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National Capital Authority—Report for 2013-14


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A N N U A L R E P O R T

A vibrant National Capital which embodies our nation’s culture, values and aspirations

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

2013-2014

N A T I O N A L C A P I T A L A U T H O R I T Y

THIS WORK IS COPYRIGHT. APART FROM ANY USE AS PERMITTED UNDER THE COPYRIGHT ACT 1968, NO PART MAY BE REPRODUCED BY ANY PROCESS WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION FROM THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY.

I S S N : 1 4 4 1 4 1 7 1 ISBN: 978-0-646-93220-0

- C O V E R P H O T O : J O H N A H U N T -

W W W . N A T I O N A L C A P I T A L . G O V . A U

14 November 2014

The Hon. Jamie Briggs MP Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development Parliament House CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

We are pleased to present the Annual Report for the National Capital Authority (NCA) for the year ended 30 June 2014.

The report has been prepared in accordance with section 50(1) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 and reflects the requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit under subsections 63(2) and 70(2) of the Public Service Act 1999 (updated May 2014).

The report includes the NCA’s audited financial statements as required by section 57 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

Section 50(2) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 requires that you cause a copy of the report to be laid before each House of the Parliament within 15 sitting days after you receive the report.

Yours sincerely

Shelley Penn

Chair

Malcolm Snow

Chief Executive

A VIBRANT NATIONAL CAPITAL WHICH EMBODIES OUR NATION’S CULTURE, VALUES AND ASPIRATIONS

TELEPHONE: +61 2 6271 2888 | FACSIMILE: +61 2 6273 4427 | EMAIL: natcap@natcap.gov.au | WEB: www.nationalcapital.gov.au

KINGS AVENUE OVERPASS

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | v

CONTENTS

CHAIR’S REPORT ........................................................................VII

CHIEF EXECUTIVE'S YEAR IN REVIEW AND OUTLOOK ............. X

STRUCTURE OF THIS REPORT ................................................ XIII

CONTACT DETAILS ................................................................... XIV

CHAPTER 1 NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY.................................... 1

Overview .................................................................................. 1

Our Purpose ............................................................................ 1

Our Role .................................................................................... 1

Our Goals ................................................................................. 1

Our Values, People and Service ...................................... 2

Minister’s Powers ................................................................. 2

2013-14 Milestones............................................................. 2

Australian Parliament ........................................................ 6

Delegations and Authorisations ..................................... 6

Review of Operations.......................................................... 7

Financial Overview ............................................................. 7

Performance Information ................................................. 7

Agency Performance .......................................................... 9

Administered Performance ...........................................10

Cost Recovery .....................................................................10

Implementing the Recommendations of the Review of the NCA ................................................10

CHAPTER 2 NATIONAL CAPITAL PLAN .............................................11

Development Assessment .............................................. 11

Regulating Development .................................................12

Key Achievements .............................................................12

Development and Works Approvals ...........................12

Works Approvals Over $1 Million ...............................14

Planning Studies .................................................................16

Investigation into Diplomatic Sites ............................16

National Capital Plan Amendments ..........................17

Amendments Finalised in 2013-14 ............................17

Territory Plan Variations ................................................19

Urban Design Studies ...................................................... 20

Urban Design Advice ........................................................21

Heritage Management......................................................21

Heritage Assessments .................................................... 22

Heritage Management Plans ........................................ 22

Self-Assessment of Significant Impacts .................. 22

CHAPTER 3 NATIONAL ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATION .............. 23

Five Year Inform and Educate Strategy ................... 23

National Capital Exhibition .......................................... 23

Key Achievements ............................................................ 25

Blundells Cottage .............................................................. 27

National Carillon ............................................................... 27

Library ................................................................................... 28

Touring Exhibitions ..........................................................31

Education Programs ........................................................ 32

The Canberra Guide ..........................................................33

Self Guided Tours ..............................................................33

Guided Walks .......................................................................33

Social Media ........................................................................ 34

Volunteers ............................................................................ 34

Horticulture Volunteers ................................................. 34

Volunteer Guides ................................................................35

Research Volunteers .........................................................35

Public Forum ........................................................................35

Commitment to Community Engagement ............. 36

International Relationships .......................................... 38

Online Event Registration ............................................. 38

CHAPTER 4 NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE .......................................39

Major Achievements and Highlights ........................ 39

Managing and Maintaining National Assets .........41

Scrivener Dam ................................................................... 45

Lake Burley Griffin ........................................................... 46

Lake Usage ........................................................................... 49

Administration of National Land .............................. 50

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CHAPTER 5 NATIONAL CAPITAL WORKS ....................................... 55

Overview ................................................................................55

Major Achievements and Highlights .........................56

Capital Works Program ...................................................56

Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project .........................................................56

Bowen Place Crossing ......................................................56

Installation of Pay Parking Infrastructure ............. 58

York Park and Windsor Walk Car Park Upgrade ...59

Lawson Crescent Upgrade Works ...............................59

Constitution Avenue East ...............................................59

Boundless Playground Toilet Facility ........................61

Scrivener Dam Interpretive Signage ..........................61

Peace Park Street Furniture ..........................................61

Scrivener Dam Capital Works Program .................. 62

Jetty and Platform Replacement Rolling Program ................................................................. 62

CHAPTER 6 PURCHASING, COMPETITIVE TENDERING AND CONTRACTING ...................................................................63

Overview ............................................................................... 63

Consultants and Consultancies .................................. 63

Contracts and Tenders .................................................... 63

Purchasing ........................................................................... 63

Quality Assurance Certification ................................. 64

Quality Management Plans ........................................... 64

Program and Exception Reporting ............................ 64

Contract Performance Monitoring ............................ 64

Asset Management ........................................................... 64

CHAPTER 7 MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY .....................65

Overview ...............................................................................65

Major Achievements and Highlights ........................65

The Authority ......................................................................65

The Chief Executive and Senior Executives ......... 68

Corporate Governance ................................................... 68

Committees ......................................................................... 68

Executive Group ............................................................... 68

Audit Committee .............................................................. 69

Remuneration Committee ............................................ 69

Consultative Committee ............................................... 69

Health and Safety Committee ..................................... 69

Business Continuity Plan .............................................. 70

ICT Steering Committee ................................................ 70

Fraud Control Plan ........................................................... 70

Certificate of Agency Fraud Control Arrangements .................................................... 70

Security ..................................................................................71

Risk Management .............................................................71

Ethical Standards ..............................................................71

Customer Service ............................................................. 72

Service Charter Performance ...................................... 72

Partnerships and Community Collaboration ....... 72

Sponsorship ........................................................................ 72

Visual Communications ................................................ 73

Electronic Records Management .............................. 73

Human Resources ............................................................ 73

Employment Agreements and Remuneration ..... 74

Performance Management ............................................75

Staffing Summary and Profile .......................................75

Staff Retention and Turnover ..................................... 78

Workplace Diversity ........................................................ 78

Work Health and Safety ................................................. 80

Information Publication Scheme and Freedom of Information ........................................81

CHAPTER 8 EXTERNAL LIAISON AND SCRUTINY .........................83

Overview ............................................................................... 83

Highlights ............................................................................. 83

Social Justice and Equity ............................................... 83

Parliamentary Committees .......................................... 83

Complaints to the Commonwealth Ombudsman 84

Complaints to the Privacy Commissioner ............. 84

Courts and Tribunals ...................................................... 84

Regulation Review ........................................................... 84

Legislative Instruments ................................................ 85

Certificate of Compliance ............................................ 85

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | vii

APPENDIX 1 MANDATORY REPORTING .......................................... 87

Advertising and Market Research ............................. 87

Ecologically Sustainable Development and Environmental Performance ....................................... 87

NCA activities against the principles of ESD ....... 87

NCA Outcomes Contributing to ESD ...................... 88

Effect of NCA Activities on the Environment ...... 88

Measures taken to minimise the NCA’s impact on the environment ............................ 90

Disability Reporting ........................................................ 90

Grant Programs .................................................................. 90

APPENDIX 2 AGENCY RESOURCES AND SUMMARY RESOURCE TABLES BY OUTCOMES ..............................................................91

APPENDIX 3 INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ..........................................................93

GLOSSARY ................................................................................. 159

COMPLIANCE INDEX ................................................................ 162

ALPHABETICAL INDEX ............................................................. 165

viii | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

FIGURES

Figure 1: Outcome and outputs reporting structure ... 6

Figure 2: Departmental income and expenses 2013-14 and 2012-13 .......................................................... 9

Figure 3: Departmental assets and liabilities 2013-14 and 2012-13 .......................................................... 9

Figure 4: Administered asset and liabilities, 2013-14 and 2012-13 .......................................................... 9

Figure 5: Administered income and expenses 2013-14 and 2012-13 .......................................................... 9

Figure 6: Comparison of works applications from 2013-14 back to 2009-10 .....................................16

Figure 7: Information and Education Programs .. 24

Figure 8: National Capital Exhibition visitor attendance.............................................................. 26

Figure 9: Blundells Cottage visitor attendance ..... 27

Figure 10: The Canberra Guide statistics .................33

Figure 11: NCA Public Forum attendance ............... 36

Figure 12: Building and Infrastructure..................... 43

Figure 13: Diplomatic Land and Lease achievements ....................................................................... 51

NCA Achievement and Highlights ............................. 52

Figure 14: Capital Projects Awards ............................ 58

Figure 15: Organisational Structure .......................... 66

Figure 16: Employment arrangements at 30 June 2014 ....................................................................75

Figure 17: Total employee numbers at 30 June 2013 and 2014 .................................................................................75

Figure 18: At 30 June 2014, NCA staff from diverse backgrounds ........................................................................ 80

MAPS

Map 1: Designated Areas for which the NCA has responsibility for works approvals .............................13

Map 2: Land Managed by the NCA ............................. 40

TABLES

Table 1: NCA approved minor works under the de minimis principle in the Parliamentary Zone, 2013-14 ..................................................................................... 5

Table 2: Performance Information ............................... 8

Table 3: Works Approvals granted during 2013-14 ($1 million or more in value) .......................14

Table 4: Draft Territory Plan variations considered in 2013-14............................................................................. 20

Table 5: Salary ranges as at 30 June 2014 .................75

Table 6: Ongoing and non-ongoing employees at 30 June 2014 ................................................................... 76

Table 7: Ongoing and non-ongoing employees at 30 June 2013 ................................................................... 77

Table 8: Staffing numbers by classification and gender at 30 June 2014 ........................................... 78

Table 9: Staffing numbers by classification and gender at 30 June 2013 ........................................... 78

Table 10: 2013-14, movements into and out of the NCA ............................................................ 78

Table 11: Advertising and Market Research 2013-14 ............................................................. 87

Table 12: Agency Resource Statement 2013-14 .....91

Table 13: Outcome Expense Statement 2013-14 . 92

CHAIR’S REPORT Canberra - as the National Capital - belongs to all Australians. It is an internationally recognised city, not just as our capital, but as a planned city of exceptional qualities and character, which is also home to major national institutions and cultural collections. Also located in Canberra are policy agencies of the Australian Government, the headquarters of the Australian Defence Force, leading educational and research institutions, and the growing diplomatic community.

In these senses, the city is a repository for and increasingly an expression of Australia’s broad, rich and diverse culture. As a growing city, it is also currently on the cusp of major change, with a series of ‘game-changing ’ initiatives brewing - projects including major infrastructure, significant urban development and establishment of new, key precincts - each of which will contribute to the legacy that is Australia’s Capital.

This is an important place for Australians. It is and should be a place that our diverse communities can connect with - a place that resonates and informs their view of Australia and of themselves as Australians. Having just celebrated its centenary, Canberra has come a long way, but it is still a work in progress.

Under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988, the National Capital Authority (NCA) is responsible for preparing and administering the National Capital Plan (the Plan), which provides the strategic planning framework for Canberra as the National Capital and for the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). In this role, the NCA ensures Canberra is planned, managed and promoted consistent with its enduring national significance, to advance the National Capital as a place that is valued and respected by Australians and visitors.

The NCA’s Annual Report takes a look at our broad and varied work in managing the capital. Consistent with our legislated function, this work includes planning and design of the most nationally significant parts of Canberra; managing the National Capital Estate on

x | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

behalf of the Australian Government and implementing programs to inform and educate about the role and significance of the capital.

The NCA’s achievements in 2013-14 include the February 2014, release of a Report on the Review of the National Capital Open Space System (NCOSS). The NCOSS covers over 70 per cent of the ACT, and includes the hills, ridges and buffers between urban areas, the Molonglo and Murrumbidgee River Corridors, Lake Burley Griffin and extensive areas of mountains and bushland to the south of the city. The NCOSS is a characteristic component in the DNA of the ACT and Canberra and it is pervasive. At both large and small scales, the landscape has a powerful affect on the experience and image of the capital.

The NCOSS Report provides a series of recommendations that will set up a governance framework for ongoing review of the system. The framework will enable greater promotion of the NCOSS and its value, along with better engagement of stakeholders in managing the values of the NCOSS. The recommendations will also initiate changes to the Plan regarding the planning and management of NCOSS landscapes.

Consistent with our focus on making decisions based on professional, rigorous and independent advice, an expert Reference Group was established. The Reference Group guided and advised on the NCOSS review, considered the community’s interest in the NCOSS and landscape values and provided advice to the NCA on how to incorporate NCOSS objectives into the Plan. On behalf of the NCA, I sincerely thank the Reference Group for the work they have done in this area.

The NCA has undergone four major reviews of its role and functions over the past 10 years. We have come through each of these with reinforcement of the relevance and importance of our role. At the same time, the scope for efficiency, and for clarification of our role in working with the ACT Government in planning the National Capital, has been identified. We have progressively and effectively responded to the review outcomes.

The NCA has completed the first stages of a comprehensive planning reform to update the Plan, more than 20 years since its creation in 1990. The foremost aim of the Plan review is to clarify and simplify the shared planning responsibilities of the Australian and ACT Governments, while protecting the national interests in the ACT. We see this as critical to ensure the Commonwealth and ACT Governments are enabled to collaborate effectively in fulfilling their respective roles in the ACT, while also simplifying the system for those who must work with it.

We are proposing a series of changes to the Plan through a staged approach to maximise transparency and opportunities for public feedback. In 2013-14, the first step toward implementation of the planning reform was the passage of Amendment 76 - Policy 4.4 (d) for Urban Areas. Amendment 76 enhanced the powers of the ACT Government to determine the boundary between Urban Areas and other land use categories.

Last year, the completion of the first stage was seen by the passage of Amendment 81, which removed redundant and out-of-date material from the Plan. This amendment resulted in a refined document within which more detailed policy review work can be undertaken. This year, work has progressed on restructuring the Plan with an exposure draft to be released in 2014-15. The next stage will involve a more substantial policy review and will commence following community consultation on the exposure draft.

We have also continued to implement our five year Information and Education Strategy. This year we expanded our touring exhibitions to reach Australians and visitors outside of Canberra, to raise awareness and understanding about the significance, meaning and value of the National Capital.

I acknowledge the significant work of Mr Peter Core whose term as Authority member concluded on 17 June 2014. Over the past five years, Peter provided invaluable advice in his role and demonstrated enormous integrity, matched only by his passion for Canberra. His strategic stewardship and his knowledge of and sensitivity to, the Territory and its ways have been greatly appreciated.

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | xi

I’m delighted to have been able to participate in the engagement of Mr Malcolm Snow who commenced as Chief Executive of the NCA in January 2014. Malcolm brings a wealth of knowledge and skill to the NCA following a diverse career, encompassing extensive senior executive experience, and membership of statutory and commercial boards. Malcolm is one of Australia’s leading place makers with expertise in urban planning and landscape architecture, and a career spanning nearly four decades in these areas. I believe Malcolm is ideally suited to the task and am thrilled to have him leading the NCA into the coming years.

I also acknowledge the work of Mr Andrew Smith who performed an excellent job as Acting Chief Executive prior to Malcolm’s commencement. I am most grateful to Andrew for his unwavering commitment and professionalism, which is highly valued.

In closing, I thank the NCA team for their dedication and passion for the capital. Their achievements in steadfastly delivering the work of the NCA through ups and downs are to be highly commended, I’ve been privileged to work with this team of individuals and I look forward to continuing to support their endeavours in the National Capital.

Shelley Penn

Chair

YEAR IN REVIEW AND OUTLOOK The Chief Executive’s year in review and outlook summarises the National Capital Authority’s (NCA):

• achievements in 2013-14 • performance and financial results for 2013-14 • outlook for 2014-15.

Mr Andrew Smith was acting Chief Executive from 4 August 2013 to 12 January 2014. Prior to this Mr Gary Rake was the Chief Executive of the NCA, concluding on 4 August 2013.

Chief Executive's year in review and outlook

Having commenced at the NCA in January 2014, I am pleased to present my first Annual Report as Chief Executive of the agency, providing an overview of the past year and a snapshot for the year ahead.

I would like to thank my predecessor Mr Gary Rake and Mr Andrew Smith, who acted as Chief Executive for half of this year, for their valuable contributions to our agency’s achievements.

Drawing on my professional experiences in the fields of urban planning and place making both nationally and internationally, I see scope for strengthening our capacity to collaborate. In recognising a shared interest with others in making Canberra a dynamic city, how we work together will be a vital part of achieving the NCA’s vision into the future. This year we continued to work closely with the community, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Government Directorates, the national institutions, business and government.

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | xiii

The Central National Area is distinguished by an extraordinary array of institutions, facilities and attractions. Harnessing the collective potential of these assets and the spaces around them to ensure they provide an experience commensurate with the National Capital’s status will be a primary focus of the NCA and Authority.

The NCA’s responsibility for planning in the Territory will continue to ensure an appropriate standard of urban quality for the nation’s capital is achieved while developing well-designed and inclusive public spaces. This will apply to proposals such as the redevelopment of West Basin, which will support Canberra’s status as a forward thinking and progressive community. West Basin is a seminal opportunity for the city centre to engage both its waterfront and the Australian National University campus.

Of particular interest at this year’s Annual Public Forum in April was the ACT Government’s City to Lake (West Basin) and Capital Metro projects. In early 2014, the NCA established an expert Design Review Panel (DRP) to assist it in evaluating the design merits of city-shaping projects such as these at their conceptual stage.

The genesis of the DRP is the ongoing importance the NCA attaches to high quality architectural, urban and landscape design and for the significant value it adds to the ACT and to the broader Australian community. The panel’s role will evolve into an integral part of our development approval process and will provide advice on development projects of significance to the National Capital with sites selected by the NCA within Designated Areas in the ACT.

The NCA’s work in estate management covers many facets including managing key infrastructure assets; heritage buildings, artworks, memorials, fountains and water features; National Landscape areas such as conservation open wood lands and grasslands, Old Parliament House Gardens and National Rose Gardens; property assets on National Land and Lake Burley Griffin.

The Lake is one of Canberra’s pre-eminent natural public realms that provides an extraordinary recreational and landscape resource while contributing to the visitor and leisure experience of the city. During 2013-14, approximately 900 events were conducted on National Land areas managed by the NCA. The diversity of events included Enlighten, Floriade, Skyfire, charity walks, triathlons, weddings and other private functions.

In 2013, the NCA was tasked with implementing a pay parking scheme. Some of the arrangements set up this year to implement pay parking include installation of 190 solar powered parking machines, installation of parking signage; upgrades to Windsor Walk and York Park and the selection of service providers for the day-to-day operation of the scheme.

As well as managing the National Capital Estate, the NCA enhances the Central National Area through its capital works program. Two significant capital projects which highlight how the NCA continues to create and maintain an asset standard appropriate to the National Capital are the Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation and the construction of Bowen Place Crossing.

On 18 March 2013, work on Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project began which involved complex engineering works to replace 120 anchor bolts. The bolts secure the dam gates to the concrete structure of the Dam. By April 2014, the project was completed ahead of time and significantly under budget. This outcome is a testament to the application of clever engineering design and astute project management.

In February 2014, construction of Bowen Place Crossing commenced. This major pedestrian and cyclist grade-separated crossing will provide safe access between Kings Avenue and the foreshore of the Lake. The project is scheduled for completion by May 2015.

xiv | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Recognition of the national capital’s significance is about more than just its physical attributes. It must also be measured by the sense of pride all Australian’s have for it as the pre-eminent symbol of our nation.

In July 2013, a permanent exhibition ‘Brick By Brick: Build Your Own Capital’, was opened at Regatta Point, National Capital Exhibition. This engaging exhibition allows visitors to create their own version of a National Capital or replicate iconic buildings in Canberra such as the National Carillon and Australian War Memorial. Earlier this year we commenced touring of this exhibition in South Australia which proved very popular.

This year the NCA strengthened its social media presence and engagement through Twitter and Facebook for the ‘Brick by Brick Exhibition’. This form of communication offers great potential to engage with the different communities interested in the work of the NCA.

Financial Information

In 2013-14, the NCA received revenue of $18.2 million from Government and other sources for its important operations and role. This funding was allocated across the NCA's three functions as follow; $14.3 million for maintaining much of the Commonwealth’s heritage estate in Canberra, $1.9 million for planning the National Capital into the future and $2.0 million for informing and educating Australians about our National Capital.

In 2013-14, the NCA reported an operating deficit of $0.453 million. When unfunded depreciation charges of $1.004 million are added back, the NCA’s effective operating result was a surplus of $0.551 million. This has improved the NCA’s overall financial position and provides stability to the NCA’s ongoing viability.

Looking ahead, our key priorities in 2014-15 include:

* commencing pay parking on National Land within the Central National Area on 1 October 2014

* finishing the construction of Bowen Place Crossing by May 2015

* continuing the reform of the National Capital Plan with an exposure draft due for release in 2014-15

* continuing to research solutions to improve water quality in the Lake

* ensuring the quality and condition of the National Capital Estate's buildings, roads, bridges, paths and public spaces are of a standard appropriate to the nation's capital

* finalising Heritage Management Plans for Old Parliament House Gardens, the Surveyors Hut and Surveyors Park, the Acton Peninsula Buildings 1, 2 and 15 and the Acton Peninsula Limestone Outcrops.

I am delighted to work with such a professional and committed team who continually strive to create a vibrant, impressive National Capital which embodies our nation’s culture, values and aspirations.

Malcolm Snow Chief Executive

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | xv

STRUCTURE OF THIS REPORT During 2013-14 the National Capital Authority (NCA) had one outcome against which it reported.

Outcome 1: A National Capital which symbolises Australia's heritage, values and aspirations, is internationally recognised, and worthy of pride by Australians.

This Outcome comprises two Programs:

PROGRAM 1.1: NATIONAL CAPITAL FUNCTIONS

1.1.1: Canberra and the Australian Capital Territory are planned and developed in accordance with their national significance

1.1.2: Promotion and awareness of the significance of Canberra as the National Capital

1.1.3: Advocacy, enhancement and management of the National Capital Estate

PROGRAM 1.2: NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE

1.2.1: Upgrade and renewal of National Capital assets

The structure of this Annual Report addresses these functions and other reporting requirements.

CHAPTER 1 describes the NCA's enabling legislation and its relationship to the Parliament and the Minister. It also provides outcomes and output structure, resources and assets, and meets the NCA's performance reporting requirements.

CHAPTER 2 describes the review, amendment and administration of the National Capital Plan (Component 1.1.1).

CHAPTER 3 describes the NCA's engagement and education activities (Component 1.1.2) that include animating the capital and promoting Canberra as Australia's National Capital.

CHAPTERS 4 and 5 describe the NCA's asset and land management services, capital enhancement services and administration of National Land (Component 1.1.3 and Component 1.2.1).

CHAPTERS 6 to 8 provide an overview of the NCA's management structure, reports on governance, corporate, competitive tendering and contracts and other reporting including diversity and employment and the Certificate of Compliance.

Additional mandatory reporting is at APPENDIX 1. The resources for outcomes report is at APPENDIX 2. Financial statements for the year appear at APPENDIX 3.

A glossary and compliance and alphabetical indexes appear at the end of this report.

Note: Within this report, to identify decisions and actions of the members of the Authority, acting as a board, the term the Authority is used. Other actions of the organisation are identified by the acronym NCA.

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CONTACT DETAILS Further information about the NCA may be obtained by:

TELEPHONE: +61 2 6271 2888 FACSIMILE: +61 2 6273 4427 EMAIL: natcap@natcap.gov.au WEB: www.nationalcapital.gov.au POSTAL ADDRESS: GPO Box 373 Canberra ACT 2601 STREET ADDRESS: Treasury Building, King Edward Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600

Requests and enquiries concerning the contents of this report should be addressed to the Communications Officer on +61 2 6271 2888.

