key internal procedure relating to managing permissions non-compliance.

The release of the My Case Manager system allows for the ability to establish baseline performance and efficiency measures relating to the management of permission compliance in future reporting periods.

P E R F O R M A N C E

172

18 100 428 165 9 104

344

11

2014

1199

775

58 10 91

0

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

Any other purpose

Carrying out works

Education

Facility

Fishing and collecting

Photography, filming, sound recording

Removal of species

Research

TUMRA

Tourism

Non-tourist commercial charter

Mooring

Operating a vessel in one vicinity

Fishing industry service vessel

Navigating a ship

Current permissions

Permission type

Figure 8: Current permissions managed at 30 June 2021

Marine Park compliance activities in each risk category Throughout the reporting period, the number of Marine Park compliance activities in each risk category improved, with a decrease in the number of Very High risks and the number of High risks remaining the same as last year. The 2020-21 assessment of 36 activities found the number of risks to be Very High = four, High = 14, Medium = 14 and Low = four.

Subject matter expert group reviews of the compliance risk assessment for 2020-21 saw several activities shift from their 2019-20 risk category, some up and some down. For some, this change was due to a change in the assessed likelihood and for others to a change in the assessed consequence. A number of other activities changed in their risk score but remained within the same risk category. Overall, there was a decline from five to four Very High risks, the number of High risks remained stable at 14, Medium risks increased from 10 to 14, and the number of Low risks remained stable at four.

The increase in the total number of risks from 33 to 36 was due to the separation of three risks into two categories each, to better reflect the ‘minor’ versus ‘major’ range of sub-risks within these broad categories (commercial reef line fishing, island national park offences and breaches of marine parks permits).

2 FINFO is where further information is requested of the permit holder to undertake an assessment of the proposed activity.

Permissions system Implementation of the permissions systems has continued to enable the sustainable use of the Marine Park while protecting identified environment and heritage values.

As at 30 June 2021, the Authority managed 1511 permits, covering 5606 permissions. Figure 8 shows the different permission types managed. Each permit can include multiple permissions with conditions.

Applications received and decisions made During the reporting period, the Authority deemed 319 permit applications properly made in accordance with section 76 of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 2019 (Figure 9). A further 87 applications were received but were deemed to not have been properly made in accordance with the regulations. Of those properly made applications:

• 25 per cent required a routine assessment approach

• 63 per cent required a tailored assessment approach and all information was supplied with the application (tailored)

• 10 per cent required a tailored assessment approach with at least one formal further information request (tailored FINFO2)

32 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Routine Tailored Tailored FINFO Public Information Package

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

2020 2021

Applications received by month

Number of applications received

Figure 9: Number of properly made applications in the reporting period

Annual Report 2020-21 33

• One per cent required a public information package assessment approach (for example, long-term maintenance dredging and installation of new facilities).

During the reporting period, 144 requests of an administrative nature such as notification approvals, condition variations, permit splits and mergers were received. A further 168 post-permit requirements for approval were also received, such as environmental management plans, research reports and schedules of works.

During the reporting period, 310 permit decisions were made (Figure 10). Of those decisions:

• 23 per cent were made through a routine assessment approach

• 60 per cent were made through a tailored assessment approach

• 17 per cent were made through a tailored FINFO assessment approach

A total of 30 permit applications were withdrawn before a decision was required.

Part 5 directions, sea dumping permits and compulsory pilotage exemptions During the reporting period, the Authority granted two sea dumping permits under the Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981, seven Part 5 directions and zero compulsory pilotage exemptions.

Progress against the permission systems service charter timeframes The Authority’s Service Charter outlines that routine applications will be decided within 25 business days of receipt of the application. Tailored applications (including tailored FINFO) are to be decided within 50 business days from receipt of all required information.

Fifty-two per cent of decisions for tailored and routine permit applications were made within the Service Charter decision timeframes. Of these decisions:

• 82 per cent of routine assessment approaches

• 38 per cent of tailored assessment approaches

• 58 per cent of tailored FINFO assessment approaches

Figure 11 shows the trend of all permit applications and administrative processes underway each month. The bars represent routine and tailored assessment decisions against service charter timeframes.

The months of July to October 2020 saw an increase in applications, in both tourism and research sectors. Triage to support high levels of variations and new applications/activities led to a build-up of continuation applications where the permit holder could continue operating whilst a decision was pending. November to January 2021 saw a small decrease in application numbers,

P E R F O R M A N C E

Routine Tailored Tailored FINFO

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Decisions made by month

Number of decisions made

2020 2021

Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

Figure 10: Number of permit application decisions made in the 2020-21 reporting period

Not met Met Applications in assessment

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Decisions made by service charter

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

160

Number of processes underway

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Nov 20

Dec 20

Jan 21

Feb 21

Mar 21

Apr 21

May 21

Jun 21

Month/Year

Figure 11: Service charter analysis and number of processes underway

34 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

allowing the assessment team to progr

ess

applications that were overdue, hence the higher number of overdue decisions being recorded in the Jan-Mar 2021 quarter. This pattern is evident across the months of fluctuating application numbers and subsequent decision timeframes over the reporting period.

Coordination with the EPBC Act The Authority continued to implement the 2009 memorandum of understanding with the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment in relation to the integration and application of the EPBC Act and Marine Park Act. Discussions continued between the agencies to progress a review and update of the memorandum of understanding. This memorandum helps integrate and streamline application and assessment processes when approvals and permissions are required under both Acts by establishing agreed administrative arrangements. During the reporting period, the Authority considered and provided advice, where relevant, on six projects that were referred under the EPBC Act. These projects triggered the consideration of potentially significant impacts on Matters of National Environmental Significance, being the Marine Park or the World Heritage Area.

Management of defence activities The Authority maintained a strong working relationship with the Australian Department of Defence throughout 2020-21, consistent with the memorandum of understanding that supports a collaborative approach to managing defence exercises in the Marine Park. Staff provided advice to the Department of Defence on ways to avoid or minimise impacts from several defence operations and exercises that occurred in the Marine Park. In particular, Authority staff contributed to planning activities for the joint Australian and United States training exercise, Talisman Sabre 2021. This large exercise took place in July 2021 across several defence and non-defence training areas within the Marine Park. An important part of these activities is raising awareness and understanding among visiting militaries of the environmental responsibilities of operating in a World Heritage Area.

Annual Report 2020-21 35

COVID-19 response The Authority acknowledged the ongoing travel and work restrictions due to COVID-19 placed severe financial and operating hardship on individuals and businesses.

Staff worked with permit holders who are in the process of restructuring businesses as they adapt to the changing COVID-19 business environment. This has resulted in an increased internal administrative burden to restructure permits.

Between March 2020 and June 2020, non-urgent Future Act Notifications were placed on hold at the request of the Queensland Representative Body Alliance due to the impacts of COVID-19 on the capacity of Traditional Owner groups to respond to notifications. This led to a backlog of application decisions not being made until those notifications could be sent and addressed. The ongoing impacts are reflected in the Service Charter timeframe shown in Figure 11.

P E R F O R M A N C E

Corporate result 2.3: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 2.3: Innovate for a resilient Reef. These relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic result: The Reef is protected.

New research and development projects The ways in which the Authority (in particular through the Reef Joint Field Management Program) facilitates new research and innovative resilience-based management are rapidly developing. A key project, the Green Island Reef Rehabilitation Project, delivered in 2020-21 exemplifies many of these. This project brought the Program together with tourism industry partners, research institutions, corporate stakeholders and Traditional Owners to undertake one of the first major reef rehabilitation efforts on the Reef. This project specifically aimed to test applying these methods to real-life situations where reef rehabilitation may be required at a local scale, such as following the grounding of a vessel on a coral reef.

The Authority provided a lead role to the project during its 18-month development and delivery, including comprehensive risk assessments, granting legislative approvals, project refinement (including site selection, Traditional Owner engagement and specific delivery methods) and major logistical support (Marine Park vessels and crew and trained divers).

The installation included the use of ‘reef-stars’ (developed by Mars Incorporated) and ‘coral-clips®’, in-water tools designed to support live coral fragments as they continue to grow into new healthy areas of reef (in areas previously devoid of stable substrate or live coral).

This (approximately 200m²) installation is continuing to be actively managed and monitored and now serves as a demonstration site. Tourism industry partners regularly access the site to interpret elements of the developing field of localised reef restoration to visitors.

This project tested many prevailing management paradigms and has achieved significant success in supporting and encouraging innovative ways to enhance reef resilience. The success of the project has paved the way for another similar project planned for delivery later in 2021 at Bait Reef in the Whitsundays Region.

Construction of Mars Reef Stars at Green Island © Commonwealth of Australia. (GBRMPA)

36 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Consistent with the Authority’s crown-of-thorns starfish strategic management framework and the Blueprint, the Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program continues to integrate new research findings to improve its effectiveness and efficiency. In 2020-21, this program worked with National Environmental Science Program researchers to identify 600 reefs that were the most critical to coral recovery and crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak dynamics within the Marine Park. These results were combined with the Authority’s prototype Resilience Network dashboard on cumulative impacts, Reef health and impact data collected by the Reef Joint Field Management Program and AIMS’ Long-Term Monitoring Program results to enhance the targeting of crown-of-thorns starfish culling operations.

Increased focus on restoration and adaptation The challenges facing the Reef call for new and innovative ways to enhance Reef resilience. To that end, the Authority is increasingly supporting processes and activities concerned with restoration and adaptation in the Marine Park.

Following public consultation on a draft policy in April-June 2020, the Authority finalised and is now implementing the Policy on Great Barrier Reef Interventions to guide matters related to restoration or adaptation interventions within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Great Barrier

Reef Coast Marine Park. The policy aims to enable Reef interventions designed to support and build ecosystem resilience and provide conservation benefits, at a range of scales, now and in the future. It also aims to ensure the continued long-term protection and conservation of the Reef to safeguard the values of the Marine Park for current and future generations to the greatest extent possible. The policy is available on the Authority’s website.

Restoration and adaptation activities continue to steadily increase in the Marine Park, with 12 permit applications for restoration activities or research into restoration methods and 11 permits granted in the reporting period. Of the permits granted within the reporting period, three were umbrella permits for the Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program. This is a program that brings together Australia’s leading experts to create an innovative suite of safe, acceptable interventions to help the Reef resist, adapt to, and recover from the impacts of climate change.

Throughout 2020-21, the Authority maintained engagement with the Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program. In 2020-21, the program made strong progress on the $150 million implementation phase, being delivered by the six main research providers and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation. The Authority has maintained engagement with this partnership through observer roles on the board and steering committee.

Instalation of MARS Reef Stars at Green Island © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 37

P E R F O R M A N C E

To improve ecosystem resilience in the face of known challenges, the Authority continues to refine and focus its regulatory effort on activities presenting the highest risks, including through implementation of the Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap.

Implementing this program area will see the Authority progress forward-looking, risk-based Marine Park and Sea Country planning and update relevant policy and regulation in line with strategic priorities.

Douglas Shoal Environmental Remediation Project

Progress continues to be made in meeting the Douglas Shoal Environmental Remediation Project objectives. The project aims to remediate the damage to the shoal caused by the grounding of the bulk carrier Shen Neng 1 in 2010.

An expression of interest process concluded in late 2020 resulted in a shortlist of remediation proponents. The Authority has delayed releasing the request for proposals to these shortlisted parties to obtain Queensland and Commonwealth government approvals and progress the required commercial arrangements associated with the project.

Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program Outbreaks of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish cause significant damage to the Reef across large spatial scales comparable to impacts of coral bleaching events and tropical cyclones. The Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program forms part of the Authority’s strategic approach to the long-term management of these damaging starfish outbreaks. This program delivers one of the main on-ground initiatives identified in the Blueprint to enhance the resilience of the Reef in the face of climate change.

The Authority is responsible for the prioritisation of reefs for crown-of-thorns starfish control under its crown-of-thorns starfish strategic management framework, developing the Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program annual work plan, and the collation and analysis of outcomes. The Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program results include the combined outcomes delivered by the three crown-of-thorns starfish culling vessels managed by the Reef and Rainforest Research Centre and the two crown-of-thorns starfish culling vessels managed by the Authority.

In 2020-21, Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program vessels actioned 107 of 185 (58%) high-value reefs targeted for crown-of-thorns starfish

management activities and an additional six reefs to assist the tourism industry with coral protection on their sites. Figure 13 shows the distribution of reefs actioned for crown-of-thorns starfish management during 2020-21. At the end of 2020-21, crown-of-thorns starfish were at or below ecologically sustainable levels for coral growth and recovery on 59 of the 107 (55%) actioned reefs, while culling was underway at 40 reefs (37%) and pending at 8 reefs (8%) (Figure 12). Since the expansion of the Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program in late 2018, over 35,000 diver hours have been invested in cull operations, more than 275,000 crown-of-thorns starfish have been culled and coral has been protected from starfish predation on more than 13,000 hectares of reef. Surveillance monitoring has also been conducted across more than 11,000 hectares of reef to determine crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak status, direct culling effort and assess coral status and trends.

The Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program is operating at 100 per cent capacity. The number of reefs actioned is dependent on culling resources, weather conditions and the integrated pest management guidelines that require cull divers to concentrate significant, repeated effort on reefs with very high numbers of crown-of-thorns starfish until cull thresholds are achieved. The Authority is working with Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program partners to continually improve the program, including its operational targets, reef prioritisation process and on water decision-making. This will generate ongoing improvements in program effectiveness and efficiency and maximise coral protection across high-value reefs consistent with the objectives of the Authority and the Reef 2050 Plan.

38 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

8%

Reconnaissance, COTS detected

Culled, currently unsustainable

Monitored, remains sustainable

Culled, sustainable levels achieved

25%

37%

30%

Figure 12: Management modes of crown-of-thorns across 107 actioned target reefs

Annual Report 2020-21 39

Queensland

Coral

Sea

Cooktown

Cairns

Townsville

Mackay

Rockhampton

Bundaberg

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park boundary

155°0'0"E

150°0'0"E

150°0'0"E

145°0'0"E

145°0'0"E

15°0'0"S 20°0'0"S 25°0'0"S

Culled, currently unsustainable

Culled, sustainable levels achieved

Monitored, remains sustainable

Reconnaissance - COTS Detected

Non-Target Reef

Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program 2020-21

5 Vessels

1221

On water vessel days delivered on-water

113 High value reefs actioned

3224

Kilometres of reef surveyed for crown-of-thorns starfish and to assess coral cover

7940

Hectares of coral reef protected by COTS culling

14,268 Dive hours spent culling

87,142 Crown-of-thorns starfish culled

2757

Surveys to monitor coral health and impacts

Figure 13: Map of reefs patrolled for crown-of-thorns starfish during 2020-21

P E R F O R M A N C E

Program area 3: Enhancing Reef resilience through partnerships, collaboration and education Through targeted education and stewardship programs, the Authority works to establish mutually beneficial relationships with Traditional Owners, Australian and Queensland government agencies, regional councils, Reef-dependent industries, students of all ages, community groups and the community more broadly.

These targeted programs aim to raise awareness, influence best practice, foster innovative actions and build a sense of collective responsibility to care for the Reef and empower others to contribute to Reef protection and resilience.

Performance results The results against performance criteria for Program area 3 are outlined in Table 7.

Table 7: Summary of performance results against Program area 3

Corporate result Performance criteria

2020-21 Target

2020-21 Actual

3.1 Educating others about the Reef

3.1.1 Deliver a global presence through targeted digital and mainstream marketing activities that promote face-to-face and virtual visitation to Reef HQ Aquarium

40,000 visitors 45,094 visitors

3.1.2 Engagement and audience growth on the Authority’s website and social media channels

Establish methodology and baseline

Completed

3.1.3 Participants who successfully complete Reef Education program or training Establish methodology

and baseline

In progress

Methodology developed within the draft Reef Education and Engagement Implementation Plan 2021-2022

3.1.4 The Authority’s campaigns raise awareness Establish methodology

and baseline

Completed

3.1.5 Number of public contact events where our people are talking directly to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area users and associated communities

2512 Regional based staff

- engaged more than 3500 people

Field Management Program - engaged with 2835 users

40 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Corporate result Performance criteria

2020-21 Target

2020-21 Actual

3.2 Partnering with others to care for the Reef

3.2.1 Number of users of the redeveloped Eye on the Reef app Redevelop app In progress

3.2.2 Proportion of Reef tourism operators recognised as High Standard Tourism Operators

69% of total Tourism Operators

70 High Standard Tourism Operators

3.2.3 Number of Master Reef Guides 82 Master Reef Guides /41 High Standard Tourism Operators

82 Master Reef Guides /41 High Standard Tourism Operators

3.2.4 Percentage of Marine Park coastline covered by Traditional Owner agreements 25% 25%

3.2.5 Progress towards management goals under the revised Reef 2050 Plan Deliver updated Reef 2050 Plan

and establish reporting framework against management goals

In progress

3.2.6 Progress Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnership Strategy and set targets against actions

Deliver strategy and establish reporting framework against actions

In progress

Criteria source: Performance indicators are recorded in the Authority’s chapter in the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements p. 314 and in the Authority’s Corporate Plan 2020-21 pp. 35-36.

Corporate result 3.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement

The following strategies and activities support corporate result 3.1: Educating others about the Reef. These relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic result: The Reef is understood.

Reef HQ Aquarium Reef HQ Aquarium is the Authority’s national education centre for the Reef.

The forecast visitation for Reef HQ Aquarium has been reduced from the previous year’s visitation of more than 90,000 visitors to 40,000 visitors in 2020-21 because of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions and the closure of the facility from 1 February 2021 to enable the two and a half year, $80.1 million renewal project to occur. Despite this, the reduced visitation forecast for this period before the closure, has been exceeded. Total visitation

from opening post COVID (from 13 July to the final trading day on 31 January) was 45,094.

Since closing on 1 February, Reef HQ Aquarium has continued its exciting $80.1 million upgrade with the completion of early works in preparation for site handover to a principal contractor in September 2021. This Australian Government-funded project will improve animal

Staff continued to maintain aquaria at Reef HQ Aquarium during closure © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 41

P E R F O R M A N C E

Figure 14: Reef HQ Aquarium highlights 2020-21

Reopened July 13, 2020 under COVID restrictions

45,094 visitors

45 domestic 65 international tourism buyers at the 2021 Australian

Tourism Exchange

2,146,073 impressions 4.5% engagement across Reef HQ social

media channels

13,696 bookings were made to visit Reef HQ Aquarium

90.3%

of survey respondents rated our customer service upon entry as 4-5 stars

Scheduled water changes on

156 days

280 Megawatts of solar energy produced

Upgraded Virtual Connection technology and virtual meeting room capacity to

1,000

connections per session

Induction into the Centre for Interactive Learning and Collaboration’s

Pinnacle Award Hall of Fame for education excellence

88% of members who were offered a refund due to COVID chose to retain their

membership

1056.07 tonnes of CO2 emissions avoided through use of our renewable energy

systems

More than

50

companies delivered the early works program

In addition to the previously recieved $29.5 million Reef HQ received a

further

$10.6 million for improvements to visitor access and exhibits

Closed 1 February 2021 to undertake refurbishment

42 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

life support systems that are essential to the care of animals, provide a new façade and admissions area, reinvigorate the exhibits to enrich visitor experiences and upgrade critical safety infrastructure. While the facility is closed, the Authority will continue national and international engagement, taking the Reef to schools, communities and the public through its Virtual Connections program, Facebook and website.

A number of proactive public relations activities were delivered throughout 2020-21, which focused on key themes such as the Reef HQ Aquarium renewal project, temporary closure of the facility and animal husbandry. As a result, the Reef HQ Aquarium public relations activities delivered to a domestic audience reached 1,976,699, representing an editorial value of $3,377,361. This reflects the interest levels regarding the current capital works deliverables, including the rehoming of the animals.

Impressions across all social media channels were 2,237,427, with Facebook representing 79 per cent of total impression. Engagement rate per impressions across all social media channels was 4.5 per cent. However, post frequency reduced across all channels following closure of the facility.

Digital communication highlights 2020-21 The Authority’s corporate digital communication strategy sees a focus on our website as a key channel and includes a new approach to our social media channels with an emphasis on producing higher quality and more targeted content that is in line with corporate strategic objectives, and posting less frequently. Providing improved value to social followers is in line with what is now accepted as effective social engagement.

This subsequently reduced overall engagement compared to the previous year, although, there was an overall increase in the impressions on our posts that appeared on the channels, indicating algorithms are responding positively to the higher quality content.

Search impressions across the Authority’s Google my Business amounted to 663,600 views with more than 1,097,000 total views. The Google Business page received 12,708 post views, with an average Google review rating of 4.89 stars.

Reef education programs

Community Reef education

Annual Report 2020-21 43

Reef HQ Aquarium delivers key messages about the values and threats to the sustainable future of the Reef and the actions that people can take to help protect it.

Surveys indicated that 80 per cent of visitors had an improved understanding of Reef issues and what actions they can take to protect the Reef after their visit to Reef HQ Aquarium.

Reef HQ Aquarium volunteer training No new volunteers were recruited into the Reef HQ Aquarium volunteer program in 2020-21 due to the closure of Reef HQ Aquarium. Although volunteers are no longer on site at Reef HQ Aquarium, the Reef HQ Aquarium Volunteers Association Incorporated continued to maintain engagement with its volunteers through newsletters and social media, and providing social outings and training opportunities such as training some volunteers in AUSLAN (Australian sign language).

Formal Reef education Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a transition from face-to-face formal education delivered through the Reef HQ Aquarium to providing digital educational resources for use in home-schooling and online education through the Authority’s Virtual Connections program.

Reef Guardian Schools Program The Reef Guardian Schools Program aims to create awareness, understanding and appreciation for the Reef and its connected ecosystems. Schools and students are encouraged and empowered to undertake actions and projects within their schools and the local community that will benefit the long-term health of the Great Barrier Reef. Two new schools joined the Reef Guardian Schools Program during 2020-21, bringing the total to 297, with more than 139,900 students and 9630 teachers.

The COVID-19 pandemic required delivery changes to the Reef Guardian Schools Program. The Authority’s Reef Education team offered 18 free Virtual Connection programs on subjects such as climate change, marine debris, threatened species and reef ecosystems with more than 2570 students

Underwater Reef education video conferencing © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

P E R F O R M A N C E

Digital communication highlights 2020-21

Social media channels

Figure 15: Digital communicaiton highlights 2020-21

Channel Target Actual

Total engagement rate 4.5% 4.2%

Total engaged followers 3% increase 36.28% decrease

Total new followers across channels 20,000 per year 13,415

Total followers across channels 165,021

Platform Impressions

Number of times content is displayed

Engagement

Number of interactions users have with the content

Posts

Number of posts to all social media platforms

Facebook 10,427,015 307,228 314

Twitter 430,192 8589 725

Instagram 4,316,293 275,016 410

LinkedIn 313,120 17,224 193

Total 15,486,620 608,057 1642

Reef Authority website

Target Actual

Page views 1.4 million 1.4 million

Users 494,000 507,100

Website

Male Female Engagement Time on page

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority 49.8% 50.2% viewed 1.93 pages

Two minutes 18 seconds

Reef HQ Aquarium 42.8% 57.2% viewed 2.21 pages

One minute 27 seconds

44 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

and teachers from more than 70 Reef Guardian schools participating.

An innovation for 2021 was to host the Reef Guardian Future Leader Eco-challenges as virtual challenges. A series of 10 marine themed weekly challenges ran across Terms one and two for Reef Guardian primary schools and high schools. Being virtual, the challenges allowed non-Reef Guardian schools outside the Reef catchment to participate. A total of 94 schools registered for the virtual challenges, including schools from Queensland, South Australia, New South Wales and the Northern Territory, and four international schools based in Canada, USA, UAE and Nigeria also registered. A total of 439 submissions were received over 10 weeks.

Virtual challenges encourage students to care, learn, act and share their love for the Reef. Following the challenges, a survey was sent to participants and 90 per cent of teachers’ survey responses agreed or strongly agreed that the activities in the virtual challenges inspired the students to care about the Great Barrier Reef and encouraged students to take actions to help protect the Reef.

The activities increased the students’ learning, knowledge and understanding of the Reef and they shared their learnings from the virtual challenges with family and friends and the wider community, including through their school’s social media channels with the hashtag #rgsflec.

ReefTube - education lessons online

A series of educational lessons on the Reef were produced and made available via YouTube as well as educational activity sheets and resources. A range of educational sessions were delivered live on the Facebook pages of the Authority, Reef HQ Aquarium and partners, with viewers posting questions that were answered live by the presenters.

EduTourism The COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on domestic and international travel resulted in no groups physically participating in EduTourism programs in 2020-21. The Authority used its outreach education technology to remain connected with various EduTourism partners and support delivery of Reef education and remote student learning. One example of this was the City University of New York that was scheduled to visit north Queensland in 2020-21 for a 10-day study abroad program. Using outreach education technologies, the Authority’s Reef Education team facilitated a virtual learning program that reached over 850 participants from 13 countries at the City University of New York.

Outreach Reef education Expanding the Authority’s Virtual Connections program continued to be a focus during 2020-21. The program delivered 99 virtual education sessions to school students, universities, individuals and other organisations, reaching more than 7920 people from across 10 countries.

In program evaluations, 98 per cent of participants agreed or strongly agreed that they had a better understanding of the Reef as a result of their Virtual Connections program and that they were inspired to care for the Reef. A total of 95 per cent indicated that they were encouraged to take action to help protect the Reef and 98 per cent indicated that they would share their learnings and experience of the Virtual Connections program with others.

Reef Discovery Course The Reef Discovery Course is an online education course released to the public in May 2020. Developed for the Reef tourism industry, the course aims to improve knowledge and understanding of the World Heritage Area, its cultural connections, biological diversity, management and protection. The course was designed to inspire people to learn more about the Reef, how valuable it is and how to share accurate information about it. More than 240 members of the community have now joined the Reef Discovery Course, including more than 130 Reef tourism operator staff, including all Master Reef Guides.

Eye on the Reef Eye on the Reef is a reef monitoring, reef assessment and capacity-building program run by the Authority for tourism industry staff and the wider community. The data obtained is an additional and critical source of information on Reef health for Marine Park managers. This program currently stores 57,512 reef health surveys and 29,279 records of protected species and significant event sightings. In 2020-21, more than 7067 Reef

Reef Guardian school students from Farnborough State School collaborated with Livingstone and Gladstone Reef Guardian Councils to install new Drain Buddies © Livingstone Shire Council

Annual Report 2020-21 45

P E R F O R M A N C E

health surveys were received. The program enables anyone who visits the Reef to contribute to its long-term protection by collecting valuable information about Reef health, marine animals and incidents, including sightings of crown-of-thorns starfish and charismatic megafauna, such as whale sharks. Eye on the Reef offers a range of assessment and monitoring methods, including:

• Rapid monitoring: 464 rapid monitoring surveys were submitted this financial year.

• Tourism weekly monitoring: tourism operators undertake weekly observations of specific sites, providing invaluable early warning data. A total of 634 site monitoring surveys were submitted by reef tourism operators this financial year.

• Reef health and impact survey: a robust and rapid method for providing a snapshot of Reef health, which is used to assess the impacts of cyclones, bleaching, disease and predation. A total of 5969 reef health and impact surveys were submitted by 208 people this financial year.

• Sightings network: a smartphone app that enables any Marine Park user to access Marine Park zoning in real-time and report interesting or unusual sightings. A total of 5117 sightings by 321 people were submitted this financial year, bringing the total number of sightings to 29,385. Further details about the Eye on the Reef app can be found on page 47.

The Remaining Connected and ‘Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection Initiative programs to support reef tourism operators during the COVID-19 pandemic they resulted in more than 80 Reef tourism industry staff, representing 20 Reef tourism operators, being trained in Eye on the Reef survey methods. Most visitors to coral reef habitats within the Marine Park now travel with an operator submitting Reef health knowledge to the agency.

The $3.2 million Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection Initiative was part of the Australian Government’s $1 billion COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Fund. This initiative helped ensure business continuity for the tourism industry in 2020-21 and conserve and protect high-value reef tourism sites. As a result of this funding, tourism operators became the dominant supplier of reef health data in the Marine Park, submitting more than 2000 Reef health surveys from 114 reefs across the Marine Park.

Master Reef Guide program In June 2021, 19 Reef tourism operator staff joined the Master Reef Guide program, bringing the total to 82 Master Reef Guides. The Master Reef Guide program is focused on recognising the best of the best guides working within the Great Barrier Reef tourism industry and enhancing their knowledge base and guiding skills while connecting them to valuable knowledge sources. The immersive component of the training is predominately achieved through an intensive field school where the guides and trainers come together and share their knowledge. The vast majority of visitors to the Marine Park now travel with an operator that has at least one highly trained and recognised Master Reef Guide.

Raising awareness through educational campaigns The Authority runs educational campaigns to promote responsible Reef practices and provide broader education around the Reef and its management.

Campaigns focused on improving recreational fishing compliance with Marine Park zoning throughout 2020-21. The targeted compliance campaigns promoted zoning information and encouraged downloads and use of the Eye on the Reef zoning app. The campaigns were rolled out Reef-wide across various digital platforms, including Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, search and programmatic display advertising. Traditional advertising mediums included fishing publications, radio and corflute signs at popular boat ramps. All advertising linked to dedicated landing pages on the Authority’s website, which included a cal-to-action to download the Eye on the Reef app, provide direct links and access to

Reef Authority Staff conducting Eye on the Reef training to tourism operators © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

46 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

zoning maps, videos demonstrating how users can use their GPS plotters and associated responsible Marine Park use information. The Eye on the Reef app download total was 19,394, a 146 per cent increase on the previous financial year, which totalled 7888 downloads across both iOS and Android operating systems.

A campaign was rolled out to support the new innovative approach to delivering Future Leaders Eco-challenges. This program was originally run face-to-face but due to COVID-19 a new online approach was implemented this year. Advertising was targeted to specific audiences and appeared across Facebook, LinkedIn and search engines. Virtual challenges were aimed at engaging school students to care, learn, share and act for the Reef. International schools could register to take part in the challenges for the first time due to this new approach. The target for the Future Leaders Eco-challenges campaign was for 120 schools to sign up for the challenge. A total of 94 schools had signed up by the end of the campaign, which was well within the margin initially calculated. Four international schools took part in the challenge.

Public engagement

Regional engagement Regional engagement officers based in Cairns, Mackay and Yeppoon service regional communities through a range of programs. During 2020-21, the officers engaged more than 3500 people from Bundaberg to Cape York. While many events were cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19 restrictions, the engagement target exceeded the forecast target of 750 people.

Reflecting the corporate priorities, the major events for the year encouraged communities to address the key threats to the Reef. These events included fishing competitions, community festivals, workshops and supporting Reef Guardian Councils.

Reef Joint Field Management Program engagement The Reef Joint Field Management Program is a joint initiative delivered by the Authority and Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service. Through the delivery of this program, officers engaged with 2835 users while in the field and recorded these interactions on the field reporting system. These contacts comprised 2454 public contacts, 57 permit checks, 308 incidents and 16 caution notices. Public contacts are the primary mechanism to effectively engage with Reef users about their responsibilities on the Reef. Field staff are provided with training, talking points, educational material and other targeted marketing material. In 92 per cent of the public contact events recorded, visitors had access

to one or more sources of zoning information: 61 per cent used chart plotters, 23 per cent used printed maps and 20 per cent used the Authority’s Eye on the Reef app.

Corporate result 3.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 3.2: Partnering with others to care for the Reef. These relate directly to the Portfolio Budget Statement strategic result: Sustainable use of the Reef.

Eye on the Reef smartphone app redevelopment The free Eye on the Reef app provides access to zoning information and rules in the Marine Park. The app shows users what zone they are in, what’s allowed, it works outside of mobile range and can be used on a smartphone or tablet.

The current app requires upgrades to enhance functionality and increase positive user experience. As part of this process, initial research and consultation with internal and external working groups across multiple stakeholders has been completed. The research resulted in a list of identified user needs requirements and a gap analysis was performed. The identified user needs require prioritisation and a draft product roadmap has been completed to guide the app redevelopment in 2021-22.

An assessment of external user needs and functional requirements will continue in 2021-22, which will allow for a more comprehensive understanding of the functional specifications as well as provide further specificity as to how the app is used.

High Standard Tourism Operators The Authority is committed to ensuring that tourism in the Marine Park is world-leading and innovative to inspire strong stewardship by tourism operators and visitors alike. As a part of its commitment under the Tourism Management Action Strategy, the Authority is undertaking a review of the High Standard Tourism Operator program to ensure it continues to evolve and remain contemporary for the industry. Initial scoping and analysis have been presented to the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee along with workshopping best practice standards.

High Standard Tourism Operators voluntarily operate to a higher standard than required by legislation as part of their commitment to the ecologically sustainable use of the Marine Park. Tourism experiences with a High Standard

Annual Report 2020-21 47

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Ribbon Reefs

Cape Tribulation

Heron Island

Yeppoon

Lady Musgrave Island

Great Keppel Island

Lady Elliot Island

Port Douglas

Roving guides

Townsville

Whitsundays

Cairns

WHERE TO FIND A MASTER REEF GUIDE

Master Reef Guides are committed to sharing the wonders of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area through world-class guiding and interpretive talks and tours, delivered in a respectful, informative, and memorable way.

Find a Master Reef Guide here: www.gbrmpa.gov.au/our-partners /master-reef-guides

Follow the Master Reef Guides on Facebook: Master Reef Guides Instagram: @masterreefguides

Figure 16: Distribution of Master Reef Guides along the Great Barrier Reef

48 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Tourism Operator in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park are world leading, ecologically sustainable and culturally appropriate, and enhance Reef protection.

At 30 June 2021, 70 tourism operators were recognised as High Standard Tourism Operators in the Marine Park. Using contemporary best practice benchmarks, High Standard Tourism Operators deliver site stewardship actions, including Marine Park citizen science, to manage and support their Master Reef Guides to deliver world class immersive educational Reef experiences centred on the outstanding universal value of the World Heritage Area.

The outcomes from the workshops held with the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee have forged the pathway to ensure a contemporary framework and industry-relevant program that is fit-for-purpose and enables equal opportunities within the tourism industry. The next phase of the program will be to incorporate the initial feedback from the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee and establish an expert working group to guide the stakeholder consultation phase.

Master Reef Guide program The Master Reef Guide program is managed in partnership with Tourism and Events Queensland and the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators. As at 30 June 2021, 82 industry professionals from 41 Authority-recognised High Standard Tourism Operations had graduated as Master Reef Guides.

A virtual masterclass was held on 17 and 18 December 2020. The key presenters were internationally-recognised marine biologist and guide, Robin Aiello, and the Authority’s Chief Scientist, Dr David Wachenfeld.

From 14 to 18 June 2021, the 5th Master Reef Guide Field School was held on Heron Island. This

field school was the first to be held in more than a year due to COVID-19 restrictions and uncertainties placed on the tourism industry. Successful applicants from across the Reef, from Port Douglas to Bundaberg, came together to learn, experience and be inspired to become Master Reef Guides. These 19 Master Reef Guides join 63 others in sharing their knowledge with their guests and inspiring them to see the Reef, love the Reef and protect the Reef.

The Master Reef Guides Facebook and Instagram social media pages have continued to grow and through these channels, stories on the Reef continue to be shared worldwide and raise awareness of the Reef’s importance, protection and management with an engaged audience.

To date:

• A total combined reach from social media pages (Facebook and Instagram) is 850,000

• There are 7856 Facebook followers, which is an increase of more than 2000 followers from the previous reporting year, with the most popular Facebook post shared being a fever of cow nose rays, which reached more than 43,000 people

• There are 14,200 Instagram followers, which is an increase of more than 5000 followers from the previous reporting year, with the most popular post being ‘A reef I didn’t know existed until now’ that reached 26,600 Instagram users.

High Standard Tourism Operators taking part in Eye on the Reef surveys as part of the Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection Initiative © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

5th cohort of Master Reef Guides undertaking training © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA)

Annual Report 2020-21 49

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Traditional Use of Marine Resources Agreements The Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreement program continues to be the benchmark in Traditional Owner-designed and led Sea Country management agreements in the Marine Park. The program has maintained nine accredited marine resource agreements, which support 17 Traditional Owner clan groups, covering approximately 23 per cent of the coastline. Moreover, one extra Indigenous Land Use Agreement brings the total approximate coverage of agreements to 25 per cent.

Traditional Use of Marine Resources Agreements recognise and support Traditional Owner lores and customs with a robust legislative framework under the Marine Park Act 1975, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 2019 and Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003. They are a unique partnership agreement that recognises and supports the Native Title rights and interests of Traditional Owners who hold an inherent spiritual connection to the Reef.

These Sea Country management tools can describe how Traditional Owner groups wish to manage their traditional use of marine resources; their role in compliance, research and monitoring of plants and animals; the protection of cultural heritage values and the management of human activities in the Marine Park.

In addition to the nine accredited marine resource agreements, the Authority has commenced new partnerships in developing two new marine resource agreements.

Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreement group activities include, employing marine resource agreement coordinators, junior ranger programs and, recording/promoting/protecting heritage values such as burial sites, song/ storylines, women’s/men’s places and fish traps. Marine resource agreement groups also conduct mangrove/coral/water quality and seagrass research and monitoring projects. These projects include ongoing monitoring of iconic species such as turtle, dugong, crocodile, stingrays and swordfish on Country.

Sea Country values mapping has been a focus of the marine resource agreement groups with some significant cultural values information recorded and shared. The first publicly available product is from Mandubarra Traditional Owners and can be viewed on the Authority’s website.

Reef 2050 Plan The Reef 2050 Plan sets out the collaborative approach between the Australian and Queensland governments to manage the Reef. It focuses on

actions to address key threats and support the health and resilience of the Reef. Through day-to-day operations, the Authority is a key partner in delivering a large part of the Reef 2050 Plan under joint governance arrangements.

The Plan was first released in 2015 and is undergoing its first five-yearly review. The draft updated Plan was released for a six-week public consultation in August 2020. The feedback received during the consultation process was analysed and considered in updating the Plan. Once approved, the Plan will be available on the Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment’s website.

The Authority contributed to the preparation of the annual report against the objectives of the Reef 2050 Plan. The annual report for the 2019 calendar year showed the Australian and Queensland governments have continued to make good progress in implementing the Reef 2050 Plan actions.

Work commenced on a Reef 2050 Traditional Owner Implementation Plan in late 2020-20, which is expected to be finalised in 2021-22.

The Authority is the lead agency on the reporting framework for the Reef 2050 Plan’s goals, and work is underway to design a new reporting framework. The Authority worked with Reef managers, scientists, other stakeholders and end-users to comprehensively understand what information is needed to assess progress against the Plan and inform decision makers. The work required to fill critical monitoring gaps will be prioritised. Work commenced on building the Reef Knowledge System for future reporting on the Plan, along with the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program, for which the Authority is the program lead.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnership Strategy The Authority created a new position (Assistant Director, Strategy and Partnerships Traditional Owners) in early 2021, with responsibility for delivering the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnership Strategy. It was agreed that a Traditional Owner partnerships framework would be a more fit for purpose tool for the Authority in establishing and strengthening partnerships with Traditional Owners. The delivery process of the framework commenced in June 2021.

50 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Program area 4: Supporting a high-performing organisation The Authority is committed to continuing to evolve its operations and support its people. We continue to embrace agile ways of working so we are well equipped to manage an increasingly complex reef environment.

The Authority continues to invest in its people and the tools they need to enable them to perform at their best. Improvements to technology and processes are front and centre of corporate priorities as is the investment in developing capabilities in key areas such as project management, digital services and leadership. Alongside this, significant work continues on imbedding the four GBRMPA culture pillars, which lay the foundation for a high performing organisation.

Performance results The results against performance criteria for Program area 4 are outlined in Table 8.

Table 8: Summary of performance results against Program area 4

Corporate result

Performance criteria

2020-21 Target

2020-21 Actual

4.1 Our resources are applied judiciously

4.1.1 Overall score in the Check-up PLUS Information Management Maturity Report 3.0 2.79

4.1.2 Number of the Authority’s legal affairs that give rise to formal sanction for breach of any legislation

0 0

4.1.3 Percentage of contract variations, with a value of 10% or more of the contract value Establish baseline

5.99%

4.1.4 Minimum procurement spend for goods and services from eligible Indigenous enterprises

1.25% 5.65%

4.1.5 Percentage of non-mandatory training courses offered that are fully subscribed Establish baseline

75% fully subscribed

4.2 Internal controls are documented and implemented

4.2.1 Proportion of ‘important’, ‘very important’ and ‘critical’ internal controlled documents that are active and current each month

80% ± 10% each month 75.51%

4.2.2 Proportion of agreed internal audit management actions/recommendations completed each financial quarter

25% ± 10% each financial quarter

24.23% each financial quarter on average

4.2.3 Proportion of external audit actions completed 100% 100%

4.2.4 Maturity score achieved for maintaining risk management capability 4.035 out of a maximum 6.000

in 2021

3.675 out of a

maximum of 5.000

This measure changed in 2020-21

Annual Report 2020-21 51

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Islander suppliers. During the 2020-21 reporting period, 5.65 per cent of procurement spend for goods and services for the Authority came from eligible Indigenous enterprises. This is in line with the Commonwealth Indigenous Procurement Policy. Procurement tools and guidance material have been reviewed to ensure Indigenous procurement opportunities are maximised.

Training staff and development There were 16 non-mandatory courses made available to staff during 2020-21, with 12 of them being fully subscribed. Non-mandatory courses are defined as those funded and facilitated by centralised learning and development and identified as agency priorities and do not include internal training courses. The courses included mental health first aid (fully subscribed), cultural appreciation, complaints management (fully subscribed), bringing culture to life and role specific health and safety training.

In 2020-21, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural appreciation courses were provided to staff across the Authority. This awareness program provided 38 participants with an insight to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and customs. For 2021-22, we will be expanding our training to further develop cultural capability, enabling staff to build and apply knowledge in a practical and structured way.

The number of courses offered in 2020-21 was lower than expected due to shifting corporate priorities following an organisational review and restructure, and restrictions on trainer availability

Corporate result

Performance criteria

2020-21 Target

2020-21 Actual

4.3 People and assets are safe

4.3.1 Proportion of confirmed fraud incidents that have a system or process failure identified as a root cause

Establish a baseline

0

4.3.2 Maturity self-assessment for the Protective Security Policy Framework ‘Developing’ overall maturity

or better

Developing

4.3.3 Proportion of hazards identified via workplace site inspection (every six months) that have been eliminated or minimised

100% 100%

4.3.4 Staff are satisfied with the policies/ practices in place to help them manage health and wellbeing

68% 64%

4.3.5 Proportion of employees who feel they have been subjected to harassment or bullying in the workplace

20% less than 2019-20 2% increase

Criteria source: Performance indicators are recorded in the Authority’s chapter in the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment 2020-21 Portfolio Budget Statements p. 314 and in the Authority’s Corporate Plan 2020-21 pp. 37-39

Corporate result 4.1: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 4.1: Our resources are applied judiciously. These are in place to support the undertaking of program areas 1-3.

Overall score in the Check-up PLUS Information Management Maturity Report The National archives of Australia has a national scoring system Check-up PLUS for Information Management. The 2020 Check-up PLUS score was 2.79, an increase from 2.69 in 2019-20. The Check-up measures governance, creation, interoperability, storage, disposal and digital operation of information management.

Since January, the Authority has significantly increased its efforts towards digitisation and disposal of physical records. The Authority has developed an ICT strategy that considers a cloud-first approach. Through these efforts it is expected that there will be significant improvement in the Authority’s maturity.

Indigenous enterprise procurement As part of the opportunities identified under the Authority’s Reconciliation Action Plan, the Authority has promoted the understanding of the Commonwealth’s intent to maximise procurement activities through Aboriginal and Torres Strait

52 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

as a result of COVID-19. While this year’s result was positive, lack of notice was identified as a key contributor to low attendance. Competing priorities were also cited as reasons why staff could not attend the available training.

During 2021-22, there will be a structured training program focused on the agency’s current priorities and linked to staff development plans.

Corporate result 4.2: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 4.2: Internal controls are documented and implemented. These are in place to support the undertaking of program areas1-3.

Internal controlled documents Document control assists in translating legal and policy obligations into practice. Maintaining document currency helps to ensure that:

• appropriate and suitable information is available where and when it is needed

• the integrity of information guiding workforce behaviour is protected

• the unintended use of invalid, harmful, outdated or unlawful information is minimised.

Target performance is based on an average of the previous 12 months’ results.

Compared to the baseline average, a sustained improvement in the currency of documents has been observed, and performance as at 30 June 2021 is two percentage points above the minimum target range (Figure 17).

During the 2020-21 financial year, increased scrutiny of overdue documents by the Audit and Risk Management Committee is suspected as the key driver of improved performance.

Internal audit management actions/ recommendations Internal auditing contributes to the Authority’s system of internal control by providing independent, objective assurance about the effectiveness of important management systems and processes. Responding to internal audit recommendations contributes to the continuous improvement of internal control effectiveness and minimises the likelihood of risk events.

The target range of performance, per quarter, was determined so as to seek delivery of 100% of actions over the course of one year (Figure 18).

On average, 24.23 per cent of internal audit actions were completed each quarter during 2020-21. This remained within the target range.

External audit actions All audit actions raised in the 2019-20 external audit have been resolved promptly, which was acknowledged by the external auditor.

65.51% 63.12%

67.91% 65.48%

65.68%

65.52%

66.29%

64.61%

66.29%

68.21%

64.33%

68.05%

66.67%

67.25%

69.01%

70.18%

70.00%

69.59%

70.18%

72.09%

Feb 20

Mar 20

Apr 20

May 20

Jun 20

Jul 20

Aug 20

Sep 20

Oct 20

Nov 20

Dec 20

Jan 21

Feb 21

Mar 21

Apr 21

May 21

Jun 21

Baseline Natural variation - upper limit

Natural variation - lower limit Performance (%)

Controlled documents (%)

Months

Figure 17: Proportion of ‘controlled documents’ that were current during 2020-21

Annual Report 2020-21 53

P E R F O R M A N C E

Maturity score for risk management capability Further maturity of the Authority’s risk management capability continues to be a strategic initiative for the organisation. In 2020-21 the Authority engaged Deloitte to assist the Marine Park Authority Board

29.56%

-13.51%

72.64%

15.38%

29.09%

2.44%

6.94%

10.45%

48.33%

22.58%

15.56%

Q1 19-20

Q2 19-20

Q3 19-20

Q4 19-20

Q1 20-21

Q2 20-21

Q3 20-21

Q4 20-21

Baseline Natural variation - upper limit

Natural variation - lower limit Performance (%)

Quarterly Internal audit actions/recommendations (%)

in further defining the organisation, strategic risks, and in developing risk reporting. For 2020-21 the extent of improvement achieved exceeded the target by 0.1 per cent. (Figure 19).

During the 2020-21 financial year, 16 positions were offered the opportunity to attain a Certificate

Figure 18: Proportion of internal audit actions/recommendations that have been completed each quarter during 2020-21.

48.49%

29.20%

67.79%

37.33%

42.90%

45.20%

53.98%

63.05%

73.60%

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2021

Baseline Natural variation - upper limit

Natural variation - lower limit Performance (%)

Years

Risk maturity (%)

Figure 19: Proportion of the highest score possible for risk capability maturity, as determined by Comcover

54 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

IV in Risk Management Essentials (where 50 per cent of Senior Executive Service and 40 per cent of Executive Level 2 personnel participated), which is suspected as the key driver of improvement.

Corporate result 4.3: Analysis against performance criteria and purpose statement The following strategies and activities support corporate result 4.3: People and assets are safe. These are in place to support the organisation undertaking of program areas 1-3.

Protective Security Policy Framework The level of security maturity moved from low-end developing to high-end developing just below managing. Therefore, during the 2020-21 period, there was an increase in the Authority’s security posture and awareness, which was due to the rollout of security awareness training (personnel security), increased security reporting (governance), audits of facilities and rectification of identified security risks (physical security) and ICT system reporting, including the development of the protected enclave (information security). Issues that will form a focus in the next 12 months include:

• management of non-Australian citizens, their security clearances or waivers and a risk assessment of how access to potentially classified information is managed

• confirming appropriate security levels to positions

• ensuring contracts have clauses in place that acknowledge how sensitive information is to be managed by the contractor

• conducting an annual security check with security-cleared personnel

• debriefing any separating staff on their security obligations such as non-disclosure.

These issues are being addressed.

Hazards Hazard reporting is captured during site surveys and via direct reporting to the Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) Manager. Currently, no identified hazards remain unresolved. The Authority intends focussing on practical improvements to the way we manage hazards to ensure our staff remain safe at work and that safety related risks are appropriately dealt with.

Workplace Health and safety is further reported on in Part 4 Management and Accountability.

Staff policies and practices The 2020 Australian Public Service (APS) Census provides a 64 per cent satisfaction rating based on 169 respondents. This is down 2 per cent on 2019. This may be in part due to the challenges faced in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Significant work has been done and continues to be done in 2021 looking at future working arrangements to ensure the opportunities identified during the COVID-19 response in terms of workforce flexibility continue to be harnessed and considered as the Authority plans for its new office accommodation in 2023. The Authority has also been working with the employee assistance provider on improving access to wellbeing coaches and group wellness sessions.

Further analysis of the employee assistance program can be found in Part 4.

Bullying and harassment According to the annual APS Census, 22 per cent of staff felt they were subjected to harassment or bullying in the workplace. This was a two per cent increase on the 2019 Census result (20 per cent). This result was not consistent with reporting of these matters. The Authority is undertaking a number of actions to address this measure, including taking actions to encourage reporting, expanding the number of Harassment Contact Officers within the Authority and providing wide range of training and development to better support staff. The Authority’s policy and procedure relating to bullying and harassment is also being updated and in 2021-22 bullying and harassment training will be mandatory for all staff.

Annual Report 2020-21 55

P E R F O R M A N C E

56 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PART 4

Management and accountability

© Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA) and State of Queensland (QPWS) Annual Report 2020-21 57

M A N A G E M E N T A N D A C C O U N T A B I L I T Y

The Authority’s governance framework in the 2020-21 reporting period enables implementation of the legislative requirements of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 (Marine Park Act), the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act) and the Public Service Act 1999 (Public Service Act).

Corporate governance The Authority reports to the Minister for the Environment. The Chief Executive Officer is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Authority and is the Accountable Authority and Agency Head for the purposes of the PGPA Act and Public Service Act respectively.

The Authority Board, led by the Chairperson, is responsible for the management of the Marine Park under the Marine Park Act.

The Authority uses the best available scientific information to guide its work and engages with experts and the community, including two Reef Advisory Committees (Indigenous and Tourism) and 12 Local Marine Advisory Committees.

The Authority’s main office is in Townsville, with regional offices in Cairns, Mackay, Gladstone and Yeppoon to ensure a close connection with Reef communities. An office in Canberra provides a key liaison function with the Minister’s office, the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, and other Australian Government entities.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Board The Marine Park Act specifies that the Authority Board comprises a part-time Chairperson, the Chief Executive Officer and five part-time members. The Board has a dedicated secretariat provided by the Authority.

The Authority Board, led by the Chairperson, is responsible for the management of the Marine Park under the Marine Park Act, to provide for the long-term protection and conservation of the environment, biodiversity and heritage values of the Great Barrier Reef Region. This includes:

• developing plans and policies to allow for a range of ecologically sustainable uses

• encouraging the engagement of users in the management of the Reef

• assisting Australia in meeting its international obligations in relation to the World Heritage Convention.

The Board may delegate its powers to enable agency staff to make decisions about operational matters that give effect to the board’s policies and guidelines (for example permit decisions).

However, the Board doesn’t make decisions on how the Authority spends its budget. The Authority’s budget and expenditure is the responsibility of the Chief Executive Officer as the Accountable Authority.

Discussions by the Board are focused on broad policy and legislative matters, while responsibility for operational matters (including delegated permit and development application decisions) rests with senior management.

The Board meets formally six times per calendar year.

Board members

Chairperson: Dr Ian Poiner Dr Poiner is a highly respected marine scientist with a long history of involvement in Reef science and conservation.

Dr Poiner is the current Chair of the Australian and New Zealand International

Ocean Discovery Program Consortium and a member of the board of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. His recent roles include Chair CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Advisory Committee, Chair of Australia’s Integrated Marine Observing System; Marine National Facility Steering Committee and the Reef and Rainforest Research Centre. Dr Poiner is also the Patron of the Australian Marine Sciences Association.

Following a successful research career at CSIRO (1985-2004), Dr Poiner served as the CEO of Australian Institute of Marine Science from 2004 to 2011. He was a member of the International Scientific Steering Committee of the Census of Marine Life from 2002 and its Chair from 2007 to 2013. From 2012 to 2016, he was Chair of the Gladstone Healthy Harbour Partnership Science Panel.

58 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

In 2008, Dr Poiner was appointed a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering in recognition of his leadership of research and development-based enterprises for the benefit of marine science, the conservation of some of the most iconic marine life and marine habitats on Earth, including the Great Barrier Reef, and the development of the marine industry.

In 2013, JCU awarded Dr Poiner an Honorary Doctor of Science in recognition of his outstanding service and distinguished public contribution to the northern Queensland community and exceptional service rendered to the university, comprising of academic excellence and the exercise of outstanding leadership. Dr Poiner holds a Bachelor of Science (Honours) 1A Zoology and a PhD in Zoology from the University of Queensland.

On 29 October 2018, Dr Poiner was appointed as the part-time Chairperson of the Authority Board for a term of four years and six months.

Chief Executive Officer: Mr Josh Thomas Mr Thomas was appointed CEO of the Authority in 2019, for a term of five years. Mr Thomas has worked in the public and private sectors in Australia and overseas, and helped shape environmental policy

and programs for the Reef and terrestrial natural resource management.

Mr Thomas has worked in several senior public sector roles and across the environment, agriculture and finance portfolios, and in federal ministerial offices. He has a strong track record of public engagement on matters affecting Australia’s World Heritage sites and through major environmental programs such as the Biodiversity Fund and Caring for our Country.

Mr Thomas’ policy experience in the marine environment extends across the Reef and its catchments, to migratory and endangered species, whaling matters, marine parks and Antarctica. He is committed to enhancing Australia’s natural environment and has been a strong advocate for incorporating contemporary science and Indigenous traditional knowledge into environmental management throughout his career.

Mr Thomas lives in Townsville, is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, and holds a Master of International Affairs, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts with Honours.

Member: Ms Wendy Morris Ms Morris developed a passion for the Reef while sailing and exploring the far northern reefs out from Port Douglas in 1974. After graduating from JCU with a Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology/Zoology, Ms

Morris completed an Honours degree at Murdoch University. She founded the first marine biologist guided snorkelling tours with her company Reef Biosearch on Quicksilver from Port Douglas in 1986 and continues to spend time on the Reef.

Since 1990, Ms Morris has been involved in tourism businesses, including reef charter vessels, hotels, resorts and attractions. Through her family’s company, she was involved in the successful establishment of the Mt Emerald Windfarm.

Her previous board appointments have included Tourism and Events Queensland, Tourism Port Douglas Daintree, Advance Cairns, Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef and most recently as Chair of Tourism Tropical North Queensland. She is also a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. In 2017, Ms Morris was awarded the Marie Watson Blake Award for outstanding contribution by an individual by the Queensland Tourism Industry Council.