This report is also accessible from the NCA’s website and is available in both .pdf and .html formats.

The NCA’s Freedom of Information contact point is foi@natcap.gov.au or +61 2 6271 2888.

The NCA’s library, located at Commonwealth Place, 40 Parkes Place, Parkes, ACT, is open by appointment only. Appointments may be made by contacting the Library Information Officer on +61 2 6271 2888.

Information about the National Capital is available from the National Capital Exhibition, Barrine Drive Commonwealth Park, Canberra. The Exhibition is open Monday to Friday 9.00AM to 5.00PM and on weekends between 10.00AM and 4.00PM; it is closed between Christmas and New Year and on public holidays except Australia Day and Canberra Day.

Blundells Cottage is open on Thursdays and Saturdays from 10.00AM to 11.30AM and 12.00PM to 4.00PM, excluding public holidays.

Online event registration for use of venues on National Land can be found at www.nationalcapital.gov.au

The ‘HAVE YOUR SAY’ www.nationalcapital.gov.au/ haveyoursay website hosts discussions about the way Canberra is developed and managed as the National Capital. Members of the public are able to comment on proposed topics either on the website or by post.

- CHAPTER ONE -

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Outcome

Manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, delivery of education and awareness programs and works to enhance the

character of the National Capital.

OVERVIEW

The National Capital Authority (NCA) is established under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (the Act).

The NCA performs a special role as trustee of the National Capital and in this capacity serves the interests of the Australian Government, the nation and its people.

Our Purpose

To advance the National Capital as a valued and respected place for all Australians by ensuring it is planned, managed and promoted consistent with its enduring national significance.

Our Role

The NCA is responsible for shaping the National Capital into the future, as well as caring for the significant parts of Canberra and raising awareness of Canberra as Australia’s capital.

Our Goals

THE GOALS OF THE NCA ARE:

* to protect the national interest in the planning, development and heritage of the National Capital

* to inform and educate Australians and visitors about the significance and role of Canberra as the National Capital

* to develop and maintain the special character of the National Capital Estate.

$1 968M National Capital Plan

$35 666 F U N D I N G

$17 036

M

$14 662M M National Capital National Capital Estate Works $2 000M National Engagement and Education

2 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Our values, people and service

THE NCA:

* values and recognises excellence * encourages innovation and continually looks for opportunities to improve how we work

* supports the development of employees’ new skills to contribute to our full potential

* actively engages with stakeholders and seeks feedback

* supports strong internal collaboration to operate as a single agency

* displays a collegiate workplace.

NCA EMPLOYEES ARE ALSO GUIDED BY THE AUSTRALIAN PUBLIC SERVICE (APS) VALUES, TO BE AT ALL TIMES:

* impartial * committed to service * accountable * respectful

* ethical.

Minister’s Powers

The Act establishes the NCA, prescribes its powers and functions and makes it subject to general ministerial direction. During 2013-14, the Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Honourable Jamie Briggs MP, administered the Act.

The Minister has a range of specific powers under the Act.

Amendments to the National Capital Plan (the Plan) are subject to the Minister’s approval.

Sections 19-21A provides that the Minister, having considered a Draft Amendment to the Plan submitted by the NCA, may approve it without alteration or refer it back to the NCA with directions to consider it further.

CHAPTER 2 outlines details of amendments to the Plan in 2013-14.

Section 7(1) provides that the Minister may give the Authority general directions in writing about the performance of its functions. On 25 June 2014, the

Minister asked the NCA to investigate the potential for further urban development in Tuggeranong, specifically in the West Murrumbidgee area.

THE MINISTER ALSO HAS POWERS UNDER OTHER LEGISLATION RELATING TO MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL LAND, NAMELY THE:

* National Land Ordinance 1989 and applied provisions of the:

* City Area Leases Ordinance 1936 * City Area Leases Regulations * Crown Lands Act 1884 (NSW) * Dedication by User Limitation Act 1902 (NSW)

* Lakes Ordinance 1976 * Leases Ordinance 1918 * Leases (Special Purposes) Ordinance 1925 * Leases Regulations

* Protection of Lands Ordinance 1937 * Public Roads Act 1902 (NSW) * Recovery of Lands Ordinance 1929 * Roads and Public Places Ordinance 1937

* Trespass on Commonwealth Lands Ordinance 1932

* National Memorials Ordinance 1928.

2013-14 Milestones

The National Land (Parking) Repeal Ordinance 2014 was created to repeal the National Land (Parking) Ordinance 1994 (Former Parking Ordinance) and the National Land (Parking) (Consequential Amendments) Ordinance 1994 and to make other amendments necessary as a consequence of those repeals.

Under the Former Parking Ordinance, ACT laws with respect to road transport and parking were applied to National Land.  However, the NCA as the responsible agency for National Land was not empowered to implement, administer and enforce pay parking on National Land.

On 20 February 2014, the National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014 (the Ordinance) came into affect creating a legislative framework for the management and enforcement of pay parking on National Land.

CHAPTER 1 National Capital Authority | 3

PARLIAMENT HOUSE VISTA

4 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

KINGS PARK, COMMONWEALTH PARK AND CONSTITUTION AVENUE

CHAPTER 1 National Capital Authority | 5

The Ordinance was tabled in both Houses of Parliament as a Disallowable Instrument, under the Seat of Government (Administration) Act 1910 using the Legislative Instruments Act 2003. Tabling occurred in the House of Representatives on 24 February 2014 and in the Senate on 3 March 2014. See CHAPTER 4 for details on the implementation of pay parking.

Table 1: NCA APPROVED MINOR WORKS UNDER THE DE MINIMIS PRINCIPLE IN THE PARLIAMENTARY ZONE, 2013-14

LOCATION DESCRIPTION OF WORKS

Parliamentary Zone

Block 1 Section 39 Parkes (Old Parliament House)

King Edward Terrace

Block 15 Section 28 Parkes (High Court of Australia)

Block 1 Section 57 Parkes

Block 15 Section 28 Parkes (High Court of Australia)

Block 15 Section 28 Parkes (High Court of Australia)

Block 15 Section 28 Parkes (High Court of Australia)

Block 15 Section 28 Parkes (High Court of Australia)

Tree Removal Program - Removal and replacement of 82 trees

Installation of parking signage

Amendment to the location of the ‘Torsional Wave’ artwork at Questacon

Amendments to the western forecourt landscape rectification works

Interpretive signage for ‘Torsional Wave’ artwork at Questacon

Installation of covering cages for boiler room flues

Amendments to forecourt landscape works, rectification of levels and accessibility

Replacement and upgrade of eastern forecourt handrails

Excavation for irrigation upgrade

Federation Mall

Block 2 Section 23 Parkes (West Block)

King George Terrace

Block 1 Section 51 Parkes (East Block)

Block 5 Section 27 Parkes

Parliamentary Zone

Parliamentary Zone

Block 17 Section 28 Parkes (National Portrait Gallery)

Block 1 Section 57 Parkes (Questacon)

Removal and replacement of two Eucalyptus elata

Excavation and storm water repair

Permanent formalisation of signage and line marking for three coach parking bays at Old Parliament House

Removal of storm damaged tree

Installation of benches and associated landscaping at Peace Park

Installation of weather station and irrigation control cabinets

Installation of new streetlight fittings

Replacement of external plywood panels on building façade

Installation of photovoltaic array to roof top

6 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Figure 1: OUTCOME AND OUTPUTS REPORTING STRUCTURE

1.1

PROGRAM NATIONAL CAPITAL FUNCTIONS

1.1.1

PLAN AND DEVELOP Canberra and the Australian Capital Territory in accordance with their

national significance

1.1.2

PROMOTION AND AWARENESS of the significance of Canberra as the National Capital

1.1.3

ADVOCACY, ENHANCEMENT AND MANAGEMENT of the National Capital Estate

Australian Parliament

THE NCA’S FORMAL RELATIONSHIP WITH THE AUSTRALIAN PARLIAMENT HAS TWO MAIN ELEMENTS, NAMELY:

* Either House of Parliament may disallow amendments, either in whole or in part, to the Plan tabled by the Minister under the Act. See CHAPTER 2 for details of amendments to the Plan in 2013-14.

* The Parliament Act 1974 requires that any work undertaken in the Parliamentary Zone must be approved by both Houses of Parliament. The NCA assesses such proposals and provides advice to the Minister and, through the Minister, may provide information to the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories.

Under section 5(1) of the Parliament Act 1974 the Minister has a responsibility to ensure no works are carried out in the Parliamentary Zone unless the proposal has been approved by resolution of each House of Parliament. The Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988 places this obligation in respect of works in the Parliamentary Precincts on the Presiding Officers.

In 2013-14, the Presiding Officers submitted no proposals for works approval within the Parliamentary Precincts. No proposals were prepared by the NCA for the Minister to lay before both Houses of Parliament in accordance with section 5(1) of the Parliament Act 1974.

Some works are not referred to Parliament because they are legally considered to be minor works. Legally such works conform with the de minimis non curat lex principle, which translates to ‘the law is not concerned with trivial matters’.

The NCA approved 18 minor works in the Parliamentary Zone under the de minimis principle and the Minister and the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories were duly advised (TABLE 1).

Delegations and Authorisations

Under section 49 of the Act, the Authority of the NCA has delegated its powers to the Chief Executive. The Authority has also delegated works approval powers to staff responsible for approving works in Designated Areas of the National Capital under section 12 of the Act.

Under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 the Chief Executive has delegated limited powers to the Deputy Chief Executive (Chief Planner), the Executive Director National Capital Estate, Directors and other key staff for the authorisation of expenditure of monies and to enter into contracts in accordance with Chief Executive Instructions.

The Minister has delegated specific powers in relation to administering National Land under the National Land Ordinance 1989, including applied provisions of

CHAPTER 1 National Capital Authority | 7

Figure 1: OUTCOME AND OUTPUTS REPORTING STRUCTURE

A NATIONAL CAPITAL WHICH SYMBOLISES AUSTRALIA’S HERITAGE, VALUES AND ASPIRATIONS, IS INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNISED, AND WORTHY OF PRIDE BY AUSTRALIANS.

1.2

PROGRAM NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE

1.2.1

UPGRADE AND RENEWAL of National Capital assets

the Lakes Ordinance 1976, the Roads and Public Places Ordinance 1937, the Trespass on Commonwealth Lands Ordinance 1932, the City Area Leases Ordinance 1936, the Leases (Special Purposes) Ordinance 1925 and the Leases Ordinance 1918, to the Chief Executive, Chief Planner, Executive Director National Capital Estate and key positions.

Powers under the Lands Acquisition Act 1989, relating to acquisition and disposal of land, have been delegated to the Chief Executive, the Chief Planner and the Executive Director National Capital Estate. These delegations provide the NCA with an efficient working environment in the service of government and the community.

Review of Operations

The Portfolio Budget Statements for the Infrastructure and Regional Development portfolio provides information on the NCA’s program structure for 2013-14 and the three forward years.

Financial Overview

As a not for profit independent statutory agency, the NCA’s primary source of operating revenue is departmental appropriation from the Australian Government. The NCA uses this funding to deliver its three programs under Program 1.1, including administration and overhead costs required to run the

agency’s operations (see FIGURE 1 for information on the NCA’s programs). The majority of costs incurred by the NCA relate to the maintenance and preservation of assets under the NCA’s control in the National Capital.

From time to time, the NCA also receives funding from non-government entities to facilitate construction activities on behalf of those entities. Usually these projects relate to the construction of memorials in the National Capital. Any funding received for these activities is accounted for in the NCA’s departmental operations.

The NCA receives administered appropriations to carry out activities on behalf of the Australian Government. These activities primarily involve the construction and upgrade of assets in the National Capital, including the insurance and revaluation of these assets. The NCA also manages land for diplomatic use and collects rental income from embassies on the Australian Government’s behalf.

Performance Information

OUTCOME: Manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, delivery of education and awareness programs and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.

8 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Table 2: PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

Program 1.1: NATIONAL CAPITAL FUNCTIONS

1.1.1: CANBERRA AND THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY ARE PLANNED AND DEVELOPED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THEIR NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE

Deliverables 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Draft Amendments to the National Capital Plan 2 2

Works Approvals granted 300 434

Masterplans/Development Control Guidelines/urban design guidelines 6 4

Key performance indicators 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Percentage of works approval applications assessed against the National Capital Plan within 15 working days 90% 91.7%

1.1.2: PROMOTION AND AWARENESS OF THE SIGNIFICANCE OF CANBERRA AS THE NATIONAL CAPITAL

Deliverables 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Notified events on National Land (events organised by external parties) 1000 882

Visitors to the National Capital Exhibition 160 000 145 770

Visits to online educational materials on NCA website 5500 2211

Key performance indicators 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Percentage of surveyed National Capital Exhibition visitors who report an increased awareness of the special importance of Canberra as the National Capital 90% 97%

1.1.3: ADVOCACY, ENHANCEMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF THE NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE

Deliverables 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Diplomatic rent reviews completed 2 2

Contract management peer reviews 5 5

Value of assets under NCA management $810m $805m

Key performance indicators 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Percentage of building and civil infrastructure maintenance issues resolved with required timeframes

90% 90%

Program 1.2: NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE

1.2.1: UPGRADE AND RENEWAL OF NATIONAL CAPITAL ASSETS Deliverables 2013-14 Target 2013-14 Actuals

Value of development and renewal works in the National Capital Estate $19m $17m

CHAPTER 1 National Capital Authority | 9

Figure 2: DEPARTMENTAL INCOME AND EXPENSES 2013-14 AND 2012-13

Figure 5: ADMINISTERED INCOME AND EXPENSES 2013-14 AND 2012-13

Figure 3: DEPARTMENTAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 2013-14 AND 2012-13 Figure 4: ADMINISTERED ASSETS AND LIABILITIES, 2013-14 AND 2012-13

$18 177 $18 630 INCOME EXPENSE

$453 DEFICIT

D E F I C I T

2 0 1 3 - 2 0 1 4

E X P E N S E

$’OOO I N C O M E

$20 061 $20 665 INCOME EXPENSE

$604 DEFICIT

D E F I C I T

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3

E X P E N S E

$’OOO I N C O M E

Financial Assets

2013-14 $4 389

2012-13 $3 763

Non-financial Assets

2013-14 $15 191

2012-13 $15 460

Liabilities

2013-14 $4 330

2012-13 $4 528

Net Assets

2013-14 $15 250

2012-13 $14 695

Financial Assets

2013-14 $964

2012-13 $808

Non-financial Assets

2013-14 $789 875

2012-13 $798 126

Liabilities

2013-14 $22 117

2012-13 $17 759

Net Assets

2013-14 $768 722

2012-13 $781 175

$2 264 $23 312 INCOME EXPENSE

$21 048 NET COST OF SERVICES

I N C O M E

N E T

C O S T O F

S E R V I C E S

2 0 1 3 - 2 0 1 4 $’OOO

E X P E N S E

$5 834 $20 971 INCOME EXPENSE

$15 137 NET COST OF SERVICES

I N C O M E

N E T

C O S T O F

S E R V I C E S

2 0 1 2 - 2 0 1 3 $’OOO

E X P E N S E

Departmental Performance

In 2013-14 (see FIGURE 2), the NCA reported a departmental operating deficit of $0.453 million which was less than the budgeted deficit of $0.983 million. After adding unfunded depreciation and amortisation expense of $1.004 million, the NCA’s true operating position was a surplus of $0.551 million. Revenues and expenses both reduced in 2013-14 compared to the previous year. This is due to the NCA carrying out works on behalf of third party sponsors, such as the proponents of the National Workers Memorial, which increased revenue and expense in the year of

construction. Excluding sponsored works, revenues and expenses associated with the NCA’s normal operations were mostly unchanged from the previous year.

Additional funding resulting from the government’s response to ‘Canberra a Capital Place: Report of the Independent Review of the NCA’ has assisted with stabilising the agency’s financial position.

During 2013-14, the NCA’s net asset position increased by $0.5m (see FIGURE 3) due to an increase in amounts of cost and receivable available. This has a positive offset on the agency’s financial position. Non-financial assets and liabilities varied from the previous year.

10 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Administered Performance

The 2012-13 figures have been adjusted as a result of a Crown Lease termination on a diplomatic site.

In 2013-14 (see FIGURE 5), administered expenses increased by $2.3 million due to increased depreciation charges and write-downs associated with the replaced components of upgraded assets. Both of these expenses do not have an associated cash flow. Supplier expenses draw on available appropriation balances and increased by $0.1 million in 2013-14 to $0.6 million.

In 2013-14, administered revenue in the previous year included $2.0 million associated with the construction of the externally sponsored National Workers Memorial project. The previous year’s income also included a $1.5 million gain associated with termination of a Crown Lease. The resultant decrease in administered income is $3.5 million.

As at 30 June 2014 (see FIGURE 4), administered asset values remained mostly unchanged from the previous financial year. The NCA’s non-financial assets include land, buildings, infrastructure, plant, equipment and heritage assets on the National Capital Estate which are subject to revaluation annually by an external valuer. The net effect of revaluations in 2013-14 was $6.8 million. Land under the National Portrait Gallery (the Gallery), valued at $9.2 million, was transferred to the Gallery’s control during 2013-14.

As at 30 June 2014, administered liabilities increased by $4.3 million due to expenses accrued on a number of construction projects that were active at year-end.

Cost Recovery

During 2013-14, the NCA recovered a small portion of its costs through works approval fees and licence agreements.

Implementing the Recommendations of the Review of the NCA

As part of the 2012-13 Australian Government Budget announcements and in response to the report titled ‘Canberra a Capital Place: Report of the Independent Review of the National Capital Authority’, the NCA was provided with $11.9 million over 4 years and $3.3 million per annum ongoing funding thereafter. 2013-14 was the second year of funding provided to ensure financial sustainability, support heritage compliance and asset management and to implement the Government’s response to address issues of balance between the Australian and the ACT Government’s roles in the National Capital.

During 2013-14:

* a dedicated Manager of Cultural Heritage provided guidance on the implementation of the NCA heritage strategy, including policies and actions under formal heritage management plans. Further details of the heritage works undertaken in 2013-14 are within CHAPTER 2.

* the NCA implemented the second year of its five year strategy of information and education activities. For further details see CHAPTER 3.

* work progressed on reformatting the National Capital Plan. The revised National Capital Plan will include:

* a clearer definition of national significance * a coherent format and structure to reflect contemporary planning practice

* improved harmonisation with the Territory Plan with a similar hierarchy and common terminology.

An exposure draft of the revised National Capital Plan is intended to be released for public comment in 2014-15.

- CHAPTER TWO -

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLAN Overview

Section 6 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (the Act) sets out the National Capital Authority’s (NCA) functions.

SECTION 6(A) AND (B) GIVES THE NCA THE AUTHORITY:

* to prepare and administer a National Capital Plan (the Plan)

* to keep the Plan under constant review and to propose amendments to it when necessary.

PROGRAM 1.1.1 CANBERRA AND THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY ARE PLANNED AND DEVELOPED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THEIR NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE.

The Plan sets out general planning policies and principles for overall development of the Australian Capital Territory.

The Plan’s general policies apply to the whole of the Territory and demonstrate a strategic approach to planning. The Plan acknowledges distribution of national functions throughout the city and the interdependence of the urban and non-urban parts of the Territory. It provides for critical services for both national and local purposes and safeguards the important landscape character of the bush capital. The Plan defines the future of the National Capital by safeguarding the status, future land use, amenity, infrastructure, quality and setting of the Seat of Government for all Australians.

Development Assessment

The Plan sets out detailed conditions of planning, design and development for Designated Areas, which are those areas that have special characteristics of the National Capital. Designated Areas include the main avenues and approach routes, the inner hills that

$1 968M National Capital Plan

$35 666 F U N D I N G

$17 036

M

$14 662M M National Capital National Capital Estate Works $2 000M National Engagement and Education

provide the immediate landscape setting to Canberra, the Central National Area embracing the Parliamentary Zone, Lake Burley Griffin and foreshores, the Australian National University, City Hill precinct, Constitution Avenue and Russell, parts of Forrest and Barton and the diplomatic estate. MAP 1 shows the Designated Areas for which the NCA has responsibility for works approvals.

‘The city without a soul gibe levelled at Canberra in the 70s and 80s has been replaced by a stronger sense of identity and self-confidence.’

MALCOLM SNOW, CHIEF EXECUTIVE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY.

12 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Section 12(1) of the Act states:

No works shall be performed in a Designated Area unless:

* the Authority has approved the works in writing * the proposal to perform the works has been submitted to the Authority together with such plans and specifications as are required by the Authority

* the works are in accordance with the Plan.

Outside the developed urban areas (in the National Capital Open Space System, the Broadacre and Rural areas), the Plan sets out broad land use policies and specifies the range and nature of permitted uses. It also sets out special requirements for development of certain areas (not being in the Designated Areas) where considered desirable in the interests of the National Capital.

Regulating Development

The NCA promotes, facilitates and regulates development to ensure it is in accordance with the Plan by:

* approving works in Designated Areas, as set out in the Plan

* undertaking master planning * setting special requirements for defined areas of Canberra outside Designated Areas, where such requirements are considered to be in the interests

of Canberra as the National Capital

* preparing detailed conditions of planning design and development for Designated Areas

* issuing leases and licences for land administered by the NCA.

Key Achievements

During 2013-14, the NCA:

* approved 434 works applications * approved three Development Control Plans. Further information on planning the National Capital is contained within this chapter.

‘The ability to have a frank and inclusive discussion about the future urban condition is the true mark of cities committed to a transformational agenda.’

MALCOLM SNOW, CHIEF EXECUTIVE, NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY.

Development and Works Approvals

Within Designated Areas, the NCA is responsible for the detailed conditions of planning, design and development, for approving any subdivisions of land and for approving works (under Section 12 of the Act). The scope of the works subject to such approval, enables the NCA to influence qualities of planning, design and development that respect and enhance Canberra’s status and character as the National Capital.

‘Works’ is defined in Section 4 of the Act to include:

* construction, alteration, extension or demolition of buildings or structures

* landscaping * tree-felling * excavations.

This excludes anything done inside buildings or structures.

Works Approval granted by the NCA is a planning approval, not a building approval, and is granted only on the basis that works are in accordance with provisions of the Plan. It does not constitute any form of warranty as to the structural sufficiency of the proposed works or as to the safety of the performance of the works. It is the responsibility of applicants to ensure adherence to all applicable legislation.

Map 1: DESIGNATED AREAS FOR WHICH THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY HAS TUGGERANONG TOWN CENTRE RESPONSIBILITY FOR WORKS APPROVALS Designated Areas

Lake Burley Griffin

Canberra Airport is no longer a Designated Area: see Section 112A of the Airport Act 1996.

BELCONNEN TOWN CENTRE

GUNGAHLIN TOWN CENTRE

WODEN TOWN CENTRE

CIVIC

TO MELBOURNE

TO SYDNEY

BARTON HIGHWAY

NORTHBOURN AVENUE

MONARO HIGHWAY

AIRPORT

14 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Works Approvals Over $1 Million

In 2013-14, the NCA approved 26 applications for works valued at $1 million or more (TABLE 3).