Ms Morris was appointed as a part-time member of the Authority Board for five years effective from 7 February 2019.

Member: Professor Emma Johnston AO Professor Emma Johnston AO FTSE FRSN is Dean of Science and Professor of Marine Ecology and Ecotoxicology at UNSW Sydney. Professor Johnston studies the impacts of human activities in marine

ecosystems and how we can build ecological resilience. Her research is conducted in diverse field environments, from Antarctica, to the Reef and temperate Australian estuaries.

A highly awarded scientist, educator and communicator, Professor Johnston has published more than 160 peer-reviewed articles and supervised 27 successful PhD graduates. She is an elected fellow of the Australian Technological Society (ATSE) and her awards include the Australian Academy of Science’s inaugural Nancy Millis Medal and the Royal Society of New South Wales Clark Medal and the Eureka prize for Science

Annual Report 2020-21 59

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Communication. In 2018, she was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (OA) for ‘distinguished service to higher education, particularly to marine ecology and ecotoxicology, as an academic, researcher and administrator, and to scientific institutes’.

Professor Johnston is a national advocate for the science and technology sector and is Co-Chief Author of the Australian Government’s State of Environment Report and immediate past-President of Science & Technology Australia. She consults with industry through the development and implementation of new biomonitoring and ecological engineering techniques and frequently contributes expert opinion to state, federal and international government agencies. Professor Johnston is also a highly sought-after science communicator and television presenter for the ongoing BBC/Foxtel series, Coast Australia and the ABC Catalyst program.

She was re-appointed as a member of the Authority board on 5 May 2021 for another five-year term.

Member: Mr Duane Fraser

Mr Duane Fraser is a Wulgurukaba and Bidjara Traditional Owner, and has extensive experience advising Commonwealth and state governments

on matters relating to Indigenous affairs and environmental policy.

Mr Fraser enjoys a diverse national and global network that includes high-level influencers, current and ex-politicians from both major parties, senior executives and grass roots communities. He uses his profile to create positive change and impact to ensure Traditional Owners are given the opportunity for full and effective participation and leadership roles at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life. Mr Fraser has presented at numerous international forums on the advancement of Indigenous peoples of the world and their empowerment in protecting and safeguarding their delicate biocultural land and seascapes, heritage and cultural expressions.

Mr Fraser has a high-level understanding of the Authority’s strategic objectives and ministerial priorities and has demonstrated experience in providing advice to multiple state and federal government ministers.

Currently serving as Chair of the Federal Minister for the Environment’s Indigenous Advisory Committee, Mr Fraser serves on several committees including the Reef 2050 Advisory Committee and the National Environmental Science Programs Tropical Water Quality Hub Steering Committee.

Member: Ms Robbie Sefton Ms Robbie Sefton is a respected leader and influencer in regional and rural Australia and possesses a wealth of experience in stakeholder engagement, natural resource management and strategic planning

and communications. Ms Sefton is currently the Managing Director of Seftons, a national communications and marketing company in business for more than 25 years, and is also a partner in a New South Wales farming enterprise.

Ms Sefton is a strategic adviser and non-executive director within the government, corporate, education and not-for-profit sectors, with a range of experience in business management and cultural change. She has successfully managed and implemented major economic, social and environmental projects and campaigns that have contributed substantially to Australia’s agriculture and land use sectors, including Australia’s Farming Future, the Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper, the National Biodiversity Strategy, Water for the Future, and the Murray-Darling Basin Social and Economic Assessment.

Recognised as a well-informed and knowledgeable rural leader and advocate, Ms Sefton is consulted by a range of sectors wishing to utilise her extensive knowledge of, and involvement in, regional community issues and priorities, agriculture and the nation’s unique natural resource assets. Her expert advice and opinions are sought by federal and state government agencies, corporate and agribusinesses in Australia. Ms Sefton is regularly approached by print and broadcast media for comment, or for appearances on national radio and television panel programs.

Ms Sefton was appointed as a member of the Authority board on 28 May 2020 for a five-year term.

Member: Mr Dave Stewart Mr Stewart resigned from the Board on 8 April 2021 effective immediately. He had been a member of the Authority Board since 23 July 2015.

Mr Stewart was appointed

the Director-General of the Department of the Premier and Cabinet in 2015.

60 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

He has considerable experience in the public service. As the former Secretary of Transport for New South Wales, he led around 27,000 people in shaping the planning, policy and delivery of public transport, roads and freight across the state.

Following a distinguished career in local government, and engineering construction in Australia and the United Kingdom, Mr Stewart joined the Queensland Government as Deputy Coordinator-General within the Department of Infrastructure and Planning. In this role, he was responsible for delivering major water and road projects.

Earlier, he was the Director-General of Queensland Transport and then the Department of Transport and Main Roads, overseeing the integration of organisations to a new customer-focused model. His primary responsibility was transport leadership, including strategic policy and planning, system stewardship, infrastructure delivery and service delivery.

Mr Stewart is an advocate for regional Queensland and one of his highlights as Director-General has been participating in the community champions program for Indigenous communities, where he regularly visits the community of Pormpuraaw and assists them with accessing much-needed government services.

He holds Master’s Degrees in Business and Engineering Science and completed a Harvard executive program looking at private sector involvement in infrastructure delivery.

Mr Stewart is also a Fellow of Engineers Australia, Honorary Fellow, of the Chartered Institute of Transport and Logistics, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering, and Fellow of the Institute of Public Administration Australia.

Authority Board meeting schedule The meeting schedule of the Authority Board for 2020-21 is shown in Table 9.

Table 9: Meetings of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Board 2020-21

Meeting Date Location Attendance

MPA 262 25 August 2020 Virtual Present:

Dr Ian Poiner Mr Josh Thomas Prof Emma Johnston AO Ms Wendy Morris Mr Dave Stewart Mr Duane Fraser Ms Robbie Sefton

Apologies: Nil

MPA 263 27 October 2020 Virtual Present:

Dr Ian Poiner Mr Josh Thomas Prof Emma Johnston AO Ms Wendy Morris Mr Dave Stewart Ms Robbie Sefton

Apologies: Mr Duane Fraser

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Meeting Date Location Attendance

MPA 264 1-2 December 2020 Canberra Present:

Dr Ian Poiner Mr Josh Thomas Prof Emma Johnston AO Ms Wendy Morris Mr Duane Fraser Ms Robbie Sefton

Apologies: Mr Dave Stewart

MPA 265 2-3 March 2021 Brisbane Present:

Dr Ian Poiner Mr Josh Thomas Prof Emma Johnston AO Ms Wendy Morris Mr Dave Stewart Mr Duane Fraser Ms Robbie Sefton

Apologies: Nil

MPA 266 4 May 2021 Virtual Present:

Dr Ian Poiner Mr Josh Thomas Prof Emma Johnston AO Ms Wendy Morris Ms Robbie Sefton

Apologies:3 Mr Duane Fraser

MPA 267 30 June 2021 Virtual Present:

Dr Ian Poiner Mr Josh Thomas Prof Emma Johnston AO Ms Wendy Morris Mr Duane Fraser Ms Robbie Sefton

Apologies: Nil

Senior executive As at 30 June 2021, the three branches of the Authority were led by the following senior executives (Table 10):

Table 10: Senior executive and their responsible branches

Name Branch Dates

Margaret Johnson Strategic Policy and Partnerships 01/07/2020 - 30/06/2021

Simon Banks Reef Protection 01/07/2020 - 04/01/2021

Richard Quincey Reef Protection 07/07/2020 - 20/07/2020

21/12/2020 - 30/06/2021

Rhona MacPherson Corporate Services 01/07/2021 - 18/12/2020

Natalie Conner Corporate Services 14/12/2020 - 30/06/2021

3 Mr Dave Stewart resigned from the Board on 8 April 2021 effective immediately and therefore has not been recorded as an apology for MPA 266 and MPA 267.

62 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Their remuneration can be found in Table 16.

An organisational chart including the branch outlines can be found in Figure 4 of the Overview.

Corporate and operational plans Figure 20 demonstrates how the Authority’s legislation is supported through corporate and operational planning.

Corporate Plan 2020-21 The Authority’s Corporate Plan 2020-21 outlines the Authority’s purpose, activities, performance criteria and other information as required under the PGPA Act.

The Authority delivers its management program under four main program areas:

• Program area 1: Enhancing Reef resilience by providing expert knowledge to advise key decision-makers on managing, reducing or avoiding significant threats to the Reef.

• Program area 2: Enhancing Reef resilience through innovation, management and regulation of the Marine Park and our in-field presence.

• Program area 3: Enhancing Reef resilience through partnerships, collaboration and education.

• Program area 4: Supporting a high-performing organisation.

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 (and other legislation)

Government Priorities including Reef 2050 Plan Commitments

Great Barrier Reef Blueprint for Resilience

Outlook Report

Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS)

Annual Report

Corporate Plan

Agency Operating Plan

Annual Operating Plan reporting

Activity plans

Staff performance and development agreements

Staff performance reviews

Executive Management Group priorities

Figure 20: Corporate and operational planning process

Annual Report 2020-21 63

M A N A G E M E N T A N D A C C O U N T A B I L I T Y

Annual operating plan The Corporate Plan is supported by an annual operating plan. This plan sets out detailed actions to achieve the Authority’s goals.

Service Charter 2020-2024 The Service Charter 2020-2024 outlines the Authority’s goals, aims and customers, and its commitments to its customers. The Authority aims to provide appropriate services to meet all of its commitments and continue to develop services as new issues arise. The Service Charter was updated in April 2020 and is reviewed regularly. The Service Charter is available on the Authority’s website.

Ethical standards The Authority is committed to the APS Values and Code of Conduct set out in the Public Service Act 1999, which is an integral part of the people management framework. It is incorporated in the Authority’s Corporate Plan and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021.

Information on ethical standards is provided to staff through the Authority’s intranet, induction procedures, staff meetings and internal newsletter, CEO’s Update.

Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan The Authority has delivered on its Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan and will commence developing an Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan in late 2021-22.

Audit and Risk Management Committee The Audit and Risk Management Committee was established in accordance with section 45 of the PGPA Act and Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 section 17 Audit Committees for Commonwealth Entities.

The Audit and Risk Management Committee provides independent advice and assistance to the accountable authority and the Authority Board on the Authority’s risk, control and compliance framework, and its financial and performance reporting responsibilities.

Functions and responsibilities Functions and responsibilities are set out in the Audit and Risk Management Committee’s Charter of Operation, reflecting requirements under the PGPA Act and Regulations. The charter covers the Audit and Risk Management Committee’s functions in relation to:

• financial reporting

• performance reporting

• risk oversight and management

• systems of internal control.

Members of the Audit and Risk Management Committee are expected to understand and observe the legal requirements of the PGPA Act and Regulations. Members are also expected to:

• act in the best interests of the Authority

• apply good analytical skills, objectivity and judgement

• express opinions constructively and openly, raise issues that relate to the Audit and Risk Management Committee’s responsibilities and pursue independent lines of inquiry

• contribute the time required to review the provided meeting papers.

The Audit and Risk Management Committee Charter of Operation can be viewed at https:// elibrary.gbrmpa.gov.au/jspui/handle/11017/3625.

Audit and Risk Management Committee membership The Audit and Risk Management Committee comprised the following members during 2020-21.

Chair: Ian Rodin Mr Rodin is a Chartered Accountant with more than 35 years of experience in professional services, including external audit, investigations, acquisition due diligence, risk management and internal audit. He was a partner in Ernst & Young for more than 15 years, specialising in internal audit and risk management, focusing on delivering value-adding internal audit services to government and private sector organisations, and internal audit transformations.

Mr Rodin has served on the boards of several organisations in the private sector and not-for-profits, and has served on several audit committees as an external member. His audit committee appointments have included, inter alia, Griffith University (Chair), Cancer Council Queensland (Chair), Institute of Internal Auditors (Australia), Queensland Audit Office (Chair), South Bank Corporation (Queensland) and the Queensland Department of Regional Development, Manufacturing and Water (Chair).

64 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Member: Peter Bell Mr Bell is a Fellow of the Association of Certified Practicing Accountants with more than 30 years’ experience in internal audit, external performance audit and risk management. This has included roles as a senior public servant in the Australian Government for the Australian National Audit Office and Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and senior roles in the profession as a partner in Ernst & Young for 12 years and as Managing Director of Protiviti for six years.

Mr Bell has worked extensively with non-corporate accountable authorities. His recent work with the Australian National Audit Office has included coverage of agency compliance with PGPA Act requirements and identifying opportunities for some of these agencies to improve in these areas. This has included the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Special Broadcasting Service, Department of Communications and the Arts, and the Australian Media and Communications Authority.

Member: Filly Morgan PSM Ms Morgan is the Deputy Director-General (Corporate and Government Services) of the Queensland Department of the Premier and Cabinet. She has more than 25 years of experience in the Queensland public sector.

Ms Morgan has broad experience in central and line agencies. She has previously worked in senior roles in the Department of the Premier and Cabinet and the Department of Tourism, Major Events, Small Business and the Commonwealth Games.

Ms Morgan is a Clerk of the Executive Council and is the Queensland representative on the Council for the Order of Australia and the Australian Bravery Decorations Council. She was awarded a Public Service Medal on Australia Day 2018 for her outstanding service through a range of coordination and governance roles in Queensland.

Member: Basil Ahyick (commenced 1 April 2021) Mr Ahyick is Chief Finance Officer and Corporate Services Manager for Australian Institute for Marine Science (AIMS). As a member of the AIMS Leadership Team, he is responsible for Finance, Human Resources, ICT, Business Development, Legal Services, Project Management Office and Information Services. Mr Ahyick leads AIMS’s leadership and culture program and coordinates the planning and financial strategy of the business. He has had a varied industry background for the last 30 years, including 17 years with BHP Billiton with experience in Corporate, Treasury, Petroleum, Steel, Iron Ore, Nickel and Shared Services, and led the BHP and Billiton merger integration.

His other experience includes clothing and fruit juice manufacturing, sugar milling, mergers and integrations, dentistry and consulting across Melbourne, Sydney, Port Hedland, Perth and Townsville with international travel to many locations. He has a Bachelor of Business (Accounting), is a Fellow of the Association of Certified Practicing Accountants and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Table 11: Remuneration and meeting attendance of Audit and Risk Management Committee

Member name Tenure

Number of meetings attended / total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

Ian Rodin (Chair) 01/07/20-30/06/21 4 $14,000

Peter Bell (member) 01/07/20-30/06/21 4 $ 6,000

Filly Morgan (member) 01/07/20-30/06/21 2 nil

Basil Ahyick (member) 01/07/20-30/06/21 1 nil

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Table 12: Meeting schedule for the Audit and Risk Management Committee

Meeting Date Location Attendance

AC 88 3 September 2020 Virtual Mr Ian Rodin (Chairperson)

Mr Peter Bell (member)

Apologies Ms Filly Morgan (member)

AC 89 12 November 2020 Virtual Mr Ian Rodin (Chairperson)

Mr Peter Bell (member)

Apologies Ms Filly Morgan (member)

AC 90 29 March 2021 Brisbane Mr Ian Rodin (Chairperson)

Mr Peter Bell (member) Ms Filly Morgan (member)

Apologies Nil

AC 91 3 June 2021 Townsville Mr Ian Rodin (Chairperson)

Mr Peter Bell (member) Ms Filly Morgan (member) Mr Basil Ahyick (member)

Apologies Nil

Internal audit reports The Authority’s risk-based internal audit program is focused on providing assurance on the internal control environment and is governed by a strategic (and annual) internal audit plan.

During 2020-21, the following internal audits were undertaken in accordance with the strategic internal audit plan:

• Post COVID-19 review - lessons learned

• Field Operations - safety management system

• Reef HQ Aquarium - capital works project assurance gap analysis and mapping

• Development of a corporate compliance management framework (continued into the 2021-22 year)

Risk management The Authority continued to improve its risk management maturity during 2020-21 by focusing on enhancing its risk management culture and capability so decisions are risk-informed.

During the financial year, a Certificate IV in Risk Management Essentials was offered to 16 people, including 50 per cent of Senior Executive Service personnel and 40 per cent of Executive Level 2 personnel. The staff charged with responsibility for the risk management framework also attained a Diploma of Risk Management and

Business Continuity, or an Advanced Diploma of Governance, Risk and Compliance.

Accordingly, results of participation in Comcover’s risk management benchmarking program in 2021 indicate an overall ‘embedded’ level of risk management maturity, with the Authority’s risk management framework and practices at an ‘advanced’ level of maturity (leading all Commonwealth ‘specialist’ entities).

Assurance on the integrity and reliability of the risk management framework is provided to the Authority via periodic internal and external audits, and from the Audit and Risk Management Committee.

Fraud control The Authority’s Fraud Control Policy and Plan and Fraud Incident Investigation Policy are consistent with the Australian Government fraud control policy, AS 8001-2008 Fraud and Corruption Control, and Resource Management Guide No. 201 (preventing, detecting and dealing with fraud).

In 2020-21, the Authority commenced an organisation-wide review of its fraud risks to assure its exposure is minimised.

Four enquiries regarding suspected fraud were made to the Authority’s fraud liaison officer during 2020-21. One remains subject to a final assessment and there was insufficient evidence to support two of the other allegations. The fourth

66 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

allegation was reported to an external agency.

Collectively, governing fraud policies, internal controls and the broader fraud control framework give effect to the provisions of the PGPA Act and rule 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule, and:

• facilitate appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection in a way that meets the Authority’s needs

• minimise the opportunity for, and the incidence of, fraud in the Authority as much as is reasonably practicable

• facilitate the process to recover the proceeds of fraud against the Authority.

Advisory committees The purpose of the Authority’s Reef Advisory Committees is to provide objective advice, insights and recommendations to the Authority Board on:

• legislative, policy and guideline review and development, directly related to the management of the Marine Park

• strategic plans and programs that give effect to the objects of the Marine Park Act

• actions that can be taken to address risks to the Marine Park identified in the Outlook Report (released by the Authority every five years)

• emerging or unfamiliar issues occurring within the Marine Park and the World Heritage Area.

Local Marine Advisory Committees Twelve Local Marine Advisory Committees operate along the Reef catchment. They represent community interests from Cape York in the north to the Burnett Region in the south.

The purpose of the committees is to provide advice to the Authority on Marine Park issues and management proposals, which support the long-term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Great Barrier Reef; promote the exchange of information between Reef stakeholders, the Authority and management partners; and encourage, through local community networks, actions that reduce threats to the Reef and build resilience. Members are appointed for a three-year term. The term began in July 2018 and ended in 30 June 2021. More than 180 members were involved in the committees with more than 20 management partners. The committees were involved in the Local Community Action Grants, funded under the Reef Trust Partnership, administered by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation in 2019-20 and 2020-21.

Reef Advisory Committees There are two Reef Advisory Committees that provide advice to the Authority Board through the Authority on the management of the Marine Park. The two Reef Advisory Committees are the Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee and the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee. Both Reef Advisory Committees are competency-based appointments, and members are appointed considering their experience, knowledge, skills, relationships and networks with Reef Traditional Owners, the Reef tourism industry or relevant groups or sectors. All committee members are expected to adopt a broad perspective on committee business that is raised. Reef Advisory Committees are not decision-making bodies. Advice and recommendations provided to the Authority Board are non-binding. Each Reef Advisory Committee operates in accordance with their Charter of Operation and relevant terms of reference.

Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee The Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee held its inaugural meeting on 9-10 February 2021 with the second formal meeting held on 9-10 June 2021. Membership of this committee can be found on the Authority’s website. The Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee has provided advice on matters relating to Marine Park management and the implementation of actions by the Authority to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples keep their heritage strong, safe and healthy, and contribute towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander aspirations for Sea Country and heritage management into the future. The committee provides advice on ways to facilitate partnerships, enhance engagement with industry sectors, such as tourism, and build capacity with Traditional Owners in the management of marine resources.

Tourism Reef Advisory Committee During 2020-21, the Tourism Reef Advisory Committee met virtually on 12 October 2020 and 14 April 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to have major impacts on the marine tourism industry during 2020-21. The Tourism Reef Advisory Committee has provided advice on the development and implementation of strategies, management policies, plans and guidelines to ensure ecologically sustainable tourism within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, including priorities for developing the draft Tourism Management Action Strategy. The committee has considered global tourism management actions and how they can potentially be applied to the management of the Marine Park, particularly concerning the evolution of the High Standard Tourism Operators program.

Annual Report 2020-21 67

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Asset management The Authority commenced using an agency-wide asset management system in 2020-21. This system will assist in financial reporting, including valuation, depreciation and budgeting, and assuring compliance of registered or licensed assets that require mandatory reporting and workplace health, safety and security assurance. Capital management plans are also in place for the re-development of Reef HQ Aquarium, office fit-out, information management systems and technology, and field management equipment.

External scrutiny

Australian National Audit Office reports Crowe Australasia, under contract to the Australian National Audit Office, undertook an external audit of the Authority’s 2020-21 financial statements (see Part 5 Finances).

During the reporting period, the Australian National Audit Office completed a follow-up performance audit of the Authority’s regulation of permits and approvals, Auditor General Report No. 44. Since the original audit in 2016, the Authority has been transforming the permission system for the Reef, making sure use of the Reef is well managed while supporting individual Marine Park permit holders. The audit shows that gains have been made through regulatory reform, enhancing permissions compliance and using technologies to deliver online permits. The Authority agreed with all seven audit recommendations, which focus on finalising practices and processes for a robust and transparent permission system.

Other Auditor General reports of 2020-21 that may contain recommendations of relevance to the Authority are:

No. 4 - Establishment and Use of ICT Related Procurement Panels and Arrangements.

No. 12 - Defence’s Procurement of Offshore Patrol Vessels - SEA 1180 Phase 1

No. 20 - Management of the Australian Public Service’s Workforce Response to COVID-19

No. 32 - Cyber Security Strategies of Non-Corporate Commonwealth Entities

No. 35 - Implementation of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation Partnership

Management of human resources

Managing and developing employees People Services provide a range of services, including:

• payroll

• recruitment

• Workplace health and safety

• learning and development

• dive operations and training

• workforce planning

• workplace relations, including high-level advice and assistance to managers and supervisors regarding performance and health case management matters.

The People Services section proactively supports line areas to meet business objectives as outlined in the annual operating plan.

The Authority invested $487,934 for learning and development in 2020-21, which included the costs of training courses, conference attendance, formal qualifications, study fee reimbursements and professional memberships.

The Authority continued with an ongoing program to systematically reinforce fundamental public service values through mandatory corporate training delivered via our e-Learning platform. For 2020-21, the mandatory courses focused on fraud awareness, Commonwealth Child Safety Framework, delegations, and work health and safety and emergency response.

In-house corporate training programs contributed to the development of APS core skills in mental health first aid, cultural appreciation, fire warden, project management and workplace culture. Specialised in-house training included Contact and Referral Officer training and a variety of field-based skills.

The Authority maintains its support of the professional development of its employees, with leave for face-to-face study where appropriate and reimbursement of professional fees upon successful completion of a semester of study.

68 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Workplace agreements The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021 was introduced in March 2018. This agreement had a notional expiry date of 29 March 2021. During the year, the Authority sought the views of staff as to whether the agreement should be retained and future pay adjustments provided through a determination made under section 24(1) of the Public Service Act. This proposal was put to a staff poll in March 2021 where 96 per cent of respondents were supportive. The determination is now in place with the final pay adjustment scheduled to take effect on 30 March 2023.

Consistent with government policy, all non-senior executive service employees are covered by the enterprise agreement. The current agreement provides salaries to cover classifications ranging from APS Level 1 to Executive Level 2, including a specific legal officer classification.

For non-senior executive service employees, salaries range from $42,350 for APS Level 1 to $149,676 for Executive Level 2, including a specific legal officer classification. More information is provided in the staffing overview table in Appendix B.

Non-salary benefits provided to employees include:

• payment of one work-related professional association membership fee for ongoing employees, exempt from fringe benefits tax

• access to salary packaging of vehicles for ongoing employees and superannuation for all ongoing and non-ongoing employees, exempt from fringe benefits tax

• a healthy lifestyle allowance of $150 per financial year to help meet the cost of activities or equipment that maintain health and fitness.

Employee statistics The Authority had 213 headcount of ongoing employees as at 30 June 2021. Of these, 149 people were employed at APS Levels 1-6, 62 were employed at Executive Levels 1 or 2 and two were employed at senior executive service level, excluding the CEO. More information is provided in the staffing overview table in Appendix B.

Supporting a diverse workplace The Authority recognises the importance of creating a workplace that is inclusive and diverse and reflects the diversity of the Australian community (Table 13). The Authority is committed to the inclusion of diversity and equity principles and practices across all work areas. In line with the APS wide strategies to address diversity and inclusion, the Authority is developing action plans

to implement the Commonwealth’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Workforce Strategy 2020-24, the Disability Strategy and the Gender Equity Strategy.

Table 13: Staff diversity within the workforce during 2020-21

Women (% of total workforce) 65

People with a disability (% of total workforce) 1

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples (% of total workforce) 5

Staff who speak English and another language (% of total workforce) 2

Since 1994, non-corporate Commonwealth entities have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the APS Commission’s State of the Service reports and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov. au. From 2010-11, entities have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been replaced by the National Disability Strategy 2010- 2020, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level, two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these progress reports was published in 2014 and can be found at www.dss.gov.au.

Performance pay The Authority does not operate a performance pay scheme.

Workplace health and safety (WHS) The Authority’s working environment varies from contemporary office accommodation to remote camping and offshore and aquarium diving operations. Staff conduct extensive fieldwork that includes boat patrols, in-water reef health surveys, engineering and water quality management. The Authority’s broad community consultation involves staff liaising with schools, tourism operators, the fishing industry and Traditional Owners (including in remote locations).

In accordance with its terms of reference, the Authority’s WHS Committee met four times during the reporting period. The Committee is

Annual Report 2020-21 69

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chaired by the General Manager Reef Protection. During 2020-21, 29 incident and 11 near-miss reports were submitted by employees. Of those reported, one incident was classified as notifiable to Comcare, the WHS regulator, as a serious or dangerous illness or incident. One claim for compensation was submitted and subsequently rejected by Comcare during 2020-21.

In recognition of the complexities of WHS issues, the Authority appointed a Manager, WHS (Corporate) and a Manager, WHS (Field Operations) in March 2021 and subsequently filled the position of WHS Officer (Dive). These positions now work as a Safety Cell providing advice, guidance and management on safety related issues.

The Authority continues to provide an employee assistance program to enable support for work and family matters. Between 1 July 2020 and 30 June 2021, 35 people accessed the service with a total of 119 sessions delivered to staff and their immediate family. The Authority also trialled a wellness coaching program over the period which started June 2021, and will continue into the 2021-22 reporting period.

In May 2021, approximately 130 employees received a free influenza vaccination as part of the Authority’s health and wellbeing program. These numbers continue to increase each year as more staff access this initiative. This program will be sustained, helping and encouraging staff to be, and stay, healthy.

COVID-19 response In navigating COVID-19 responses, the Authority relied on information from the Australian Public Service Commission, relevant state departments of health and the Commonwealth Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment (the Authority Portfolio Department). The Authority’s’ leadership team and key staff representatives met regularly to manage any operational impacts associated with COVID-19. With the acceptance that COVID was to have an ongoing impact on operations, in March 2021 the management of COVID-related issues was delegated to the Manager, WHS for ongoing control and monitoring.

The Authority has a robust COVID-19 plan in place, ensuring compliance with government health directives and advice and enabling it to react to peaks and troughs within the pandemic cycle. We are strongly encouraging all staff to get vaccinated and facilitating employee ability to attend vaccination clinics as circumstances allow.