Table 3: WORKS APPROVALS GRANTED DURING 2013-14 ($1 MILLION OR MORE IN VALUE)

DESCRIPTION OF WORKS DATE APPROVED

Block 1 Section 35 Parkes - John Gorton building façade repairs and conservation project 04/07/2013

Limestone Avenue and Australian National University - Water mains renewal project 05/07/2013

Block 1 Section 39 Campbell - Replacement and upgrade of external lighting for main building and hall of memory at Australian War Memorial 05/07/2013

Block 33 Section 19 Campbell - Redevelopment of 65 - 67 Constitution Avenue 01/08/2013

Blocks 2,3,4,5,6 Section 10 Barton - Refurbishment of the Kurrajong Hotel 22/08/2013

Majura Parkway shared user path 26/08/2013

Royal Military College Duntroon and Australian Defence Force Academy Base Security Improvements Project - main works package 29/08/2013

Block 13 Section 9 Barton - Governor Place Stage one (residential apartments) 16/09/2013

Sections 87, 88 and 89 Russell - Russell Defence precinct Base Security Improvements Project - main works package 26/09/2013

Block 13 Section 10 City - Upgrade works to the façade of 2 Constitution Avenue 03/10/2013

Blocks 5 and 7 Section 13 Forrest - Forrest Early Childhood Centre - alterations and additions 18/10/2013

Block 14 Section 22 Barton - Redevelopment of 21 National Circuit - Stage one works 18/10/2013

Block 707 Majura - Construction of medium scale solar farm between Majura Road and Majura Parkway 25/11/2013

Constitution Avenue Road Reserve (City Hill to Anzac Parade) - early works package associated with duplication 23/12/2013

Block 28 Section 19 Campbell - RSL National Office and residential development 24/12/2013

Block 8 Section 99 Yarralumla and Flynn Drive road reserve - telecommunications infrastructure installation including excavation and new pit for fibre optic connection 14/01/2014

Block 4 Section 13 Forrest - construction management plan for Forrest Early Childhood Centre extension works 14/01/2014

Bowen Place Crossing works - main works package 03/02/2014

Block 1 Section 39 Acton - external works for building 54 refurbishment (John Curtin School of Medical Research ) at Australian National University 04/02/2014

Block 9 Section 9 Barton - alterations and additions to 50 Blackall Street 31/03/2014

Block 5 Section 1 Barton - civil works and temporary signage associated with upgrade of Windsor Walk car park 31/03/2014

Block 1 Section 122 Yarralumla - Government House honours building window rectification 30/04/2014

Federal Highway road reserve - acid rock spoil remediation and stockpile area 12/05/2014

Block 4 Section 120 Campbell - Royal Military College armoury replacement project 13/05/2014

Block 12 Section 42 Yarralumla - Chinese Garden at Lennox Gardens 19/05/2014

CHAPTER 2 National Capital Plan | 15

ANZAC PARADE

16 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

FIGURE 6 illustrates the number of works approval applications completed each year from 2013-14 back to 2009-10 as well as the value of works assessed each year.

Figure 6: COMPARISON OF WORKS APPLICATIONS FROM 2013-14 BACK TO 2009-10

$729 2009-10

396 2012-13

351

335 330 2011-12

2009-10 2010-11

Value of works ($M)

$616

$575

2012-13

2010-1

Number of 434

works 2013-14

approved

$257 $261

2011-12 2013-14

Planning Studies

The NCA investigates a range of considerations to ensure a holistic planning approach is adopted, and in turn, that only appropriate works are carried out in the National Capital. This work is vital in protecting the national interest in the planning, development and heritage of the National Capital. Background planning and urban design may when required, contribute to the formulation of future amendments to the Plan.

NATIONAL CAPITAL AND OPEN SPACE SYSTEM REVIEW

The National Capital Open Space System (NCOSS) covers over 70 per cent of the ACT, and includes the hills, ridges and buffers between urban areas, the Molonglo and Murrumbidgee River Corridors, Lake Burley Griffin and extensive areas of mountains and bushland to the south of the city. Its importance in defining the natural setting of Canberra is recognised by the formal adoption of the NCOSS into the Plan. The aim of the NCOSS review was to establish principles for guiding land use and management for the NCOSS.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2010, the NCA announced a review into the NCOSS. The review was initiated to determine what role the NCOSS should play and whether the existing delineation of open space is appropriate in terms of efficient land use, meeting national sustainability objectives and in maintaining a high quality landscape setting for the National Capital.

Between April and October 2011, the NCA released a discussion paper for consultation. In February 2012, the consultation report was released identifying the emerging themes, ideas and issues raised by the community through the consultation process.

Between June and December 2012, the NCA’s expert Reference Panel considered the community’s interest in the NCOSS and landscape values and provided advice to the NCA on how to incorporate NCOSS objectives into the Plan.

In December 2013, the Authority endorsed the NCOSS review report and recommendations. The report was publicly released in February 2014.

Where appropriate, recommendations of the report have been incorporated into the exposure draft of the revised Plan anticipated for release in 2014-15. Further recommendations of the report will be implemented as the comprehensive review of the Plan progresses.

Investigation into Diplomatic Sites

The NCA manages land set aside for the establishment of diplomatic missions in the National Capital. Canberra hosts over 100 diplomatic missions from around the world. Many of these missions are located in three distinct diplomatic estates - Yarralumla, West Deakin and O’Malley.

The existing supply of diplomatic land does not meet the needs of those nations wishing to establish their mission in Canberra. New areas for diplomatic use are required to meet the current and future needs of foreign missions in Canberra and the NCA is working to identify possible locations to meet the demand.

CHAPTER 2 National Capital Plan | 17

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

During 2013-14, the NCA completed two studies into diplomatic land supply. The feasibility of the vacant sites at O’Malley, including possible design solutions to ameliorate the challenging landform conditions was undertaken. A second study investigated possible new areas for development. The NCA is awaiting a decision from Government on the future direction of planning of the diplomatic estate.

National Capital Plan Amendments

The NCA is responsible for keeping the Plan under constant review and proposing amendments to the Plan when necessary. The statutory provisions for amending the Plan are set out in Sections 14 to 22 of the Act.

Draft Amendments to the Plan are subject to public consultation including with the Territory planning authority. The NCA submits amendments to the Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Honourable Jamie Briggs MP, (the Minister) who may approve the amendment without alteration; or refer the amendment back with directions to either conduct further consultations or provide suggested alterations. The Minister may also refer Draft Amendments to the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories before considering the amendment.

Amendments Finalised in 2013-14

Amendments to the Plan are laid before both Houses of Parliament as a disallowable instrument for a period of 15 sittings days in accordance with the Legislative Instruments Act 2003.

Draft Amendments are also subject to a regulation impact assessment, as administered by the Department of Finance.

AMENDMENT 82 - AMTECH ESTATE

The purpose of Amendment 82 was to broaden the range of industrial uses permitted for Amtech Estate. Resulting in the Territory planning authority being able to determine detailed land use policies for Amtech Estate.

Amtech Estate was developed by the ACT Government in the 1990s in response to a perceived demand for a high-tech industrial ‘campus’. The estate was intended to cater exclusively for advanced technology manufacturing industries and provide an opportunity for such industries to co-locate with similar businesses.

Amendment 13 to the Plan (gazetted in March 1995) introduced specific requirements for Amtech Estate. The requirements included restricting land use to ‘Advanced Technology Park’, ‘Public Utility’ and ‘Open Space’ only. Special Requirements were also introduced into the Plan, which stated that development of the estate is to conform to a Development Control Plan.

Land in the estate was released to the market in the mid-1990s, however the estate has not achieved full occupancy and the ACT Government’s ambition of creating an ‘Advanced Technology Park’ has not been realised. Existing uses in the estate include Australian Government offices and storage facilities, health facilities (such as Canberra Eye Hospital) and telecommunications facilities. A number of blocks remain undeveloped.

On 14 June 2013, the Authority agreed to draft an amendment removing the land use restrictions applying to Amtech Estate.

18 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN, CAPTAIN COOK MEMORIAL JET AND COMMONWEALTH AVENUE

CHAPTER 2 National Capital Plan | 19

Key Achievements Between 4 July and 14 August 2013, Draft Amendment 82 was released for consultation.

The NCA received two written submissions. One submission, from the ACT Government, had no objection to the Draft Amendment proceeding. The other submission raised issues regarding limitations on office uses and leasing arrangements.

The NCA considered all submissions and determined that no changes were required to the Draft Amendment.

On 14 January 2014, Amendment 82 was approved by the Minister.

On 4 March 2014, Amendment 82 was tabled in the Senate and House of Representatives. The disallowance period ended on 27 May 2014, in the House of Representatives and 17 June 2014, in the Senate.

AMENDMENT 84 - PIALLIGO SECTION 9 PART BLOCK 4 AND SECTION 12 PART BLOCK 2

The purpose of Amendment 84 was to change the land use policy of part Block 4 Section 9 and part Block 2 Section 12 Pialligo from Broadacre Areas to Urban Areas.

In June 2013, the ACT Government’s Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate approached the NCA to amend the Plan to change the land use of this site to increase the supply of land available for a mixed use industrial and bulky goods retail. On 16 August 2013, the Authority agreed to prepare a Draft Amendment to expand the urban area at Pialligo.

Key Achievements Between 19 October and 29 November 2013, Draft Amendment 84 was released for consultation. Consultation on Draft Amendment 84 was conducted concurrently with the ACT Government’s Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate’s consultation on Territory Plan Draft Variation 324.

The NCA received 10 written submissions. Two submissions, from ACT Government Directorates, had no objection to the Draft Amendment proceeding. One

submission supported expansion of the urban area, while others did not support expanding urban areas due to the loss of open space and impact on existing character of the Majura Valley. Other issues raised in submissions included the need for a masterplan for the whole of Majura Valley, the need to consider alternative locations for the types of uses intended for the subject site and the impact of development on the approach route to the city.

The NCA considered all submissions and determined that no changes were required to the Draft Amendment.

On 14 January 2014, Amendment 84 was approved by the Minister. On 4 March 2014, Amendment 84 was tabled in both Houses of Parliament. The disallowance period ended on 27 May 2014, in the House of Representatives and 17 June 2014, in the Senate.

Territory Plan Variations

Part IV of the Act provides for the ACT Legislative Assembly to establish a Territory planning authority responsible for preparing and administering a Territory Plan. The Planning and Land Authority of the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate (ESDD) currently administers the Territory Plan.

Section 25(2) of the Act provides that the object of the Territory Plan is:

‘to ensure, in a manner not inconsistent with the National Capital Plan, the planning and development of the Territory to provide the people of the Territory with an attractive, safe and efficient environment in which to live and work and have their recreation’.

The NCA considers draft Territory Plan variations to ensure their consistency with the Plan and its statutory object.

20 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

During 2013-14, the NCA considered 15 draft Territory Plan variations, up from six in 2012-13. No variations were found to be inconsistent under the provisions of the Plan. Details of the draft variations are listed at TABLE 4.

Table 4: DRAFT TERRITORY PLAN VARIATIONS CONSIDERED IN 2013-14

VARIATION NO. DESCRIPTION OF VARIATION PROPOSED NCA RESPONSE

297 Draft Variation - Public Land Overlay and Zone Changes (Hackett Horse Paddocks) Not Inconsistent

305 Draft Variation - Mugga Lane Resource Centre Expansion Not Inconsistent

309 Draft Variation - Turner Bus Overlay Not Inconsistent

318 Draft Variation - Tuggeranong Town Centre Not Inconsistent

320 Draft Variation - Erindale Group Centre Not Inconsistent

321 Draft Variation - Pialligo Not Inconsistent

322 Draft Variation - Downer Primary School Not Inconsistent

325 Draft Variation - Woden Bus Layover Not Inconsistent

326 Draft Variation - Chisholm (Section 590) Not Inconsistent

327 Draft Variation - Intertown Public Transport Routes and Light Rail Definition Not Inconsistent

2013-02 Technical Amendment - Clarification of Heritage Act 2004 (ACT) provisions to Non-Urban land and minor changes to Gungahlin codes Not Inconsistent

2013-10 Technical Amendment - Amendments to the residential zones development code, the single dwelling housing code, the multi-unit housing code, the estate development code and the lease variation general code

Not Inconsistent

2013-12 Technical Amendment - Residential zones code, single dwelling housing development code, multi unity housing development code and definition of ‘north facing boundary’ Not Inconsistent

2013-16 Technical Amendment - Coombs/Wright codes and adds Amaroo Group centre to commercial zones development code Not Inconsistent

2014-04 Technical Amendment- Casey Precinct Code and various clarifications Not Inconsistent

Urban Design Studies

The NCA undertakes urban design studies to ensure the quality of development in the National Capital. These studies and resulting guidelines provide guidance to land managers and site developers on the application of the Plan at a detailed precinct scale or site.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

During 2013-14, the NCA formulated West Basin Precinct planning guidelines to help shape the form of new development connecting the West Basin of Lake Burley Griffin with the city centre. The area is Designated Land under the Plan, therefore the NCA is the relevant works approval authority. The guidelines are intended to ensure a high quality of design and development on the Lake’s edge is realised. It is envisaged that a range of people including land managers, developers, government and designers, will use these guidelines as benchmarks for the desired physical, social and environmental qualities of West Basin.

CHAPTER 2 National Capital Plan | 21

These guidelines were reviewed by the NCA’s Design Review Panel made up of high calibre, experts with extensive planning and design experience at a national and international level and the relevant ACT Government Directorates.

Urban Design Advice

The NCA provides urban design advice and liaises with community and industry representatives and with the ACT Government on planning and urban design matters.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

The NCA has provided urban design direction on a range of projects and advice and contributed to intergovernmental panels for the City to the Lake, Capital Metro, the Black Spot Panel and the Australia Forum. The NCA has provided advice on the following projects:

* City to the Lake and West Basin * Capital Metro Light Rail * City Plan * Constitution Avenue Renewal

* Wendouree Drive * Windsor Walk * National Rock Garden * Beijing Gardens

* Acton Peninsula Foreshore * ‘Boundless’, an all-abilities playground * Australia Forum, a proposed convention centre complex for Canberra

* Campbell Section 4 * Parkes Section 3 * Australian National University Masterplan.

In May 2014, the NCA set up the Design Review Panel to provide independent expert guidance on major projects within Designated Areas in the Australian Capital Territory. The panel is comprised of design experts from around Australia who will focus on providing advice on the West Basin Precinct development and associated City to the Lake proposal.

Heritage Management

The NCA manages a diverse portfolio of heritage places on behalf of the Australian Government. Under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), the NCA is responsible for identifying, protecting and managing heritage places of National and Commonwealth Heritage value. The NCA is responsible for over 20 listed, five nominated and two indicative places on the Commonwealth Heritage List and one nominated and two listed places on the National Heritage List.

National Heritage Listed places include Anzac Parade and the High Court-National Gallery Precinct. Lake Burley Griffin and Lakeshore Parklands have been nominated for National Heritage Listing.

Commonwealth Heritage Listed places for which the NCA has responsibility include:

* Acton Peninsula Building 1, 2 and 15 * Acton Peninsula Limestone Outcrops * Air Disaster Memorial (Nominated) * Australian-American Memorial and Sir Thomas

Blamey Square

* Blundells Farmhouse, slab outbuilding and surrounds

* National Carillon * Canberra Main Sewer Outfall (Sewer Vent No.1, Access Chambers and Tunnel) (Nominated)

* Changi Chapel * Commencement Column Monument * General Bridges Grave * High Court-National Gallery Precinct (part)

* King George V Memorial * Lake Burley Griffin and Adjacent Lands (nominated) * National Rose Gardens * Old Parliament House Gardens

* Parliament House Vista * Rond Terraces (Nominated) * State Circle Cutting * Stirling Ridge

* Surveyors Hut * York Park North Tree Plantation.

22 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Following recommendations outlined in the relevant Heritage Management Plans, planning reports and conservation works were undertaken during 2013-14 for:

* Blundells Cottage Landscape Masterplan * roof plumbing, painting and security upgrade to Blundells Cottage

* stone conservation and landscaping at General Bridges Grave

* stonework and metal conservation (Stage 1) at King George V Memorial

* conservation works and interpretation signage at Changi Chapel, Duntroon

* landscaping and weed removal of State Circle Cutting, Parkes.

Heritage Assessments

Under the EPBC Act, the NCA is required to assess the places it owns or manages and identify any with Commonwealth Heritage values.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, the NCA completed a heritage assessment of roads on National Land in Central Canberra. The roads that were assessed as likely to have Commonwealth Heritage values included; Constitution Avenue, Dunrossil Drive, State and Capital Circles, northwest verge of State Circle, Commonwealth and Kings Avenue, Parkes Way, Russell Drive and Kelliher Drive, Russell and Northcott Drive - north western verge.

A number of these roads are adjacent to existing Commonwealth Heritage Listed places. These roads will be nominated for placement on the Commonwealth Heritage List through inclusion with existing Commonwealth Heritage Listings.

Heritage Management Plans

The EPBC Act requires the Minister responsible for heritage matters to make a written plan to protect and manage the Commonwealth Heritage values of each Commonwealth Heritage place.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, the NCA completed Heritage Management Plans for the following places:

* Blundells Cottage, slab outbuilding and surrounds * King George V Memorial * State Circle Cutting.

Heritage Management Plans are being prepared for:

* Old Parliament House Gardens * Surveyors Hut and Surveyors Park * Acton Peninsula Buildings 1, 2 and 15 * Acton Peninsula Limestone Outcrops.

Self-Assessment of Significant Impacts

The EPBC Act requires Commonwealth agencies to undertake a self-assessment process to determine if any action may have a significant impact on a matter protected by the EPBC Act. Any action that may have a significant impact on a matter protected by the EPBC Act must be referred to the Minister responsible for the EPBC Act.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, the NCA prepared the following self-assessments for proposed actions:

* external painting, Blundells Cottage * roof plumbing, Blundells Cottage * replacement of irrigation control systems and cabinets, Parliamentary Zone.

No proposed actions were referred to the Minister responsible for the EPBC Act.

- CHAPTER THREE -

NATIONAL ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATION Overview

SECTION 6 OF THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY (PLANNING AND LAND MANAGEMENT) ACT 1988 (THE ACT) PROVIDES FOR THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY (NCA): TO FOSTER AN AWARENESS OF CANBERRA AS THE NATIONAL CAPITAL ________________________

Program 1.1.2 Promotion and awareness of the significance of Canberra as the National Capital. To achieve this objective the NCA uses a variety of tools to inform and raise awareness of Canberra as the National Capital.

Five Year Inform and Educate Strategy

In 2013-14, the NCA implemented the second year of its five year strategy to inform and educate Australians and international visitors, about the role and significance of the National Capital. There are four outcomes identified in the strategy:

* improving the positive perception of Canberra as the National Capital

* increasing the awareness of the unique characteristics of the National Capital

* improving the understanding of past, current and future development of the National Capital

* increasing the recognition of Canberra’s place in the history of Australia.

National Capital Exhibition

The National Capital Exhibition (the Exhibition) is a place where Australians and visitors can experience the history and development of our nation’s capital. Through interactive displays, the Exhibition illustrates Canberra’s role as a symbol of Federation. It features the

$1 968M National Capital Plan

$35 666 F U N D I N G

$17 036

M

$14 662M M National Capital National Capital Estate Works $2 000M National Engagement and Education

people, events, history and design which contributed to the development of this unique, modern, fully planned capital city.

The Exhibition is located on Barrine Drive in Commonwealth Park. It is open Monday to Friday from 9.00 am to 5.00 pm, and on weekends from 10.00 am to 4.00 pm. It is closed on public holidays (except Australia Day and Canberra Day) and during Christmas week. Admission is free.

24 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

In 2013-14, the NCA’s information and education programs had great success with:

55 459

1

Student carillonist graduating and two students commencing carillon studies.

104 89

Volunteers providing People taking part in the horticulture, interpretation annual Public Forum and research services

145 7Visiting the National C70 apital Exhibition, Participants in an education programlocated in Commonwealth Park

Visiting the ‘Brick b

5154y Brick’ touring exhibition in Mount Gambier and Adelaide

Brick by Brick won a national Highly Commended Award from Museums

Australia

P

1100 eople viewing ‘A Capital Collection’ touring exhibition in Melbourne 2211 1654

Unique visitors to the Followers on Twitter

education portal and online outreach tools

25 008 Visits to ‘The Canberra Guide’ app and mobile website

1300 Active users on the consultation website, ‘Have Your Say’

Figure 7: INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS

CHAPTER 3 National Engagement and Education | 25

‘What the “bush capital” lacks in big-city tousle, it makes up for in big-sky beauty, breezy civic pride and a decidedly hipster underbelly. Set on an artificial lake and spread across a valley between mountain ranges, Canberra is the Brasilia of Australia, designed by the American architects Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin’.

PEARSE, E, 2014, 36 HOURS IN CANBERRA AUSTRALIA, NEW YORK TIMES, ACCESSED 11 AUGUST 2014

The Exhibition was originally built in 1962, as a viewing platform for visitors to observe the construction of Lake Burley Griffin (the Lake). The first enclosed display was temporarily mounted for a visit by Queen Elizabeth II in February 1963. Public enthusiasm at the time saw the temporary display become permanent.

Key Achievements

During 2013-14, several displays and layout changes were implemented, as part of the NCA’s ongoing renewal of the Exhibition. Changes to the Exhibition layout have improved visibility of the major national institutions around the Lake and created a greater awareness of the architecture, the landscape in the National Capital’s setting and significance.

The rolling upgrade of the Exhibition, with temporary and permanent displays has been a major achievement this year. In 2013-14, ‘Brick by Brick’, ‘A Capital Collection’, ‘Quote/Unquote’ and ‘The Story of Canberra’ film were produced.

The ‘Brick by Brick’ activity also won a national Highly Commended Award from Museums Australia.

In 2013-14, the Exhibition had 145 770 people visit which is a 6.2 per cent increase on 2012-13. The total comprises:

* 52 410 school students, 96 per cent from interstate * 14 294 international visitors * 16 259 domestic visitors * 62 807 free and independent travellers.

A key ambition for the Exhibition is to increase the awareness of the special role of Canberra as the National Capital. In 2013-14, an exit survey of visitors was undertaken. Of those surveyed, 98 per cent agreed their visit to the Exhibition had increased their awareness of the special importance of Canberra as Australia’s National Capital and 97 per cent agreed they had a greater appreciation and knowledge of the National Capital.

Brick by Brick On 18 July 2013, a new education activity called ‘Brick by Brick: Build Your Own Capital’ opened at the Exhibition. It allows visitors to the Exhibition to create their own National Capital, or replicate some of Australia’s national institutions and buildings located in Canberra using LEGOTM or DUPLOTM. The activity was developed by the NCA, as an engaging way to tell Australians about their National Capital.

Eleven construction sheets are available, showing step-by-step instructions on how to build some of the national treasures located in Canberra. These include the Captain Cook Memorial Jet, the Australian War Memorial and Old Parliament House for example. Participants are encouraged to use the construction sheets provided when they visit the Exhibition, or take them away to try the designs at home.

Creative participants can build their own version of the National Capital during their visit to the Exhibition. Participants are asked to build a new national institution, memorial or other building that is important for all Australians; think about where their design will be placed; design something that will make Canberra more environmentally friendly; or construct a building that is part of the landscape.

26 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

In 2014, the activity won a national Highly Commended Award from Museums Australia.

Following the success of the activity at the Exhibition, a duplicate version was toured outside of Canberra in 2014 (see touring exhibitions on PAGE 31).

A Capital Collection As part of the Centenary of Canberra celebrations, temporary displays telling the social history of Canberra through fashion were displayed at the Exhibition. The series, called ‘A Capital Collection - Our History in Fashion’ (A Capital Collection), depicted snapshots of Canberra’s history through the fashions worn at key milestone events. In 2013-14, the two final temporary exhibitions were displayed as part of the series.

On 26 July 2013, the 1964 collection celebrating the inauguration of the Lake opened at the Exhibition. It was inspired by a National Capital Development Commission film called ‘Canberra Springtime 64’ and from photographs of the day. Daughter of Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies, Heather Henderson loaned the NCA the Kings Avenue bridge ceremonial key for display in the exhibition.

On 26 September 2013, Department of Parliamentary Services Secretary Ms Carol Mills officially opened the display showing the fashions worn to the opening of Parliament House in 1988. Parliamentary Services provided support for the exhibition with uniforms that were worn in the first years of the new parliament.

Interest from interstate venues to host the exhibition encouraged the NCA to engage a designer and fabricator to develop it into a touring exhibition (see touring exhibitions on PAGE 31).

Quote/Unquote In June 2014, a permanent display called ‘Quote / Unquote’ opened at the Exhibition. The display provides quotations, both negative and positive, about the National Capital. It features comments from prominent Australians such as Barry Crocker and HG Nelson, as well as international visitors like Bill Bryson.

‘Quote / Unquote’ also encourages visitors to the Exhibition to engage with the display by adding their own comments about the National Capital. It asks visitors to write down why they are visiting Canberra, what their favourite national institution is, and whether they have discovered something new about the National Capital.

Story of Canberra Film In 2013-14, the ‘Story of Canberra’ short film was updated. The seven minute film explains the early history of the National Capital and how it has developed into the modern city it is today. The film is a key element of the Exhibition story. It is screened in the Exhibition theatre to all school groups and is available at regular intervals to other visitors.