External service providers

Purchasing The PGPA Act and Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rules state which powers and functions the accountable authority may delegate. The accountable authority has, in writing, delegated certain powers and functions to officials. The delegate does not have the power to sub-delegate without a specific provision in the legislation.

The accountable authority instructions are the primary mechanism for an accountable authority to set out the processes to promote the proper use of Australian Government resources, including relevant money and property by officials in their entity.

The Authority’s accountable authority instructions comply with the requirements of the PGPA Act and ensure compliance with Australian Government procurement guidelines.

Consultants and contracts Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy and non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy and non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.

Reportable consultancy contracts During 2020-21, three new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $415,268. In addition, three ongoing reportable consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $311,923 (Table 14).

Consultants are engaged when specialist expertise are not available within the Authority or where an independent assessment is considered desirable. In 2020-21, consultants were engaged for legal advice.

Table 14: Expenditure on consultancy contracts for the 2020-21 reporting period

Number Expenditure $ (GST inc.)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period

1 61,859

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period

3 311,923

Total 4 373,782

70 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Reportable non-consultancy contracts During 2020-21, 198 new reportable non-consultancy contracts were entered into, involving total actual expenditure of $13.981 million. In addition, 151 ongoing reportable non-consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $18.509 million (Table 15).

Table 15: Expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts for the 2020-21 reporting period

Number Expenditure $ (GST inc.)

New contracts entered into during the reporting period

200 14.334 million

Ongoing contracts entered into during a previous reporting period

151 18.509 million

Total 351 32.843

million

There is no additional information in regard to Section 17AGA of the PGPA Rule about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy or non-consultancy contracts.

Competitive tendering and contracting The Authority follows the Commonwealth Procurement Rules 2020, whole-of-government policies such as the Indigenous Procurement Policy and the Authority’s purchasing guidelines.

Depending on the estimated values of the tender, the selection and engagement of consultants may involve open tender or, where appropriate, limited tender (for example, to provide for the engagement of a recognised and pre-eminent expert in a particular field).

Exempt contracts During 2020-21, no contract was exempted by the accountable authority from publication in AusTender.

Grants The Authority did not award any grants during 2020-21.

Procurement initiatives to support small business The Authority supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and medium enterprises and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

The Authority’s procurement practices support small and medium enterprises in ways that are consistent with paragraphs 5.5-5.7 of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, including consideration of the capabilities of small and medium enterprises and their commitment to Townsville and regional markets, and through such practices as electronic systems or use of payment cards that facilitate on-time payment performance.

The Authority recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.

Annual Report 2020-21 71

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Senior executive remuneration Information about remuneration for key management personnel

4

Table 16: Senior executive remuneration

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Name

Position title

Base salary

Bonuses

Other benefits and allowances

Total short term benefits

Superannuation contributions

Long service leave

Other long-term benefits

Josh Thomas

Chief Executive Officer

309,558

-

-

309,558

49,632

8,082

-

-

367,272

Ian Poiner

Chair (Marine Park Authority Board)

93,939

-

-

93,939

14,283

-

-

-

108,222

Emma Johnston

Member (MPA Board)

47,827

-

-

47,827

4,823

-

-

-

52,650

Wendy Morris

Member (MPA Board)

46,970

-

-

46,970

4,479

-

-

-

51,449

Duane Fraser

Member (MPA Board)

46,970

-

-

46,970

4,479

-

-

-

51,449

Robbie Sefton

Member (MPA Board)

47,873

-

-

47,873

4,343

52,216

Margaret Johnson

General Manager (Strategic Policy and Partnerships)

219,839

-

20,945

240,784

41,032

5,501

287,317

Simon Banks

General Manager (Reef Protection)

209,973

-

18,264

228,237

23,930

4,127

-

-

256,294

Rhona MacPherson

A/General Manager (Corporate Services)

74,666

-

11,020

85,686

8,758

-

-

-

94,444

Natalie Conner

Chief Operating Officer

98,984

-

11,525

110,509

15,797

3,543

-

-

129,849

Richard Quincey

A/General Manager (Reef Protection)

87,408

-

10,140

97,548

8,931

-

-

-

106,479

More information on senior executive remuneration is included in Part 5 Finances 4 Mr David Stewart, Authority Board Member, is not remunerated by the Authority as his position on the Authority Board was held as a Queensland Government representative

72 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PART 5

Finances

Photographer: Jumbo Aerial Photography © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA) Annual Report 2020-21 73

F I N A N C E S

2020-21 Financial Statements

Table of Contents

Independent Auditor’s Report 75

Statement by Officers 78

Statement of Comprehensive Income 79

Statement of Financial Position 80

Statement of Change in Equity 81

Cash Flow Statement 82

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income 83

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities 84

Administered Reconciliation Schedule 85

Administered Cash Flow Statement 85

Table of Contents - Notes 86

Notes to and forming part of the Financial Statements 87-109

74 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

GPO Box 707 CANBERRA ACT 2601 38 Sydney Avenue FORREST ACT 2603 Phone (02) 6203 7300 Fax (02) 6203 7777

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the Minister for the Environment

Opinion

In my opinion, the financial statements of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (the Entity) for the year  ended 30 June 2021:  

(a) comply  with  Australian  Accounting  Standards  -  Reduced  Disclosure  Requirements  and  the  Public  Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015; and 

(b) present fairly the financial position of the Entity as at 30 June 2021 and its financial performance and cash  flows for the year then ended. 

The financial statements of the Entity, which I have audited, comprise the following as at 30 June 2021 and for  the year then ended:  

 Statement by the Accountable Authority and Chief Financial Officer;    Statement of Comprehensive Income;    Statement of Financial Position;    Statement of Changes in Equity;    Cash Flow Statement;    Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income;    Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities;    Administered Reconciliation Schedule;    Administered Cash Flow Statement; and    Notes to the financial statements, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other 

explanatory information. 

Basis for opinion

I  conducted  my  audit  in  accordance  with  the  Australian  National  Audit  Office  Auditing  Standards,  which  incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described  in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of my report. I am independent  of the Entity in accordance with the relevant ethical requirements for financial statement audits conducted by  the  Auditor‐General  and  his  delegates.  These  include  the  relevant  independence  requirements  of  the  Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants  (including Independence Standards) (the Code) to the extent that they are not in conflict with the Auditor‐ General Act 1997. I have also fulfilled my other responsibilities in accordance with the Code. I believe that the  audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. 

Annual Report 2020-21 75

F I N A N C E S

Other information

The Accountable Authority is responsible for the other information. The other information comprises the  information included in the annual report for the year ended 30 June 2021 but does not include the financial  statements and my auditor’s report thereon. 

My opinion on the financial statements does not cover the other information and accordingly I do not express  any form of assurance conclusion thereon. 

In connection with my audit of the financial statements, my responsibility is to read the other information and,  in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial statements or  my knowledge obtained in the audit, or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. 

If,  based  on  the  work  I  have  performed,  I  conclude  that  there  is  a  material  misstatement  of  this  other  information, I am required to report that fact. I have nothing to report in this regard. 

Accountable Authority’s responsibility for the financial statements

As  the  Accountable  Authority  of  the  Entity,  the  Chief  Executive  Officer,  is  responsible  under  the  Public  Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the Act) for the preparation and fair presentation of  annual  financial  statements  that  comply  with  Australian  Accounting  Standards  -  Reduced  Disclosure  Requirements and the rules made under the Act. The Chief Executive Officer is also responsible for such internal  control as the Chief Executive Officer determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements  that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.  

In preparing the financial statements, the Chief Executive Officer is responsible for assessing the ability of the  Entity to continue as a going concern, taking into account whether the Entity’s operations will cease as a result  of an administrative restructure or for any other reason. The Chief Executive Officer is also responsible for  disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless  the assessment indicates that it is not appropriate. 

Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements

My objective is to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from  material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes my opinion.  Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance  with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it  exists.  Misstatements  can  arise  from  fraud  or  error  and  are considered  material  if,  individually or  in  the  aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis  of the financial statements. 

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian National Audit Office Auditing Standards, I exercise  professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:  

 identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or  error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is  sufficient  and  appropriate  to  provide  a  basis  for  my  opinion.  The  risk  of  not  detecting  a  material  misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion,  forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control;    obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are 

appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of  the Entity’s internal control;   evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates  and related disclosures made by the Accountable Authority;    conclude on the appropriateness of the Accountable Authority’s use of the going concern basis of accounting 

and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or  conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude  that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my auditor’s report to the related  disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. My  conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of my auditor’s report. However, future  events or conditions may cause the Entity to cease to continue as a going concern; and  

76 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

 evaluate  the  overall  presentation,  structure  and  content  of  the  financial  statements,  including  the  disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a  manner that achieves fair presentation.  

I communicate with the Accountable Authority regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing  of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify  during my audit. 

 

Australian National Audit Office 

 

 

Peter Kerr  Executive Director    Delegate of the Auditor‐General 

 

Canberra 

2 September 2021 

Annual Report 2020-21 77

F I N A N C E S

78 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee Benefits 1.1A 25,689 25,559 26,543

Suppliers 1.1B 32,097 31,075 38,610

Provision for Douglas Shoal remediation 3.5A 277 1,646 ‐

Grants 3.5B ‐ 279 3,295

Depreciation and amortisation 3.2 2,801 2,574 3,244

Finance Costs 1.1C 129 44 32

Write‐down and impairment of other assets 3.2 2,818 ‐ ‐

Losses from asset sales 3.2 ‐ 2 ‐

Cost of goods sold 30 109 ‐

Payments to Queensland Government for Field Management Program 5.2 24,024 17,994 23,629

Total Expenses 87,865 79,282 95,353

Own‐source income Own‐source revenue Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2A 620 1,804 1,925

Fees and Fines 1.2B 4 214 ‐

Receipts from Queensland Government for Field Management Program 5.2 16,468 12,710 16,468

Grants received from Government and Industry Partners 1.2C 8,884 20,691 13,561

Other revenue 1.2D 222 309 ‐

Total own‐source revenue 26,198 35,728 31,954

Gains Other gains 1.2E 52 52 54

Total gains 52 52 54

Total own‐source income 26,250 35,780 32,008

Net cost of services (61,615) (43,502) (63,345)

Revenue from Government 1.2F 75,642 55,573 78,264

Total Revenue from Government 75,642 55,573 78,264

Surplus attributable to the Australian Government 14,027 12,071 14,919

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation reserve (894) ‐ ‐

Items subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Gains/(losses) on financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income ‐ ‐ ‐

Total comprehensive income attributable to the Australian Government 13,133 12,071 14,919

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income Affected line items and statement

Expenses The Authority expended $6.513m (17%) less on supplier expenses than was originally budgeted due to underspends and delays in finalising contracts associated with the: ▪ Reef HQ upgrade project ‐ $2.286m ▪ GBR Green Turtle Research Program ‐ $1.777m ▪ Reef Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program (RIMReP) ‐ $1.548m ▪ Reef Islands Interventions ‐ $1.306m ▪ RHQ and Property services ‐ $1.272m ▪ Curtis Islands Offset Program ‐ $0.637m ▪ International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) ‐ $0.253m ▪ Reef Land Sea Country Program ‐ $0.249m ▪ other expenditure ‐ $0.385m. This $9.713m underspend was offset by payments made ($3.200m) to deliver the Marine Tourism Activation initiative.

Suppliers

The Authority budgeted ($0.095m) grants program in 2020‐21 which was not implemented. The special appropriation for the Marine Tourism Activation initiative ($3.200m) was budgeted as grants, but expensed as suppliers. Accordingly, expenses were $3.295 (100%) less than was originally budgeted.

Grants

The Authority recorded; a $1.486m write‐down of plant & equipment due the asset revaluation as per note 3.2, a $1.310m impairment of intangibles as per note 3.2, and a $0.022m write‐off of a financial receivable. Accordingly, expenses were $2.818m (100%) less than was originally budgeted.

Write‐down and impairment of other assets

Own‐source revenue Received $4.677m (34%) less than budget, due to a milestone payment requirement for the Crown of Thorns Starfish control program (COTS) (Great Barrier Reef Foundation) being renegotiated to 2021‐22. Grants received from Government and industry partners Net cost of services Recorded $2.622m (3%) less than budget in Revenue from Government, due to special appropriation which was recognised in 2019‐20 being incorrectly budgeted as revenue in 2020‐21.

Revenue from Government

12 12 21 21GLACT

Annual Report 2020-21 79

F I N A N C E S

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 3.1A 31,300 32,349 32,349

Trade and other receivables2 3.1B 54,793 29,907 39,111

Total financial assets2 86,093 62,256 71,460

Non‐financial assets1 Buildings 3.2 11,514 11,551 27,325

Leasehold improvements 3.2 53 27 ‐

Plant and equipment 3.2 1,728 3,634 3,413

Computer software 3.2 1,665 2,749 2,586

Capital works in progress 3.2 4,930 ‐ ‐

Reef HQ shop inventory ‐ 29 29

Prepayments 506 407 407

Total non‐financial assets 20,396 18,397 33,760

Total assets2 106,489 80,653 105,220

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 5,805 2,627 2,912

Other payables 3.3A 634 712 427

Permit bonds 3.3B 1,384 1,358 1,358

Total payables 7,823 4,697 4,697

Interest bearing liabilities Leases 3.4 3,383 1,913 1,957

Total interest bearing liabilities 3,383 1,913 1,957

Provisions Employee provisions 6.1 8,040 7,859 7,859

Provision for Douglas Shoal remediation 3.5A 26,391 27,790 28,069

Other Provisions ‐ 279 ‐

Total provisions 34,431 35,928 35,928

Total liabilities 45,637 42,538 42,582

Net assets2 60,852 38,115 62,638

EQUITY Contributed equity2 3.1B 33,163 23,809 46,989

Reserves 2,263 2,497 2,497

Accumulated surplus 25,426 11,809 13,152

Total equity2 60,852 38,115 62,638

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1. Right‐of‐use assets are included in the line items for Buildings, and Plant and Equipment 2. These items have had their 2019‐20 balances restated for a prior year error as per note 3.1B.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position Affected line items and statement

Assets Trade and other receivables is $15.682m (40%) more than was originally budgeted primarily due to an increase in unspent annual and special appropriations, and expenditure of prior year's funds, as detailed at Note 5.1 (Appropriations).

Financial Assets ‐ Trade and other receivables

Building assets is $15.811m (58%) less than was originally budgeted. Contributing factors include: ▪ delays in finalising contracts associated with the ReefHQ upgrade project, and ▪ the revalued write‐down of buildings, as detailed at Note 3.2 (Non‐financial Assets). This buildings underspend was offset by an increase in the value of Right Of Use (ROU) assets and the carrying amount of capital works in progress (WIP).

Non‐Financial Assets ‐ Buildings

The carrying amount of WIP was $4.930m (100%) more than was originally budgeted due to the refurbishment of assets associated with the ReefHQ upgrade project, as detailed at Note 3.2 (Non‐ financial Assets). This WIP will be held until they are brought into service. The original budget identified these assets as buildings to be capitalised by the end of the financial year.

Non‐Financial Assets ‐ Works in progress (WIP)

Liabilities Supplier payments were $2.893m (99%) more than was originally budgeted due to several late payments associated with the COTS control program which were accrued into the 2020‐21 year. Payables ‐ Suppliers Equity Equity reserves are $2.380m (95%) less than was originally budgeted as a result of the comprehensive, independent revaluation of the non‐financial assets, which resulted in an overall reduction to their fair value in 2020‐21. This is further detailed at Note 3.2 (Non‐financial Assets).

Equity - Reserves

Accumulated surplus is $1.905m (14%) more than originally budgeted. Factors contributing to this are outlined by the budget variances commentary, within the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Equity ‐ Accumulated surplus

80 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Statement of Changes in Equity for the period ended 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 23,809 28,244 37,385

Adjustment for errors1 (250) ‐ ‐

Adjusted opening balance 23,559 28,244 37,385

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection ‐ Appropriations 5.1A 8,853 8,385 8,853

Departmental capital budget 5.1A 751 756 751

Return of equity ‐ Repealed appropriation2 3.1B ‐ (13,576)

Total transactions with owners2 9,604 (4,435) 9,604

Closing balance as at 30 June2 33,163 23,809 46,989

RETAINED EARNINGS Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 11,809 (262) 11,809

Adjustment for errors1 (410) ‐ ‐

Adjustment for repealed appropriation ‐ ‐ (13,576)

Adjusted opening balance 11,399 (262) (1,767)

Comprehensive income Surplus for the period 14,027 12,071 14,919

Total comprehensive income 14,027 12,071 14,919

Closing balance as at 30 June 25,426 11,809 13,152

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 2,497 2,497 2,497

Adjustment for errors1 660 ‐ ‐

Opening balance 3,157 2,497 2,497

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income 3.2 (894) ‐ ‐

Total comprehensive income (894) ‐ ‐

Closing balance as at 30 June 2,263 2,497 2,497

TOTAL EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 38,115 30,479 51,691

Adjustment for repealed appropriation ‐ ‐ (13,576)

Adjusted opening balance 38,115 30,479 38,115

Comprehensive income Surplus for the period 14,027 12,071 14,919

Other comprehensive income 3.2 (894) ‐ ‐

Total comprehensive income 13,133 12,071 14,919

Transactions with owners Contributions by owners Equity injection ‐ Appropriations 5.1A 8,853 8,385 8,853

Departmental capital budget 5.1A 751 756 751

Return of equity ‐ Repealed appropriation2 3.1B ‐ (13,576)

Total transactions with owners2 9,604 (4,435) 9,604

Closing balance as at 30 June2 60,852 38,115 62,638

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy Equity injections Amounts appropriated which are designated as 'equity injections' for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Changes in Equity Affected line items and statement

Retained earnings The budgeted adjustment for repealed appropriation of $13.576m against Retained earnings was not required in 2020‐21. Instead, a prior year adjustment has been made to Contributed equity in 2019‐20 as per note 3.1B.

Adjustment for repealed appropriation

There was an overall increase in the surplus for the period due to reduced revenue, offset by a greater underspend in suppliers. Contributing factors are further outlined by the budget variances commentary, within the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Surplus for the period

Asset revaluation reserve As outlined by the budget variances commentary, within the Statement of Comprehensive Income, a comprehensive revaluation has led to a decrease in the asset revaluation reserve in 2020‐21. Other comprehensive income

1. The asset revaluation reserve has been split by class in 2020‐21, resulting in $0.410m of prior year plant & equipment decrements being applied to retained earnings, and $0.250m of island properties, incorrectly removed from the reserve in 2007‐08, being applied to contributed equity.

2. These items have had their 2019‐20 balances restated for a prior year error as per note 3.1B.

Annual Report 2020-21 81

F I N A N C E S

Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 52,438 35,107 69,060

Receipts from Government and industry partners 8,884 20,691 13,561

Sale of goods and rendering of services 603 2,184 1,925

GST received 966 113 ‐

Receipts from Queensland Government for Field Management Program 16,468 12,710 16,468

Other 274 362 ‐

Total cash received 79,633 71,167 101,014

Cash used Grants ‐ 279 3,295

Employees 25,425 24,919 26,543

Suppliers 28,281 27,503 38,556

GST paid 3,141 3,696 ‐

Interest payments on lease liabilities 129 44 32

Payments to Queensland Government for Field Management Program 26,359 20,359 23,629

Total cash used 83,335 76,800 92,055

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities (3,702) (5,633) 8,959

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of property, plant and equipment 3.2 5,508 4,306 17,182

Total cash used 5,508 4,306 17,182

Net cash used by investing activities (5,508) (4,306) (17,182)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Contributed equity 9,604 9,141 9,604

Total cash received 9,604 9,141 9,604

Cash used Principal payments of lease liabilities (1,443) (1,456) (1,381)

Total cash used (1,443) (1,456) (1,381)

Net Cash from Financing activities 8,161 7,685 8,223

Net (decrease) in cash held (1,049) (2,254) ‐

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 32,349 34,603 32,349

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 3.1A 31,300 32,349 32,349

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Cash Flow Statement Affected line items and statement

Operating activities ‐ Cash Received The draw down of annual and special appropriations was $16.622m (24%) less than originally budgeted. This was offset by the use of prior year expenditure, as detailed at Note 5.1 (Appropriations). Appropriations The Authority received $4.677m (34%) less than was originally budgeted due to the factors outlined by the budget variances commentary, within the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Receipts from Government and industry partners

Operating activities - Cash Used The Authority expensed $3.295m (100%) less grants funds than was originally budgeted due to the factors outlined by the budget variances commentary, within the Statement of Comprehensive Income. Grants The Authority expensed $10.275m (27%) less in suppliers than was originally budgeted due to: ▪ the underspends outlined by the budget variances commentary, within the Statement of Comprehensive Income ▪ a portion of the additional accruals outlined by budget variances commentary within the Statement of Financial Position, and ▪ the GST paid which had not been separated from suppliers in the original budget.

Suppliers

The GST paid ($3.141m) had not been separated from suppliers in the original budget. GST paid The scope of works to be performed by the Queensland Government through the Field Management Program's Annual Business Plan had not been finalised before submission of the Portfolio Budget Statements. Accordingly the Authority's contribution to the program was $2.730m (12%) more than was originally budgeted. Investing activities - Cash Used As outlined by the budget variances commentary within the Statement of Financial Position, the Authority expensed $11.674m (68%) less for property plant and equipment. The balance of the capital works program will be delivered in future years.

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

Payments to Queensland Government for Field Management Program

82 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES INCOME Revenue Non‐taxation revenue

Environmental management charge 2.1A ‐ 8,711 ‐

Infringement notices 2.1A 106 249 80

Rent from island properties 2.1B ‐ 249 186

Total non‐taxation revenue 106 9,209 266

Total revenue 106 9,209 266

Total income 106 9,209 266

Net contribution by services 106 9,209 266

Surplus 106 9,209 266

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation reserve 4.2 847 (384) ‐

Items subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Gains/(Losses) on financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income ‐ ‐ ‐

Total other comprehensive income 847 (384) ‐

Total comprehensive income 953 8,825 266

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Comprehensive Income Affected line items and statement

Revenue Due to greater than anticipated compliance activity in the period, the Authority received $0.026m (33%) more than originally budgeted in infringement notice revenue. Infringement notices Due to the Australian Government waiver of lease payments, as detailed at Note 2.1 (Administered ‐ Income), the Authority received $0.186m (100%) less in rent from island properties than was originally budgeted.

Rent from island properties

Other comprehensive income Due to the revaluation of island properties, detailed at Note 4.2 (Administered ‐ Non‐financial Assets), the asset valuation reserve increased by $0.847m (100%) more than originally budgeted. Changes in asset valuation reserve

12 12 21 21GLACT 21GLACT

Annual Report 2020-21 83

F I N A N C E S

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities as at 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

ASSETS Financial assets Receivables ‐ Environmental management charge 4.1 ‐ 179 179

Receivables ‐ CDPP Court ordered fines 4.1 622 662 662

Total financial assets 622 841 841

Non‐financial assets Island properties 4.2 3,843 2,996 2,996

Total non‐financial assets 3,843 2,996 2,996

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 4,465 3,837 3,837

LIABILITIES Payables Environmental management charge payable to Commonwealth 4.3 ‐ 179 179

CDPP court ordered fines payable to Commonwealth 4.3 622 662 662

Total payables 622 841 841

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government 622 841 841

Net assets 3,843 2,996 2,996

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Statement of Financial Position Affected line items and statement

Assets Accrued receivables associated with the Environmental Management Charge (EMC) were $0.179m (100%) less than was originally budgeted due to the final collection of EMC in 2019‐20 being transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) in 2020‐21.

Receivables ‐ Environmental management charge

As per the budget variance commentary, within the Administered Statement of Comprehensive Income, the valuation of island properties increased by $0.847m (100%) more than was originally budgeted.

Island properties

Liabilities Accrued payables associated with the Environmental Management Charge (EMC) were $0.179m (100%) less than originally budgeted due to the final collection of EMC in 2019‐20 being transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) in 2020‐21.

Payables ‐ Environmental management charge

84 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Administered Reconciliation Schedule for the period ended 30 June 2021

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

Opening assets less liabilities as at 1 July 2,996 3,380

Net contribution by services Income 106 9,209

Transfers (to) the Australian Government: Appropriation transfers to Official Public Account Transfers to OPA (106) (9,209)

Other comprehensive income Administered revaluations taken to reserves 847 (384)

Closing assets less liabilities as at 30 June 3,843 2,996

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Accounting Policy Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account Revenue collected by the GBRMPA for use by the Government is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of the Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the GBRMPA on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the schedule of administered cash flows and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

Administered Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

Original

2021 2020 Budget

Notes $'000 $'000 $'000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Rent from island properties ‐ 249 186

Infringement notices 106 249 80

Environmental management charge ‐ 8,711 ‐

Total cash received 106 9,209 266

Net cash from operating activities 106 9,209 266

Cash to Official Public Account Environmental Management Charge ‐ 8,711 ‐

Other 106 498 266

106 9,209 266

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period ‐ ‐ ‐

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period ‐ ‐ ‐

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Budget Variances Commentary

Administered Cash Flow Statement Affected line items and statement

Operating activities Cash received and Cash to Official Public Account The Authority received $0.026m (33%) more in infringement notices than was originally budgeted. Infringement notices Due to the Australian Government waiver of lease payments, detailed at Note 2.1 (Administered ‐ Income), the Authority received $0.186m (100%) less in rent from island properties than was originally budgeted.

Rent from island properties

Annual Report 2020-21 85

F I N A N C E S

Table of Contents - Notes

Overview 87

Financial Performance 89

1.1 Expenses 89

1.2 Own Source Revenue and Gains 90

Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government 92

2.1 Administered - Income 92

Financial Position 93

3.1 Financial Assets 93

3.2 Non-Financial Assets 94

3.3 Payables 96

3.4 Leases 96

3.5 Provisions 97

Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of Government 98

4.1 Administered - Financial Assets 98

4.2 Administered - Non-Financial Assets 98

4.3 Administered - Payables 99

Funding 100

5.1 Appropriations 100

5.2 Field Management Special Account 102

5.3 Regulatory Charging Summary 103

5.4 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 103

People and Relationships 104

6.1 Employee Provisions 104

6.2 Key Management Personnel Remuneration 105

6.3 Related Party Disclosures 105

Managing Uncertainties 106

7.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities 106

7.2 Financial Instruments 106

7.3 Administered - Financial Instruments 107

7.4 Fair Value Measurements 108

7.5 Administered - Fair Value Measurements 108

Other Information 109

8.1 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities 109

86 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Financial Performance

Objectives of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

The GBRMPA conducts the following administered activities on behalf of the Government:

a) Collection of the Environmental Management Charge (EMC) and Infringements; and b) Management of Commonwealth Islands land, heritage buildings and lease revenue.

Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

Recognition of revenue from contracts with customers - Refer Note 1.2: Own‐Source Revenue and Gains Fair value of buildings, plant and equipment - Refer Note 3.2: Non‐Financial Assets Remaining useful lives of buildings, infrastructure, plant and equipment ‐ Refer Note 3.2: Non‐Financial Assets Douglas Shoal provision ‐ Refer Note 3.5: Provisions Employee entitlement provision - Refer Note 6.1: Employee Provisions

New Australian Accounting Standards

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by Section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the GBRMPA has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign‐off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the entity’s financial statements.

Application of AASB 1059 Service Concession Arrangements: Grantors The GBRMPA has adopted AASB 1059 using the modified retrospective approach at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2020 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASBs and related interpretations.

For arrangements within the scope of AASB 1059, on transition and at initial recognition a public sector grantor is required to record the asset(s) used in the service concession arrangement at current replacement cost in accordance with the cost approach to Fair Value under AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement, with a related liability, which could be a financial liability, an accrued revenue liability or a combination of both.