Figure 8: NATIONAL CAPITAL EXHIBITION VISITOR ATTENDANCE 2009-2014

59 386 52 410

2009-10 2013-14

47 287

0 487 2012-13

2010-11

54 180

School

2011-12 Students

14 294

23 598 2013-14 2009-10

15 700 2012-13

18 311 2010-11 17 300

International

6

2011-12 Visitors

CHAPTER 3 National Engagement and Education | 27

Domestic Visitors

4386 2009-10

16 259 2013-14

6341 2010-11

6896 2011-12

11 252 2012-13

Independent Travellers

88 309 62 807

2013-14 2009-10

63 035 2012-13

88 265 2010-11 70 523

2011-12

Figure 8: NATIONAL CAPITAL EXHIBITION VISITOR ATTENDANCE 2009-2014

Blundells Cottage

Built around 1860, Blundells Cottage (the Cottage) is a rare remnant of the pastoral history of the National Capital. Once a workers’ cottage on the Duntroon Estate, the Cottage is now open as a museum.

The Cottage is located on Wendouree Drive, Parkes on the shores of the Lake. It is open on Thursdays and Saturdays from 10.00AM to 11.30AM and 12.00PM to 4.00PM, excluding public holidays. It is closed during Christmas week. Admission is free.

Figure 9: BLUNDELLS COTTAGE VISITOR ATTENDANCE

2788 Visitors

1389 Students

2947 Visitors

2025 Students

3580 Visitors

866 Students

2308 Visitors

551 Students

2013-14

2012-13

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

942 Visitors

303 Students

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, proposals were considered to renew the permanent displays and provide an interpretation of the Cottage but have been deferred until the new landscape plan has been implemented and the collections from the Cottage have been fully documented. The role of the Cottage in the history of the National Capital is unique. Oral histories from people associated with the Cottage are being collected and will influence the new installation.

The Cottage has undergone major repairs to ensure that water doesn’t degrade the fabric of the building. The external woodwork has been repainted in a colour that is sympathetic to the earlier period of the cottage and external paving has also been repaired or replaced.

During 2013-14, the Cottage attracted a total of 4177 visitors, of which 1389 were school students. The decline in visitation on the previous year is attributed to the Cottage being closed for several days over the summer period due to excessive heat in the building.

National Carillon

The National Carillon (the Carillon), is one of the largest percussion and concert instruments in the world, is located on Aspen Island in the Lake. It was a gift from the British Government to the people of Australia to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Canberra as the National Capital and was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on 26 April 1970.

Regular recitals are performed from 12.30PM to 1.20PM each Wednesday and Sunday with extra recitals played during January through to March. Special recitals are performed on Christmas Eve, Australia Day, Valentine’s Day, Canberra Day, ANZAC Day and the Queen’s Birthday public holiday.

Sponsorship by Colliers International (ACT) Pty Ltd supports the Carillon public programs, including the four summer recitals, the ‘Stillness and the Night’ January recital program, and the ‘April Carillon Frolic’ event.

28 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

The carillonists’ professional development program initiated in 2012 has proved to be extremely beneficial. In 2013-14, two international experts, Mr Koen Cosaert Director of the Royal Carillon School ‘Jef Denyn” from Mechelen and Mr Peter Langberg former Director of the Scandinavian Carillon School from Copenhagen both provided intensive training sessions with the carillon team.

In 2013-14, student carillonist Mr Leonard Weiss was assessed by Mr Cosaert and graduated. Mr Weiss also graduated with a Bachelor of Music from Australian National University using a carillon performance as part of his graduation assessment. Further, an additional two students, Ms Anna Wong and Mr Tim Magarry commenced carillon studies.

From 9 until 12 October 2013, the first carillon school holiday program was held. Children from the age of 12 years, were given an opportunity to get ‘hands-and legs-on experience’ at the Carillon. The four day program allowed the children to learn how to play 300g handbells and the Carillon up to the largest 6 tonne bell. 

To celebrate the 44th anniversary of the opening of the Carillon, a month of activities was held during April 2014. Volunteer guides gave tours of the Carillon on Thursdays and Saturdays at 12.30PM and 1.30PM. All tour sessions were fully booked out.

On 5 April 2014, the ‘Carillon Frolic’, an annual open day was held. This free event included children’s entertainment, picnic games and recitals and attracted 1000 people to Aspen Island. All guided tours of the Carillon offered on the day were fully booked. Performances by the two carillonists and the Canberra Handbell Ensemble were extremely popular.

On 25 April 2014, the first ANZAC Day recital for the unknown soldiers of the First World War conflict was held. Commemorating a significant occasion such as the unknown soldiers of the 1914-1918 conflict was an opportunity for the carillonists to profile their skills in playing, arranging and composing, as well as promoting the versatility of the instrument. ‘Tocsin’, a piece famous by eminent Australian Mr Larry Sitsky AM was composed for the performance. The recital attracted 250 people to Aspen Island.

In June 2014, five of the carillonists attended the Congress of the World Carillon Federation in Antwerp, Belgium. During the congress, Senior Carillonist Dr Thomas Laue achieved third place at the seventh International Queen Fabiola Carillon Competition in Mechelen, Belgium.

Library

The NCA’s library collection provides a comprehensive history of the planning and development of the National Capital. The library has a strong core of architecture and planning, landscape architecture and environmental planning material as well as capital city planning, development and maintenance material.

Visiting the library is by appointment. Admission is free.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, visitors of the Library were interested in material relating to:

* the history of the suburbs of Hughes, Curtin and Woden Valley

* images documenting to the development of the High Court of Australia

* Lake Burley Griffin, specifically * the floodplains leading into the Lake and the Jerrabomberra Wetlands

* Yarralumla Bay * public artworks commissioned by the National Capital Development Commission

* Magna Carta Place * the heritage of City Hill * the development of Queen Elizabeth II Family Centre

* the Murrumbidgee River Corridor * images of people enjoying Gus’s Café, Civic * major weather events in Canberra such as snow, floods, storms and drought.

1, 2, 3, 4 CARILLON SCHOOL 2014

5, 6, 7, 8 A CAPITAL COLLECTION TRAVELLING EXHIBITION OPENING

1

3

5

7

2

4

6

8

1 2

4

3

5 6 7

8

1, 2, 4, 5 BUILD YOUR OWN CAPITAL

3, 6, 7, 8 NATIONAL CARILLON AND RECITAL

CHAPTER 3 National Engagement and Education | 31

Touring Exhibitions

During 2013-14, the NCA trialled two touring exhibitions as a way of informing and raising awareness of the National Capital in metropolitan and regional areas of Australia. These were ‘Brick by Brick’ and ‘A Capital Collection’. Touring exhibitions have proved very popular and have been successful at reaching Australians who are unlikely to visit Canberra. The touring exhibitions include education programs together with information support for the participating venues.

A CAPITAL COLLECTION

‘A Capital Collection’ was developed to provide an innovative way to introduce Australians to the history of the National Capital based on the fashions of the time, supporting documentation and memorabilia. Where possible original garments on loan from local sources were used, but where that wasn’t possible replicas were made. NCA volunteers worked on a replica of Lady Denman’s dress using original film footage and photographs from a contemporary source as their guides.

On 27 March 2014, fashion designer and artist Dr Prue Acton OBE officially opened the exhibition at the Academy of Design Australia, Port Melbourne.

The exhibition was timed to feature in the Melbourne Fashion Festival Cultural Program. Opening night included a runway event presented by current students at the Academy of Design in homage to each of the historical periods on display in the exhibition. The exhibition was on display until 8 May 2014.

During the remainder of 2014, the exhibition will travel to Williamstown Library in Melbourne, the Main Corner in Mount Gambier and the State Library of South Australia in Adelaide.

‘The Brick by Brick exhibition exceeded our expectations as well as all who attended - providing the Library staff and visitors an opportunity to increase their awareness of the National Capital’

STATE LIBRARY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

BRICK BY BRICK

Following the success of ‘Brick by Brick’ at the Exhibition, a duplicate version was toured outside of Canberra during 2013-14. The education activity allows visitors to create their own National Capital, or replicate some of Australia’s national institutions and buildings located in Canberra using LEGOTM. It was designed to excite and inform school age children about the buildings in the National Capital through interactive play. The activity is also directed at older Australians through the material that accompanies the exhibition.

On 16 January 2014, ‘Brick by Brick’ was jointly opened at the State Library of South Australia by the Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Honourable Jamie Briggs MP and South Australian Minister for Education and Child Development, the Honourable Jennifer Rankine. The activity was available until 19 March 2014.

On 3 April 2014, the activity opened at the Main Corner Library in Mount Gambier, South Australia and was on display until 1 July 2014.

In the remainder of 2014, the activity will tour to Melbourne and Bendigo.

32 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Key Achievements In 2013-14, 6254 people visited an NCA touring exhibition.

This comprised:

* 1100 visited ‘A Capital Collection’ at the Academy of Design, Port Melbourne.

* 3750 visited ‘Brick by Brick’ at the State Library of South Australia

* 1404 visited ‘Brick by Brick’ at the Main Corner in Mount Gambier). Of the 817 people surveyed at Mount Gambier, 99 per cent learnt something new about Canberra.

Education Programs

Onsite education programs are offered to school groups visiting the NCA visitor attractions. These programs include ‘Imagining the Capital’, ‘Brick by Brick’ and ‘Meet the Capital’ at the Exhibition, and ‘Step Back in Time’, ‘Mechanical Toys’ and ‘In Their Footsteps’ at the Cottage.

Education resource kits are also available through the NCA’s education portal at http://education. nationalcapital.gov.au including:

* The Story of our Nation’s Capital * Reflections of a Nation * Blundells Cottage - The Past in the Present - National Curriculum Year 2 History

* Blundells Cottage - middle Primary * A Capital Investigation * A Capital Choice * The Police Memorial

* Mapping the Capital.

In 2013-14, additional education programs and school holiday activities were developed to link with the temporary and travelling exhibitions.

The NCA website includes other education activities, such as virtual tours and podcasts to inform Australians about the National Capital.

The virtual tour of the Cottage allows users to see and learn about the Cottage from home or school.

The Carillon virtual tour offers the experience of viewing inside the Carillon, including the 55 bells, how the instrument is played and hearing a carillon recital. Users can also try their hands (and feet) at playing the instrument.

The Exhibition virtual tour includes links to the primary education kit, films and an animation of the Canberra Sound and Light Show exhibition. It is designed to be used by teachers on smart boards in the classroom and assist teachers in planning pre and post visit activities for their class.

The Anzac Parade podcast includes contributions from veterans and explores the symbolism of Anzac Parade and its memorials.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, 55 459 people participated in an NCA education program and 2211 unique visitors viewed the NCA education portal. This comprised:

* 52 410 students at the Exhibition * 1389 students at the Cottage * 2211 unique visitors to the NCA Education Portal * 290 people took part in a school holiday activity

* 65 people listened to a presentation on the personalities in the ‘Story of our Nation’s Capital’

* 45 people attended an education program as part of the touring ‘A Capital Collection’ exhibition

* 1159 people took part in an education activity for the touring version of ‘Brick by Brick’

* 45 educators heard a presentation on ‘Brick by Brick’ at the Museums Australia conference

* 26 volunteer ambassadors at the State Library of South Australia attended training on the ‘Story of Canberra’

* 11 teachers and 19 tour operators listened to presentations on the ‘Story of our Nation’s Capital.’

CHAPTER 3 National Engagement and Education | 33

The Canberra Guide

A free smartphone app and mobile website called ‘The Canberra Guide’ www.thecanberraguide.com.au is available for tourists to plan their visit to the National Capital. It was developed in collaboration between the NCA, ACT Government and the National Capital Attractions Association. The Canberra Guide provides information about attractions and events taking place in the National Capital. In 2013-14, the app was enhanced to also include food and drink listings.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, ‘The Canberra Guide’ received a total of 25 008 visits and 202 555 page views.

Sixty-four per cent of people viewing ‘The Canberra Guide’ were from interstate, with 84 per cent of these coming from New South Wales.

Of the 11 220 people that downloaded ‘The Canberra Guide’ on their device, 64 per cent accessed it via the App Store and 36 per cent from Google Play.

On 31 October 2014, The Canberra Times described the smartphone app as one of the five best applications available to showcase the capital.

Figure 10: THE CANBERRA GUIDE STATISTICS

2505 2012-13 1623

2012-13

4005 2013-14

7163 2013-14

I T U N E

9668 S A P P S T O R E

5680 G O O G L E P L A Y

Self Guided Tours

The NCA has four walking and two driving tour brochures available for visitors to explore the landmarks, special places and memorials in Canberra. These include self guided walks of the Lake, Magna Carta Place, Anzac Parade and the Old Parliament House Gardens. Driving tours of the Yarralumla Diplomatic Estate and Military Memorials in the National Capital are also available.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, an electronic walking tour of Anzac Parade was developed. The app is available for free on iTunes and Google Play. It includes detailed information on each memorial, images and audio provided by the returned servicemen who were the original volunteer guides on Anzac Parade. The app was timed to align with the Anzac Centenary commemorations, marking 100 years since our nation’s involvement in the First World War.

Guided Walks

In 2013-14, guided walking tours of the special parts of the National Capital commenced.

Monthly volunteer led walks of Anzac Parade were available from March to June 2014. The 1.5 hour walk explored the monuments as well as the significance of Anzac Parade.

As part of the 2014 National Heritage Festival, guided tours were offered of Anzac Parade, Old Parliament House Gardens, around the central basin of the Lake, and between the Cottage and St Johns Schoolhouse.

Two guided tours of the inspiring artworks that make up Reconciliation Place were held during Reconciliation Week and National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) celebrations.

Daily tours of the Exhibition also occurred. At 11am, each day visitors to the Exhibition can take a guided tour to learn about the story of Canberra.

34 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

During the Carillon celebrations in April, volunteer guides gave tours of the Carillon at two sessions on Thursdays and Saturdays.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, 920 people participated in a guided tour of the central parts of Canberra. This comprised:

* 681 people joined a guided tour of the memorials on Anzac Parade

* 60 people took part in a walk offered as part of the 2014 National Heritage Festival

* 36 people attended a guided walk of Reconciliation Place

* 27 delegates attending the National Nurses Forum walked Lake Burley Griffin

* 49 visitors and 67 students took part in a tour of the Old Parliament House Gardens.

Social Media

The NCA actively participates on the social media site Twitter. The Twitter account is nca_media.

In 2013-14, the NCA also commenced engagement on social media sites Facebook and Instagram as part of the ‘Brick by Brick’ activity. Participants of ‘Brick by Brick’ are encouraged to post photographs of their creations on Facebook (www.facebook.com/ brickxbrick), Twitter (@nca_media) or Instagram (#brickbybrick #buildyourowncapital).

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

At the end of 2013-14, the NCA had 1654 Twitter followers and 179 likes on the Brick by Brick Facebook page.

Volunteers

In 2000, the NCA established a volunteer program to complement its role of informing and educating Australians and visitors about Canberra as the National Capital. The volunteers come from the local community and contribute their experience and knowledge in a variety of ways.

Volunteers are provided with a range of training opportunities to assist them to successfully undertake their role as ambassadors for Canberra. Volunteers also have the opportunity to participate in on-going professional development and group activities. These activities allow volunteers to expand their knowledge about the nation’s capital in an informal and enjoyable manner.

The NCA’s volunteer program is now divided into three separate teams; Horticulture, Guides and Research.

In 2013-14, a Volunteers Coordinator Committee was established to work collaboratively with other national institutions and to share experiences. The NCA’s Volunteers Coordinator jointly heads the committee, along with the Museum of Australian Democracy Volunteers Coordinator.

The NCA Volunteer Policy is being updated to reflect the Volunteering Australia requirements and to improve the NCA’s volunteer program.

Horticulture Volunteers

In 2005, a horticultural volunteer program commenced to provide ongoing care of the Old Parliament House Gardens in conjunction with maintenance contractors. These volunteers undertake defined gardening activities in the gardens. A team of volunteers assist in looking after the Broinowski, Rex Hazelwood and Senate Gardens and two teams care for the largest garden, the Ladies Garden.

CHAPTER 3 National Engagement and Education | 35

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

At the end of 2013-14, there were 62 horticulture volunteers involved in the program. A total of 4440 hours was contributed to the maintenance of the Old Parliament House Gardens this financial year. The Horticulture Volunteers worked on projects such as lavender planting in the Old Parliament House Gardens, the seasonal pruning of the roses and also assisted with a rose audit.

The volunteers have received specialist training on correct pruning and health management of the roses, including identifying the different requirements for each rose cultivar. The volunteers have also begun training in budding and grafting.

Volunteer Guides

In August 2000, an interpretive volunteer program was established. The volunteers share their time, skills and knowledge with visitors that come to the Exhibition and the Cottage. They also provide guided walking tours of national significant areas such as Anzac Parade.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, there were 12 Volunteer Guides actively involved in the program. A further nine volunteers joined the program in June 2014.

The guides contributed 1559 hours over the financial year. These included taking tours and school programs at the Exhibition and the Cottage. They also provided guided tours on Anzac Parade, Old Parliament House Gardens and the Carillon.

The guides participated in the Volunteers Week events and activities run by the Volunteers Coordinators Committee. Events included the NCA volunteers taking guides from other national institutions on tours of the National Capital Estate. It also gave the NCA volunteers the opportunity to see how volunteer programs run at larger institutions.

Research Volunteers

Research volunteers share their time, skills and knowledge on specific research tasks.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

Three research volunteers have contributed a total of 1180 hours during 2013-14. This has included research on the Cottage, the Carillon, international Carillons during the First World War, the reconstruction of Lady Denman’s dress for the touring exhibition ‘A Capital Collection’, as well as assisting in the organisation of the Cottage collection.

In June 2014, an additional 18 research volunteers joined the program.

Public Forum

The annual Public Forum provides a face-to-face opportunity for the community to ask questions regarding the areas of special national importance in Canberra. Authority members and senior staff listened and responded to views and ideas raised by attendees.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 3 April 2014, the NCA held its sixth annual Public Forum at the Canberra Business Event Centre, located in Commonwealth Park. The Forum was also available via a live web stream.

The key themes nominated by the community for discussion at the 2014 Forum included:

* pay parking management on National Land * administration of the Lake * management of the National Capital Estate * development of West Basin

* light rail in Canberra * heritage matters * the review of Kings and Commonwealth Avenues * NCA and the Territory planning authority shared

responsibilities.

36 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

The agenda allowed significant time for questions from the floor on any aspect of the NCA’s role or performance.

Fifty-four people attended the public forum and a further 35 watched via the live webstream.

Figure 11: NCA PUBLIC FORUM ATTENDANCE

200 180 100 34 89

APRIL APRIL MAY JUNE APRIL

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

15 24 6 35

WEB WEB WEB WEB

Commitment to Community Engagement

The NCA is committed to improving engagement with the community and the accountability and transparency of its decision-making.

The NCA’s ‘Commitment to Community Engagement (August 2011)’ enables:

* the ability to nominate stakeholders to consult, depending on the nature of the proposal

* the ability to assess Works Approval applications using a risk based approach, to determine when and how public consultation is undertaken

* greater consistency across the Territory in terms of consultation requirements on planning matters.

The NCA has embraced new communications technology and mechanisms to reach stakeholders and interested parties when undertaking public consultation. These online tools allow all Australians, regardless of where they reside, to have their say on topics released for public consultation.

The community is invited to comment via:

* the NCA’s consultation website www.nationalcapital.gov.au/haveyoursay

* hardcopy submissions * Twitter using @nca_media * Email.

The NCA’s consultation website hosts discussions about the way Canberra is developed and managed as the National Capital. Online comments are published on the website immediately and post-moderated to ensure a natural flow of conversation.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

At the end of 2013-14, there were 1600 registered users of the NCA’s public consultation website, ‘Have Your Say’ and the following topics were released for public consultation:

* draft Development Control Plan 14/03-Pialligo Avenue

* Blundells Cottage draft landscape Masterplan * draft Development Control Plan 14/02-Canberra Avenue, Griffith

* draft Heritage Management Plan for Surveyors Hut and Surveyors Park

* draft Development Control Plan 14/01-Gold Creek Tourist Area

* Old Parliament House Gardens draft Heritage Management Plan

* Acton Peninsula Heritage Management Plan survey * Draft Amendment 84-Pialligo * draft Development Control Plan 13/02-Hume * draft Heritage Management Plan for State Circle

Cutting

* draft Heritage Management Plan for Blundells Cottage and King George V Memorial

* Draft Amendment 82-Amtech Estate * draft Development Control Plan 13/01, Griffith.

* Works Approval applications relating to:

* Section 9 Barton-structured car park * Parlour Wine Room-installation of neon signage * demolition and construction of new single dwelling, 45 National Circuit, Forrest

* Block 2 Section 119 and Block 1 Section 121, Yarralumla-Royal Canberra Golf Club

* Canberra Chinese Gardens-Lennox Gardens * Block 28 Section 19, Campbell-Redevelopment of Returned and Services League National Office

CHAPTER 3 National Engagement and Education | 37

2014 ANNUAL PUBLIC FORUM

38 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

* Block 11 Section 118 Campbell-relocation of telecommunication monopole at Morsehead Drive

* Block 9 Section 57 Lyneham-upgrade to mobile telecommunications tower

* Black Mountain Peninsula-development of a slipway

* 9 Talbot Street Forrest-construction of a carport * installation of safety screens to two bridges over Parkes Way

* Block 13 (part) Section 9 Barton-Blackall Street * Blocks 15 and 16 Section 17 Alexandrina Drive, Yarralumla

* Block 13 Section 10 2 Constitution Avenue, City.

International Relationships

The NCA continues to maintain its membership of the Capitals Alliance, an international network of government planning bodies from national capital cities including Washington DC and Ottawa.

Canberra is Australia’s gateway for interaction with the international community and the appropriate place for significant international events and gatherings. Foreign missions are encouraged to hold flag raising ceremonies to celebrate their national day or date of significance at the International Flag Display at Commonwealth Place.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In July 2013, the Executive Director of Washington DC’s National Capital Planning Commission visited Canberra and held meetings with NCA officials.

On 6 May 2014, the three agency heads responsible for planning and land management of capital cities met via teleconference and discussed topics of mutual interest to their agencies.

In 2013-14, two flag raising ceremonies were held. On 1 July 2013, the High Commission of Canada celebrated the national day of Canada at Regatta Point and the High Commission of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka celebrated Independence Day on 4 February 2014 at the International Flag Display in Parkes.

Online event registration

The NCA’s online registration system enables event organisers to manage their own registrations for use of venues on National Land. The system allows the public to check venue details and availability and register for weddings and other private events. These bookings are managed online through the NCA’s website.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

During 2013-14, there were over 900 events booked using the online registration tool.

- CHAPTER FOUR -

NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE Overview

SECTION 6 OF THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY (PLANNING AND LAND MANAGEMENT) ACT 1988 (THE ACT) PROVIDES FOR THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY (NCA): (G) WITH THE MINISTER’S APPROVAL, ON BEHALF OF THE COMMONWEALTH, TO MANAGE NATIONAL LAND DESIGNATED IN WRITING BY THE MINISTER AS LAND REQUIRED FOR THE SPECIAL PURPOSES OF CANBERRA AS THE NATIONAL CAPITAL.

________________________

Program 1.1.3 Advocacy, enhancement and management of the National Capital Estate.

The NCA manages and maintains National Land and $1 968M

National Capital

some of the nation’s most significant cultural assets. Plan

These assets are managed as a national investment for their cultural, heritage and environmental values and provide the setting for ceremonies, activities and events that occur in the National Capital. $35 666

F U N D I N G

$17 036

M

$14 662M M National Capital National Capital MAP 2 indicates National Land areas administered by Estate Worksthe NCA on behalf of the Australian Government. This includes the Parliamentary Zone, Lake Burley Griffin (the Lake) and parts of the foreshore, Anzac Parade and $2 000M National Engagement Diplomatic Estates in Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley. and EducationThese areas have been declared for the special purpose of Canberra as the National Capital. investment. During 2013-14, the NCA undertook the following activities on National Land: In managing assets in the National Capital, the NCA upgraded the irrigation control system to deliver aims to ensure maintenance and other practices are * water efficiencies in the Parliamentary Zone consistent with the design intent and support the objectives of the National Capital Plan (the Plan). * commenced a re-lamping program to upgrade out-dated and inefficient light fittings* conducted engineering inspections on the 25 bridges Major Achievements on National Land and Highlights * refurbished one of the two Captain Cook Memorial Jet pumps The Australian Government has a direct ongoing * approved approximately 900 events on National Land interest in developing and maintaining the National * worked in partnership to conserve Capital as a place in which all Australians have an and manage grasslands

Map 2: LAND MANAGED BY THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY

Lake Burley Griffin

NCA Managed Land

Diplomatic Estate

WAR MEMORIAL

PARLIAMENT HOUSE

CIVIC

LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN

GOVERNMENT HOUSE

CHAPTER 4 National Capital Estate | 41

* issued 883 boat permits for recreational and sporting use on the Lake

* responded to over 1000 requests for maintenance activities on National Land

* replaced dead and dying trees in the Parliamentary Zone, Anzac Parade and Dunrossil Drive

* held community macrophyte planting days around the Lake to improve water quality

* commenced a long term Alligator Weed infestation removal program around affected parts of the Lake.