After initial recognition, service concession assets are measured applying the GBRMPAs property, plant and equipment and intangible assets (refer Note 3.2) subsequent measurement accounting policies.

The GBRMPA has reviewed all arrangements (including leasing arrangements) that are controlled and administered by the GBRMPA to assess whether AASB 1059 applies. No arrangements were identified.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) is an Australian Government controlled non‐corporate entity. It is a not‐for‐profit entity. Under the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975, the Authority is responsible for managing one of the world's premier natural resources ‐ the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

The GBRMPA and the Queensland Government jointly manage the Marine Park and this close collaboration is critically important for effectively managing such a large, diverse and complex marine area. The GBRMPA continues to work closely with other Australian Government entities, particularly the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, and other industry partners, particularly the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, to implement the Reef 2050 Plan.

The continued existence of the GBRMPA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continued funding by Parliament for the GBRMPA's administration and programs.

GBRMPA activities contributing toward this outcome are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by the GBRMPA in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by the GBRMPA, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or incurred by the Government.

Overview

Annual Report 2020-21 87

F I N A N C E S

Financial Performance

Budgetary Reporting of Major Variances (AASB1055) The Budget Variances Commentary provides a comparison between the original budget reported in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2020‐21, and the final financial outcome in the 2020‐21 financial statements. The original budget provided is not audited, however major changes in budget have been explained as part of the variance analysis where relevant.

Variances are considered to be 'major' where:

(a) the variance between budget and actual is greater than +/‐10% of the budget for the line items; and (b) the variance between budget and actual is greater than +/‐2% of the relevant budget base.

The relevant budget bases are: ‐ Departmental ‐ Total Expenses ‐ Administered ‐ Total Income

Variance explanations will also be provided where there have been major changes to business activities that may not be numerically material but by nature may assist users in understanding underlying business changes that may have occurred since the original budget was released.

Where a revised budget has been presented to Parliament, the GBRMPA may include variance explanations of major variances between the revised budget and actual amounts where they are considered relevant to an assessment of the discharge of accountability and to an analysis of the performance of the GBRMPA.

Taxation The GBRMPA is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Reef HQ The Reef HQ building was funded as a Commonwealth-State Bicentennial project, through the Great Barrier Reef Wonderland Association Incorporated (the Association) on land leased from the Townsville Port Authority. Following the winding up of the Association in September 2001 the lease arrangement for the land is now between the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and the Townsville Port Authority for $1.

This operating lease has been assessed retrospectively under AASB 16 Leases at the date of initial application. With no lease payments in the arrangement this results in a lease liability of zero, and accordingly when applying the cost model in the standard, a right of use asset of zero.

Insurance The GBRMPA is insured for risks through the Government's insurable managed fund Comcover. This includes insurance cover for the operation of Reef HQ aquarium. Workers compensation is insured through Comcare Australia.

Reporting of Administered activities Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the administered schedules and related notes.

Except where otherwise stated, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Events After the Reporting Period Departmental There was no subsequent events that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the GBRMPA.

Administered There was no subsequent events that had the potential to significantly affect the ongoing structure and financial activities of the GBRMPA.

Overview (con) Overview (cont)

88 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Financial Performance 1.1: Expenses

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

1.1A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 18,965 19,200

Superannuation Defined contribution plans 1,117 1,278

Defined benefit plans 2,177 2,116

Leave and other entitlements 2,904 2,528

Separation and redundancies 335 315

Other employee benefits 180 135

Fringe benefit tax 11 (13)

Total employee benefits 25,689 25,559

Accounting Policy Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and relationships section (refer 6.1).

1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Aircraft and vessel charter costs 956 1,226

Consultants 944 760

Contractors 20,015 18,762

Employee related and training 522 379

Employment agency temporary staff 2,786 2,821

External audit fees 52 52

Internal audit fees 93 91

IT Services 1,469 1,255

Legal fees and other legal 208 378

Library and subscriptions 40 75

Meetings and engagement costs 80 100

Property and minor equipment 603 702

Reef HQ general expenses 734 799

Telephone and communications 904 721

Travel 1,152 1,513

Utilities 601 495

Other general expenses 800 640

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 31,959 30,769

Goods supplied 632 742

Services rendered 31,327 30,027

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 31,959 30,769

Other Suppliers Low value leases 15

Operating lease rentals 26 ‐

Short‐term leases 185

Workers compensation premiums 112 106

Total other suppliers 138 306

Total suppliers 32,097 31,075

The GBRMPA had no short‐term lease commitments as at 30 June 2021. The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 1.1C, 3.2 and 3.4.

Accounting Policy Short‐term leases and leases of low‐value assets

on a straight‐line basis over the lease term.

1.1C: Finance Costs Interest on lease liabilities 129 44

Total finance costs 129 44

Accounting Policy All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

The GBRMPA has elected not to recognise right‐of‐use assets and lease liabilities for short‐term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low‐value assets (less than $10,000). The GBRMPA recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense

This section analyses the financial performance of Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority for the year ended 30  June 2021.  Financial Performance

Annual Report 2020-21 89

F I N A N C E S

1.2 Own‐Source Revenue and Gains

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

Own‐Source Revenue

1.2A: Revenue from contracts with customers Sale of goods1 60 210

Rendering of services1 560 1,594

Total revenue from contracts with customers 620 1,804

1. The GBRMPA's revenue from contracts with customers relates to point in time sales of goods and tickets for the Reef HQ Aquarium.

Accounting Policy Revenue is recognised either at a point in time for services rendered or over time in accordance to contractual milestones, when (or as) the GBRMPA satisfies performance obligations by transferring the promised goods or services to its customers.

The GBRMPA recognises contract liabilities for consideration received in respect of performance obligations paid for up‐front and reports these amounts as contractual liabilities in the statement of financial position. Similarly, if the GBRMPA satisfies a performance obligation before it receives the consideration, the GBRMPA recognises either a contractual asset or a receivable in its statement of financial position, depending on whether something other than the passage of time is required before the consideration is due.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the GBRMPA expects to be entitled to in exchange for transferring of contracted goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts or both.

Receivables for services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account Collectability of debts is reviewed at end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Accounting Judgement and Estimates Revenue recognition for contractual revenue with customers has significant judgements applied to performance obligations. The determination of the revenue recognition is based on contractual term, time and materials at a point in time, transaction price, satisfaction that control has passed to a client, identification of costs that can be capitalised, and any material variations to contracts. If a contract with the GBRMPA has multiple deliverables, the transaction price is allocated to each performance milestone and revenue is recognised based on the actual services provided as a proportion of the total services to be provided because the customer receives and uses the benefits simultaneously. This is determined on the actual costs of the project relative to the total expected costs of the project.

90 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

1.2 Own‐Source Revenue and Gains (cont)

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

Own‐Source Revenue

1.2B: Fee and fines Permit assessment fees 5.3 4 214

Total fees and fines 4 214

1.2C: Grants received from Government and Industry Partners Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers1 1,021

Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers5 569 200

Crown of Thorns Starfish Control 2016‐202 ‐ 8,575

Crown of Thorns Starfish Control 2019‐224 2,605 6,877

Curtis Island Offsets Program2 1,948 2,498

Future Coral Bleaching and Reef Health Assessment2 390 144

Great Barrier Reef Green Turtle Research Program2 1,872 144

International Coral Reef Initiative Co‐Chairing3 ‐ 797

National Landcare Reef Integrated Marine Monitoring and Reporting Program2 ‐ 435

Reef Islands Restoration2 1,500 ‐

Total grants received from Government and Industry Partners 8,884 20,691

1. Funding received directly from Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet 2. Funding received directly from Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment 3. Funding received directly from Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 4. Funding received directly from the Great Barrier Reef Foundation 5. Funding received directly from the National Indigenous Australians Agency

1.2D: Other Revenue Other revenue 212 308

Sale of assets 10 1

Total other revenue 222 309

1.2E: Other Gains Resources received free of charge ‐ external audit services 52 52

Total gains 52 52

Accounting Policy Resources Received Free of Charge Resources received free of charge are recognised as revenue when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources are recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature. Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.2F: Revenue from Government Appropriations Departmental appropriation 42,824 31,500

Departmental special appropriation 16,242 11,333

Field management program 5.2 16,576 12,740

Total revenue from Government 75,642 55,573

Accounting Policy Revenue from Government Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the GBRMPA gains control of the appropriation. Where amounts relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts. Special Appropriation The GBRMPA, as agent for the Commonwealth, collects an Environmental Management Charge (EMC) from permit holders who collect on behalf of individual tourists and remit to the GBRMPA. Amounts collected are paid into the Official Public Account (OPA). The GBRMPA receives an equivalent amount via a special appropriation (GBRMP Act s65A) for its operations. Special appropriation is recognised when the GBRMPA has the right to receive the revenue and it can be reliably measured. This is deemed to occur when monies are received by the GBRMPA from permit holders.

Annual Report 2020-21 91

F I N A N C E S

1.3A Reclassification Adjustments and 1.3B Income Tax Relating to other comprehensive income 2.1 Administered ‐ Income

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

REVENUE

Non‐Taxation Revenue 2.1A Fees and fines Environmental management charge ‐ 8,711

Infringement notices 106 249

Total fees and fines 106 8,960

2.1B Rental income Commonwealth islands operating leases ‐ 249

Total rental income ‐ 249

Operating Leases

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, in its capacity as lessor, manages two leases on behalf of the Commonwealth. Dent Island 15 year lease to Hamilton West Pty Ltd expiring 31 January 2029 with an option to extend for 2 terms at 15 years each term.

Lady Elliot Island 10 year lease to Reef Resort Management Pty Ltd expiring 30 November 2025 with an option to extend for another 10 years.

The GBRMPA manages the risk associated with any rights it retains in the underlying assets through a regime of activities not limited to; general maintenance programs, regular inspections, environmental management plans, historic precinct management plans, operations committees, a bank guarantees, tenant insurance requirements, and public liability insurance.

Due to the impacts of COVID 19 on the tourism industry the Government waived the lease payments from the 23/3/2020 to 20/12/2020 (39 weeks).

This waiver has now been extended to a date undetermined, and subsequently the GBRMPA has received no lease payments in 2020‐21.

The GBRMPA has estimated that the rent will commence from 1 July 2022 in line with the EMC waiver terms.

2021

Maturity analysis of operating lease income receivables: $’000

Within 1 year ‐

One to two years 374

Two to three years 377

Three to four years 381

Four to five years 385

More than 5 years 434

Total undiscounted lease payments receivable 1,951

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying note 4.2.

Accounting Policy All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by the GBRMPA on behalf of the Australian Government. As such, administered appropriations are not revenues of the GBRMPA as it oversees distribution or expenditure of the funds as directed.

The GBRMPA, as agent for the Commonwealth, collects an Environmental Management Charge (EMC) from permit holders who collect on behalf of individual tourists and remit to the GBRMPA. Due to the impacts of COVID 19 on the tourism industry this charge has been waived by the Government until 30 June 2022. Other revenue received is from QLD Government State Penalties Enforcement Registry (SPER) that administer the recovery of infringement debts. Revenue is also generated from rent that is charged under leases associated with the use of the land including a number of heritage listed lighthouse properties. All amounts collected are paid into the Official Public Account (OPA).

Income and Expenses Administered on Behalf of Government This section analyses the activities that the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent with those applied for departmental reporting.

92 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

3.1 Financial Assets

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

3.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Field Management special account ‐ cash at bank 5.2 27,433 29,147

Field Management special account ‐ cash held in OPA 5.2 3,432 2,739

Cash on Hand or on deposit 435 463

Total cash and cash equivalents 31,300 32,349

Accounting Policy Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents includes: a) cash on hand; b) cash held in special accounts; and

c) bank accounts.

3.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivables Goods and services1 3,533 2,811

Total goods and services receivables 3,533 2,811

Appropriations receivable Appropriations receivable2 5.1B 50,668 27,416

Total appropriations receivable2 50,668 27,416

Other Receivables GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office (net) 593 (323)

Other (1) 3

Total other receivables 592 (320)

Total trade and other receivables (gross)2 54,793 29,907

Total trade and other receivables (net)2 54,793 29,907

Credit terms for goods and services were within 20 days (2020: 20 days).

2020 Adjustment 2020

$'000 $'000 $'000

Financial Statements Line Item (original) $'000 (restated)

2019‐20 Departmental Statement of Financial Position Trade and other receivables 43,483 (13,576) 29,907

Net assets 51,691 (13,576) 38,115

Contributed equity 37,385 (13,576) 23,809

Total equity 51,691 (13,576) 38,115

2019‐20 Departmental Statement of Changes in Equity Contributed equity Return of equity ‐ Repealed appropriation ‐ (13,576) (13,576)

Total transactions with owners 9,141 (13,576) (4,435)

Closing balance as at 30 June 37,385 (13,576) 23,809

Total equity Return of equity ‐ Repealed appropriation ‐ (13,576) (13,576)

Total transactions with owners 9,141 (13,576) (4,435)

Closing balance as at 30 June 51,691 (13,576) 38,115

Accounting Policy Financial assets

Trade receivables, appropriations receivable, loans, and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash �lows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below‐market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

2. The prior period of 2019‐20 was misstated by $13.576m due to Departmental 2017‐18 annual appropriations being repealed at 1 July 2020. As at 30 June 2020, while this amount was legally available as per note 5.1B, under the Commonwealth financial framework the GBRMPA is deemed to have lost control of the $13.576m, and therefore should have recognised a return of equity and reduction in appropriation receivable as at 30 June 2020. Accordingly, Appropriations receivable in 2019‐20 has been restated and reduced by $13.576m. This reduction is summarised in Total trade and other receivables (gross and net) above, and offset by an equivalent reduction in Contributed equity. The restated items in the 2019‐20 Financial Statements are as follows:

1. Goods and services receivable includes $2.600m from the Assistance for Severely Affected Regions (Special Appropriation) (Coronavirus Economic Response Package) Act 2020 (Cth) to be drawn down in 2021‐22.

Financial Position This section analyses the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result. Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

Annual Report 2020-21 93

F I N A N C E S

3.2 Non‐Financial Assets 3.2: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment and Computer Software

Total

Leasehold Work in Plant & Computer

Buildings Improvements Progress Equipment Software Total

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

As at 1 July 2020 Gross book value 13,217 80 ‐ 4,358 2,971 20,626

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (1,666) (53) ‐ (724) (222) (2,665)

Total as at 1 July 2020 11,551 27 ‐ 3,634 2,749 17,961

Additions Purchase or internally developed ‐ ‐ ‐ 175 403 578

Right‐of‐use assets 2,743 ‐ ‐ 169 ‐ 2,912

Work in progress ‐ ‐ 4,930 ‐ ‐ 4,930

Revaluations recognised in net cost of services ‐ ‐ ‐(1,486) ‐ (1,486)

Impairments recognised in net cost of services ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ (1,310) (1,310)

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 20,926 (8) ‐ ‐ 34 20,952

Recognition of accumulated depreciation on revaluation in other comprehensive income (21,893) 56 ‐ ‐ (9) (21,846)

Disposals

‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

Depreciation and amortisation (451) (22) ‐ (551) (202) (1,226)

Depreciation on ri

ght‐of‐use assets (1,362) ‐ ‐ (213) ‐ (1,575)

Net book value 30 June 2021 11,514 53 4,930 1,728 1,665 19,890

Net book value as of 30 June 2021 represented by Gross book value 36,886 72 4,930 3,216 2,098 47,201

Accumulated depreciation and impairment (25,372) (19) ‐ (1,488) (433) (27,312)

Net book value 30 June 2021 11,514 53 4,930 1,728 1,665 19,889

Carryin

g amount of ri

ght‐of‐use assets

2,922 ‐ ‐ 329 ‐ 3,251

2. There are no property, plant and equipment and intangibles that are expected to be sold or disposed with the next 12 months. 3. The carrying amount of computer software included $1.176m of purchased software and $0.489m of internally generated software.

Revaluations of non‐financial assets

Contractual commitments for the acquisition of property, plant and equipment As at 30 June 2021, the GBRMPA had contractual commitments for asset acquisitions of $2.704m (2020: $1.086m).

1. The current operating environment presented indicators of impairment, but none were realised for buildings, or plant and equipment. An impairment of $1.310m was realised for intangibles due the pending transition to cloud services for computer software items.

In 2020‐21, the GBRMPA contracted Jones Lang LaSalle Incorporated (JLL) for a period of 5 years for valuation services. Being the first year of the arrangement, in 2020‐21 a comprehensive valuation was complemented with a full asset audit and rebuilding of the GBRMPAs asset register. Site visits were conducted in all major offices with the resulting data forming the basis of a new asset register. In terms of the valuation approach, for assets classified as having Level 2 inputs, JLL compared the Written Down Value (WDV) of the assets against similar assets in the most appropriate active market. This enabled JLL to ascertain that the WDV was materially in line with observable market data. For assets that JLL were unable to value by identifiable observable market data an alternative approach was utilised. These assets were valued by the cost approach method, a depreciated replacement cost (DRC) approach, utilising Level 3 inputs. In doing so, the JLL review ensured the estimated replacement cost, total useful lives (TUL), and remaining useful lives (RUL) were in line with industry standards to ensure the DRC calculation was reliable. In terms of the valuation result, JLL measured the total replacement cost of all current assets alongside their current WDV. This resulted in an additional $19.428m in total asset costs, and $21.808m in total accumulated depreciation, for a total revaluation write down of $2.380m. Of this write down, $1.486m was taken through net cost of services and $0.894m was applied to the asset revaluation reserve. As the asset register transition was administrative in nature, with no physical disposals or new commissions, this result was realised against the asset revaluation reserve through other comprehensive income. Due the impact of the COVID‐19 outbreak, JLL also disclosed that valuation and market uncertainty is not measurable, but maintained that result was substantiated.

In 2020‐21, the GBRMPA is also carrying $4.930m in work in progress (WIP). This is due to the Reef HQ Upgrade that is refurbishing the aquarium over the next few years. These assets will be commissioned from WIP as they are brought into service over the course of the upgrade.

The next scheduled comprehensive revaluation of GBRMPA's assets is in 2021‐22 by JLL. All increments and decrements have been transferred to accumulated depreciation firstly, and then the asset revaluation reserve. The reserve was split by class in 2020‐21, and due to Plant & Equipment having no remaining reserve a decrement $1.486m was expensed (2020: Nil).

94 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

3.2 Non‐Financial Assets (cont)

Accounting Policy Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Asset Recognition Threshold Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position, except for purchases costing less than $5,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total such as IT equipment).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located.

This is particularly relevant to 'make good' provisions in property leases taken up by the GBRMPA where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the GBRMPA's leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the 'make good' recognised.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

In accordance with AASB 16 the GBRMPA adjusts any additional ROU assets on initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired.

Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, GGS and Whole of Government financial statements.

Revaluations Following initial recognition at cost, property plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets' fair values as at the reporting date.

The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluations decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Depreciation Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written‐off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the GBRMPA using, in all cases, the straight‐line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable assets are based on the following useful lives:

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2021. Where indicators of impairment exist, the asset's recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset's recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset's ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the GBRMPA were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is restated proportionately with the change in the gross carrying amount of the asset so that the carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount.

2021 2020

Buildings 5 â€ 50 years 5 â€ 50 years

Leasehold improvements Lease Term Lease term

Plant and equipment 3 to 20 years 3 to 20 years

Annual Report 2020-21 95

F I N A N C E S

3.2 Non‐Financial Assets (cont)

Derecognition An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Computer software These assets are carried at fair value as determined by an independent valuer. Computer software costing less than $5,000, is expensed in the year of acquisition.

Computer software is amortised on a straight‐line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the GBRMPA's software is 3 to to 10 years (2020: 3 to 10 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2021.

3.3 Payables

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

3.3A: Other payables

Wages and salaries 510 427

Amounts owed to Commonwealth 124 285

Total other payables 634 712

3.3B: Permit bonds Cash Bonds held on behalf of Permit Holders 1,384 1,358

Total permit bonds 1,384 1,358

Accounting Policy The GBRMPA holds cash bonds for tourism permittees on the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park to mitigate against the risk of access damage.

3.4 Leases

3.4: Leases Lease liabilities 3,383 1,913

Total leases 3,383 1,913

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2021 was $1.443m (2020: $1.456m).

Maturity analysis ‐ contractual undiscounted cash flows Within 1 year 1,585 1,470

Between 1 to 5 years 1,868 472

More than 5 years ‐ ‐

Total leases 3,453 1,942

The GBRMPA in its capacity as lessee, has lease commitments for office accommodation (including options), vehicles, and photocopiers.

Accounting Policy For all new contracts entered into, the GBRMPA considers whether the contract is, or contains a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate is readily determinable, or the department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased for interest. It is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease liability is remeasured, the corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right‐of‐use asset or profit and loss depending on the nature of the reassessment or modification.

96 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

3.5 Provisions

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

3.5A Provision for Douglas Shoal Remediation1 Balance carried forward from previous period 27,790 29,117

Expenses against provision (1,676) (2,973)

Discounting of provision 277 1,646

Total provision for Douglas Shoal Remediation 26,391 27,790

3.5B Provision for refund of Environmental Management Charge2 Refunds to be paid as grants ‐ 279

Total provision for refund of Environmental Management Charge ‐ 279

Total provisions 26,391 28,069

1. On 3 April 2010, the Chinese owned bulk carrier, Shen Neng 1, grounded on Douglas Shoal within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Douglas Shoal is a reef shoal located 90 kilometres off the central coast of Queensland. The Shen Neng 1 traversed a significant area of Douglas Shoal over 3‐12 April 2010 before being re‐floated. The damage to Douglas Shoal comprises both physical and contaminant damage. The grounding created large depressions of rubble across Douglas Shoal as well as leaving behind large concentrations of toxic anti‐fouling paint, in particular tributyltin (TBT) (banned in Australia since 2008).

The Commonwealth of Australia, acting through the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, commenced proceedings in March 2013 against the shipowner of the Shen Neng 1. The Commonwealth claimed damages for remediation of Douglas Shoal. The hearing was held in the Federal Court, however it was settled out of court for $35.000m with payment made in October 2016.

In 2016‐17 the $34.909m Douglas Shoal remediation provision was discounted over a 3 year period, with a flat rate of 2% based on CPI, for a resulting expensed discount of $1.319m. In 2017‐18 the project plan was significantly revised, with the resulting provision of $34.298m calculated by discounting over a 5 year period, with a weighted rate of up to 3.5% based on a standard wage price index. The difference of $2.259m, between the calculated discount of $3.578m and the original discount, was recognised as a gain.

In 2020‐21, the program has now been forecasted to extended into a 6th period (2023‐24), due to delays in the procurement for remediation contractors and associated delays in progressing Government approvals and agreements for commercial arrangements for anticipated onshore contaminated and uncontaminated waste storage and disposal. The provision has therefore been recalculated with a 6 year project plan, utilising the same weighted wage price index, with the forecasted payments remaining now 20.3% (2021‐22), 51.8% (2022‐23), and 6.2% (2023‐24) of the total project expenditure over the next 3 years. The current provision of $26.391m reconciles to the original provision of $35.000m when combined with the total discount applied of $1.003m as at 30 June 2021, and the life to date expenditure of $7.606m. Of the total discount applied to date, $0.277m has been expensed in 2020‐21.

2. Due to the impacts on the tourism industry from COVID‐19 the Government waived the Environmental Management Charge (EMC) from 1 January to 31 December 2020. This has now been extended to 30 June 2022. Whilst the approval of the waiver was being considered by Government, some industry participants continued to remit the EMC to the GBRMPA. These monies were fully receipted as Administered income, and then returned to GBRMPA as a Special Appropriation. Accordingly the Government determined that the equivalent amount remitted would be returned to these participants. The GBRMPA therefore created a provision for the payment of these funds in the 2020‐21 financial year, with all funds subsequently paid and the provision exhausted by 30 June 2021.

Annual Report 2020-21 97

F I N A N C E S

4.1 Administered ‐ Financial Assets

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

4.1 Other receivables Receivables ‐ Environmental Management Charge ‐ 179

Receivables ‐ CDPP Court ordered fines 622 662

Total other receivables 622 841

Receivables are aged as follows Not Overdue ‐ 179

Overdue by more than 90 days 622 662

Total receivables 622 841

Accounting Policy Loans and receivables The GBRMPA, as agent for the Commonwealth, collects an Environmental Management Charge from permit holders who collect on behalf of individual tourists and remit to the GBRMPA. Amounts collected are paid into the Official Public Account. Fees and fines payable to the Commonwealth are administered by QLD Government State Penalties Enforcement Registry (SPER).

4.2 Administered ‐ Non‐Financial Assets

4.2: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Commonwealth Island Properties

Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of Commonwealth Island Properties that are subject to operating leases for 2021 Island Properties Total

$'000 $'000

As at 1 July 2020 Gross book value 2,996 2,996

Total as at 1 July 2020 2,996 2,996

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 847 847

Total as at 30 June 2021 3,843 3,843

Total as at 30 June 2021 represented by Gross book value 3,843 3,843

Total as at 30 June 2021 3,843 3,843

The GBRMPA is the custodian of 21 Island properties on behalf of the Commonwealth, with 18 having only a nominal value. While the current operating environment presented indicators of impairment, no material impairment was required. The Island properties are not expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months. The GBRMPA is planning to formalise the classification of the Commonwealth Islands as Administered assets in 2021‐22.

Revaluations of non‐financial assets

Accounting Policy Island properties Administered non‐financial assets only consists of Island properties valued at fair value. Lighthouse and other adjacent properties are heritage listed therefore no depreciation is recorded against the asset. The Island properties are valued in accordance with AASB116 by an independent valuer. Valuations are deemed to occur on 30 June of each year. From 1 July 2015, the islands are valued in accordance with their restricted use under lease agreements.

Heritage and Cultural assets In accordance with AASB116, and as per Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (s. 341ZA) the Authority is required to have plans in place to comply with the Commonwealth Heritage management principles. Accordingly the Island properties are managed by Commonwealth project officer, and have resident caretakers for maintenance. Comprehensive valuations are conducted every 3 years, with the next one due in 2023‐24, and desktop valuations are conducted in between. The GBRMPA Commonwealth Heritage Listed Places and Properties Heritage Strategy 2018-21, can be found at: http://hdl.handle.net/11017/3369.

In 2020‐21, the GBRMPA contracted Jones Lang LaSalle Incorporated (JLL) for a period of 5 years for valuation services. For Commonwealth Island properties, an in depth desktop assessment was conducted utilising the GBRMPAs detailed site inspection data, with physical audits to be conducted later in 2021. A full assessment of the highest and best use of each of the GBRMPAs 21 Commonwealth Island properties was conducted, with Dent Island, Low Isles, and Lady Elliot, given market valuations based on their land and buildings, and a further 18 island properties brought into the gross book value at a nominal value of $1. The overall fair value assessment resulted in an increase of $0.847m to the gross book value due to the change in approach from income based to a market assessment. The properties will be assessed by desktop in 2022.

All increments and decrements are transferred to the asset revaluation surplus by asset class and included in the Administered Reconciliation Schedule. No increment/decrement was expensed in the current year (2020: Nil).

Assets and Liabilities Administered on Behalf of the Government This section analyses assets used to conduct operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority does not control but administers on behalf of the Government. Unless otherwise noted, the accounting policies adopted are consistent withthose applied for departmental reporting.

98 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

4.3 Administered ‐ Payables

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

4.3: Suppliers Environmental management charge payable to the Commonwealth ‐ 179

CDPP court ordered fines payable to the Commonwealth 622 662

Total suppliers 622 841

Settlement was usually made within 30 days (2020: 30 days)

Accounting Policy Liabilities The GBRMPA, as agent for the Commonwealth, collects an Environmental Management Charge from permit holders who collect on behalf of individual tourists and remit to the GBRMPA. Amounts collected are paid into the Official Public Account. Fees and fines payable to the Commonwealth are administered by QLD Government State Penalties Enforcement Registry (SPER).

Annual Report 2020-21 99

F I N A N C E S

5.1 Appropriations 5.1A: Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive') A nnual Appropriations for 2021

Appropriation

applied in 2020

Annual Adjustments to

Total (current and

Appropriation

1

Appropriation

2

appropriation prior years) Variance

3

$'000 $'000

$'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental Ordinary annual services 59,400 6,760 66,160 63,766 2,394

Capital Budget

4

751 ‐ 751 751

‐

Other services

‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

Equity in

jections 8,853

‐

8,853 1,515 7,338

Total departmental 69,004 6,760 75,764 66,032 9,732

Notes 1. In 2020‐21, there were no appropriations that have been quarantined under section 51 of the PGPA Act. 2. In 2020‐21, adjustments are for section 74 of the PGPA Act.

4. Departmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts. They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

Annual Appropriations for 2020

Appropriation

applied in 2019

Annual Adjustments to

Total (current and

Appropriation

1

Appropriation

2

appropriation prior years) Variance

3

$'000 $'000

$'000 $'000 $'000

Departmental Ordinary annual services 44,240 18,049 62,289 48,911 13,378

Capital Budget

4

756 ‐ 756 756 ‐

Other services

‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

Equity in

jections 8,385

‐

8,385 3,549 4,836

Total departmental 53,381 18,049 71,430 53,216 18,214

Notes 1. In 2019‐20, there were no appropriations that have been quarantined under section 51 of the PGPA Act. 2. In 2019‐20, adjustments are for section 74 of the PGPA Act. 3. In 2019‐20, there is a material difference due to the provision of additional appropriations and section 74 adjustments. 4. Departmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts. They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts.

3. In 2020‐21, there is a material difference primarily due to the supplier underspends as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income Budget Variance Commentary, and the variance in Buildings in the Statement of Financial Position Budget Variance Commentary.

Funding

This section identifies the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority's funding structure.

100 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

5.1 Appropriations (cont)

5.1B: Unspent Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Departmental Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2017‐182 ‐ 13,576

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2018‐19 ‐ 4,076

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2019‐20 9,058 15,199

Appropriation Act (No. 4) 2019‐20 4,836 4,836

Appropriation Act (No. 5) 2019‐201 3,305 3,305

Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2020‐21 26,131 ‐

Appropriation Act (No. 2) 2020‐21 3,688 ‐

Supply Act (No. 2) 2020‐21 3,650 ‐

Cash on Hand or on deposit 435 379

Total departmental 51,103 41,371

1. The GBRMPA requires further funding agreements to expend the remaining amount from Appropriation Act (No. 5) 2019‐20.

5.1C: Special Appropriations Applied ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

2021 2020

Authority $'000 $'000

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 (Cth) s.65A, Departmental, Unlimited Amount ‐ 8,711

Assistance for Severely Affected Regions (Special Appropriation) (Coronavirus Economic Response Package) Act 2020 (Cth) s.4, Limited 16,264 ‐

Total 16,264 8,711

Appropriation applied

2. Departmental 2017‐18 annual appropriations of $13.576m were repealed at 1 July 2020. As at 30 June 2020, while this amount was legally available as per above, under the Commonwealth financial framework the GBRMPA is deemed to have lost control of the $13.576m, and therefore should have recognised a return of equity and reduction in appropriation receivable as at 30 June 2020 as per note 3.1B.

Annual Report 2020-21 101

F I N A N C E S

5.2 Field Management Special Account

The Special Account is used for the facilitation of payments for and on behalf of the GBRMPA and the Queensland Government Department of Environment and Science.

Appropriation: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 section 80 Establishing Instrument: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975; section 49 Purpose: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975; section 51(2): a) the management, protection or maintenance of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area;

b) purposes incidental to the management, protection or maintenance of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area; c) meeting the expenses of administering the account.

The guiding principles agreed between the Commonwealth and Queensland Governments under the Great Barrier Reef Intergovernmental Agreement 2015 are:

Barrier Reef

$ $

Departmental Note 2021 2020

Balance brought forward from previous period 31,969,018 34,282,995

Increases Payments received from Queensland Government 16,468,164 12,709,398

Government appropriation1 16,679,664 12,740,398

Receipts from external parties 21,989 72,209

Recognition of prior year revenue ‐ 62,060

Curtis Islands Offsets revenue2 1,947,189 2,642,271

Total increases 35,117,006 28,226,336

Available for payments 67,086,024 62,509,331

Decreases Payments made to Queensland Government for Field Management Program 24,023,434 17,993,757

Further payments made to Queensland Government4 1,327,626 236,000

Payments made to employees and suppliers 7,888,914 7,288,619

Capital expenditure 25,690 48,386

Curtis Islands Offset payments made to employees and suppliers3 1,273,872 2,001,083

Douglas Shoal remediation payments made to employees and suppliers3 1,676,190 2,972,468

Total decreases 36,215,726 30,540,313

Total balance carried to the next period 30,870,298 31,969,018

Balance represented by: Cash on deposit 3.1A 5,105 83,320

Cash held in the Official Public Account 3.1A 3,432,269 2,738,849

Cash held in the GBRMPA bank account 3.1A 27,432,923 29,146,849

Notes 1. Includes $16.576m from Appropriation Act (No. 1) 2020‐21, and $0.104m from a Special Appropriation that was not passed on in 2019‐20.

2. Included in note 1.2B: Grants received from Government.

3. The Curtis Islands Offsets program and the Douglas Shoal remediation project, also utilise the Field Management Special Account.

4. Additional payments were made to the QLD Government for vessels, patrol staffing, and capital projects to undertake further activities.

Accounting Policy Except for expenditure on fixtures upon land owned by or under the direct control of the Commonwealth or the GBRMPA, payments to the Queensland Department of Environment and Science for the JFMP are fully expensed in the year of payment.

external pressures on the ecosystem can have regional and local social and economic effects, and improve the long term viability of the region v) Trends in the health, use of and risks to the environment of the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem, including its outstanding universal Value will be regularly monitored and reported to ensure decisions are soundly based; vi) Co‐ordinated long‐term monitoring and research and the collection and sharing of marine‐based biological, physical, social and economic data is fundamental; vii) Regular, periodic review of the resources necessary for the long‐term management of the marine and national parks within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area will be undertaken; and viii) Initiatives should be delivered through a concerted response across all levels of government with shared funding arrangements of joint Commonwealth‐State initiatives agreed on a case‐by‐case basis.

Great Barrier Reef Field Management Account

‐ regulation of activities that exploit marine resources, measures for protection of marine parks, or initiatives to reduce

i) A collaborative and cooperative approach is fundamental to the effective long‐term protection, conservation and management of the Great Barrier Reef as this is beyond the power and remit of either jurisdiction; ii) The precautionary principle will be applied to protecting the environmental, World Heritage and National Heritage values of the Great Barrier Reef including its outstanding universal value; iii) The marine and land environments within and adjacent to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area will be managed in

an integrated manner consistent with ecosystem‐based management and the principles of ecologically sustainable use; iv) Economic growth and the long‐term health of the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem are interconnected, and actions or changes in one can impact on the other and must be taken into account, in particular ‐ population growth and economic development increases the demand for resource and recreational use of the Great

‐ land‐use activities in the catchment, and urban development can have adverse impacts on the quality of water entering the Great Barrier Reef, and

102 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

5.3 Regulatory Charging Summary

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Expenses Departmental 2,658 2,838

Total expenses 2,658 2,838

Amounts applied Own source revenue 4 214

Total revenue 4 214

Cost recovered activities Managing the Permission System under the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975.

The Cost Recovery Implementation Statement is currently under review, the 2018/19 version is available at: http://hdl.handle.net/11017/3167

5.4 Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Total comprehensive income excluding depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations, depreciation on right‐of‐use 18,088 10,953

assets, and principal repayments on leased assets Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue 1,226 1,162

Plus: depreciation right‐of‐use‐assets 1,575 1,412

Less: principal payments ‐ leased assets (1,443) (1,456)

Total comprehensive income ‐ as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 19,446 12,071

From 2010‐11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements, where revenue appropriation for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principle repayment amount reflects the cash impact on implementation of AASB 16 Leases, it does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements.

Annual Report 2020-21 103

F I N A N C E S

6.1 Employee Provisions

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

6.1: Employee Provisions Leave 7,973 7,797

Other 67 62

Total employee provisions 8,040 7,859

Accounting Policy Liabilities for 'short‐term employee benefits' (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligation are to be settled directly.

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non‐vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the GBRMPA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the GBRMPA's employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation The GBRMPA staff are members of the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The PSS is a defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported by the Department of Finance administered schedules and notes.

The GBRMPA makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The GBRMPA accounts for contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

People and relationships This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

104 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

6.2: Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the entity, the Portfolio Minister, and any other relevant Government Minister. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority has determined the following people are the internal Key Management Personnel during the reporting period:

Board (Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Act 1975) Period as KMP

Dr Ian Poiner ‐ Chairman ‐ appointed under s10(2) 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Mr Joshua Thomas ‐ Member ‐ appointed under s10(6) 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Ms Emma Johnston ‐ Member ‐ appointed under s10(6) 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Mr David Stewart ‐ Member ‐ appointed under s10(2‐4) 1/7/20 ‐ 8/4/21

Ms Wendy Morris ‐ Member ‐ appointed under s10(6B) 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Mr Duane Fraser ‐ Member ‐ appointed under s10(2) 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Ms Robyn Sefton ‐ Member ‐ appointed under s10(2) 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Executive Management Group (Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013) Period as KMP Mr Joshua Thomas ‐ Accountable Authority 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Ms Margaret Johnson ‐ General Manager Strategic Policy and Partnerships 1/7/20 ‐ 30/6/21

Dr Simon Banks ‐ General Manager Reef Protection 1/7/20 ‐ 28/03/21

Ms Rhona MacPherson ‐ Acting Chief Operating Officer 1/7/20 ‐ 13/12/20

Ms Natalie Conner ‐ Chief Operating Officer 14/12/20‐ 30/6/21

Mr Richard Quincey ‐ Acting General Manager Reef Protection 21/12/20 ‐ 30/6/21

2021 2020

$ $

Short‐term employee benefits 1,355,899 1,266,192

Post‐term employee benefits 180,488 182,107

Other long‐term employee benefits 21,253 38,851

Termination benefits ‐ ‐

Total key management personnel remuneration benefits 1,557,640 1,487,150

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table is 11 individuals (2020: 9 individuals). The above key management personnel remuneration is internal only, and excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister, and any other relevant Government Ministers. Ministerial remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the GBRMPA. Mr David Stewart was not remunerated by the GBRMPA, as the Director General of the Department of the Premier and Cabinet his position on the board was held as a Queensland Government representative. Mr Stewart's Queensland Government position had no controlling interest in the Joint Field Management Program partnership that the GBRMPA maintains with the Department of Environment and Science.

6.3 Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships The GBRMPA is an Australian Government controlled entity. Board members are appointed under section 10 of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975. Board members and their related parties may hold positions in other entities that result in them having control or significant influence over the financial or operating policies of those entities. Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the Government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of Environmental Management Charge, receipt of Medicare rebate or Higher Education loans. These transactions have not been separately included in this note. Certain entities transacted with the GBRMPA in the reporting period. The terms and conditions of those transactions with key management personnel and their related parties were no more favourable than those available, or which might reasonably be expected to be available, on a similar transactions to non‐related entities on an arm's length basis.

Loans to Key Management Personnel or Key Management Personnel‐Related Entities In 2020‐21, no loans were made to key management personnel or key management personnel‐related entities (2019‐20: Nil).

Other Transactions with Key Management Personnel or Key Management Personnel‐Related Entities In 2020‐21, no other transactions were made to key management personnel or key management personnel‐related entities (2019‐20: $4.679m).

Annual Report 2020-21 105

F I N A N C E S

7.1 Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Contingent Assets The GBRMPA has no Contingent Assets for the 2020‐21 financial year (2019‐20: Nil)

Contingent Liabilities The GBRMPA has no Contingent Liabilities for the 2020‐21 financial year (2019‐20: Nil)

Unquantifiable Contingent Assets The GBRMPA has no Unquantifiable Contingent Assets for the 2020‐21 financial year (2019‐20: Nil)

Unquantifiable Contingent Liabilities The GBRMPA has no Unquantifiable Contingent Liabilities for the 2020‐21 financial year (2019‐20: Nil)

Significant Remote Contingencies The GBRMPA has no Significant Remote Contingencies for the 2020‐21 financial year (2019‐20: Nil)

7.1B Administered ‐ Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Contingent Assets and Liabilities The GBRMPA has no Contingent assets and Liabilities for the 2020‐21 financial year (2019‐20: Nil)

Accounting Policy Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

7.2 Financial Instruments

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

7.2: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial assets at amortised cost Cash and cash equivalents 31,300 32,349

Receivables for goods and services 3,533 2,811

Other receivables (1) 3

Total financial asset at amortised cost 34,832 35,163

Total financial assets 34,832 35,163

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade Creditors 5,805 2,627

Other 634 712

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 6,439 3,339

Total financial liabilities 6,439 3,339

The GBRMPA did not incur a net gain or a net loss on financial assets or financial liabilities.

Managing Uncertainties This section analyses how the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority manages financial risks within its operating environment.

106 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Accounting Policy Financial Assets In accordance with AASB 9 Financial Instruments, the GBRMPA classifies its financial assets in the following categories: a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and c) financial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the entity's business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the entity becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria: 1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and 2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Impairment of Financial Assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12‐month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write‐off constitutes a derecognition event where the write‐off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classi�ied as either �inancial liabilities ‘at fair value through pro�it or loss’ or other �inancial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

7.3 Administered ‐ Financial Instruments

2021 2020

Notes $'000 $'000

7.3: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial assets at amortised cost Receivables ‐ Environmental management charge ‐ 179

Receivables ‐ CDPP Court ordered fines 622 662

Receivables ‐ Rental Income ‐ ‐

Total financial assets at amortised cost 622 841

Total financial assets 622 841

The GBRMPA did not incur a net gain or a net loss on financial assets or financial liabilities.

Annual Report 2020-21 107

F I N A N C E S

7.4 Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Non‐financial assets Buildings ‐ Level 3 11,514 11,551

Leasehold improvements ‐ Level 3 53 27

Plant and equipment ‐ Level 2 1,599 1,599

Plant and equipment ‐ Level 3 129 2,035

Computer software ‐ Level 3 1,665 2,749

Total non‐financial assets 14,960 17,961

Total fair value measurements of assets in the Statement of Financial Position 14,960 17,961

Liabilities not measured at fair value in the statement of financial position Payables 7,823 4,697

Interest bearing liabilities 3,383 1,913

Provisions 34,431 35,928

Total liabilities 45,637 42,538

1. The following valuation techniques were used: Cost approach: based on the amount required to replace the service potential of an asset Market approach: based on market transactions involving identical or similar assets or liabilities

Accounting Policy The GBRMPA deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at 30 June 2021.

7.5 Administered ‐ Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Non‐financial assets Land & Buildings ‐ Level 3 3,000 2,386

Buildings ‐ Level 2 843 610

Total non‐financial assets 3,843 2,996

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 3,843 2,996

Liabilities not measured at fair value in the statement of financial position Payables 622 841

Total liabilities 622 841

1. The following valuation techniques were used: Income approach: based on future amounts (e.g. cash flows or income and expenses) that are converted (discounted) to a single present value Market approach: based on market transactions involving identical or similar assets or liabilities

The GBRMPA procured valuation services from Jones Lang LaSalle Incorporated (JLL) and relied on valuation models provided by JLL. An assessment of fair value was undertaken remotely in 2021, with site visitation to follow later in the calendar year. JLL re‐tests the valuation model every 12 months and has provided written assurance to the GBRMPA that the model developed is compliant with AASB 13. This assurance is then reviewed and subjected to an acceptance process by management prior to finalisation. As per note 4.2A, there were no transfers between classes or levels of the fair value hierarchy.

The GBRMPA procured valuation services from Jones Lang LaSalle Incorporated (JLL) and relied on valuation models provided by JLL. A comprehensive assessment of fair value was undertaken across all major offices in 2021. JLL re‐tests the valuation model every 12 months and has provided written assurance to the GBRMPA that the model developed is compliant with AASB 13. This assurance is then reviewed and subjected to an acceptance process by management prior to finalisation. As per note 3.2A, there were no transfers between classes or levels of the fair value hierarchy. For the GBRMPA's policy on revaluations see the Accounting Policy section in note 3.2.

108 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

8.1 Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months1 86,599 62,692

More than 12 months 19,890 17,961

Total assets1 106,489 80,653

Liabilities expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months 24,932 14,671

More than 12 months 20,705 27,867

Total liabilities 45,637 42,538

1. Assets expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months, and Total assets, have had the 2019‐20 balance restated as per note 3.1B.

Current Assets consists of; cash and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables, WIP, Reef HQ shop inventory, and prepayments. Non‐current Assets consists of; buildings, leasehold improvements, plant and equipment, and computer software. Current Liabilities consists of; suppliers, other payables, permit bonds, and the current portion of all provisions. Non‐current liabilities consists of the non‐current portion of all provisions.

8.1B Administered ‐ Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2021 2020

$'000 $'000

Assets expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 622 841

More than 12 months 3,843 2,996

Total assets 4,465 3,837

Liabilities expected to be settled in: No more than 12 months 622 841

More than 12 months ‐ ‐

Total liabilities 622 841

Current Assets consists of all receivables. Non‐current Assets consists of island properties. Current Liabilities consists of all payables. There are no Administered non‐current liabilities.

Other Information This section analyses how the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority manages financial risks within its operating environment.

Annual Report 2020-21 109

F I N A N C E S

110 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PART 6

Appendices

Photographer: Lady Musgrave Experience © Commonwealth of Australia (GBRMPA) Annual Report 2020-21 111

A P P E N D I C E S

Appendix A: Agency resource statement and resources for outcomes Table 17 shows the resource statement for 2020-21 for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority. The Authority’s expenses and resources for Outcome 1 are listed in Table 17.

Table 17: Authority resource statement

RESOURCES ACTUAL AVAILABLE

APPROPRIATION FOR 2020-21 $’000 (A)

PAYMENTS MADE 2020-21 $’000

(B)

BALANCE REMAINING 2020-21 $’000

(A) - (B)

Ordinary annual services1

Departmental appropriation2 103,446 64,517 38,929

Total ordinary annual services (A) 103,446 64,517 38,929

Other services3

Departmental non-operating

Equity injections 13,689 1,515 12,174

Total other services (B) 13,689 1,515 12,174

Total available annual appropriations and payments 117,135 66,032 51,103

Special appropriations

Special appropriations limited by criteria/entitlement

Special appropriation: Assistance for Severely Affected Regions (Special Appropriation) (Coronavirus Economic Response Package) Act 2020 (Cth) s.4 18,864 16,264 2,600

Total special appropriations (C) 18,864 16,264 2,600

Special accounts4

Opening balance 31,969 3,827 28,142

Appropriation receipts5 16,680 16,680 -

Non-appropriation receipts to special accounts 18,437 15,708 2,729

Total special account (D) 67,086 36,215 30,871

Total resourcing and payments

A+B+C+D 203,085 118,511 84,574

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts 16,680 16,680 -

Total net resourcing and payments for GBRMPA 186,405 101,831 84,574

1 Appropriation Bills (No.1 and 3) 2020-21. This also includes unspent prior year departmental appropriation and relevant S74 agency receipts.

2 Includes an amount of $0.751m in 2020-21 for the Departmental Capital Budget. For accounting purposes, this amount has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’.

3 Appropriation Bill (No.2) 2019-20

4 Does not include ‘Special Public Money’ held in accounts like Other Trust Monies accounts, Services for other government and non-agency Bodies accounts, or Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts.

5 Appropriation receipts from GBRMPA annual and special appropriations for 2020-21 included above.

112 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Table 18: Expenses and resources for Outcome 1

Outcome 1: (The long term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Great Barrier Reef for all Australians and the international community, through the care and development of the Marine Park)

BUDGET1

2020-21 $’000 (A)

ACTUAL EXPENSES 2020-21 $’000

(B)

VARIATION

2020-21 $’000 (A) - (B)

Program 1.1: (Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority)

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation2 45,944 29,362 16,582

Special appropriations 14,448 16,264 -1,816

Special accounts 33,044 36,215 -3,171

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 1,917 6,024 -4,107

Total for Program 1.1 95,353 87,865 7,488

Total expenses for Outcome 1 95,353 87,865 7,488

BUDGET 2020-21

ACTUAL 2020-21

Average staffing level (number) 238 217

1 Full year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2020-21 Budget.

2 Departmental appropriation combines ‘Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No.1 and 3)’ and ‘Revenue from independent sources (s74)’.

Annual Report 2020-21 113

A P P E N D I C E S

Appendix B: Staffing overview The following tables provide an overview of full-time and part-time and ongoing and non-ongoing employees at all substantive classification levels as at 30 June 2021 and 30 June 2020 (Tables 19-22).

Table 19: Ongoing employee overview, 30 June 2021

Female Male

Classification Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time Total

APS1 0 0 1 0 1

APS2 2 2 1 0 5

APS3 10 0 2 0 12

APS4 13 5 3 0 21

APS5 21 3 11 0 35

APS6 35 9 31 0 75

EL1 27 3 18 0 48

EL2 7 0 7 0 14

SES1 2 0 0 0 2

CEO 0 0 0 0 0

Total 117 22 74 0 213

Table 20: Non-ongoing employee overview, 30 June 2021

Female Male

Classification Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time Total

APS1 0 0 0 0 0

APS2 0 1 0 0 1

APS3 2 0 1 0 3

APS4 2 1 0 0 3

APS5 3 2 1 0 6

APS6 6 1 3 3 13

EL1 2 1 1 0 4

EL2 1 0 0 0 1

SES2 0 0 0 1 1

CEO 0 0 1 0 1

Total 16 6 7 4 33

APS = Australian Public Service; CEO = Chief Executive Officer; EL = Executive Level; SES = Senior Executive Service

As at 30 June 2021, the total employee headcount was 246 compared to 226 in 2019-20, and 232 in 2018-19. The Authority’s main offices are in Townsville. The headcount for Townsville was 208 employees as at 30 June 2021. In addition, there were 18 in Cairns, and three each in Mackay, Yeppoon, Brisbane, and Gladstone, one employee headcount in Airlie Beach and seven in Canberra.

114 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Table 21: Ongoing employee overview (headcount), 30 June 2020

Female Male

Classification Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time Total

APS1 0 0 1 0 1

APS2 5 3 1 0 9

APS3 9 1 2 0 12

APS4 14 3 3 0 20

APS5 15 4 7 1 27

APS6 32 7 31 0 70

EL1 27 2 17 0 46

EL2 8 0 7 0 15

SES1 1 0 2 0 3

CEO 0 0 0 0 0

Total 111 20 71 1 203

Table 22: Non-ongoing employee overview (headcount), 30 June 2020

Female Male

Classification Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time Total

APS1 0 0 0 0 0

APS2 1 0 0 0 1

APS3 0 0 0 0 0

APS4 2 0 1 0 3

APS5 2 1 2 0 5

APS6 6 1 3 0 10

EL1 1 1 1 0 3

EL2 0 0 0 0 0

SES1 0 0 0 0 0

CEO 0 0 1 0 1

Total 12 3 8 0 23

APS = Australian Public Service; CEO = Chief Executive Officer; EL = Executive Level; SES = Senior Executive Service

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Workplace diversity figures for 2020-21 can be found in Part 4 Management and Accountability

Table 23: Workplace diversity figures, 30 June 2020

Women A&TSI NESB NESB1 NESB2 PWD

Classification Total No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. %

APS1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS2 10 9 90 0 0 1 10 1 10 1 10 0 0

APS3 12 10 83 1 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS4 23 19 82 2 8 2 8 3 13 2 8 0 0

APS5 32 22 68 0 0 1 3 1 3 2 6 0 0

APS6 80 46 57 3 4 6 8 3 4 6 8 1 1

EL1 49 31 63 2 4 4 8 5 10 3 6 2 4

EL2 15 8 53 1 7 3 20 2 13 1 6 0 0

SES1 3 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

CEO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 226 146 64 9 4 17 7 15 7 15 7 3 1

APS = Australian Public Service; A&TSI = Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; CEO = Chief Executive Officer; EL = Executive Level; NESB = Non-English speaking background; NESB1 = Non-English speaking background, second generation (mother); NESB2 = Non-English speaking background, second generation (father); No. = number; PWD = People with a disability; SES = Senior Executive Service

Table 24: Salary ranges by classification level 2020-21

2019-20 2020-21

Classification Minimum

salary ($)

Maximum salary ($)

Minimum salary ($) Maximum salary ($)

CEO - - 319,750 319,750

SES 2 - - 338,803 338,803

SES 1 151,193 217,632 151,193 217,632

EL 2 119,246 149,679 119,246 140,916

EL 1 101,818 128,334 101,818 111,595

APS 6 81,441 92,663 81,441 92,663

APS 5 73,829 81,015 73,829 81,015

APS 4 66,461 73,283 66,461 73,283

APS 3 59,904 65,652 59,904 65,652

APS 2 52,916 59,482 52,916 59,482

APS 1 42,350 52,706 42,350 52,706

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Appendix C: Advertising and marketing During 2020-21, the Authority conducted numerous advertising campaigns. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at https://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/ and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. These reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.

The details of the costs of media advertising and organisations used in 2020-21 compared to 2019-20 are outlined in Table 25.

Table 25: Expenditure for advertising and marketing campaigns in 2020-21

Advertising campaign and media organisations Amount

2020-21

Amount 2019-20

Zoning education $185,798.75 $111,928.33

Virtual Future Leaders Eco Challenge event $23,147.45 Nil

Recruitment $20,671.31 Nil

National Science Week event, Facebook $105.00 Nil

Local Marine Advisory Committee $10,999.95 Nil

Be Reef Smart, Universal McCann Nil $4764.00

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Universal McCann $23,146.97 $28,250.19

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Southern Cross Austereo, Turtle Hospital 10 Years Nil $5580.00

Reef HQ Aquarium Turtle Hospital marketing, Townsville and Magnetic Island Guide

$80 $960.00

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Sensis Nil $309.96

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Facebook $348.15 $746.58

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Tripping Magazine $700 $1050.00

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Duo Magazine Nil $300.00

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Pak Mag Nil $3200.00

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, Jorbens Hotel Guides Nil $681.82

Reef HQ Aquarium marketing, NQ Touch Association Nil $693.75

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Appendix D: Freedom of information (FOI) The Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) provides the community with the right of access to documents held by Australian Government agencies.

This right of access is limited only by certain exceptions and exemptions, which are contained in the FOI Act. Under the FOI Act, to request access to information an application must:

1. be made in writing

2. state that the request is an application for the purposes of the FOI Act

3. provide enough information about the document(s) for a responsible officer of the agency to identify it (them)

4. provide an address in Australia at which notices under the FOI Act may be sent to the applicant.

FOI requests should be sent to:

The FOI Officer C/- Legal Services Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority PO Box 1379 TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810 Australia

Alternatively, they can be lodged via email to FOI@gbrmpa.gov.au.

FOI requests can also be delivered to the Authority’s Townsville office at Northtown, 280 Flinders Street, Townsville, Queensland, 4810.

If the applicant decides to proceed with a request, charges may also be payable for the time spent searching for and retrieving relevant documents, decision-making time, photocopying and postage. In the event that the Authority decides that an applicant is liable to pay a charge for processing a request, the applicant would be notified of the preliminary assessment of the charge and have the opportunity to contend that the charge should not be imposed or should be reduced.