Managing and Maintaining National Assets

The NCA manages and maintains a diverse range of assets on behalf of the Australian Government including:

* National Infrastructure assets such as Scrivener Dam, Commonwealth Avenue and Kings Avenue Bridges and major roadways including Parkes Way, Capital Circle and State Circle

* National heritage buildings, artworks, memorials, fountains and water features including the Captain Cook Memorial Jet (the Jet), National Carillon, Blundells Cottage, Reconciliation Place and Regatta Point

* Assets on National Land and the Lake including Aspen, Spinnaker and Springbank Islands, the Parliamentary Zone and Anzac Parade

* Land Management such as open space maintenance of the National Triangle (including the Old Parliament House Gardens and National Rose Gardens), Commonwealth and Kings Parks, Lindsay Pryor National Arboretum, conservation of open woodlands at Stirling Park, grasslands at Yarramundi Reach and management of over 20 000 trees in Canberra’s central areas.

‘Being the largest of the city’s several lakes, ‘LBG’ serves as a centre for many Canberra happenings over the year’.

PRITCHARD, S, 2014, WHY I LOVE LAKE BURLEY GRIFFIN, OUTINCANBERRA

When scheduling maintenance or replacement works and activities, public safety and asset life are the major factors considered. Many assets are maintained under competitively tendered contracts and asset maintenance programs are based on regular condition assessments and reports. An asset management system is used to track asset information such as locations, descriptions, condition, works undertaken and life-cycle data.

For information on the NCA’s asset management framework, see CHAPTER 6.

OPEN SPACE

The NCA manages 610 hectares of open space, predominantly formal parks and gardens on National Land, such as Commonwealth Park and Kings Park. Maintaining the areas consists of mowing, weeding, edging, tree care, irrigation maintenance, graffiti removal, rubbish removal and pavement cleaning.

Key Achievements In June 2013, the NCA extended the provision of the open space maintenance contract for an additional three years to June 2016.

In 2013-14, the NCA undertook a comprehensive restoration program of various prominent garden beds to improve the standard of open space on the National Estate. In particular, large areas on Anzac Parade, Kings Park, State Circle and various small gardens in the Parliamentary Zone were conditioned and mulched. During the 2013-14 summer season, 300 hebes on Anzac Parade were replaced after the particularly hot, dry weather.

A comprehensive condition assessment and asset audit of the irrigation infrastructure was undertaken during 2013-14. With the information gathered, the NCA commenced replacement of the central irrigation control system across the National Capital Estate. This was completed in the Parliamentary Zone in June 2014, and will continue in the remainder of the National Capital Estate in 2014-15.  The new system provides improved irrigation controls to monitor usage and leaks

42 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

and will lead to reduced water consumption. Additional measures such as the installation of pressure release valves in the east National Rose Garden provided better control of shrub and lawn watering in this area.

URBAN TREES

With many trees planted over 50 years ago, the NCA is implementing a tree replacement strategy for those trees in the National Capital Estate that die or become dangerous. The strategy aims to maintain current plantings and protect the heritage significance of individual trees.

A tree replacement program was prepared for the Central Parklands, the Parliamentary Zone, Stirling Ridge precinct, Lodge Park, Acton and Dunrossil Drive and environs. The NCA received approval from the Department of Environment under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 to proceed.

It is not always possible to replace every tree due to available space and the suitability of the location. NCA’s policy is to replace like with like except where the species is a weed or has performed poorly.

Key Achievements During the year 500 dead or dangerous pine trees were cleared along Dunrossil Drive. This work involved the clearing of woody material and stumps, grading, ploughing and re-establishing grass. Replanting the trees will commence in 2015-16 and will include an evergreen species of oaks to strengthen the avenue and pines to replace those removed.

On Anzac Parade the growing conditions for new and existing trees of the 4.3 hectare of verge area was improved by coring, composting and mulching.

Following approval from the House of Representatives and the Senate, 205 trees in the Parliamentary Zone were removed and the majority replaced with the same species to maintain the design integrity of the original plantings.

LINDSAY PRYOR NATIONAL ARBORETUM

The Lindsay Pryor National Arboretum (the Arboretum), located opposite the Canberra National Arboretum, was planted in the 1950s by Professor Lindsay Pryor AO, an eminent Australian forest scientist, botanist and landscape architect. The NCA has created a masterplan which defines the Arboretum as a place for recreation, scientific research and education, and also gives recognition to the achievements of Professor Pryor. Consideration of the heritage of the site, including recognition of its history of trialling tree species for use in Canberra, is guiding the restoration program including future tree planting.

Key Achievements Works completed during the year in accordance with the Arboretum Masterplan included the removal of weeds in treed areas and spreading 1400 cubic metres of mulch under many of the trees.

CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT OF GRASSLANDS

The NCA manages Stirling Park and Yarramundi Reach conservation grasslands and grassy woodlands through hazard reduction burning, woody weed removal, re-establishment of native grasses, mowing fire breaks and control of invasive weeds.

Key Achievements The NCA works with volunteer organisations to support the management of significant grassland ecosystems in Stirling Park and Yarramundi Grasslands. Weed removal was undertaken with the assistance of ‘Friends of the Grasslands’ volunteer group and hazard reduction burning with the ACT Rural Fire Service, including prescribed burning at Yarramundi Reach, the Arboretum and on Springbank Island.

In 2013-14, a major regeneration project commenced at Stirling Park. Exotic shrub species such as Cotoneaster, Pyracantha and Rose Briar were removed and a large number of non-endemic blue gums and pine wildlings felled and subsequently ecologically burned to promote native trees and grasses back to the area. This work will be supplemented by planting of native trees and

CHAPTER 4 National Capital Estate | 4 3

The NCA manages a broad range of building and infrastructure assets

Minor structures**

Signs

1136 Paths

10

10

22

STOP

2015 ighting assemblies

St

25 Bridges

990 ROADS*

grasses by the local community in future years. The NCA undertook quarterly fire break maintenance and broad acre weed control of St John’s Wart, Tall African Lovegrass and spot spraying of Broom and Madeira vine.

BUILDINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Key Achievements Works undertaken during 2013-14, included lighting upgrades, building refurbishments, infrastructure repairs and replacements.

The NCA continues to implement energy efficient alternatives to lighting where practical.

Key projects included the replacement and design change of 249,400watt mercury vapour lighting heads to 250watt metal halide with Active Reactive control units across the Parliamentary Zone. This change will significantly improve the energy consumption of these lights and reduce maintenance costs. Additionally the roll out of compact fluorescent lighting to car parks continued across the Parliamentary Zone. One of the two water pumps used to operate the Jet was refurbished to ensure its longevity.

Figure 12: BUILDING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Buildings include the National Capital Exhibition, Commonwealth Place, the National Carillon, Blundells Cottage, as well as licenced premises including the Lobby Restaurant and buildings at Acton Peninsula and Commonwealth Park.

* such as Kings and Commonwealth Avenues, Constitution Avenue, Anzac Parade, Capital and State Circle, Dunrossil Drive, parts of Parkes Way and the roads within the Parliamentary Zone and the Russell Defence precinct

** includes barbecues, 10 bus shelters, 10 drinking fountains, 22 toilets, seats, retaining walls, bike racks, flag poles, fences, electrical switchboards, bollards and three picnic shelters

2350 665

7

Sewage pumps

L

24 km

orm water infrastructure

44 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

INTERNATIONAL FLAG DISPLAY, PARKES

CHAPTER 4 National Capital Estate | 45

The NCA replaced damaged sections of paths in and around the Parliamentary Zone which posed a public safety risk. Key projects included Federation Mall, removal of the spoon drains at the National Library of Australia, pram ramps near the John Gorton Building and numerous small sections of paths.

In June 2014, new line marking was completed on major roads and pedestrian crossings within the southern area of Parkes.

MEMORIALS, ARTWORKS AND FOUNTAINS

The NCA manages over 140 commemorative works in the National Capital comprising of national memorials, fountains and artworks. These include the memorials on Anzac Parade, King George V Memorial, the Federation Centenary Fountains, Treasury Fountain, memorials and artworks in Commonwealth and Kings Parks and the artworks in Reconciliation Place.

The NCA tests, treats and maintains the water, the filters and the pumps of 18 water features.

In consultation with a conservator the NCA has set maintenance standards and best practice benchmarks for managing and maintaining these special assets, taking into account their artistic and heritage values. The NCA employed four experienced people dedicated to providing these specialised services.

Key Achievements Work undertaken during 2013-14 included the re-application of protective wax coatings to the Royal Australian Navy Memorial , the Royal Australian Artillery Memorial, the Kemal Ataturk Memorial and the Desert Mounted Coup Memorial.

Conservation works were carried out to General Bridges Grave, Changi Chapel in Duntroon, Magna Carta Memorial and King George V Memorial in Parkes.

Along with regular mowing, edging and weed control, dead and old plants were replaced at the Korean, Changi Chapel, Kemal Ataturk, Vietnam and Desert Mounted Corps memorials. Normal seasonal turf maintenance and improvement activities were conducted along Anzac Parade and at Blamey Square.

In preparation for major commemorative events on Anzac Parade such as Remembrance Day and ANZAC Day, all memorials of military significance were cleaned and new flags flown. In preparation for these events the NCA engages the services of Koomarri and the Community Programs Association to provide maintenance assistance including the collection of fallen branches, litter removal, weeding and pruning of native grasses.

In time for the National Police Remembrance Day Service, held 27 September 2013, four new ‘Touch Stones’ were installed to commemorate a further four officers who have given their lives serving the Australian and Southwest Pacific communities.

FLAG SUPPLY

The NCA is responsible for the supply, maintenance and display of flags for Anzac Parade, the International Flag Display at Commonwealth Place and the flags throughout the Parliamentary Zone. The flags are rotated quarterly and have a life span of approximately three years.

The NCA also maintains 360 flag poles on National Land including Anzac Parade, Federation Mall, and Commonwealth and Kings Avenues.

Key Achievements The NCA has engaged a specialist supplier for a three year period to provide flags for the International Flag Display, the Parliamentary Zone and other sites on the National Capital Estate.

Scrivener Dam

Scrivener Dam (the Dam) is a concrete dam that controls the water level in the Lake. It incorporates five ‘fish belly’ overflow flood gates and three sluice gates. The flood gates hold back the upper five metres of the storage and are the prime component of the spillway which controls flood discharges from the Lake. In November 2011, potentially serious corrosion of the Dam’s anchor bolts was discovered during the NCA’s annual independent safety and surveillance inspection.

46 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

For more information on the Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project, see CHAPTER 5.

Managing the Dam involves:

* routine operations and maintenance including flood planning and forecasting

* undertaking maintenance of the Dam’s asset database

* routine operator inspections * creating and maintaining programs, procedures and instructions

* undertaking minor planned and unplanned works.

Regular surveillance inspections covering the structural, maintenance and operational aspects of the Dam are undertaken. These inspections include monitoring the Dam structure for movement, preparing annual safety and surveillance reports and a five yearly comprehensive safety and surveillance report.

Key Achievements In 2013-14, a major Dam safety review was undertaken, entailing a once in 20 year detailed study of the Dam’s structural, hydraulic, hydrologic and geotechnical design aspects. The review prioritised substantive Dam safety projects for the next decade. The NCA also implemented a new management and governance regime, as specified in the ‘Dam Safety Management Plan (2013).’

In January and February 2014, modifications were made to the locking pin operations for the flood gates and a digital tilt monitoring network was installed to determine downstream movement in the dam structure.

In March 2014, rock erosion control measures were installed on the right abutment downstream and a permanent cover of rock was used to stabilise the right abutment, upstream. Condition assessments of access and bridge deck covers were conducted.

In May and June 2014, condition assessments were undertaken of the floating gate and Scrivener Bridge, and dam break and loss of life review undertaken.

HYDROMETRIC DATA SERVICES

The NCA maintains and manages 17 water level/river height monitoring stations and 18 rainfall monitoring sites in the Queanbeyan/Molonglo River, Sullivans Creek and Jerrabomberra Creek catchments. These inform normal dam and flood management at the Dam and provide flood warning data for the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM).

Key Achievements In 2013-14, the NCA conducted an open market tender process for the provision of hydrometric data that covers rainfall and flood flow data services, essential to early flood warning and to meet BOM data requirements.

Lake Burley Griffin

The Lake is Canberra’s centrepiece landscape feature with parks, playgrounds, walking tracks and cycle paths surrounding the water body as well as a number of national institutions located near its shores.

The Lake covers an area of 664 hectares and is an important recreational feature of Canberra with a maximum depth of 17.6 metres near the Dam and an average depth of four metres. Recreational activities on the waterway include swimming, rowing, sailing, windsurfing, canoeing, kayaking, dragon boating, fishing, model boating and paddle boating.

Administration of the Lake is governed by the Lakes Ordinance 1976 (as applied by the National Land Ordinance 1989).

MAINTENANCE AND MANAGEMENT

The NCA is responsible for the Lake and its facilities, including the water body, jetties and beaches. A comprehensive maintenance program outlines works to maintain and enhance the Lake and its surrounding infrastructure.

An abstraction plan for irrigation and various other matters associated with use of the Lake is currently

CHAPTER 4 National Capital Estate | 47

managed by the NCA. On 17 December 2013, the Australian Capital Territory Water Management Amendment Bill (2013) was passed. From 18 December 2014, responsibility for the management of water abstraction from the Lake will be transferred to the ACT Government.

Key Achievements Works undertaken in 2013-14 to enhance existing assets and associated areas included a boat ramp extension at Lotus Bay, Lake wall repair at Acton Peninsula, beach restoration, pontoon repair, launch wall repairs at Yarralumla Bay, major woody weed control along the Lake edges and buoy line and mooring replacements.

A major infestation of Alligator Weed was identified in the western reaches of the Lake and spraying was undertaken to begin a long term eradication program. Alligator Weed is a notifiable weed and is on the Weeds of National Significance List.

WATER QUALITY

Routine weekly sampling for blue-green algae and bacteria occurs at eight beach sites each year from mid October to mid April. Results are assessed in accordance with the ‘ACT Guidelines for Recreational Water Quality (ACT Health, 2010)’ and relevant closures and alerts are notified to the public through warning signs at locations and NCA website updates. In addition, midstream samples are taken from five sites during January, February, March, May, August, October, November and December.

Key Achievements Only a small number of alert warnings were in place during the recreation season. An unseasonably warm Autumn and low wind and rainfall conditions resulted in late blooms of blue-green algae and the closure of all recreational entry points to primary contact users. The Jet was also out of operation in late May and June.

During Spring 2013, water reed (macrophyte) community planting days were conducted at Lotus Bay, Orana Bay and West Basin. Macrophytes help improve water quality by acting as a natural filter.

A single water contamination event was reported this year in October 2013, from a diesel spill at Acton West Jetty. This had minimal impact on the Lake as containment booms and absorbent material was placed around the jetty to successfully remove the contamination.

In February 2014, the Australian Government signed an agreement with the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) where up to $85 million of Australian Government funds will be available to help clean up Canberra’s lakes and waterways. Firstly, the ACT will work on an improved water quality monitoring program of six major catchments. The data collated in stage one, due to be completed by February 2016, will inform the types of infrastructure works required to improve the catchment management of ACT waterways. These infrastructure works will be carried out in stage two.

The NCA is on the inter-jurisdictional committee to complement phase one in providing a coordinated effort to improve the long term water quality in the ACT and Murrumbidgee River systems.

FLOODING

Flood events usually require the use of the Dam’s flood gates and cause significant amounts of organic debris to flow into the Lake creating maritime hazards.

Key Achievements A small flood event occurred between 17-19 September 2013, the peak flow was 422m 3/s and calculated volume was 38 970 ML. Removal of flood debris was completed within two weeks.

LAKE LEVEL LOWERING

In late 2011, due to the Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project (see CHAPTER 5), the Lake was lowered by 0.5 meters to 555.43 metres Australian Height Datum (AHD) to reduce the stress loading on the flood gates.

Key Achievements During the anchor bolt remediation project, dam engineers regularly assessed the load case scenarios,

48 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

NATIONAL CAPITAL EXHIBITION AND CAPTAIN COOK MEMORIAL JET

CHAPTER 4 National Capital Estate | 49

risks and safety implications of returning the lake level to full supply level. After repairing three of the five flood gates, the NCA received expert advice that restrictions were not required to the operating level of the Lake during the remediation of the last two flood gates. On 17 November 2013 , the Lake returned to the full supply level of 555.93 metres AHD.

CAPTAIN COOK MEMORIAL JET

The Jet was constructed to commemorate the bicentenary of Captain James Cook’s discovery of the East coast of Australia. On 25 April 1970, the Jet was officially unveiled by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The Jet operates for two hours daily between 2.00PM and 4.00PM.

The Jet is an impressive example of hydraulic engineering sending three tonnes of water into the air at 260kph.

Key Achievements During 2013-14, works undertaken on the Jet included the 10 year programmed refurbishment to one of the two pump jets. This refurbishment is to ensure the operability and efficiency of the asset.

Lake Usage

The NCA and ACT Sport and Recreation co-chair an Inter-Governmental Working Group on the future provision of recreational facilities around the Lake.

LAKE USER GROUP

The NCA convenes quarterly Lake User Group (LUG) meetings about events and commercial operations, providing greater safety for all Lake users.

The meetings include representatives from groups such as rowing, sailing, dragon boating, triathlon, school groups and commercial boat operators, to discuss matters such as safety on the Lake, water quality and lake infrastructure.

Key Achievements During 2013-14, matters discussed included Lake maintenance activities, status reports on the Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project, the proposal to construct a commercial boat slipway at Black Mountain Peninsula, the establishment of a sport and recreation hub at Grevillea Beach and the development of the Kingston Foreshore Boat Harbour.

In March 2014, a traffic flow guide for the Lake was prepared and provided to the LUG for further distribution to users of the Lake. The traffic flow guide is designed to improve safety on the Lake for all users by ensuring craft users understand safety principles, give-way arrangements, cautions, risks in certain areas of the Lake and lighting requirements for crafts and vessels.

LAKE PERMITS AND AGREEMENTS

The NCA aims to maintain and encourage a range of compatible recreation opportunities consistent with the special characteristics and significance of the Lake.

This includes facilitating commercial undertakings that enhance visitor and community experiences of Canberra and the Lake.

Key Achievements In 2013-14, the NCA introduced an on-line application system for boat permits. The new system captures additional boat information and streamlines the process for users. The NCA issued 883 boat permits and 31 mooring permits to lake users for fishing, sports and other recreational activities.

During the year the NCA managed six agreements to operate commercial services on the Lake under Section 33 of the Lakes Ordinance 1976, these included:

* Lake Burley Griffin Cruises * Lakeside Ferry Services * Canberra Lake Cruises * MV Canberra Southern Cross Club

* Lake Burley Griffin Boat Hire * Canberra Yacht Club.

50 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Administration of National Land

The NCA negotiates leases and licences for activities on National Land and on the Lake including administering diplomatic leases and negotiating with key stakeholders to formulate and agree mutual roles and responsibilities. These activities contribute towards achieving the vision of the Parliamentary Zone as ‘the place of the people’ for the benefit of all Australians.

LEASES AND LICENCES

The NCA manages a range of licence agreements for premises and facilities located at Commonwealth Place, Commonwealth Park, Acton Peninsula and Parkes. The NCA liaises with commercial tenants and commissions independent reviews of fair market licence fees for the various premises.

Temporary trader permits are issued under the Roads and Public Places Ordinance 1937.

Key Achievements In 2013-14, the NCA undertook compliance checks on all licensees and finalised the following licence matters:

* Rent reviews were conducted for The Lobby Restaurant, Commonwealth Park Compound, Commonwealth Place West Kiosk, The Deck Restaurant at Regatta Point and the Treasury Café outdoor area.

* Three new licence agreements were entered into for Limestone House, Acton, the Caretaker’s Cottage and the Compound Depot at Commonwealth Park and for the Old Parliament House Depot.

* The NCA commenced negotiations with the National Gallery of Australia for the installation of a Contemporary Art Annex in East Space, Commonwealth Place.

Temporary trader permits reviewed during 2013-14, included:

* Gaby’s Takeaway on Windsor Walk - the NCA advised that the takeaway’s temporary trader permit and temporary works approval was to expire on 12 October 2014 due to scheduled development of the area

* Maria’s Coffee Van in Kings Park (renewed until 19 June 2015)

* My Sweet Alice Van, Wendouree Drive, Parkes (new permit until 14 June 2015).

EVENTS ON AND USE OF NATIONAL LAND

The NCA issues permits for events on National Land. The NCA’s Events Policy ensures a balance is achieved between events, public access and impact on national assets. An online registration system, accessible via the NCA’s website www.nationalcapital.gov.au, allows the public to book private events on National Land and to manage their bookings.

The NCA liaises with key stakeholders on requirements for approval and running of major events on National Land and participates in the ACT Government Events Coordination Group, a forum for strategic level information sharing and operational coordination for events in Canberra.

Key Achievements The NCA issued 882 permits for events such as Floriade, Snowy Hydro Gala, Carols by Candlelight, Australia Celebrates 2014, Australia Day, Ben & Jerry’s Openair Cinema, Enlighten, Balloon Spectacular, Canberra Day, Skyfire, ANZAC Day, charity walks, triathlons, weddings and other private functions.

On 30 August 2013, the NCA ran the ‘Boundless Canberra Walk & Play’ fundraising event at Kings Park. ‘Walk & Play’ was part of ‘In Work and in Play’, a celebration of the contribution of the Australian Public Service to Canberra’s first one hundred years. Australian and ACT public servants participated in the walk around the Lake to help raise money for Boundless, Canberra’s first all-abilities playground. Boundless Canberra received 860 registrations and raised approximately $20,000.

CHAPTER 4 National Capital Estate | 51

During 2013-14, highlights included:

FIGURE 13: DIPLOMATIC LAND AND LEASE ACHIEVEMENTS

July 2013 March 2014 February 2014 June 2014 June 2014

High Commission of Samoan High Embassy of the Kingdom Two reserved Brunei High

Pakistan commenced Commission signed of the Netherlands blocks in the Deakin Commission

construction of a Crown Lease opened a new chancery in diplomatic estate were completed the design

a chancery in for a block in the Yarralumla surrendered by the for a head of mission

Yarralumla Yarralumla diplomatic High Commission of residence in Deakin,

estate the Kingdom of Tonga alongside their

back to the Australian Chancery

Government

OPEN

In October 2013, the Authority approved the ‘Events on National Land Policy (2013)’. An events toolkit is being developed to assist organisers plan and manage their events on National Land as per the policy.

DIPLOMATIC LAND AND LEASING

Diplomatic estates are located in the Canberra suburbs of Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley. The NCA administers diplomatic leases under the Leases (Special Purposes) Ordinance 1925 contained within the National Land Ordinance 1989 (and associated pre self-government laws). Management of the diplomatic estates includes the sale and issue of Crown Leases, rent appraisal and collection and lease compliance.

The NCA liaises closely with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade on all diplomatic leasing matters and also meets with the Protective Security Coordination Centre (PSCC) on matters, where relevant.

The existing supply of diplomatic land does not meet the needs of nations wishing to establish their mission in Canberra. A new area for diplomatic use is required to meet the current and future needs of foreign missions in Canberra. See CHAPTER 2 for detail on planning of the estate.

Key Achievements As at May 2014, there were 102 foreign missions represented in Canberra. Sixty-nine crown leases have been issued to 60 countries for the development of Chancery buildings and Head of Mission residences on 72 blocks. Some countries hold more than one lease and some have more than one block.