If any difficulty arises in identifying a document or in providing access in the form requested, an officer of the agency will contact the applicant to resolve the difficulty. In consultation with the applicant, documents will be made available by mail to the address specified by the applicant or at the official FOI access point.

The authorised decision-makers for a request made under the FOI Act for the agency are the CEO, general managers, director of legal services and senior legal officers.

Documents released under the FOI Act are listed on the agency’s disclosure log, located at www. gbrmpa.gov.au/home/freedom-of-information-requests/foi. This does not include those documents exempted under section 11C of the FOI Act.

Freedom of information (FOI) operations During the 2020-21 financial year, the agency received three requests for access to documents under the FOI Act. Of those, one FOI applicant was granted partial access to the document/s sought, one FOI applicant was refused access to the document/s sought and one applicant’s request for access was still in train as at 30 June 2021.

118 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Appendix E: Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

Section 516A of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) This section of the EPBC Act requires Australian Government organisations to report on their environmental performance and how they accord with, and advance, the principles of ecologically sustainable development. It also promotes the development of a framework that integrates environmental, economic and social considerations and helps improve the environmental and ecologically sustainable development performance of Australian Government agencies.

The following is a summary of the Authority’s 2020-21 activities in accordance with this section of the EPBC Act.

How the activities of the organisation and the administration of legislation by the organisation accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development The following activities of the Authority accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development (section 516A(6)(a)):

• administering and enforcing the Marine Park Act, which explicitly recognises these principles

• working with the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, other agencies and stakeholders to promote ecologically sustainable development focused on:

- ensuring the long-term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Reef for all Australians and the international community through the control, care and development of the Marine Park

- providing policy advice to the Environment Minister to ensure the Authority’s environmental policies are mutually supportive.

During 2020-21, the Authority played a lead role in delivering the Reef 2050 Plan together with the Australian and Queensland governments and other key partners. This plan will set the overarching

strategic framework of the Australian and Queensland governments for the Reef to address key pressures and threats.

Major progress was made towards implementing the Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program as one of the Authority’s most significant actions under the Reef 2050 Plan. The Reef Knowledge System (the online portal for the monitoring and reporting program) is available online and provides an interactive service to help people access and view Reef data, understand threats and support management decisions. Over time it will be developed to enable timely responses by Reef managers and partners to emerging issues and risks, and provide a reporting platform to deliver a comprehensive understanding of how the Reef 2050 Plan is progressing against its objectives.

The range of activities presented in Part 3 of this annual report includes activities that integrate environmental, social and economic considerations. In addition, the day-to-day business of the agency — ensuring the long-term sustainability of biodiversity of the Reef — is achieved by managing the zoning plan, which was introduced on 1 July 2004 in consultation with stakeholders, communities and agencies.

The following activities accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development, especially by employing or promoting the use of the precautionary principle:

• making decisions under the Marine Park Act

• releasing publications on climate change and the Reef

• making information readily available on the agency’s external website

• working with the Australian and Queensland governments to progress implementation of the Reef 2050 Plan.

The following agency activities accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development by aiming to promote the conservation of the environment for the benefit of future generations:

• contributing to the conservation of biodiversity through:

- encouraging integrated coastal management and improving knowledge on the role that coastal ecosystems play in the health of the Reef

- encouraging collective action by community, industry and government to reduce the impacts of marine debris on the Reef

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- continuing to address the impacts of fishing activities, illegal fishing and poaching

- improving the quality and extent of information on the water quality of the Reef

- continuing to implement the Marine Monitoring Program — a component of the Paddock to Reef Integrated Monitoring, Modelling and Reporting Program under the Reef 2050 Plan

- contributing to the conservation of biodiversity in marine ecosystems, including through continued implementation of the Representative Areas Program

• protecting the World Heritage values of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef through:

- regulation, including the consideration of proposed actions predominantly in, or adjacent to, the Great Barrier Reef and the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area

- communication, education and engagement, including the active promotion of the World Heritage values of the Great Barrier Reef

• working in partnership with stakeholder groups, directly or through programs, including:

- the Reef Guardian Programs, primarily focused on local governments, schools and fishers

- Traditional Owners, by developing sustainable traditional use of marine resources practices

- advisory groups, which assist in the management of particular issues in Marine Park locations and operational programs.

The following Authority activities accord with the principles of ecologically sustainable development by aiming to improve valuation, pricing and incentive mechanisms:

• maintaining an accreditation program focused on High Standard tourism operations

• working in partnership with Reef businesses and industry to improve their acceptance and valuation of environmental and social costs and benefits. Activities in 2020-21 included:

- maintaining the Eye on the Reef Sightings Network, a reef monitoring and assessment program that enables anyone who visits the Reef to contribute to its long-term protection by collecting valuable information about reef health, marine animals and incidents

- training tourism industry staff to monitor and record the health of the Reef at their high-value tourism sites.

How the outcomes specified in a relevant Appropriations Act contribute to ecologically sustainable development The outcome for the Authority is:

The long-term protection, ecologically sustainable use, understanding and enjoyment of the Great Barrier Reef for all Australians and the international community through the care and development of the Marine Park.

This outcome is explicit in providing for the ecologically sustainable use of the Marine Park and is achieved through the delivery of three objectives:

• to protect and restore the Reef’s ecosystem health, resilience and biodiversity

• to safeguard the Reef’s heritage

• to ensure use of the Marine Park is ecologically sustainable and benefits current and future generations.

A comprehensive assessment of work undertaken under these three objectives during 2020-21 is provided in Part 3 of this annual report.

Effect of the organisation’s activities on the environment The Authority is responsible for managing one of the world’s premier natural resources through the care and development of the Marine Park. It manages the Marine Park as a multiple-use area and permits such uses that are ecologically sustainable and allowed by legislation.

In conjunction with its partners, the Authority maintained compliance and enforcement activities during 2020-21, with funding provided by both the Australian and Queensland governments for field management.

The Authority worked with the community, Reef Guardian Councils, volunteer Local Marine Advisory Committees and Reef Guardian Schools to promote responsible Reef practices, reduce littering and marine debris, and encourage positive environmental behaviour.

120 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Measures being taken by the organisation to minimise the impact of its activities on the environment The Authority maintains a strong commitment to the continuous improvement of its own environmental performance. The reconstitution of an internally-focused Green Office Committee provides opportunities to further minimise impacts.

Reef HQ Aquarium continues to deliver in the area of energy efficiency and minimising environmental impacts. Sustainability is a key component of value for money procurement decisions and includes reducing energy consumption through the use of energy-efficient building materials, and the installation of more efficient lighting, pumps and other equipment.

Inspiring behavioural change to reduce waste and increase environmental awareness has been achieved in several ways, including:

• engaging staff and visitors in reducing peak energy demand through internal temperature control adjustment, keeping doors closed and switching off lights

• showcasing and promoting sustainable choices and actions across social media channels

• using recyclable and biodegradable containers in the café and retail areas, such as bamboo straws and serving bowls, increasing recycling stations within the public space to capture eligible containers for change, providing a refillable water station and implementing a merchandising strategy within the gift shop that focuses on stocking products to complement a plastic-free lifestyle or are created from environmentally sustainable materials, which forms part of a holistic retail sustainability strategy.

Reef HQ Aquarium continues to improve its energy efficiency through the installation of new smart power management systems that will further maximise the use of solar power generation.

The investment in renewable energy that began with the installation of a 153kW peak photovoltaic system in 2011-12 and an additional 44kW in early 2013-14 was fully repaid in 2017. Reef HQ Aquarium’s consumption remained 54 per cent less than the 2005-06 baseline (when the energy-saving retrofit began). During the reporting period, Reef HQ Aquarium’s solar power station produced 280MWh of energy. This is down slightly on previous years as inverters were off for long periods due to refurbishment works occurring onsite. However, overall energy consumption is also down, which is due to the energy-efficient systems that have been implemented and installed throughout the refurbishments. Initiatives include:

• Thermal energy. Reef HQ Aquarium partnered with Glaciem Cooling Technologies to install a revolutionary renewable energy system to deliver a cooling solution for refrigeration that could help to optimise the use of renewable energy and reduce emissions from heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration. The technology uses an onsite thermal battery that stores excess solar power generated through the Aquarium’s existing solar array. The energy is stored as ice, and can be used most efficiently to power the Aquarium’s air conditioning and the life support systems and temperature controls for the coral reef exhibit, which together make up to 50 percent of the Aquarium’s current energy use. The unit has been installed and is in a defects liability phase. The technology, developed by Glaciem Cooling Technologies Pty Ltd is being installed at three organisations around Australia, including Reef HQ Aquarium. The project is funded by the Australia Renewable Energy Agency as part of its Advancing Renewables Program.

• Pico-hydro generators. When completing upgrades to the coral reef exhibit protein skimmers, energy recovery was incorporated via pico-hydro generators, which will generate 1-24kW of electricity continuously. This electricity will be used to power the new pumps that are part of the protein skimmer upgrades.

• Electrical battery storage. Completing the Aquarium’s self-sufficient energy requirements is the installation of an electrical storage system to store renewable energy and operate the transfer of energy when there is a power failure. The system has the capacity to store 90kWh, which will buy precious time if there are issues with other emergency power systems. It can also provide important peak load shedding when the solar power is low but building loads are still high and it offers a storage system when excess solar power is generated in the middle of the day.

Reef HQ Aquarium continues to improve its sustainability in the built environment as well, with initiatives such as:

• minimising energy use when redesigning the sand filter and protein skimmer systems as part of the refurbishment works — efficiencies have been improved with filtration systems relocated closer to the water source (this, coupled with highly durable and efficient pumps, minimises energy use compared with the previous systems).

• using an environmentally friendly product called Paneltim — Paneltim panels are manufactured from new and recycled polypropylene and polyethylene, (the panels are fully recyclable

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and were used in the construction of the reservoir as part of the protein skimmer upgrades).

• using materials that have zero harmful emissions and are completely recyclable, including sodium nickel chloride batteries (solid state salt) in the electrical battery storage system — the battery’s safe chemistry ensures that when recycled materials will be used to produce stainless steel, the nickel and iron go into alloys and the salt and ceramic are used for road beds

• using recycled materials, such as recycled glass in the Aquarium’s new sand filters — the sand filters remove particulates from the water by forcing the water under pressure through a micron media, in this case the recycled glass (between the three new sand filters, there is 8550 kilograms of recycled glass media).

Other measures carried out over the last year include:

• using the building management system to redirect and manage energy consumption at Reef HQ Aquarium

• increased focus on source reduction across the Authority’s office locations to reduce the volume of waste going to landfill

• using an automated office lighting system (timed with motion sensors in discrete rooms) in the main Townsville building to reduce energy consumption

• maintaining the triple-tier Ecotourism Australia’s ECO Certification of Reef HQ Aquarium for Advanced Ecotourism, Climate Action Business and Respecting our Culture — the certification requires a visit by Ecotourism Australia to audit and verify, which has not been able to occur due to COVID-19 and the closure of the facility for renewal works (the certification has been continued on the basis that they have been unable to visit)

• choosing environmentally sustainable materials for Reef HQ Aquarium exhibits where possible (not all materials can be sustainable, for example PVC pipes)

• taking Australian Greenhouse Office specifications on fuel consumption targets into account when making vehicle leasing decisions; fuel consumption targets are now included in selection processes

• undertaking pest control using methods designed to minimise environmental impact

• using energy-efficient multi-function devices (photocopiers, printers, scanners) and programming them for duplex printing to reduce paper usage and having a standby mode

• sending photocopier toner cartridges, disused desktop phones and disused mobile phones for recycling. IT systems that have a memory (hard drives and mobile phones) are destroyed as per the Authority’s security policy and all other e-waste is recycled locally

• collecting fluorescent tubes, batteries and cardboard waste for recycling via a segregated waste system

• actively encouraging staff to recycle office paper and cardboard, which is collected by a local recycling company

• recycling packaging and envelopes

• printing corporate publications on recycled paper where possible

• photocopier paper contains a percentage of recycled material

• providing documents electronically and using electronic signatures where possible to reduce paper use

• using recycled toilet paper and hand towels in toilets and using dual-flush toilets as a water conservation measure.

Mechanisms for reviewing and increasing the effectiveness of these measures (section 516A(6)(e)) Close analysis of energy performance helps the Authority determine how it can most effectively adopt the minimum energy performance measures to meet its needs and the Australian Government’s targets.

In considering lease arrangements for future office accommodation, the Authority will consider a range of efficiency options, including seeking to achieve a minimum 4.5-star rating in the National Australian Built Environment Rating System.

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Appendix F: Papers and presentations by agency staff 2020-21 1. Collier, C.J., Carter, A.B., Rasheed, M., McKenzie, L., Udy, J., Coles, R., Brodie, J., Waycott, M., O’Brien, K.R., Saunders, M., Adams, M., Martin, K., Honchin, C., Petus, C. and Lawrence, E. 2020, An evidence-based approach for setting desired state in a complex Great Barrier Reef seagrass ecosystem: A case study from Cleveland Bay, Environmental and Sustainability Indicators, 7: 100042.

2. Condie, S.A., Anthony, K.R.N., Babcock, R.C., Baird, M.E., Beeden, R., Fletcher, C.S., Gorton, R., Harrison, D., Hobday, A.J., Plagányi, É.E. and Westcott, D.A. 2021, Large-scale interventions may delay decline of the Great Barrier Reef, Royal Society Open Science, 8(4): 201296.

3. Cumming, G.S. and Dobbs, K.A. 2020, Quantifying social-ecological scale mismatches suggests people should be managed at broader scales than ecosystems, One Earth, 3(2): 251-259.

4. Dowling, N.A., Dichmont, C.M., Leigh, G.M., Pascoe, S., Pears, R.J., Roberts, T., Breen, S., Cannard, T., Mamula, A. and Mangel, M. 2020, Optimising harvest strategies over multiple objectives and stakeholder preferences, Ecological Modelling, 435: 109243.

5. Francis, P.F., Spencer, J. and McGrogan, C. 2020, Educate to keep it great: the long-term successes of a virtual Great Barrier Reef education program, The Journal of STEM Outreach, 3(2): 10.15695/jstem/v3i2.03.

6. Hall, A.E., Cameron, D.S. and Kingsford, M.J. 2021, Partially protected areas as a management tool on inshore reefs, Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, doi: 10.1007/s11160-y.

7. Hein, M.Y., Beeden, R., Birtles, R.A., Chase, T.J., Couture, F., Haskin, E., Marshall, N., Ripple, K., Terry, L., Willis, B.L., Willis, R. and Gardiner, N.M. 2020, Effects of coral restoration on fish communities: snapshots of long-term, multiregional responses and implications for practice, Restoration Ecology, 28(5): 1158-1171.

8. Kleypas, J., Allemand, D., Anthony, K., Baker, A.C., Beck, M.W., Hale, L.Z., Hilmi, N., Hoegh-Guldberg, O., Hughes, T., Kaufman, L., Kayanne, H., Magnan, A.K., Mcleod, E., Mumby, P., Palumbi, S., Richmond, R.H., Rinkevich, B., Steneck, R.S., Voolstra, C.R., Wachenfeld, D. and Gattuso, J. 2021, Designing a blueprint for coral reef survival, Biological Conservation, 257: 109107.

9. Ortiz, J.C., Pears, R.J., Beeden, R., Dryden, J., Wolff, N.H., Gomez Cabrera, Maria del C. and Mumby, P.J. 2021, Important ecosystem function, low redundancy and high vulnerability: The trifecta argument for protecting the Great Barrier Reef’s tabular Acropora, Conservation Letters: e12817.

10. Pisapia, C., Stella, J., Silbiger, N.J. and Carpenter, R. 2020, Epifaunal invertebrate assemblages associated with branching Pocilloporids in Moorea, French Polynesia, PeerJ, 8: e9364.

11. Thompson, A., Martin, K. and Logan, M. 2020, Development of the coral index, a summary of coral reef resilience as a guide for management, Journal of Environmental Management, 271: 111038.

12. Weekers, D. 2020, Illegal fishing in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Australia, in The Poaching Diaries (vol. 1): Crime Scripting for Wilderness Problems, ed. A.M. Lemieux, Center for Problem Oriented Policing, Arizona State University, Phoenix AZ, pp. 69-105.

13. Weekers, D., Petrossian, G. and Thiault, L. 2021, Illegal fishing and compliance management in marine protected areas: a situational approach, Crime Science, 10: 9.

14. Wolfe, K., Anthony, K., Babcock, R.C., Bay, L., Bourne, D.G., Burrows, D., Byrne, M., Deaker, D.J., Diaz-Pulido, G., Frade, P.R., Gonzalez-Rivero, M., Hoey, A., Hoogenboom, M., McCormick, M., Ortiz, J., Razak, T., Richardson, A.J., Roff, G., Sheppard-Brennand, H., Stella, J., Thompson, A., Watson, S., Webster, N., Audas, D., Beeden, R., Carver, J., Cowlishaw, M., Dyer, M., Groves, P., Horne, D., Thiault, L., Vains, J., Wachenfeld, D., Weekers, D., Williams, G. and Mumby, P.J. 2020, Priority species to support the functional integrity of coral reefs, Oceanography and Marine Biology: An Annual Review, 58: 179-318.

15. Wolfe, K., Desbiens, A., Stella, J. and Mumby, P.J. 2020, Length-weight relationships to quantify biomass for motile coral reef cryptofauna, Coral Reefs, 39(6): 1649-1660.

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Appendix G: Queensland Government financials The audited financial statements for the QLD Government operation of the Joint Field Management Program are provided for transparency and completeness in relation to the Intergovernmental Agreement between Queensland and the Commonwealth.

To obtain an accessible copy of the Queensland Government financials covering the Reef Joint Field Management Program for the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, phone 07 4750 0700.

Table of Contents - Notes

Financial Statements

Statement of Income and Expenses 125

Statement of Assets and Liabilities 126

Notes to the Financial Statements

SECTION 1 127

ABOUT THE PROGRAM AND THIS FINANCIAL REPORT 127

A1 BASIS OF FINANCIAL REPORT PREPARATION 127

A1-1 GENERAL INFORMATION 127

A1-2 PURPOSE AND PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES 127

A1-3 COMPLIANCE WITH PRESCRIBED REQUIREMENTS 128

A1-4 PRESENTATION 129

A1-5 AUTHORISATION OF FINANCIAL REPORT FOR ISSUE 129

A1-6 THE REPORTING PROGRAM 129

SECTION 2 130

NOTES ABOUT OUR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE 130

B1 EXPENSES 130

B1-1 EMPLOYEE EXPENSES 130

B1-2 SUPPLIES AND SERVICES 131

SECTION 3 132

NOTES ABOUT OUR FINANCIAL POSITION 132

C1 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT AND DEPRECIATION EXPENSE 131

Certification 133

Management Certificate 133

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To the Director-General of Department of Environment and Science

Report on the audit of the financial report

Opinion

I have audited the accompanying financial report of the Great Barrier Reef Joint Field Management Program.

In my opinion, the financial report:

a) gives a true and fair view of the entity's financial position as at 30 June 2021, and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended

b) complies with the Great Barrier Reef Intergovernmental Agreement 2015 and the financial reporting framework described in Note A1-3.

The financial report comprises the statement of assets and liabilites as at 30 June 2021, the statement of income and expenses for the year then ended, notes to the financial statements including summaries of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the management certificate.

Basis for opinion

I conducted my audit in accordance with the Auditor-General Auditing Standards, which incorporate the Australian Auditing Standards. My responsibilities under those standards are further described in the ncial Report section

of my report.

I am independent of the entity in accordance with the ethical requirements of the Accounting Code of Ethics for Professional

Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to my audit of the financial report in Australia. I have also fulfilled my other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code and the Auditor-General Auditing Standards.

I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion.

Emphasis of matter basis of accounting

I draw attention to Note A1-3 to the financial report, which describes the basis of accounting. The financial report has been prepared for the purpose of fulfilling the financial reporting responsibilities of Department of Environment and Science under the Great Barrier Reef Intergovernmental Agreement 2015. As a result, the financial report may not be suitable for another purpose. My opinion is not modified in respect of this matter.

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Responsibilities of the entity for the financial report

The department is responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with the Great Barrier Reef Intergovernmental Agreement 2015 and the financial reporting framework described in Note A1-3, and for such internal control as the department determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In fulfilling this responsibility, the department determined that the basis of preparation described in Note A1-3 is appropriate to meet the requirements of the Great Barrier Reef Intergovernmental Agreement 2015.

The department is also responsible for assessing the entity's ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters relating to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless management either intends to liquidate the entity or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so.

responsibilities for the audit of the financial report

My objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an able assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report.

As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, I exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. I also:

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control.

Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity's internal control.

Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the entity.

Conclude on the appropriateness of the entity's use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the entity's ability to continue as a going concern. If I conclude that a material uncertainty exists, I am required to draw attention in my audi financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify my opinion. I base my

However, future events or conditions may cause the entity to cease to continue as a going concern.

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Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

I communicate with the department regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that I identify during my audit.

30 August 2021

Carolyn Dougherty Queensland Audit Office

as delegate of the Auditor-General Brisbane

136 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Appendix H: Corrections to the Annual Report 2019-20

The following corrections are of material errors found in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Annual Report 2019-20.

Figure 9: Recorded permission non-compliances by allegation type during 2019-20 were initially reported containing percentage values on page 36 of the 2019-20 Annual Report. The below figure shows the corrected chart values numerically. Three allegation types were also missing from the legend.

Comply with MNA/VNA/FNA/ENA*

Display VIN, produce permit, mooring number

Report/notify

Submit/comply with plan/schedule of works

Exceed limits (locations, zones volumes, quantities, species)

Other

Methodology

Environmental Site Supervision

Execute a deed

Install/maintain facility

Insurance

Submit a bond

Eco-certification

Plan of Management/booking

7

3

2

61

4

2

2

4

6

7

12

14

37 49

*ENA = equipment notification approval; FNA = facility notification approval; MNA = mooring notification approval; VIN = vessel identification number; VNA = vessel notification approval, report/notify = failure of a permit holder to report or notify the Authority of something they are required to, methodology = failure to use permitted methodology.

Figure 21 (Annual Report 2019-20): Recorded permission non-compliances by allegation type during 2019-20

Annual Report 2020-21 137

138 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PART 7

Acronyms and index

Photographer: Russell Baker © Russell Baker 2021

Annual Report 2020-21 139

A P P E N D I C E S

Acronyms

AC Audit committee

AIMS Australian Institute of Marine

Science

APS Australian Public Service

A&TSI Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

CEO Chief Executive Officer

COTS Crown-of-thorns starfish

CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and

Industrial Research Organisation

EL Executive level

EMC Environmental management charge

ENA Equipment notification approval

EPBC Act Environment Protection and

Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

FINFO Further information

FNA Facility notification approval

FOI Freedom of information

GBRMPA Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

GST Goods and services tax

ICRI International Coral Reef Initiative

JCU James Cook University

MNA Mooring notification approval

MP Member of Parliament

NESB Non-English speaking background

PhD Doctor of Philosophy

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PGPA Rule Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule

PWD People with a disability

QPWS Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service

RIMReP Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program

SES Senior Executive Service

TUMRA Traditional Use of Marine Resources Agreement

VNA Vessel notification approval

140 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Glossary

Appropriation Public funds appropriated for a specific purpose.

Biodiversity The variability among living organisms from all sources including terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems, and the ecological complexes of which they are part.

COVID-19 The infectious disease caused by Coronavirus.

Ecosystem resilience The capacity of an ecosystem to recover from disturbance or withstand ongoing pressures.

Environmental management charge A charge associated with some commercial activities in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, including tourism operations, non-tourist charter operations, and facilities. The activities are undertaken with permission granted by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

Outstanding universal value Under the World Heritage Convention, a property is considered to have outstanding universal value if it is of ‘cultural and/or natural significance which is as exceptional as to transcend national boundaries and to be of common importance for present and future generations of all humanity’.

Photovoltaic A potential sources of electric current under the influence of light or similar radiation.

Plan of management A plan prepared for intensively used, or particularly vulnerable, groups of island and reefs and for the protection of vulnerable species or ecological communities.

Portfolio budget statement A statement to inform Senators, Members of Parliament and the public of the proposed allocation of resources to government outcomes by agencies within the portfolio.

Traditional Use of Marine Resources Agreement A formal agreement that describes how a Traditional Owner group works in partnership with the Australian and Queensland governments to manage traditional use activities on their Sea Country.

Annual Report 2020-21 141

A P P E N D I C E S

List of requirements Below is the table set out in Schedule 2 of the PGPA Rule. Section 17AJ(d) requires this table be included in entities’ annual reports as an aid of access.

PGPA Rule Reference Page Number

Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI iv A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and

dated by accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) vi-vii Table of contents. Mandatory

17AJ(b) 148 Alphabetical index. Mandatory

17AJ(c) 140-141 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms. Mandatory

17AJ(d) 142-147 List of requirements. Mandatory

17AJ(e) ii Details of contact officer. Mandatory

17AJ(f) ii Entity’s website address. Mandatory

17AJ(g) ii Electronic address of report. Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) 3-6 A review by the accountable authority of the

entity.

Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) 8 A description of the role and functions of the

entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) 12 A description of the organisational structure of

the entity.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) 21,26,40,51 A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) 8,15 A description of the purposes of the entity as

included in corporate plan.

Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) 9 Name of the accountable authority or each

member of the accountable authority Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) 9 Position title of the accountable authority or each

member of the accountable authority Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) 9 Period as the accountable authority or member

of the accountable authority within the reporting period

Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) N/A An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the

entity.

Portfolio departments mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered

by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, Mandatory

142 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PGPA Rule Reference Page Number

Description Requirement

17AD(c) Report on the Performance of the entity

Annual performance Statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F 13-55 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule.

Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on Financial Performance

17AF(1)(a) 10-11,

73-109

A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) 112-113 A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory

17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial

results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AD(d) Management and Accountability

Corporate Governance

17AG(2)(a) 66-67 Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) iv A certification by accountable authority that fraud

risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii) iv A certification by accountable authority that

appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) iv A certification by accountable authority that all

reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(c) 58 An outline of structures and processes in

place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(d) - (e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, Mandatory

Audit Committee

17AG(2A)(a) 64 A direct electronic address of the charter

determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) 64-65 The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) 64-65 The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

Annual Report 2020-21 143

A P P E N D I C E S

PGPA Rule Reference Page Number

Description Requirement

17AG(2A)(d) 66 Information about the attendance of each

member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings.

Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) 65 The remuneration of each member of the entity’s

audit committee.

Mandatory

External Scrutiny

17AG(3) 68 Information on the most significant developments

in external scrutiny and the entity’s response to the scrutiny.

Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions

of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the

entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity

that were released during the period. If applicable, Mandatory

Management of Human Resources

17AG(4)(a) 68 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in

managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) 69, 114 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full time employees;

(b) statistics on part time employees;

(c) statistics on gender

(d) statistics on staff location.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(b) 69, 114 Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following:

Statistics on staffing classification level;

Statistics on full-time employees;

Statistics on part-time employees;

Statistics on gender;

Statistics on staff location;

Statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) 69 Information on any enterprise agreements,

individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) 69 Information on the number of SES and non-SES

employees covered by agreements etc identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c).

Mandatory

144 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PGPA Rule Reference Page Number

Description Requirement

17AG(4)(c)(ii) 69, 116 The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) 69 A description of non-salary benefits provided to

employees.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A Information on the number of employees at each

classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of

performance pay at each classification level. If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of

performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level.

If applicable, Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, Mandatory

Assets Management

17AG(5) 68 An assessment of effectiveness of assets

management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities.