Until December 2013, where a Crown Lease was subject to a land rent payment, rent reviews were undertaken every 20 years in accordance with the lease agreement. During 2013-14, four reviews were undertaken.

In December 2014, the Australian Government adopted a new Diplomatic Leasing Policy. The new policy:

* retains the 99 year diplomatic Crown Lease term * retains the three options for acquiring diplomatic land (land swap, premium payment and land rent)

* removes the requirement for foreign missions with land rent arrangements to be subject to 20 year land rent reviews.

Works approved in the diplomatic estates during 2013-14, included the:

* removal of Pinus radiata from the South African High Commission’s block in Yarralumla

* installation of solar panels at the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands

2013-14 Major Achievements and Highlights

Minor work 18s approved in the Parliamentary Zone under the de minimis principle APPROVED

Appr 434oved works applications

VED APPRO

APPROVED

APPROVED

145 7Visitors to he Na70 tional Capital Exhibition, located in Commonwealth Park 55 459Participants in an education program Brick by Brick won a national Highly

Commended Award from Museums Australia

People vie 5154wing the ‘Brick by Brick’ touring exhibition in, Mount Gambier and Adelaide

Replaced dead and dying trees in the Parliamentary Zone,

104Volunteers provided Anzac Parade and horticulture, Dunrossil Drive interpretation and research services

2013-14 Major Achievements and Highlights

V 25 008isited to ‘The Canberra Guide’ app and mobile website

National Workers Memorial project received an Australian Institute of Architects Small Projects

Award

People t

89ook part in Follo 1654 wers on Twitterthe annual Public Forum Appr 900oved events on National Land Worked in partnership

to conserve and manage grasslands

Completion of the Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project

883Boat permits issued for recreational and sporting use on the Lake

Commenced a re-lamping program to upgrade out-dated and inefficient light fittings

Held community macrophyte planting days around the Lake to improve water quality in the Lake

‘The NCA is a very competent organisation working within the tight budget that they operate’.

NCA STAKEHOLDER

54 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

* erection of a site compound for construction of new embassy building for the People’s Republic of China

* construction of an enclosure over the existing swimming pool at the People’s Republic of China Embassy

* installation of stone monument, plaque and associated paving at the South African High Commission

* removal of three trees to construct an underground garage at the Embasy of the People’s Republic of China’s embassy

* installation of fencing at the Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil grounds in Yarralumla.

The ACT Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate advised that sites with naturally occurring mineralisation in the Deakin and O’Malley estates are fit for development purposes but may require Environmental Management Plans prior to any excavation work.

PAY PARKING

Pay parking is being introduced to free up spaces for visitors to the national institutions by discouraging encroachment of parking from other areas.

The NCA will implement pay parking arrangements on approximately 9000 car spaces in Russell, Acton, Barton and Parkes. The new parking arrangements will mean everyone will spend more time enjoying the central parts of Canberra and less time searching for a parking space.

Key Achievements In December 2013, following a joint procurement exercise with the ACT Government, an external contractor was engaged to supply, install and maintain approximately 190 pay parking ticket machines. The ticket machines are pay and display machines which run on solar power.

On 27 May 2014, the introduction of pay parking scheduled for 1 July, was delayed to finalise arrangements such as parking fees via credit cards, collection of cash from the machines and charges for parking infringement notices.

Some of the administrative arrangements required to support pay parking was implemented by 1 July 2014. This included:

* determining the mix of short stay and long stay parking

* determining the allocation of volunteer, accessible and motorcycle parking

* the preparation of a communications campaign to advise of the parking arrangements.

On 16 July 2014, the NCA announced pay parking will commence on 1 October 2014.

For details of the enabling legislation for the NCA to implement pay parking see CHAPTER 1.

For details on installation of infrastructure required to implement pay parking see CHAPTER 5.

- CHAPTER FivE -

NATIONAL CAPITAL WORKS SECTION 6 OF THE AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY (PLANNING AND LAND MANAGEMENT) ACT 1988 (THE ACT) PROVIDES FOR THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY (NCA): (C) ON BEHALF OF THE COMMONWEALTH, TO COMMISSION WORKS TO BE CARRIED OUT IN DESIGNATED AREAS IN

ACCORDANCE WITH THE NATIONAL CAPITAL PLAN WHERE NEITHER A DEPARTMENT OF STATE OF THE COMMONWEALTH NOR ANY COMMONWEALTH AUTHORITY HAS THE RESPONSIBILITY TO COMMISSION THOSE WORKS

(D) TO RECOMMEND TO THE MINISTER THE CARRYING OUT OF WORKS THAT IT CONSIDERS DESIRABLE TO MAINTAIN OR ENHANCE THE CHARACTER OF THE NATIONAL CAPITAL.

________________________

Program 1.1.3 Advocacy, enhancement and management of the National Capital Estate.

Overview

The public spaces throughout Canberra’s Central National Area are important in fostering and reinforcing the special meaning of the National Capital for all Australians. As the city matures, the density, diversity and quality of commemorative and other nationally significant places combines to create and enrich the experience for visitors and others interested in the capital. Through the process of delivering new capital works, opportunities are enhanced for ceremonial events and a wide variety of other community activities reflecting Australia’s history, spirit, culture and aspirations.

As part of its statutory function the NCA continually strives to ensure that the capital works, assets and the places created and maintained are of a standard appropriate to the National Capital. These efforts are recognised from time to time through industry awards and publications.

$1 968M National Capital Plan

$35 666 F U N D I N G

$17 036

M

$14 662M M National Capital National Capital Estate Works $2 000M National Engagement and Education

One aspect leading to the success of the NCA projects meeting the aspirations of stakeholders, regular users and visitors to the National Capital has been the NCA’s commitment to consultation. Effective community, intergovernmental and other stakeholder engagement informs and guides the desired outcomes for the NCA’s capital projects.

56 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Major Achievements and Highlights

During 2013-14, the NCA advanced a number of key capital works projects including:

* completion of the Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project

* commencement of the Bowen Place Crossing Project works

* installation of pay parking infrastructure on National Land

* completion of the York Park and Windsor Walk car park upgrades

* commencement of Lawson Crescent upgrade works * commencement of the Constitution Avenue southern carriageway duplication between Anzac Park East and Wendouree Drive

* installation of a new toilet facility as part of the Boundless playground in Kings Park

* installation of Scrivener Dam interpretive signage.

Capital Works Program

The NCA has a statutory function to develop, enhance and replace assets on National Land under its responsibility to achieve compliance with current Australian Standards, improve public amenity and establish sites of national significance.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

The 2013-14 Capital Works Program included a diverse range of infrastructure, public amenity, commemorative, educational, new and replacement works.

Scrivener Dam Anchor Bolt Remediation Project

Completed in 1963, Scrivener Dam (the Dam) retains water from the Molonglo River to form Lake Burley Griffin (the Lake). The NCA is responsible for managing and maintaining the Dam. In November 2011, the NCA identified, through an annual independent safety and surveillance audit that the 120 hinge anchor bolts securing the Dam’s five flood gates were in need of remediation due to varying degrees of corrosion. Remediation commenced on site on 18 March 2013, working from east to west across the Dam wall.

Comprehensive operational and other risk mitigation strategies ensured the works did not compromise public safety or the structural integrity of the Dam throughout the construction period.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2013-14, all five flood gates at Scrivener Dam were returned to service following successful remediation.

On 17 November 2013, the Lake was returned to Full Supply Level following specialist advice.

On 11 April 2014, site demobilisation and outstanding seal replacement works to Flood Gate 5 concluded.

Bowen Place Crossing

The pedestrian and cyclist crossing point in Bowen Place forms part of a popular circuit around the Lake’s Central Basin, as well as a busy arterial road, especially during peak periods.

Since 2010, the NCA has been working to improve the safety and amenity of pedestrians and cyclists at the crossing. Extensive public consultation on the scope of improvements has occurred.

The chosen design solution includes a 300 metre long path connecting Kings Avenue to the existing path network next to the Lake. Pedestrians and cyclists will pass under the existing road at Bowen Place, allowing continuous access for all users.

1

1, 2, 3, 4 SCRIVENER DAM ANCHOR BOLT REMEDIATION WORKS IMAGES COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN LEAH 2 3

5

4

6 7

8

5, 6, 7, 8 BOWEN PLACE CROSSING WORKS

58 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Figure 14: CAPITAL PROJECTS AWARDS

During 2013-14, the following awards were received for NCA projects:

20 September 2013 Kings Avenue overpass received a Cement Concrete and Aggregates Australia Public Domain 2013 Award in the bridges category.

14 June 2014 National Workers Memorial received the ACT Chapter of the Australian Institute of Architects Small Projects Award

28 May 2014 National Workers Memorial received the Australian Stone Advisory Association Architectural Stone Premier Award and the

Architectural Stone Best Civic Project

Commencement and construction was delayed for almost two years as a result of urgent safety anchor remediation works required at the Dam.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 7 February 2014, construction of the Bowen Place grade separated pedestrian crossing commenced. The NCA held a small ground breaking ceremony on 13 February 2014.

On 14 March 2014, temporary traffic management measures on Bowen Drive diverting traffic around the works were introduced. Contraflow traffic arrangements will be changed mid project to accommodate the balance of the works.

This project is scheduled to be completed by May 2015.

The NCA is working closely with the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) to install a sculpture named ‘Dunstable Reel’ by British sculptor Phillip King in Bowen Place as an extension of the adjoining NGA Sculpture Garden.

Installation of Pay Parking Infrastructure

Pay parking is being introduced to free up spaces for visitors to the national institutions by discouraging encroachment of parking from other areas. The NCA will implement pay parking arrangements on approximately 9000 car spaces in Russell, Acton, Barton and Parkes.

Works associated with the implementation of the scheme include installation of solar-powered ticket machines, new signage, minor works such as new traffic islands and upgrades to car parks.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

From 15 January to 23 May 2014, preparatory works to allow for the installation of the pay parking ticket machines were undertaken.

Ticket machines were installed in all pay parking areas between 26 May and 26 June 2014.

CHAPTER 5 National Capital Works | 59

Between April and June 2014, car park upgrade works were undertaken in the car park adjacent to York Park Oak Plantation and Windsor Walk. This package of works included the resurfacing of the car park and Windsor Walk, improvements to traffic egress points for the car park and realignment of Windsor Walk.

On 5 May 2014, the installation, including replacement, of parking control signage commenced across the National Capital Estate.

To coincide with the introduction of pay parking a program of car park enhancement works will continue into 2014-15 and beyond.

York Park and Windsor Walk Car Park Upgrade

As part of the pay parking infrastructure works on National Land, the parking area east of the York Park Oak Plantation in Barton has been upgraded. The civil works include resurfacing, new car park entries, road line marking and improved pathway links to adjacent office buildings.

In conjunction with the York Park car park works, upgrade works are also being undertaken in Windsor Walk. These include road resurfacing and reconfiguration, line marking, signage and verge works. The enhancement of pathway links will occur to adjacent office buildings and associated landscaping to bring a more formal character to the area.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

By 27 June 2014, site resurfacing of the York Park and Windsor Walk car parking areas was complete.

Windsor Walk verge works are scheduled for completion in the 2014-15 financial year.

Lawson Crescent Upgrade Works

In conjunction with the implementation of pay parking on National Land works, the lakeside verge of Lawson Crescent located on Acton Peninsula has been enhanced.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 2 June 2014, works commenced on the introduction of new formalised car parking bays, line marking, signage, traffic control measures, improved pathway links to adjacent buildings and associated landscaping.

Constitution Avenue East

The NCA is extending the southern carriageway of Constitution Avenue from Anzac Park East to Wendouree Drive. This work is being undertaken concurrently with northern carriageway works being carried out by the ACT Land Development Agency as part of the Campbell Section 5 development.

In 2013, as part of the Centenary of Canberra celebrations, the Australian Government gifted $42 million to the ACT Government for the upgrade of Constitution Avenue. This project will deliver major transport and public realm improvements along the Avenue corridor.

The NCA and ACT Territory and Municipal Services Directorate are working collaboratively to construct a small control section of the Constitution Avenue Upgrade project. This work will set the standard for all street furniture, pavement finishes, lighting, kerb finishes and landscaping for the full avenue.

60 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

NATIONAL WORKERS MEMORIAL, KINGS PARK

CHAPTER 5 National Capital Works | 61

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 3 February 2014, carriage duplication works commenced onsite east of Anzac Parade, in conjunction with the Campbell Section 5 Constitution Avenue road closure. Work is scheduled for completion by August 2014.

Between 3 February and 31 August 2014, Constitution Avenue between Anzac Park East and Wendouree Drive was closed to traffic to allow earth works.

It is anticipated the prototype section of Constitution Avenue works will be completed in the second half of 2014.

Boundless Playground Toilet Facility

The ‘Boundless’ playground is a gift from the public servants of Canberra as a demonstration of the spirit of service that underpins the ACT and Australian Public Service ethos and from the private sector who have helped build Canberra over the past 100 years. It is situated at the eastern end of Kings Park and will be the ACT’s first all-abilities playground.

The NCA is the playground’s largest benefactor by providing a site on National Land for the playground, new access paths and an accessible toilet facility. Once complete ‘Boundless’ will be managed and maintained by the NCA.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 21 May 2013, the ACT Government commenced construction of the ‘Boundless’ playground facility. Completion of the playground is anticipated for the second half of 2014.

On 28 June 2013, the NCA commenced the supply and installation of an accessible toilet in the ‘Boundless’ playground. On 21 October 2013, the toilet facility was commissioned.

Scrivener Dam Interpretive Signage

In accordance with the ‘Lake Burley Griffin and Adjacent Lands Heritage Management Plan (2009)’ the NCA has installed interpretive signage at the eastern and western lookouts at Scrivener Dam. One sign provides visitors with history of the Dam and the other information on the design and operation of the Dam.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 30 June 2014, signage was installed appropriate to the character and significance of the Dam.

Peace Park Street Furniture

Peace Park is located in the Parliamentary Zone, between the Lake and the National Library of Australia. It is a lasting symbol of Australia’s commitment to peace, providing a place in the nation’s capital for contemplation. The park was officially dedicated on United Nations Day, 24 October 1990.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

On 23 May 2014, the NCA installed six timber park benches in the central and end bays of the Park to improve visitor experience.

62 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Scrivener Dam Capital Works Program

The Dam is a concrete gravity dam that controls the water level in the Lake. A continuous program of capital works is required to maintain and enhance the capability of the Dam which was built 50 years ago in 1963.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

During 2013-14, capital works undertaken included the refurbishment of Sluice Gate 3, stabilisation of the right hand side abutments up-stream and downstream of the Dam, replacement of flood gate seals and construction of a storage facility at the slipway compound.

Jetty and Platform Replacement Rolling Program

The NCA owns numerous jetties and platforms on the Lake that require a continuous program of upgrades and maintenance each year.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS

In September 2013, demolition of the old boat ramp and the installation of an infill slab and prefabricated boat ramp was completed at Lotus Bay.

- CHAPTER Six -

PURCHASING, COMPETITIVE TENDERING AND CONTRACTING OVERVIEW

The NCA’s procurement policies and practices reflect the principles set out in the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. The NCA focus’ on:

• value for money - encouraging competition • the efficient, effective, economical and ethical use of government resources • accountability and transparency • compliance with other government policies.

Consultants and Consultancies

The NCA engages consultants where it lacks specialist expertise or when independent research, review or assessment is required. Consultants are typically engaged to investigate or diagnose a defined issue or problem; carry out defined reviews or evaluations; assist with capital works procurement and delivery; or provide independent advice, information or creative solutions to assist in the NCA’s decision making.

Prior to engaging consultants, the NCA takes into account the skills and resources required for the task, the skills available internally and the cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise. The decision to engage a consultant is made in accordance with the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 and related regulations including the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and relevant internal policies.

During 2013-14, the NCA entered into 23 new consultancy contracts, collectively the total expenditure was $652,333.50 (incl. GST). In addition, nine ongoing consultancy contracts were active during 2013-14 with total expenditure of $315,781.25 (incl. GST).

Contracts and Tenders

The NCA is committed to achieving the best value for money in its procurement practices. Purchasing practices and procedures set out in the Chief Executive’s Instructions are consistent with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules.

All contracts of a value of $100,000 (incl. GST) or more let by the NCA in 2013-14 included a clause providing access by the Auditor-General to the contractor’s premises.

Purchasing

The NCA’s policies and Chief Executive Instructions on purchasing goods and services are consistent with Commonwealth Procurement Rules and other policy advice issued by the Australian Government, maximising competitive opportunities on the basis of value for money. Wherever possible and appropriate, recycled and recyclable products are purchased. Attention is paid to the energy efficiency of equipment and to applicable guidelines on sustainability.

In accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, the NCA ensures that procurements above the relevant procurement threshold are published on AusTender. During 2013-14, the NCA had no contracts that were exempt from reporting on AusTender.

64 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

The NCA published its Annual Procurement Plan on the AusTender website in accordance with Commonwealth Procurement Rules. The Annual Procurement Plan is a strategic procurement outlook, providing details of significant planned procurements by the NCA for the coming years.

Quality Assurance Certification

A quality assurance certification in accordance with the Australian Industry Standard and International Organisation for Standardisation is generally required for the provision of services under estate management, development and renewal contracts. Examples of industry standards applicable to current contractors include:

* AS/NZS 4801:2001 (Occupational Health and Safety Systems)

* ISO 9001:2008 (Quality Management Systems) * ISO14001 (Environmental).

Quality Management Plans

For large construction contracts the managing contractor prepares and maintains quality management plans and must deliver milestone reports. Key performance indicators for these contracts enables the NCA to assess against the requisite standard and the quality and delivery of services provided.

Program and Exception Reporting

For major estate management and asset maintenance contracts, the contractor is required to provide an annual maintenance program including condition reports which detail the condition of assets and address the required work. The contractor must also provide the NCA with monthly reports detailing their activities against the maintenance program.

These assessments and programming are vital in improving public safety and assisting in prolonging the life of the assets of the nation’s capital.

For major estate development and renewal capital works, contractors and consultants are required

to report at regular intervals on project design and construction progress.

Contract Performance Monitoring

Any contract of a long duration is observed by the NCA by regular meetings and active monitoring of compliance under the contract. Communication between the NCA and contractors is strong, facilitating early oral and written advice is provided and actions addressed to ensure contract conditions and specifications are met.

The NCA is committed to continual improvement in the management of contracts. Contract management plans are reviewed each year and annually five contracts are subjected to peer review.

Asset Management

Asset management is a key task in meeting the NCA’s commitment to maintaining high quality public facilities across the National Capital Estate. The NCA takes a strategic approach to the way it manages its assets. The asset management framework which assists the NCA effectively manage its assets includes:

* an Asset Management Strategy which recognises the significance of national assets and the inter-relationships between them. The strategy links with the NCA Business Plan and operational activities

* a Capital Management Plan which is the mechanism for implementing the strategy intent for the asset portfolio at the individual asset level

* Asset Management Guides, which are short term plans and internal controls

* an Asset Register which records information such as asset locations and current condition, accounting information and maintenance programs.

For further details on the NCA’s management and maintenance of national assets, see CHAPTER 4.

- CHAPTER SEvEN -

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY OVERVIEW

This chapter includes an overview of the National Capital Authority’s (NCA) Authority members, internal and external review mechanisms, internal corporate functions, corporate governance, community involvement and human resource statistics.

Major Achievements and Highlights

Throughout 2013-14, the NCA:

* continued its Mobile Device Work Use Program which has increased productivity and innovation, reduced the use of paper in the office and promoted work/life balance

* remains a high performer for its overall strategy, practice and digital records performance as per the National Archives of Australia’s assessment of 171 agencies digital information and records management capabilities.

The Authority

The Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 (the Act) provides that the Authority consist of a Chair, a Chief Executive and three other members, all of whom are appointed by the Governor-General.

The Chief Executive is a full-time position and the other members serve on a part-time basis (Section 33 of the Act). The Chief Executive manages the affairs of the NCA under the general directions of the Authority (Sections 45 and 46 of the Act).

The Authority is the primary decision-making body and provides the NCA’s strategic direction. During 2013-14, the Authority met seven times. The Authority keeps minutes of its meetings. A public record of the meeting is also produced and posted on the NCA website at www.nationalcapital.gov.au.

AUTHORITY MEMBERSHIP

In 2013-14 the members were as follows:

Chair On 14 June 2012, Ms Shelley Penn was appointed Chair of the Authority until 31 December 2014. She had been acting Chair of the Authority since 29 October 2011, and prior to that a part-time member since 1 January 2010.

Ms Penn is a practising Melbourne-based architect, whose work includes advice to government and the private sector on strategic urban and architectural design across a range of scales. Her project work has been published and exhibited nationally and internationally, and has received a number of awards.

Ms Penn was Victoria’s first Associate Victorian Government Architect, 2006-2010, with the role focused on providing strategic urban design advice to government and advocacy for better public outcomes throughout Victoria’s built environment.

Ms Penn was Deputy Chair of the Heritage Council of Victoria, a board member of the Linking Melbourne Authority, and a board member of the Architects Registration Board of Victoria. During 2012-13, she was the 73rd National President of the Australian Institute of Architects, and she is currently Associate Professor (Principal Fellow) in the Faculty of Architecture, University of Melbourne and Adjunct Professor in Architecture Practice at Monash University.

66 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Chief Executive On 12 December 2013, Mr Malcolm Snow was appointed full-time Chief Executive for a five year term. Mr Snow commenced in the role on 13 January 2014.

Mr Snow joins the NCA following a diverse career working with and being a member of statutory and commercial boards and has extensive senior executive experience. This includes a decade as Head of Urban Design with the City of Melbourne, as a Director of international consulting firm Urbis and as Chief Executive Officer of South Bank Corporation in Brisbane.

Mr Snow is one of Australia’s leading place makers and managers. He was the inaugural Chairman of the Place Leaders Association and is acknowledged for the breadth of his place design and development experience and his advocacy for creating better cities. With qualifications in urban planning and landscape architecture and a career spanning nearly four decades, he has led major city revitalisation programs throughout Australia, Asia and the United Kingdom both as an urban planning consultant and advisor to all spheres of government.

Members On 18 June 2009, Mr Peter Core was appointed part-time member for five years.

Mr Core has a Master of Economics and a Bachelor of Rural Science from the University of New England. In 2008, he also attained a Graduate Diploma of Financial Planning.

During his career Mr Core worked for the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, was a Deputy Secretary of the Australian Government Department of Primary Industries and a Secretary of the Australian Government Departments of Industrial Relations and of Transport. Before joining the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, Mr Core was Managing Director of the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation.

Over the past five years, Mr Core provided strategic stewardship through difficult periods and a breadth of historical knowledge of Canberra and the community to the board.

Mr Core’s term concluded on 17 June 2014.

On 12 June 2014, Mr Terry Weber was appointed part-time member for five years.

Mr Weber is a Senior Partner and Federal Government Lead Partner in PricewaterhouseCoopers’s Canberra consulting practice. He provides specialist guidance in the areas of property, infrastructure and facilities management, financial management and service delivery models for Australian and International Governments and major corporate organisations.

From 2000 to 2008, Mr Weber was the Chief Executive Officer for UGL (United) Services a leading global corporate real estate and outsourcing business services organisation.

Mr Weber is an active member of several boards including the Canberra Raiders, the Ricky Stuart Foundation and Australia21.

CHAIR CE MEMBER MEMBER MEMBER

SHELLEY PENN MALCOLM SNOW PETER CORE TERRY WEBER VACANT

THE BOARD

CE

MALCOLM SNOW

FIGURE 15: ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 67

CHIEF PLANNER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE) NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE ANDREW SMITH ALISON WALKER-KAYE

DIRECTOR DIRECTOR

CORPORATE FINANCE AND CFO

ALAN HARRISON SCOTT BROWN

DIRECTOR NATIONAL ENGAGEMENT MELANIE SKINNER

DIRECTOR DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC PLANNING ASSESSMENT REBECCA SORENSEN AND HERITAGE (ACTING)

NATALIE BROUGHTON

DIRECTOR ESTATE MANAGEMENT RUTH MORSCHEL

DIRECTOR ESTATE DEVELOPMENT AND RENEWAL

ROB TINDAL

‘i am privileged to have worked with the Agency responsible for the crown jewels of the nation’s capital’.

MR PETER CORE, FORMER AUTHORITY MEMBER OF THE NCA

NCA ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

The NCA’s organisational structure (FIGURE 15) is aligned with its statutory responsibilities and Portfolio Budget Statement output reporting requirements. Its structure includes the Authority and senior management positions such as the Chief Executive, Chief Planner and Executive Director National Capital Estate.

The organisational structure provides for advisors and advisory panels and comprises four functional areas:

* National Capital Plan * National Capital Estate

* Information and Education * organisational support.

CHAIR SHELLEY PENN

CHIEF EXECUTIVE MALCOLM SNOW

MEMBER PETER CORE

MEMBER TERRY WEBER

CHIEF PLANNER Deputy Chief Executive ANDREW SMITH

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR National Capital Estate ALISON WALKER-KAYE

68 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

The Chief Executive and Senior Executives

MALCOLM SNOW (CHIEF EXECUTIVE)

The Chief Executive manages the affairs of the NCA under the general directions of the Authority.

As Chief Executive, Mr Snow is responsible for the operations of an organisation dedicated to the planning, estate management and promotion of the National Capital and the Australian Government’s assets.

ANDREW SMITH (DEPUTY CHIEF EXECUTIVE AND CHIEF PLANNER)

Mr Smith leads the National Capital Plan unit which is responsible for keeping the National Capital Plan (the Plan) under constant review and proposing amendments to it when necessary. This involves preparing planning policy (which form the basis of amendments to the Plan) masterplans, Development Control Plans, assessing works applications and monitoring the quality of buildings and other developments once completed.

ALISON WALKER-KAYE (EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE)

Ms Walker-Kaye leads the National Capital Estate unit which is responsible for all aspects of maintaining the National Capital Estate. This includes:

* estate development and renewal * estate management * administration of leases and licences * venue management.

Corporate Governance

The governance framework adopted by the NCA aims to ensure it achieves its overall outcomes in such a way as to enhance confidence in the agency, its decisions and its actions in an open and transparent way. It encompasses accountability, stewardship, leadership, direction and control exercised in the NCA.

As part of our commitment to good governance, the NCA values and promotes a culture that encourages leadership, achievement, professionalism and innovation. The NCA provides ongoing support for all employees who in turn are accountable for their actions in delivering professional and quality services to the public in accordance with the APS Values.

The NCA’s corporate governance framework includes business planning, audit and assurance activities, risk management, fraud prevention and control, committees, the Chief Executive’s Instructions, policies and guidelines and performance agreements.

Committees

To support the Chief Executive, the NCA has a number of groups and committees, such as:

* Executive Group * Audit Committee * Remuneration Committee * Consultative Committee

* Health and Safety Committee * ICT Steering Committee.

Executive Group

The Executive Group is comprised of the Chief Executive, Deputy Chief Executive (Chief Planner), Executive Director National Capital Estate, Director Finance (Chief Finance Officer), Director Corporate and the Director National Engagement. The Executive Group meet weekly to share information about emerging and current issues facing the NCA and provide oversight of individual business units.

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 69

Following weekly Executive Group meetings, business units hold a debrief with staff to discuss the outcomes and actions arising for the NCA in the coming weeks.

Audit Committee

The objective of the Audit Committee is to provide independent assurance and assistance to the Chief Executive on the NCA’s risk, control and compliance frameworks and its external accountability responsibilities.

The Audit Committee comprises an independent chair and two internal NCA officers - the Executive Director National Capital Estate and Director Corporate.

The Chief Finance Officer attends the meetings as an observer and the Australian National Audit Office has a standing invitation to attend committee meetings as an observer.

During 2013-14, the Audit Committee met three times to consider the internal audit plan, annual work program and internal audit reports on performance and compliance issues.

The Audit Committee also reviewed the financial statements, the annual Certificate of Compliance assurance framework and continued to monitor implementation of the control framework including the Fraud Control Plan and risk management framework.

Remuneration Committee

The Remuneration Committee is made up of the Chief Executive, Deputy Chief Executive (Chief Planner) and the Executive Director National Capital Estate.

The Committee meets in June each year to discuss the performance of non-SES employees for the current financial year based on end of year performance appraisal reports. These individual performance reports assist the Committee in determining a final performance rating for each employee and set the employee’s annual salary and other terms and conditions for the next financial year.

Consultative Committee

The Consultative Committee represents all employees at the NCA who are covered by the National Capital Authority Enterprise Agreement 2011-14 (Enterprise Agreement) and provides a forum for management and employees to discuss matters affecting the workplace. One of the Committee’s primary responsibilities is to monitor implementation of the Enterprise Agreement.

The membership of the Consultative Committee comprises the Chief Executive (Chair), the Director Corporate, two employee representatives and a representative from the Community and Public Sector Union.

The Consultative Committee met once during the reporting period.

Health and Safety Committee

The NCA’s Health and Safety Committee (HSC) is formed in accordance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act). Membership includes management, health and safety representatives and employee nominees from across the NCA. The HSC is chaired by the Director Corporate.

The role of the HSC is to facilitate discussion and cooperation between management and employees and others who work at NCA occupied premises including the Treasury Building, the National Capital Exhibition, Blundells Cottage and the depot regarding health and safety issues in the workplace.

The HSC, in conjunction with corporate service staff, was responsible for assisting in the development of the ‘First Aid Policy (2014)’ for the NCA.

The committee meets quarterly in accordance with the WHS Act.

Please see PAGE 80 for discussion regarding the NCA’s performance on work health and safety and compliance with the WHS Act.

70 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Business Continuity Plan

To ensure the continuation of NCA business during and following any critical incident resulting in disruption to normal operational capability, the NCA has a Business Continuity Plan. The NCA reviews its Business Continuity Plan twice per year or earlier if there are major changes to business priorities or senior staffing arrangements that impact on the allocation of key responsibilities. The last major update of the plan was in February 2014.

ICT Steering Committee

The Information and Communications Technology Steering Committee provides recommendations to the NCA Executive on the strategic direction of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) within the NCA. The committee considers both current and future needs, ensures the proposed ICT direction aligns with the NCA strategic direction and ensures ICT assists all areas to work in a more effective and efficient manner to meet business outcomes.

The committee established during 2013-14, and met six times.

Fraud Control Plan

In June 2013, the NCA Audit Committee and the Chief Executive endorsed the Fraud Control Plan for 2013-15. The plan is kept up to date to reflect any changes in business practices that may impact on the potential risk of fraud in the NCA.

The Audit Committee continues to monitor implementation of the plan as part of the committees’ responsibilities to satisfy that the NCA has appropriate processes and systems in place to capture and effectively investigate fraud-related information.

During 2013-14, there were no instances or allegations of fraud reported or detected within the NCA.

Certification of agency fraud control arrangements I, certify that in accordance with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines, I am satisfied that for the financial year 2013-14, the NCA has:

* prepared fraud risk assessments and a Fraud Control Plan * in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the NCA

* taken all reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud in the NCA and to investigate and recover the proceeds of fraud against the NCA.

Malcolm Snow Chief Executive

2 September 2014

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 71

Security

During 2013-14, the NCA continued to monitor and maintain an appropriate level of assurance to meet its obligations under the Australian Government’s Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF). This process will continue in 2014-15 to ensure compliance and alignment with the PSPF.

NCA staff continued to receive security and fraud awareness training. The NCA’s Protective Security Policy and Guidelines were reviewed and updated, and an Agency Security Plan developed and implemented. These documents reflect the NCA’s approach to protective security within the agency and ensure compliance with the PSPF.

Risk Management

The NCA is committed to taking a proactive approach to managing risk through an integrated risk management framework.

The NCA’s Risk Management Policy and Risk Management Guidelines are based on AS/NZS ISO ‘31000:2009 Risk Management - Principles and Guidelines’.

To improve reporting, reviewing and monitoring of ongoing risks, the executive identify which projects in the Business Plan present a significant or higher risk to the NCA. For those particular tasks, project managers are required to complete a risk assessment and risk treatment plan.

In March 2014, the NCA participated in Comcover’s 2014 Risk Management Benchmarking Program. By participating in the program the NCA was able to receive an independent assessment of its current risk management capabilities, identifying elements of strength, as well as areas that may need further development.

For its 2014 survey the NCA achieved an overall score of 6.61 per cent; a slight improvement from the 6.27 achieved in 2013 and 6.2 achieved in 2012. Based on its 2014 results the NCA is expecting to receive a 6.61 per cent discount on its 2014-15 insurance premium from Comcover.

In June 2014, the NCA commenced a review and update of its Risk Management Framework to comply with the requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act (2013).

Ethical standards

The Enterprise Agreement, Australian Workplace Agreements (AWA) and individual Common Law Contracts (CLC), endorse the NCA’s commitment to, and compliance with, the APS Code of Conduct and APS Values. At initial induction sessions the importance of the APS Code of Conduct and APS Values are outlined to each employee. The NCA’s Performance Management and Appraisal Scheme (PMAS) reinforces the ongoing need for employees to comply with the APS Values and Code of Conduct.

The NCA’s Fraud Control Plan and learning and development plan also identify the importance of ongoing education and awareness of these APS attributes by mandating that all employees are to attend in-house Code of Conduct and Values training at least once every two years. During 2013-14, the NCA provided in-house APS Code of Conduct and Values training.

The NCA is a member of the Australian Public Service Commission’s Ethics Contact Officer Network. Employees are encouraged to access these services to discuss and seek advice on ethical issues that may arise in the workplace.

72 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Customer Service

The NCA’s Service Charter sets out the standards of service stakeholders can expect including their rights, responsibilities and avenues for feedback. The charter aims to facilitate a strong and genuine relationship between the NCA and its stakeholders. Information contained in the charter includes:

* the NCA’s commitment to service as per its role and functions

* the rights and responsibilities of stakeholders * how to provide feedback on the NCA’s performance.

Service Charter Performance

The NCA undertakes to assess Work Approval applications and respond to written requests for advice within 15 working days. During 2013-14, the NCA approved 434 Work Approval applications, of which 91.7 per cent were finalised within 15 working days.

Partnerships and Community Collaboration

During 2013-14, the NCA worked with the following community organisations and partners:

* The Friends of Grasslands - a community organisation focused on reinvigorating two ecologically significant grassy ecosystems around Lake Burley Griffin; the natural temperate grassland at Yarramundi Reach and the grassy yellow box woodland at Stirling Ridge.

* The ACT Rural Fire Service - with the assistance of the Rural Fire Service volunteers, the NCA implemented three hazard reduction and ecological burns over the year at Yarramundi Grasslands and Lindsay Pryor National Arboretum.

* Volunteers - manage the Old Parliament House Gardens, NCA visitor attraction interpretation and aid in research.

* Lakecare Initiative - volunteer group from Canberra Yacht Club, Greening Australia Capital Region and Riversmart to undertake weed removal from Spinnaker and Springbank Islands.

* Conservation Volunteers Australia - undertake woody weed clearing along the Lindsay Pryor National Arboretum shoreline and O’Malley Diplomatic blocks.

* Koomarri and Community Programs Association - assist with the maintenance of Anzac Parade for ANZAC Day commemorations.

* Year 8 Marist College students - an annual collaboration as part of their citizenship program, with the students assisting to conduct litter collection, weed removal, cleaning of plaques or sweeping of paths throughout the national estate.

The NCA continued to foster and maintain mutually beneficial relationships with agencies on the ACT Flood Planning Group, ACT Joint Emergency Coordination Group, ACT Dam Liaison Committee, Upper Murrumbidgee Catchment Coordination Committee and ACT Commissioner for Sustainability and the Environment’s Working Group on the State of the Water Courses and Catchment for Lake Burley Griffin.

Sponsorship

In June 2012, the NCA signed a two-year sponsorship agreement with Colliers International (ACT) Pty Ltd to aid in the successful delivery of a program of National Carillon activities.

Sponsorship from Colliers International (ACT) enables the National Carillonists to provide regular concerts and programs such as the ‘Stillness and the Night’ in January and the April Frolic event.

In July 2014, the sponsorship will be reviewed.

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 73

Visual Communications

The Web and Graphics team provides advice and services to the NCA in the areas of print and web design as well as multimedia production and photography. This team ensures all publicly released materials are consistent and appropriate to the various target audiences.

During 2013-14, the Web and Graphics team released materials that supported the NCA’s core business areas. These included materials on parking management in the Central National Area, Development Control Plans, Draft Amendments to the National Capital Plan, several information and education initiatives and events at the National Carillon. Each year the Web and Graphics team is also responsible for the design and layout of the NCA’s Annual Reports.

This year the NCA’s website continued to benefit from and be improved by use of audiovisuals and map integration.

Electronic Records Management

Since 2007, the NCA has used TRIM, as an electronic document and records management system, as the principal document repository for NCA digital and hard copy records.

During the 2013-14, NCA continued its commitment to implementing electronic records and information management practices throughout the agency. The shift from paper-based records was improved by the records management unit providing customised training for new and current staff of all levels. Following training there was a notable increase in the number of electronic records captured in TRIM.

Human Resources

AUSTRALIA DAY ACHIEVEMENT MEDALLIONS

In January 2014, three employees, Mr Scott Brown, Ms Ruth Morschel and Ms Wendy Dawes were presented with Australia Day Achievement Medallions for their outstanding contribution to the work of the NCA during the previous 12 months.

LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT

The NCA’s annual learning and development plan identifies mandatory and priority in-house corporate and individual training activities for the current financial year. The learning and development plan is based on individual development plans completed by each employee and priority training identified by the executive to meet immediate and future skills in order for the NCA to deliver its organisational outcomes.

Where ever possible the NCA uses the expertise and skills of its own employees to deliver specific training needs in-house.

During 2013-14, key corporate learning and development topics conducted in-house included:

* APS Values and Code of Conduct * mental health first aid * cultural intelligence * first aid

* presentation skills * fraud and security awareness * financial management * MS Office (e-learning)

* Electronic records management * creating accessible documentation for the web.

74 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

return to work from maternity leave, adoption leave or foster carer’s leave

* access to 16 weeks paid leave for maternity leave, adoption leave or foster carer’s leave

* access to paid parental leave at half pay * specification of the types of leave that fall within the broad category of discretionary leave rather than deductions from personal leave

* simplification of accrual rates for personal leave for ongoing and non-ongoing employees

* three days paid compassionate leave on each occasion.

In addition to the Enterprise Agreement, the NCA has a number of other employment arrangements, which provide for more flexible remuneration and employment conditions that meet the NCA’s operational needs and suit individual employees. These include:

* individual CLC, which provide for the remuneration and other conditions of employment for the NCA’s two SES employees

* an individual AWA.

FIGURE 16 provides a summary of NCA employees covered by AWA, CLCs, the Enterprise Agreement and employees with supplementary IFAs.

As at 30 June 2014, the Chief Executive’s remuneration was determined in accordance with the ‘Remuneration Tribunal Determination 2013/10 - Remuneration and Allowances for Holders of Full-Time Public Office’.

The salary ranges for the NCA’s classification levels covering the Enterprise Agreement, the AWA and CLCs are set out in TABLE 5.

Throughout 2013-14, other learning and development opportunities attended by employees included:

* project management * policy writing * preventing psychological injury * chemical handling

* planning and conducting a tender * planning for effective public participation * shaping sustainable urbanism * Construction and Industry Induction

(White Card)

* report writing * contract management * leadership and management * strategic thinking

* writing skills.

The NCA has also provided study leave and/or financial support to its employees in the following areas that are directly relevant to their current responsibilities or enhancement of their long term career development:

* Bachelor of Information Management * Certificate IV - Work Health and Safety * Post-graduate Degree - Urban and Regional Planning.

Employment Agreements and Remuneration

On 14 July 2011, the Enterprise Agreement was approved by Fair Work Australia and commenced operating from 21 July 2011. The Enterprise Agreement nominally expires on 30 June 2014.

The Enterprise Agreement provides a number of attractive leave practices aimed at providing a more flexible and family friendly environment for employees. These include:

* entitlement to 24 months of part-time work on return to work from maternity leave, adoption leave or foster carer’s leave

* provisions for returning to former duties or other duties the employee is qualified to undertake on

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 75

Figure 16: EMPLOYMENT ARRANGEMENTS AT 30 JUNE 2014

S T A F F A T 3 0 J U N E 2 0 1 4

63

41

APS 1-6 Enterprise Agreement

2

SES BAND 1 Common Law Contract

19 EL 1-2 Enterprise Agreement

1

EL1-2 Australian Workplace Agreement

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

NOTE: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay or maternity leave.

Table 5: SALARY RANGES AS AT 30 JUNE 2014

CLASSIFICATION MINIMUM MAXIMUM

SES Band 1 $186,364 $187,529

EL 2 $109,519 $140,669

EL 1 $92,785 $116,478

APS 6 $73,286 $87,918

APS 5 $66,456 $70,884

APS 4 $59,612 $65,389

APS 3 $53,183 $58,246

APS 2 $46,760 $51,983

APS 1 $40,213 $44,445

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

NOTE: The table does not include the Chief Executive remuneration.

Performance Management

The NCA’s PMAS links individual performance agreements to specific projects in the Business Plan. This ensures performance expectations are clearly identified and aligned with business outcomes.

Access to pay point advancement under the Enterprise Agreement and salary increases and performance pay under an individual AWA are conditional upon the employee performing at a satisfactory level at a minimum.

In 2013-14, one employee received a bonus payment of $2,912. The payment was made in July 2014 and related to the employee’s performance in the 2013-14 financial year.

PERSONNEL SERVICES AND SALARY PROCESSING

From 1 July 2011, the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet has provided payroll processing and related services to the NCA through a shared services arrangement.

Staffing Summary and Profile

At 30 June 2014, the NCA had 63 employees (see FIGURE 17) engaged under the Public Service Act 1999. The Chief Executive is appointed under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. All employees are located in Canberra.

Figure 17: TOTAL EMPLOYEE NUMBERS AT 30 JUNE 2013 AND 2014

ONGOING 51

NON-ONGOING 12

63

JUNE 2013

TOTAL

ONGOING 49

NON-ONGOING 15

JUNE 2014

64 TOTAL

NOTE: These figures include the Chief Executive, as a non-ongoing employee. These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay in excess of one month or employees on maternity leave.

76 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

TABLE 6 and TABLE 7 provide a report on the number of employees in the NCA as at 30 June 2014 and 2013 by classification, employment category and gender.

Table 6: ONGOING AND NON-ONGOING EMPLOYEES AT 30 JUNE 2014

CLASSIFICATION MEN WOMEN TOTAL

Ongoing Non-ongoing Ongoing Non-ongoing

CHIEF EXECUTIVE Full-time 0 1 0 0 1

Part-time 0 0 0 0 0

SES BAND 1 Full-time 1 0 1 0 2

Part-time 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 Full-time 3 0 2 0 5

Part-time 0 0 2 0 2

EL 1 Full-time 8 1 2 0 11

Part-time 0 0 2 0 2

APS 6 Full-time 5 0 3 1 9

Part-time 0 0 2 0 2

APS 5 Full-time 2 0 3 1 6

Part-time 0 0 0 1 1

APS 4 Full-time 1 0 3 1 5

Part-time 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 Full-time 2 0 2 1 5

Part-time/Casual 0 1 1 0 2

APS 1-2 Full-time 2 0 0 1 3

Part-time/Casual 0 3 2 3 8

TOTAL 24 6 25 9 64

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

NOTE: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay in excess of one month or employees on maternity leave.

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 77

Table 7: ONGOING AND NON-ONGOING EMPLOYEES AT 30 JUNE 2013

CLASSIFICATION MEN WOMEN TOTAL

Ongoing Non-ongoing Ongoing Non-ongoing

CHIEF EXECUTIVE Full-time 0 1 0 0 1

Part-time 0 0 0 0 0

SES BAND 1 Full-time 1 0 1 0 2

Part-time 0 0 0 0 0

EL 2 Full-time 3 0 1 0 4

Part-time 0 0 3 0 3

EL 1 Full-time 8 0 2 0 10

Part-time 0 0 3 1 4

APS 6 Full-time 6 0 3 0 9

Part-time 0 0 3 0 3

APS 5 Full-time 2 0 1 1 4

Part-time 0 0 1 1 2

APS 4 Full-time 1 0 5 0 6

Part-time 0 0 0 0 0

APS 3 Full-time 1 0 0 0 1

Part-time/Casual 0 0 1 1 2

APS 1-2 Full-time 2 1 0 0 3

Part-time/Casual 0 3 2 4 9

TOTAL 24 5 26 8 63

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

NOTE: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay in excess of one month or employees on maternity leave.

78 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

TABLES 8 and TABLE 9 provide a report on the number of employees in the NCA as at 30 June 2014 and 2013 by classification and gender.

Table 8: STAFFING NUMBERS BY CLASSIFICATION AND GENDER AT 30 JUNE 2014

CLASSIFICATION MEN WOMEN TOTAL

Chief Executive 1 0 1

SES Band 1 1 1 2

EL 2 3 4 7

EL 1 9 4 13

APS 6 5 6 11

APS 5 2 5 7

APS 4 1 4 5

APS 3 3 4 7

APS 1 - 2 5 6 11

TOTAL 30 34 64

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

NOTE: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay in excess of one month or employees on maternity leave.

Table 9: STAFFING NUMBERS BY CLASSIFICATION AND GENDER AT 30 JUNE 2013

CLASSIFICATION MEN WOMEN TOTAL

Chief Executive 1 0 1

SES Band 1 1 1 2

EL 2 3 4 7

EL 1 8 6 14

APS 6 6 6 12

APS 5 2 4 6

APS 4 1 5 6

APS 3 1 2 3

APS 1 - 2 6 6 12

TOTAL 29 34 63

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

NOTE: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay in excess of one month or employees on maternity leave.

Staff retention and turnover

During 2012-13, there were 24 employees (5 ongoing and 19 non-ongoing) who commenced with the NCA and 23 employees (7 ongoing and 16 non-ongoing) who separated from employment with the NCA.

Table 10: 2013-14, MOVEMENTS INTO AND OUT OF THE NCA

CLASSIFICATION MEN WOMEN TOTAL

CHIEF EXECUTIVE Commencements 1 0 1

Separations 1 0 1

SES Commencements 0 0 0

Separations 0 0 0

EL 1 - 2 Commencements 3 1 4

Separations 2 2 4

APS 1 - 6 Commencements 7 12 19

Separations 7 11 18

KEY: SES - Senior Executive Service; EL - Executive Level; APS - Australian Public Service

Workplace Diversity

The NCA continues to reflect a diverse workforce. As at 30 June 2014, the NCA staff profile was made up of 53.1 per cent female employees, 15.6 per cent from a culturally or linguistically diverse background, 3.1 per cent identified as having a disability and 4.7 per cent identified as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent (see FIGURE 18).

The NCA’s Workplace Diversity Plan provides a framework to support its goals and principles of equity and diversity in the workplace. Its key objectives are to:

* promote awareness of workplace diversity within the NCA

* develop and maintain a highly-skilled, diverse and effective workforce, where all employees are valued, encouraged and provided with opportunities to develop their potential

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 79

80 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

* develop a supportive workplace culture that allows staff members to balance their work and personal life

* provide a discrimination and harassment free workplace

* embrace workplace diversity principles in recruitment and selection processes.

Figure 18: AT 30 JUNE 2014, NCA STAFF FROM DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS

NCA Staff

63

Women

34 (53.1%)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island decent 3 (4.7%)

People with disability

2 (3.1%)

Culturally and linguistically diverse background 10 (15.6%)

NOTE: These figures do not include employees on long-term leave without pay in excess of one month or employees on maternity leave.

Work Health and Safety

In 2013-14, as part of the NCA’s ongoing commitment to provide a safe working environment, minimise any potential WHS risks and to facilitate a work-life balance, the HSC in cooperation with management undertook the following initiatives:

* the provision and training NCA emergency contacts including first aid officers, fire wardens, health and safety representatives and harassment contact officers

* the provision of in-house training for all employee on mental health first aid

* annual safety inspections of NCA premises where employees or volunteers work

* development of a First Aid Policy specific for the NCA * ongoing safety awareness training to NCA volunteers, with additional training provided to horticultural volunteers on the safe use of gardening tools.

In addition to the above initiatives, the NCA held Healthy Breakfasts for staff during the year. The breakfasts are designed to promote the benefits of an active and healthy lifestyle with promotional information on the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), healthy eating and nutrition made available to attendees.