If applicable, Mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) 70 An assessment of entity performance against the

Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Mandatory

Reportable consultancy contracts

17AG(7)(a) 70 A summary statement detailing the number

of new reportable consultancy contracts entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all such contracts (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing reportable consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting period on those ongoing contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7)(b) 70 A statement that “During [reporting period],

[specified number] new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing reportable consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]”.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) 71 A summary of the policies and procedures for

selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) 70 A statement that “Annual reports contain

information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory

Annual Report 2020-21 145

A P P E N D I C E S

PGPA Rule Reference Page Number

Description Requirement

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AG(7A)(a) 71 A summary statement detailing the number

of new reportable non-consultancy contracts entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on such contracts (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing reportable non-consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting period on those ongoing contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7A)(b) 70 A statement that “Annual reports contain

information about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.”

Mandatory

17AD(daa) Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AGA 71 Additional information, in accordance with section

17AGA, about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts.

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of

more than $100 000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, Mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a

standing offer with a value greater than $10 000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, Mandatory

Small business

17AG(10)(a) 71 A statement that “[Name of entity] supports small

business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) 71 An outline of the ways in which the procurement

practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises.

Mandatory

146 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

PGPA Rule Reference Page Number

Description Requirement

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department

administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature—a statement that “[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

Financial Statements

17AD(e) 73-109 Inclusion of the annual financial statements in

accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory

Executive Remuneration

17AD(da) 72 Information about executive remuneration in

accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule.

Mandatory

Other Mandatory Information

17AH(1)(a)(i) 117 If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that “During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) N/A If the entity did not conduct advertising

campaigns, a statement to that effect. If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(b) 71 A statement that “Information on grants awarded

by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].”

If applicable, Mandatory

17AH(1)(c) 69 Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting,

including reference to website for further information.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) 118 Website reference to where the entity’s

Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found.

Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) 137 Correction of material errors in previous annual

report.

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(2) 69, 119 Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

Annual Report 2020-21 147

A P P E N D I C E S

Alphabetical index

A Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural appreciation courses 52 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage

Strategy for the Marine Park 15, 16, 17 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples 67 enterprise procurement opportunities 52, 71 Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan 64 see also Indigenous headings; Traditional

Owners

Accountable Authority 9, 12, 14, 58, 78 acronyms 140 administered cash flow statement (GBRMPA) 85 administered reconciliation schedule (GBRMPA) 85 administered schedule of assets and liabilities

(GBRMPA) 84 administered schedule of comprehensive income (GBRMPA) 83 advertising and marketing 117 advisory committees 67 Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee 4, 16,

17, 67

Local Marine Advisory Committees 67, 120 purpose 67

Reef Advisory Committees 27, 67 Tourism Reef Advisory Committee 16, 27, 49, 67 advisory groups 120 Ahyick, Basil 65, 66 Aiello, Robin 49 Annual Marine Parks Permissions Compliance Plan

31

annual operating plan 64 annual performance statement 13-55 performance information analysis: Outcome 1, Portfolio Budget Statement 15-20

Program Area 1 8, 20, 21-5, 64 Program Area 2 8, 20, 26-39, 64 Program Area 3 8, 20, 40-50, 64 Program Area 4 8, 20, 52-5, 64 target tracking 20 APS Census 55 APS Values and Code of Conduct 64 AS 8001-2008 Fraud and Corruption Control 66 asset management 68 Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and

Environmental Management 9 Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators 49 Audit and Risk Management Committee 64 Charter of Operations 64 functions and responsibilities 64 internal audit reports 66 meetings and attendance 65, 66

membership 64-5 remuneration of members 65 Australia: A journey to the heart of the reef (panoramic photographic installation at Paris

Aquarium) 5 Australian Government Agriculture, Water and the Environment Portfolio 8 Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) 18,

19, 20, 23 Long-Term Monitoring Program 37 Australian Maritime Safety Authority 19 Australian National Audit Office independent auditor’s report 75-7 reports 30, 68

Authority Board 12, 54, 58-62, meeting schedule and attendance 61-2 members 9, 58-61 responsibilities 58

B Bait Reef (Whitsundays Region) 36 Banks, Simon 9, 62, 72 Bell, Peter 65, 66 benthic monitoring, using ReefScan technologies 1 Blueprint see Great Barrier Reef Blueprint for

Resilience Board (GBRMPA) see Authority Board ‘brand awareness’ survey 22 bullying 55

C Cairns Area Plan of Management 1998 9 Cairns office 47, 58 Canberra office 58 Capacity Building for Indigenous Rangers Strategy

10

Capricornia Cays National Park 19 cash flow statement (GBRMPA) 82 Chairperson 58-9 Check-up PLUS Information Management Maturity

Report, overall score 52 Chief Executive Officer iv, 9, 10, 12, 14, 58, 59 review 3-6 Chief Financial Officer 78 Chief Operating Officer, Corporate Services 12 City University of New York 45 climate change 3, 4, 6, 23, 26, 27, 33, 37, 43 119 coastal ecosystems 23, 119 Comcare 70 Comcover 66 commercial fishing vessels, vessel-tracking units

25

148 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Commonwealth Blue Charter 22 Commonwealth Disability Strategy 69 Commonwealth Fraud Control Policy iv Commonwealth Procurement Rules 2020 71 communication and education activities 16, 41-7 community Reef education 43 competitive tendering and contracting 71 compliance 4, 8, 18, 120 compliance patrol vessel days 28 Marine Park compliance activities in each risk

category 32

permissions 27, 30-1 Reef Joint Field Management Program 26, 27-8

zoning 46-7

compliance management surveillance 24-5, 31 effort and outcomes 24, 25 program partners 25 compulsory pilotage exemptions 33 Conner, Natalie 62, 72 consultants and contracts 70-1 ‘coral-clips®’ 36 corporate governance 58-68 advisory committees see advisory committees annual operating plan 64, 68 asset management 68 Audit and Risk Management Committee 53,

64-6

Authority Board 12, 54, 58-62, 64, 67 corporate and operational plans 15, 30, 63-4 ethical standards 64 purchasing 70 risk management 17, 54, 66 senior executive 10, 62-3, 66, 72, 116 Service Charter 2020-2024 64 Corporate Plan 2020-21 8, 15, 17, 20, 30, 63 Corporate Services (branch) 10, 12, 62 corrections to the Annual Report 2019-20 137 Corrie, Kim 78 COVID-19 pandemic Authority response 70 and Future Act Notifications 35 impact on the Authority and its activities 3, 35,

47, 53

impact on delivery of Reef Guardian Schools Program 43, 47

impact on permission compliance audits 31 impact on Reef HQ Aquarium 41, 45 impact on Reef Joint Field Management

Program 4

and increase in manual permit applications 29 support for reef tourism operators 5, 46, 49 waiver of environmental management charge 5, 10, 29, 31

and workforce flexibility 55

COVID-19 Relief and Recovery Fund 5, 46 Crown-of-thorns Starfish Control Program 4, 10, 37, 38 culling vessels 38 management modes at actioned reefs 38, 39 reefs actioned for management during 2020-21 38, 39 CSIRO 3, 20, 23 cultural and maritime heritage, damage to 24

D Darumbal Enterprises 19 defence activities, management of 35 Department of Agriculture, Water and the

Environment 10 advice to 6, 22

agency relationship with 20, 58, 119 coordination between EPBC Act and Marine Park Act 35

Department of Defence 35 Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade 5 digital communication highlights 43, 44 document currency 53 Douglas Shoal Environmental Remediation Project

22, 38

E ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance 119 effect Authority’s activities on the environment

120

how the Authority’s activities accord with 119-20

how outcomes specified in a relevant

Appropriations Act contribute to 120 measures being taken by the Authority

to minimise the impact of activities on the environment 121 mechanisms for reviewing and increasing the effectiveness of these measures 122 ecosystem resilience 26, 37, 38 Ecotourism Australia 122 educating others about the Reef (Program area 3)

40, 41-7 Education and Partnerships Program 10 educational campaigns to promote responsible

Reef practices 46-7 EduTourism (educational tourism) 45 electrical battery storage 121 employee assistance program 55, 70 energy efficiency 121 enforcement 24, 26, 27, 120 Enterprise Agreement 2018-2021 64, 69 Entsch, Hon Warren 9 Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981

28, 33

Annual Report 2020-21 149

A P P E N D I C E S

environmental management charge 9, 29 logbook submissions 29 system, and online permissions 28 waiver of obligations during COVID-19

pandemic 5, 10, 29, 31 Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) coordination with 35 section 516A, Authorities activities in

accordance with 119-22 ethical standards 64 Evans, Hon Trevor 9 Executive Management Group see senior executive exempt contracts 71 expenses 10, 11,112 expert knowledge is shared (Program area 1) 21,

22-3

expert knowledge is used (Program area 1) 21, 23-5 external audit actions 53 external scrutiny 68 external service providers 70-1 Eye on the Reef 45-6, 120 rapid monitoring surveys 46 Reef health and impact surveys 46 sightings network 46 smartphone app redevelopment 47 tourism weekly monitoring 46 zoning app 46-7

F Facebook 43, 46, 47, 49 finances overview 10, 11 financial statements GBRMPA 79-109 Reef Joint Field Management Program 124-32 fishing commercial 25, 32, 69 illegal 6, 24, 28, 120

position statement 3-4, 23-4 recreational 28, 46 formal Reef education 43 Fraser, Duane 60, 61, 62, 72 fraud control iv, 66-7 Fraud Control Policy and Plan iv, 66 Fraud Incident Investigation Policy 66 Freedom of Information Act 1982 118 Freedom of Information (FOI) operations 118 requests 118

fuel consumption targets for vehicles 122 Future Act Notifications under Native Title Act (Cth) 29, 35

G General Manager, Reef Protection 12, 70 General Manager, Strategic Policy and Partnerships 12

Gidarjil Development Corporation 19 Gidarjil Sea Country Rangers 19 Glaciem Cooling Technologies 121 Gladstone office 58 global greenhouse gas emissions 23 glossary 141 Google my Business 43 grants 71 Great Barrie Reef Joint Field Management Program

see Reef Joint Field Management Program Great Barrier Reef Blueprint for Resilience 4, 6, 26, 27, 37-8, 63 Great Barrier Reef Coast Marine Park 8, 18, 37 Great Barrier Reef (Declaration of Amalgamated

Marine Park Area) Proclamation 2004 9 Great Barrier Reef Foundation 10, 20, 37, 67, 68 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park v, 4, 18 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975 iv, 8, 9,

28, 50, 58, 63, 67, 119 coordination with EPBC Act 35 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment

(Environmental Management Charge) Regulations 2020 9 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment (No-Anchoring Areas) Regulations 2021 9 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment (Waiver

of Fees and Charges) Regulations 2021 9 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Accountable authority 9, 12, 14, 58, 78 advisory committees see advisory committees annual operating plan 64 asset management 68 Audit and Risk Management Committee 53,

64-6

Authority Board 9, 12, 54, 58-62, 64, 67 corporate governance 58-68 corporate and operational plans 63-4 Corporate Plan 2020-21 8, 15, 17, 20, 30, 63 legislative framework 9 objectives 87

organisational structure 12 outcome and program areas 8, 15-55 overview 8

responsibilities 8 responsible Ministers iv, 9, 12, 58 senior executive 10, 62-3, 66, 72 Service Charter 2020-2024 64 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority Enterprise

Agreement 2018-2021 64, 69 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Environmental Management Charge - Excise) Act 1993 9, 28

150 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (Environmental Management Charge - General) Act 1993 9, 28

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 1983 28 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 2019 9, 28, 32, 50 amendments 18 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003

9, 26, 28, 50 Great Barrier Reef Outlook Report 2019 see Outlook Report 2019 Great Barrier Reef region v Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area v, 6 Advisory committees 67

Coordination with the EPBC Act 35 compliance management surveillance 24, 27 High Standard Tourism Operators 49 management of defence activities 35 Reef discovery course 45

Reef Joint Field Management Program

18

vessel tracking 19 Green Island Reef Rehabilitation Project 36 Green Office Committee 121

H harassment 55 hazard reporting 55 High Standard Tourism Operators program 47-9,

67

Hinchinbrook Plan of Management 2004 9 human resource management 68-71 COVID-19 response 70 managing and developing employees 68 workplace agreements 69 workplace diversity 69, 116 workplace health and safety 55, 69-70 see also staff

I illegal fishing 6, 24, 28, 120 independent auditor’s report GBRMPA 75-7 Reef Joint Field Management Program 134-6 Indigenous Land Use Agreement 17, 50 Indigenous Procurement Policy 52 Indigenous Ranger groups 4, 10, 25 Indigenous Reef Advisory Committee 4, 16, 17,

27, 67

innovate for a resilient Reef (Program area 2) 27, 36-9 Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 64 inshore coral 23 Instagram 46, 49

integrated coastal management 119 Integrated Marine Observing System 20 internal audit management actions/recommendations 53 reports 66

internal controlled documents 53 internal controls are documented and implemented (Program area 4) 51, 53-5 International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) ad hoc committee on resilience-based

management 22 Authority as co-chair of the Secretariat 4-5, 22 USA takes over as co-chair in late 2021 22 international engagement 4-5, 22

J James Cook University 23 John Brewer Reef Site Plan 18 Johnson, Margaret 9, 62, 72 Johnston, Emma 59-60, 61, 62, 72 Joint Streamlining Steering Committee 30

K key management personnel, remuneration 72 knowledge stream (Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap) 17

L Land and Sea Country Partnerships Program 10 Land and Sea Rangers 4, 25 capacity building 10 work placement 19 legislative framework 9 amendments to legislation during 2020-21 9 letter of transmittal iv Ley, The Hon Sussan iv, 9 LinkedIn 46, 47 list of requirements 142-7 Local Community Action Grants 67 Local Marine Advisory Committees 16, 58, 67, 120 looking ahead 2021-22 6

M Mackay office 47, 58 MacPherson, Rhona 62, 72 management and accountability 57-72 Mandubarra Traditional Owners 16, 50 marine debris 23, 24, 43, 119, 120 Marine Monitoring Program 10, 21, 23, 120 Marine Park planning 17 Marine Park policy 17 Maritime Border Command 25 marketing and advertising 117 Mars Incorporated 36

Annual Report 2020-21 151

A P P E N D I C E S

Master Reef Guides program 45, 46, 48, 49 masterclasses and Field School 49 social media pages 49 Minister for the Environment iv, 8, 9, 12, 22, 58, 75 Morgan, Filly 65, 66 Morris, Wendy 59, 61, 62, 72 My Case Manager module 31

N National Archives of Australia 52 National Australian Built Environment Rating System 122

National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 69 National Environmental Science Program 37 Native Title Act 1993 (Cth), Future Act Notifications 29

North West Island mice eradication program 19 visitor infrastructure works 19

O offices of the Authority 47, 58 organisational structure 12 our resources are applied judiciously (Program area

4) 51, 52-3 Outcome 1 8, 120 expenses and resources 112-3 Portfolio Budget Statement - performance

information analysis 15-20 see also Program areas Outlook Report 2019 6, 8, 20 policies, strategies and position statements

addressing risks as identified in 23-4 outreach Reef education 45 overview 7-12

P Paddock to Reef Integrated Monitoring Modelling and Reporting Program 120 papers by staff 123 Paris Aquarium, panoramic photographic

installation at 5 partnering with others to care for the Reef (Program area 3) 41, 47-50 partnership arrangements with advisory groups 120 with other agencies 18-19, 20, 119 with Reef businesses and industry 120 with Reef Guardian Programs 120 with Reef Joint Field Management Program see

Reef Joint Field Management Program with Traditional Owners 4, 10, 16, 17, 50, 120 people and assets are safe (Program area 4) 51,

55

People Services section 68

performance, annual performance statement 13-55 performance information analysis: Outcome 1 of the Portfolio Budget Statement 15 Program areas 19, 20-55, 64

the Reef is protected 15, 16-18, 27, 36 the Reef is understood 15, 19-20, 21, 27, 41

sustainable use of the Reef 15, 18-19, 27 performance pay 69 permissions system 32-5 allegations of non-compliance 30-1 compliance 27, 30-1 compliance audits 31 current permissions managed 32 My Case Manager system 31 online 28-9

permit condition review 17 progress against permission systems Service Charter timeframes 33-5 progress of routine permissions that have been

streamlined 29 regulatory framework 28 streamlining 17, 30 Traditional Owner involvement 16 permits applications received and decisions made

32-3, 34

compulsory pilotage exemptions 33 manual applications 29 online applications 28-9 Part 5 directions 33 restoration and adaptation activities 37 sea dumping permits 33 pesticides 23 pico-hydro generators 121 plans of management 8-9, 17-18, 26 plastic pollution 23 poaching 24, 120 Poiner, Ian 58-9, 61, 62, 72 Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap 16-17,

26, 38

knowledge stream 17

resilience stream 18

risk stream 17

tools stream 18

Traditional Owners stream 17 Policy on Great Barrier Reef Interventions 4, 18, 37 Portfolio Budget Statements 2020-2021 8 performance information analysis (Outcome 1)

15-20

program areas see Program Areas position statements on threats to the Reef 3-4, 23-4

152 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Priority Monitoring Gaps Prospectus 20, 25 procurement Indigenous enterprise 52 initiatives to support small business 71 Program area 1: Enhancing Reef resilience by

providing expert knowledge to advise key decision-makers on managing, reducing or avoiding significant threats to the Reef 8, 20, 21-5, 64 expert knowledge is shared 21, 22-3 expert knowledge is used 21, 23-5 performance results 21

Program area 2: Enhancing Reef resilience through innovation, management and regulation of the Marine Park and our in-field presence 8, 20, 26-39, 64

innovate for a resilient Reef 27, 36-9 performance results 26-7

rules for a resilient Reef are followed 26,

27-35

strategies and rules for a resilient Reef are made 26, 27

Program area 3: Enhancing Reef resilience through partnerships, collaboration and education 8, 20, 40-50, 64

educating others about the Reef 40, 41-7 partnering with others to care for the Reef 41, 47-50

performance results 40-1 Program area 4: Supporting a high-performing organisation 8, 20, 52-5, 64 internal controls are documented and

implemented 51, 53-5 our resources are applied judiciously 51, 52-3 people and assets are safe 51, 55 performance results 51-2 Protective Security Policy Framework 55 public engagement 47 Public Governance, Performance and

Accountability Act 2013 iv, 9, 19, 64, 67, 70, 78

Public Service Act 1999 iv, 68 purchasing 70

Q Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual 23 Queensland Audit Office, independent auditor’s report 134-6

Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol 25 Queensland Department of Environment and Science 10 Queensland Fisheries 25 Queensland Government 2, 4, 8, 10, 17, 20, 23,

28, 40, 50, 119-20 Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) 18, 25, 47

Queensland Police Service 25 Queensland Sustainable Fisheries Strategy 2017-2027 25 Queensland University of Technology (QUT) 18, 19 Quincey, Richard 62, 72

R rapid monitoring surveys 46 Reconciliation Action Plan 52, 64 recreational fishing 24, 25, 28 compliance with Marine Park zoning 46 illegal 28

recycling 121, 122 Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program 3, 6, 10, 20, 50, 119 Annual Business Plan 2021-22 20 Business Strategy 2020-25 20 established Management Office 20 Executive Group 16

Priority Monitoring Gaps Prospectus 20, 25

Reef Knowledge System (pilot) 3, 20, 25,

50, 119

Reef 2050 Long-term Sustainability Plan (Reef 2050 Plan) 3, 4, 6, 17, 20-1, 25, 26, 27, 38, 50, 119, 120

Reef 2050 Traditional Owner Implementation Plan 50 Reef 2050 Water Quality Improvement Plan (2018-2022) 23 Reef 2050 Water Quality Report Card 23 Reef Advisory Committees 58, 67 policies presented to 27 Reef and Rainforest Research Centre 38 Reef Blueprint see Great Barrier Reef Blueprint for

Resilience Reef Discovery Course 45 Reef education programs 43-6 Reef Guardian Councils 47, 120 Reef Guardian Future Leader Eco-challenges 5, 45 Reef Guardian Schools Program 43-5, 120 Reef Guardians Program 120 Reef health 6 Eye on the Reef program 45-6 and impact surveys 46 monitoring of 3, 23, 37 snapshot 23, 25 Reef HQ Aquarium 41-3 community Reef education 43 ECO Certification 122 EduTourism (educational tourism) 45 electrical battery storage 121 energy efficiency 121 environmentally sustainable materials 122 formal Reef education 43

Annual Report 2020-21 153

A P P E N D I C E S

highlights 42

hosts Reef Guardian Future Leader Eco-challenges 5, 45, 47 outreach Reef education 45 pico-hydro generators 121 public relations activities 43 ReefTube - education lessons online 45 solar power station 121 staff co-located with 6 sustainability 121-2 thermal energy system 121 upgrade 5, 6, 10, 41-3 visitor numbers 41 volunteer training 43 Reef HQ Aquarium Volunteers Association 43 the Reef is protected 15, 16-18, 27, 36 the Reef is understood 15, 19-20, 22, 27, 41 Reef Joint Field Management Program 4, 6, 8, 10,

18, 47

Business Plan targets 15 compliance 26, 27-8 compliance management surveillance 24-5, 31

core activities 18 engagement 47

financial statements 124-32 funding and expansion 10, 18 independent auditor’s report 134-6 management certificate 133 new research and development projects 36-7 supporting Traditional Owners and Land and

Sea Rangers 19 Reef Joint Field Management Program Strategy Group, technology transformation program

18-19

Reef Knowledge System (pilot) 3, 20, 25, 50, 119 Reef Management System manual applications 29 My Case Manager module 31 online applications 29 Reef Protection (branch) 10, 12, 18, 70 reef rehabilitation 36 reef resilience 3, 4, 6, 20, 21, 26, 27 increased focus on restoration and adaptation

37-8

new research and development projects 36-7 see also Great Barrier Reef Blueprint for Resilience Reef Resilience (vessel) 4 Reef Restoration and Adaptation Program 4, 37 Reef Snapshot: Summer 2020-21 23, 25 ‘reef-stars’ 36 reef structure damage 24 Reef Trust Partnership 10, 19, 20, 67 ReefScan technologies for benthic monitoring 19

ReefTube - education lessons online 45 Reflect Reconciliation Action Plan 64 regional engagement 47 Regulator Performance Framework Self-

assessment 2021-21 19 Remaining Connected program 46 remuneration Audit and Risk Management Committee

members 65

key management personnel 105 senior executive 69, 72, 116 staff 69, 116

reportable consultancy contracts 70 reportable non-consultancy contracts 71 Representative Areas Program 120 resilience stream (Policy and Planning Strategic

Roadmap) 18 Resilient Reef Network Guidance tool 25 Resource Management Guide No. 135: Annual

reports for non-corporate Commonwealth entities iv resource statement and resources for outcomes (GBRMPA) 112-13 responsible ministers iv, 9, 12, 58 revenue 10, 11 risk management Comcover’s benchmarking program 66 risk management capability, maturity score 54, 66 risk stream (Policy and Planning Strategic

Roadmap) 17 Rodin, Ian 64, 65, 66 rules for a resilient Reef are followed (Program area

2) 26, 27-35

S Science Information Needs 2014-2019 document 20 Science and Knowledge Needs for Management

document 20 Sea Country boundaries 16 Sea Country management 17, 50, 67 Sea Country values mapping projects 16, 17, 50 sea dumping permits 33 Sea Installations Act 1987 28 seagrass 23 ‘See the Reef, Love the Reef and Protect the Reef’

(theme) 5, 6, 49 Sefton, Robbie 60, 61, 62, 72 senior executive 10, 62-3 remuneration 69, 72, 116 training 66

Service Charter 2020-2024 64 Shen Neng 1 (bulk carrier grounding) 22, 38 shipping, illegal 24 Shoalwater Bay (Dugong) Plan of Management

1997 9

154 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

sightings network 46, 120 small business procurement initiatives 71 snapshot of the Reef over the past summer 23, 25 social media channels 42, 43, 44, 49 Special Envoy for the Great Barrier Reef 9 staff 6, 114-16 bullying and harassment 55 non-salary benefits 69 numbers and classification 69, 114-15 papers and presentations 123 policies and practices 55 salary ranges by classification 69, 116 statistics 69

training and development 52-3 workplace agreements 69 workplace diversity 69, 116 workplace health and safety 55, 69-70 stakeholder research 22-3 stakeholders engagement with 3, 22 working with 120 statement by the Accountable Authority and Chief

Financial Officer 78 statement of assets and liabilities (Great Barrier Reef Joint Field Management Program) 126 statement of changes in equity (GBRMPA) 81 statement of comprehensive income (GBRMPA) 79 statement of financial position (GBRMPA) 80 statement of income and expenses (Great Barrier

Reef Joint Field Management Program) 125 Stewart, Dave 60-2 Strategic Policy and Partnerships (branch) 10, 12,

62

strategies and rules for a resilient Reef are made (Program area 2) 26, 27 sustainable material choices 121 sustainable Tourism Management Action Strategy

18, 67

sustainable use of the Reef 15, 18-19, 23, 27, 47 synthesised products 23

T Talisman Sabre 2021 35 technology transformation program 18-19 thermal energy system 121 Thomas, Joshua iv, 3-6, 9, 14, 59, 61, 62, 72, 78 see also Accountable Authority; Chief Executive

Officer

tools stream (Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap) 18 Tourism and Events Queensland 49 Tourism Industry Activation and Reef Protection

Initiative 5, 10, 46 Tourism Management Action Strategy 18, 47 tourism operators

accreditation program 120 COVID-19 Relief 5, 46 environmental management charge waiver 5, 10, 29, 31

High Standard Tourism Operators program 47-9, 67

Master Reef Guides program 46, 48, 49 Reef Discovery Course 45 Remaining Connected program 46 training 45, 46, 120 weekly monitoring observations 46 Tourism Reef Advisory Committee 16, 27, 47, 49,

67

Townsville office 58, 118 Townsville—Whitsundays Management Area, no-anchoring areas 18 Traditional Owner acknowledgement iii Traditional Owner Sea Country estates, cultural

values 17 Traditional Owners and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Heritage Strategy for the Marine Park 16, 17

communication and education activities 16 and Future Act Notifications 29, 35 involvement in Marine Park permissions system 16

as key part of Reef 2050 Integrated Monitoring and Reporting Program 20 Native Title rights and interests 50 partnership arrangements 4, 8, 16, 50, 67,

120

and Policy and Planning Strategic Roadmap 17

Sea Country values mapping/boundaries/ management 16, 17, 50 spiritual connection to the Reef 50 work place arrangements developed by Reef

Joint Field Management Program 19 Traditional Use of Marine Resource Agreements (TUMRAs) 16, 17, 50 effective governance of Sea Country

management 17 training Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural

appreciation courses 52 Reef HQ Aquarium volunteer training 43 tourism operators 45, 46, 120

V vessel tracking 25 in the World Heritage Area 19 Virtual Connections program 43, 45

W Wachenfeld, David 49

Annual Report 2020-21 155

A P P E N D I C E S

water quality 3, 6, 23, 50, 120 position statement 4, 24 website use (Reef Authority) 23, 44 Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area

120

Whitsundays Plan of Management 1998 9 workforce flexibility 55 workplace agreements 69 workplace diversity 69, 116 workplace health and safety 55, 68, 69-70 World Heritage Committee, considering the Reef’s

World Heritage status 6 World Heritage Marine Programme 22 World Heritage values of the Great Barrier Reef 19,

49, 120

Y Yeppoon office 47, 58 Yintjingga Aboriginal Corporation 19 YouTube 45, 46

Z zoning compliance 46-7 Eye on the Reef zoning app 46-7

156 Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (07) 4750 0700 info@gbrmpa.gov.au www.gbrmpa.gov.au

2021-0527