In April 2014, the NCA provided free influenza vaccinations for employees and volunteers. NCA employees and their family members continue to be provided with access to EAP. A service that provides confidential and free counselling and guidance to NCA employees.

First aid officers are located throughout premises occupied by the NCA to ensure immediate assistance is available when needed.

Consistent with the requirements of Section 35 of the WHS Act, there were no notifications to Comcare of an injury or dangerous incident during the year.

There were no directions or notices issued to the NCA under the WHS Act (Sections 70, 85, 90, 191, 195 and 198).

CHAPTER 7 Management and Accountability | 81

Freedom of Information and Information Publication Scheme

The NCA is subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) and publishes information for public access as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS) on its website www.nationalcapital.gov.au.

Part II of the FOI Act has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an Annual Report.

NCA documents which may be available for inspection under the FOI Act include records and files on administration, correspondence, contracts, financial statements, plans and project details and decisions of the Authority.

The NCA received 10 Freedom of Information requests during the year. At 30 June 2014, the NCA had one outstanding request for documents under the FOI Act.

Enquiries and requests under the FOI Act should be made to:

THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION OFFICER National Capital Authority GPO Box 373 Canberra ACT 2601

TELEPHONE: +61 2 6271 2888 FACSIMILE: +61 2 6273 4427 EMAIL: foi@natcap.gov.au

PARLIAMENT HOUSE VISTA

- CHAPTER EiGHT -

EXTERNAL LIAISON AND SCRUTINY OVERVIEW

This chapter includes reporting on social justice and equity, the National Capital Authority’s (NCA) involvement with courts and tribunals, the Commonwealth Ombudsman and Privacy Act 1988, regulation review and legislative instruments.

Highlights

* NCA appeared three times before the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee and a public hearing before the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories.

* As at 30 June 2014, the NCA was not aware of any Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 breaches that would materially affect the signing of the 2013-14 financial statements.

* On 20 February 2014, the National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014 came into affect creating a legislative framework for the management and enforcement of pay parking on National Land.

* Two amendments to the National Capital Plan came into effect.

Social Justice and Equity

The Australian Government envisions a socially inclusive society, one which all Australians feel valued and have the opportunity to participate fully in the life of our society. The NCA embraces this vision by promoting social justice and equity through integrating planning and policy making with economic, social and environmental considerations. The NCA aims to achieve fair distribution of resources to develop the National Capital thereby providing a quality environment, appropriate environmental standards,

sustainability and an efficient structure and transportation network.

The NCA incorporates the views of its stakeholders and the Australian community through open and transparent decision making as detailed in the ‘Commitment to Community Engagement’ (August 2011) protocol.

The NCA aims to provide equal access for Australians to participate in discussions about the way the National Capital is developed and managed. The NCA’s consultation website www.nationalcapital.gov.au/ haveyoursay encourages feedback from all Australians on topics open for public consultation. The community can also provide comments in writing, or using social media tools such as Twitter.

Australians can also find out about the role and significance of the National Capital through the NCA’s website www.nationalcapital.gov.au and education portal http://education.nationalcapital.gov.au/.

Parliamentary Committees

Estimates of government expenditure are referred to Senate committees as part of the annual budget cycle. This opportunity to examine the operations of departments and agencies plays a key role in parliamentary scrutiny. During 2013-14, the NCA appeared three times before the Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee, being 18 November 2013, 24 February 2014 and 27 May 2014.

The Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories (JSCNCET) is empowered to inquire into the NCA through its resolution of appointment which provides for the Annual Reports of the NCA to stand referred to the committee for any inquiry the committee may resolve to adopt. The NCA is committed to appearing before the committee biannually.

84 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

During 2013-14, the NCA appeared at a public hearing before the committee on 13 February 2014. The hearings are a means of maintaining and improving the level of transparency and parliamentary accountability applying to the NCA.

Transcripts of the NCA’s appearances are available via the Parliament of Australia’s website at www.aph.gov.au.

Complaints to the Commonwealth Ombudsman

During 2013-14, the Commonwealth Ombudsman did not refer any complaints to the NCA for its consideration.

Complaints to the Privacy Commissioner

The NCA did not receive any complaints or requests from the Privacy Commissioner during 2013-14.

Courts and Tribunals

The Australian Government Solicitor has been retained by the NCA to pursue a claim in the ACT Supreme Court for damages against two contractors relating to the design and construction of a memorial.

An application for review of an alleged decision was made to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) in relation to a temporary trader permit on National Land. The matter was settled and the applicant discontinued the AAT proceedings.

Regulation Review

A Regulation Impact Statement is mandatory for all decisions made by the Australian Government and its agencies that are likely to have a regulatory impact on business or the not-for-profit sector, unless the impact is of a minor or machinery nature and does not substantially alter existing arrangements.

The Department of Finance’s Office of Best Practice Regulation vets and reviews regulations to ensure they are properly formulated and do not impose undue costs on business and the community. A regulation may include any laws or other government rules that influence the way people behave. Regulation is not limited to primary or delegated legislation.

Government policy requires that a Regulation Impact Analysis Compliance Return be prepared for regulatory proposals that may affect business, individuals or the economy. Amendments to the National Capital Plan are classified as regulatory proposals.

During 2013-14, the NCA submitted four returns to the Office of Best Practice Regulation. The returns concerned the following:

* National Capital Plan Amendment 82 - Amtech Estate, Symonston

* National Capital Plan Amendment 84 - Pialligo Section 9 Part Block 4 and Section 12 Part Block 2

* National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014 * National Land (Parking) Repeal Ordinance 2014.

The Office of Best Practice Regulation assessed that the regulations did not require the preparation of a Business Cost Calculator report or Regulation Impact Statement.

See CHAPTER 1 for an overview of the pay parking on National Land enabling legislation.

CHAPTER 8 External Liaison and Scrutiny | 85

Legislative Instruments

During 2013-14, the following legislative instruments came into effect on:

* 14 January 2014, the Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Honourable Jamie Briggs MP approved National Capital Plan Amendment 82 - Amtech Estate, Symonston and National Capital Plan Amendment 84 - Pialligo Section 9 Part Block 4 and Section 12 Part Block 2

* 20 February 2014, the National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014 created a legislative framework for the management and enforcement of pay parking on National Land.

Details of the amendments to the National Capital Plan are provided in CHAPTER 2.

Certificate of Compliance

On 9 October 2013, the NCA provided its 2012-13 Certificate of Compliance return to the relevant Ministers. None of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 breaches detected and reported in the 2012-13 Certificate of Compliance return were of a nature or size to materially affect the signing of the 2012-13 financial statements.

As at 30 June 2014, the NCA was not aware of any Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 breaches that would materially affect the signing of the 2013-14 financial statements.

PARLIAMENT OF AUSTRALIA

- APPENDix ONE -

MANDATORY REPORTING Advertising and Market Research

The NCA uses a media organisation to advertise as per legislative requirements, such as road closures and Draft Amendments to the National Capital Plan.

Table 11: ADVERTISING AND MARKET RESEARCH 2013-14

ORGANISATION VALUE (INCL. GST)

ACT Government $1,101.00

Adcorp Australia Ltd $68,575.00

Australian Public Service Commission $1,826.00

Butin & Lloyd Pty Ltd T/A Holiday Happenings $1,410.00

Hardie Grant Magazines $14,427.00

Lear Marketing Pty Ltd $1,898.00

Public Service News $1,750.00

Touchscreen Tourism $1,580.00

TOTAL $92,567.00

Ecologically Sustainable Development and Environmental Performance

The National Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development defines the goal of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) as ‘development that improves the total quality of life, both now and in the future, in a way that maintains the ecological processes on which life depends.’

The NCA reports on its ESD commitments through Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

NCA activities against the principles of ESD

The NCA undertakes activities, such as managing National Land and carrying out works to maintain or enhance the character of the National Capital and administering the National Capital Plan in accordance with the principles of ESD outlined in the EPBC Act.

ESD considerations are incorporated into the NCA’s policy framework, such as the National Capital Plan.

The NCA has in place other formal guidelines to facilitate staff consideration of ESD and the principles of ESD when undertaking business activities. These guidelines include the Risk Management Framework and the Guidelines for Events on National Land.

In all of our functions and operations, the NCA:

* Develops and implements measures and adopts technologies to reduce waste, energy and natural resource use and minimise pollution.

* Complies with environmental laws, regulations, agreements and other requirements either directly or through compliance by our contractors and suppliers.

* Systematically manages activities to achieve and promote continual improvement, by setting environmental objectives and targets and assessing our achievements.

The NCA and its employees are committed to improved environmental performance and achieves this through embedding environmentally friendly practices into everyday activities.

88 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

NCA Outcomes Contributing to ESD

The NCA’s outcomes, provide the framework for the NCA to ‘manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, delivery of education and awareness programs and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.’ Examples of NCA’s ESD activities during 2013-14 included:

* A comprehensive condition assessment and asset audit of the irrigation infrastructure. With the information, the NCA commenced a replacement of the central irrigation control system across the National Capital Estate. This was completed in the Parliamentary Zone in June 2014 and will continue in the remainder of the National Capital Estate in 2014-15. The new system provides improved controls to monitor usage and leaks and will lead to reduced water consumption.

* The installation of pressure release valves in the National Rose Garden East for better control of landscape irrigation.

* A tree replacement program as per the provisions of the EPBC Act in the Central Parklands, the Parliamentary Zone, Stirling Ridge precinct, Lodge Park, Acton and Dunrossil Drive and environs.

* Implementation of energy efficient lighting. This change will decrease the energy consumption of lights and reduce maintenance costs.

* Installation of approximately 190 solar powered pay parking ticket machines on National Land.

* Continuation of managing sites that contain species on the nationally threatened species and threatened ecological communities declared under the EPBC Act.

* Managing a number of culturally significant sites with European and indigenous artifacts declared under the EPBC Act. Ongoing management of these sites is guided by Heritage ACT, Department of Environment and consultation with Aboriginal community representatives.

Effect of NCA Activities on the Environment

The NCA has established a number of corporate initiatives to minimise the impact of its activities on the environment. As a result of the corporate environmental efficiency initiatives the NCA has a work culture that:

* actively recycles paper, cardboard, toner cartridges and commingled waste

* promotes efficient use of water in kitchens and washrooms

* efficiently uses paper and office appliances * has a conservative approach to the use of office lighting and air conditioning

* is committed to electronic record keeping.

The NCA uses 10 per cent green energy on all of its contestable sites managed under the Whole-of-Government Energy Contract.

From July 2009, the NCA and other tenants of the Treasury Building have worked collaboratively on energy efficiency initiatives under a Green Improvement Agreement. The agreement was established in accordance with the Australian Government’s Energy Efficiency in Government Operations Policy which has an emphasis on the energy efficiency of buildings. The NCA has significantly reduced the use of electricity and natural gas as a result of the Green Improvement Agreement.

In raising awareness of the impact of energy consumption on the environment, the NCA participated in the World Wide Fund for Nature’s Earth Hour awareness event in March 2014. This is the seventh year the NCA has been involved in Earth Hour.

BOWEN PLACE CROSSING, KINGS AVENUE

90 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

Measures taken to minimise the NCA’s impact on the environment

In 2013-14, the NCA undertook a range of sustainable practices that minimised the impact of its activities on the environment. These included:

* re-using leaves gathered on National Land as compost to rejuvenate soils

* introducing solar powered pay parking machines on National Land

* adherence to the Lake Burley Griffin Abstraction Plan, which establishes water consumption and water level targets for the lake that are sustainable and compatible with broader catchment management regimes

* a partnership with the Friends of Grasslands and Conservation Volunteers of Australia to undertake weed removal on conservation grasslands

* working with Greening Australia to conduct a trial for the restoration of aquatic macrophytes in Lake Burley Griffin

* implementing a Bushfire Operations Plan for the fire-prone areas of National Land, including the conservation grasslands. The Conservation Management Plan for these areas requires fire planning to promote native grasses and manage fire risks. In 2013-14 this included fire trail maintenance, slashing of fire breaks and three hazard reduction and ecological burns at Stirling Park, Springbank Island and Lindsay Pryor National Arboretum.

* The NCA continues to implement policies to achieve a sensible balance between the use of the land and the Lake and protection of their environmental and heritage values as set out in the Heritage Management Plans. Assessment criteria for events on National Land include environmental measures.

Minimising the NCA’s impact upon the environment is at the forefront when agency officers undertake strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital this is achieved through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.

Under the National Capital Plan, matters of national significance include ‘development of a city which both respects environmental values and reflects national concerns with the sustainability of Australia’s urban areas’. One of the key objectives of the National Capital Plan is to ‘support and promote environmentally responsible urban development practices’.

Disability Reporting

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s ‘State of the Service Report’ and the ‘APS Statistical Bulletin’. These reports are available at www.apsc.gov.au. From 2010-11, departments and agencies are no longer required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the new National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 which sets out a ten year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high level two yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are fairing. The first of these reports will be available in late 2014, and can be viewed at www.dss.gov.au.

Grant Programs

The NCA does not administer any grant programs.

- APPENDix TWO -

AGENCY RESOURCES AND SUMMARY RESOURCE TABLES BY OUTCOMES Table 12: AGENCY RESOURCE STATEMENT 2013-14

 

 

Actual available appropriation for 2013-14

$’000

Payments made 2013-14 $’000

Balance remaining 2013-14 $’000

(a) (b) (a) - (b)

Ordinary Annual Services1  

Prior year departmental appropriation 2.595 2,595 0

Departmental appropriation 16,098 12,713 3,385

Departmental capital budget2 493 312 181

S31 relevant agency receipts 2,164 2,164 0

Total 21,350 17,784 3,566

Administered expenses  

Prior year administered capital budget3 902 902

Administered items 624 523

Administered capital budget3 13,769 9,741

Total 15,295 11,166 

Total ordinary annual services A 36,645 28,950

Other services4  

Departmental non-operating  

Equity injections 150 36 114

Total 150 36 114

Administered non-operating  

Administered Assets and Liabilities 5,624 1,991 3,633

Total 5,624 1,991

Total other services B 5,774 2,027

Total Available Annual  

Appropriations and payments 42,419 39,977

Total resourcing and payments  

A+B 42,419 39,977

1 Appropriation Bill (No.1) 2013-14.This also includes Prior Year departmental appropriation and S.31 relevant agency receipts. 2 For accounting purposes the Departmental Capital

Budget has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’. 3 For accounting purposes the Administered Capital Budget has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’.

4 Appropriation Bill (No.2) 2013-14.

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Table 13: OUTCOME EXPENSE STATEMENT 2013-14

EXPENSES FOR OUTCOME 1 Outcome: Manage the strategic planning, promoting and enhancement of Canberra as the national capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the national capital plan, operation of the national capital exhibition, delivery of educational and awareness programmes and works to enhance the character of the national capital.

Budget* 2013-14 $’000

Actual Expenses 2013-14 $’000

variation 2013-14 $’000

(a) (b) (a) - (b)

PROGRAM 1.1: NATIONAL CAPITAL FUNCTIONS

Departmental expenses  

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 16,098 16,098 0

Revenues from independent sources (Section 31) 2,058 1,306 752

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 1,028 1,226 -198

Total for Program 1.1 19,184 18,630 554

PROGRAM 1.2: NATIONAL CAPITAL ESTATE

Administered expenses  

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 624 596 28

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 17,603 22,716 -5,113

Total for Program 1.2 18,227 23,312 -5,085

OUTCOME 1: TOTALS BY APPROPRIATION TYPE

Administered Expenses  

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 624 596 28

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 17,603 22,716 -5,113

Departmental expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 16,098 16,098 0

Revenues from independent sources (Section 31) 2,058 1,306 752

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 1,028 1,226 -198

Total expenses for Outcome 1 37,411 41,942 -4,531

  2012-13 2013-14

Average Staffing Level (number) 52 55

* Full year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2013-14 Budget

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 93

- APPENDix THREE -

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

S TAT E M E N T B Y T H E C H I E F E X E C U T I V E A N D C H I E F F I N A N C E O F F I C E R In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2014 are based on properly maintained financial records and give a true and fair view of the matters required by the Finance Minister's Orders made under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, as amended.

Malcolm Snow Chief Executive

2 September 2014

Scott Brown Chief Finance Officer

2 September 2014

95

96 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME for the period ended 30 June 2014

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 97

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION as at 30 June 2014

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

98 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY for the period ended 30 June 2014

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 99

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2014

100 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS as at 30 June 2014

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 101

SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS (CON'T) as at 30 June 2014

NOTES:

1. Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

2. Operating lease commitments are effectively non-cancellable.

Lease for office accommodation:

Initial leases are still current. Payments are subject to rent review every 2 years from the lease start date. Under the terms of the lease, rent reviews will be based on current market levels. While subject to rent review, the maximum rent payable for floor space has been capped.

Provision of motor vehicles to senior executive officers and staf f:

No contingent rentals exist. Leases can be renewed for a further period at lease end and vehicles may be purchased at lease end.

3. Project commitments comprise, amongst others, contracts for Lake Burley Griffin maintenance and Scrivener Dam projects.

4. Other commitments comprise, amongst others, contracts for outsourced IT, security and cleaning.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENCIES as at 30 June 2014

At 30 June 2014, the NCA had no quantifiable, one unquantifiable and no significant remote contingencies. Details are disclosed in Note 11.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

for the period ended 30 June 2014

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 103

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

as at 30 June 2014

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

104 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

ADMINISTERED RECONCILIATION SCHEDULE

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 105

ADMINISTERED CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ended 30 June 2014

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

106 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF COMMITMENTS

as at 30 June 2014

NOTES:

1. Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

2. Commitments receivable include leases on diplomatic land plus rents and licence fees receivable on buildings and assets administered on behalf of government. All commitments, except diplomatic leases, are GST inclusive. On 12 December 2013, the Australian Government approved a New Diplomatic Land Policy modifying arrangements for Annual Land Rent payment. The New Policy removed the requirement for 20 year appraisals on a 99 year Crown Lease. As a consequence of the change in policy, embassies are now committed to annual land rent payments at the current rates to the end of the 99 year period."

3. Capital commitments payable are for construction works on a number of property assets in and around the Parliamentary zone. All commitments are GST inclusive.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 107

ADMINISTERED SCHEDULE OF CONTINGENCIES

as at 30 June 2014

Details of each class of contingent liabilities and contingent assets in the above table are disclosed in Note 23, along with information on significant remote contingencies and contingencies that cannot be quantified.

The above schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

108 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

1.1 Objectives of the National Capital Authority

The National Capital Authority (NCA) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objectives of the NCA are to:

• Realise the promise of the city plan and the ideals of the founders.

• Foster Canberra as the National Capital.

• Develop the special character of the National Capital.

The entity is structured to meet the following outcome:

Outcome 1: To manage the strategic planning, promotion and enhancement of Canberra as the National Capital for all Australians through the development and administration of the National Capital Plan, operation of the National Capital Exhibition, delivery of education and awareness programs and works to enhance the character of the National Capital.

The continued existence of the NCA in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the agency’s administration and programs.

NCA activities contributing toward its outcome are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by the entity in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by the entity, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or incurred by the Government.

The NCA carries out administered activities on behalf of the Government involving construction and upgrade of assets predominantly within the Parliamentary region of Canberra.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 49 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a. Finance Minister’s Orders (FMOs) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011; and

b. Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations

issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar unless otherwise specified.

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the FMOs, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executor contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments or the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income when and only when the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

1.3 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the entity has made the following judgements that have the most significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements:

• The fair value of land and building assets has been taken to be the market value of similar properties as determined by a qualified independent valuer. In some instances, NCA buildings are purpose built and may in fact realise more or less in the market.

No accounting assumptions and estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 109

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard. The following new or amended standards were issued prior to signing by the chief executive and chief financial officer, were applicable to the current reporting period but did not have material effect, and are not expected to have a future material effect, on the NCA’s financial statements:

• AASB 119 Employee Benefits

• AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

The following new or amended standards were issued prior signing by the chief executive and chief financial officer, are applicable to future reporting periods but are not expected to have a material effect on the NCA’s financial statements:

• AASB 1005 Budgetary Reporting

• AASB 9 Financial Instruments

1.5 Revenue

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when:

a. the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

b. the entity retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

c. the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

d. it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

a. the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

b. the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the NCA.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Revenue from rental and fee income is initially recognised at the time of invoice. Revenue relevant to a future reporting period is treated as an unearned revenue payable at the end of the reporting period. Revenue from works approval fees is treated as unearned revenue until the application has been formally approved.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method as set out in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement.

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the entity gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

1.6 Gains

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1.7 Transactions with the Government as Owner

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Other Distributions to Owners

The FMOs require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend.

1.8 Employee Benefits

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in future years by employees of the NCA is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for sick leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the NCA’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave is based on the NCA’s estimated liability at balance date of the long service leave entitlements of its employees, which have been calculated in accordance with FMOs and guidelines. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation

The NCA's staff are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap). The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The entity makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The NCA accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year disclosed in Note 8B Other Payables.

1.9 Leases

A distinction is made between finance leases and operating leases. Finance leases effectively transfer from the lessor to the lessee substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of leased assets. An operating lease is a lease that is not a finance lease. In operating leases, the lessor effectively retains substantially all such risks and benefits.

The NCA only has operating leases. Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

1.10 Borrowing Costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

1.11 Fair Value Measurement

The entity deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1.12 Cash

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. The NCA’s cash and cash equivalents are held in the form of cash on hand only.

1.13 Financial Assets

The NCA classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a. financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b. held-to-maturity investments;

c. available-for-sale financial assets; and

d. loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. The NCA does not hold financial assets in classes a), b) or c). All financial assets are classified as ‘loans and receivables’. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit or loss.

Loans and Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘loans and receivables’. Loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

Financial assets held at amortised cost - if there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held to maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the

loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

1.14 Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. All financial liabilities held by the NCA are classified as ‘other financial liabilities’. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Other Financial Liabilities

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method calculates the amortised cost of a financial liability and allocates interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

1.15 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

1.16 Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

1.17 Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $500, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. For the NCA, this is only relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by the entity where there exists an obligation to restore the property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of the NCA’s leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for the ‘make good’ recognised.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment is carried at fair value. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date.

The NCA’s policy is to carry out a full asset revaluation every three years and a desktop update on other years.

On 30 April 2014, an independent valuer, PRP National Property Consultants, conducted a desktop revaluation of all land, buildings, property, plant, equipment, heritage and cultural assets. On 30 June 2014, PRP provided confirmation that there was no indication that upon comprehensive revaluation that there would be any material difference between the current carrying amounts of the asset classes and any revalued amount at fair value. Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset class Fair value measurement Land Market selling price

Buildings Depreciated replacement cost Property, plant and equipment Depreciated replacement cost

Heritage and cultural assets Depreciated replacement cost

Revaluation adjustments were made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment was credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets were recognised directly in the surplus/ deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the entity using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset Class 2014 2013

Buildings 10-100 years 10-100 years

Plant & equipment

3-20 years 3-20 years

Property 3-100 years 3-100 years

Heritage & cultural assets 10-100 years 10-100 years

The NCA has items of property, plant and equipment that are heritage and cultural assets that have limited useful lives and are depreciated.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2014. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the entity were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Heritage and Cultural Assets

The NCA’s heritage and cultural assets comprise a heritage listed building and a number of individually valued artworks. A draft heritage strategy for the conservation and preservation of heritage and cultural assets is under development and will be made publicly available upon completion.

1.18 Intangibles

The NCA's intangibles comprise internally developed software and purchased software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the NCA's software are 7 to 10 years (2012-13: 7 to 10 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2014.

1.19 Taxation

The entity is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST). Revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities are recognised net of GST except:

a. where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and

b. for receivables and payables.

1.20 Revenues and Expenses Relating to Assets Under Construction for Third Parties

Reciprocal Funding

Where funding for construction of an asset is provided by a related FMA agency or an external third party who takes control of the finished asset, the transaction is reciprocal in nature. The NCA recognises departmental revenue and expense in accordance with AASB 111 Constructions Contracts using the percentage of completion method. Contract revenue is matched to contract costs incurred in reaching the stage of completion. Unexpended funding remains as a payable on the departmental statement of financial position at the end of the reporting period in accordance with AASB 1004 Contributions. Where funding is received from a related FMA agency and the NCA takes control of the finished asset at completion of the project, an administered work in progress (WIP) asset and contributions revenue is recognised as the asset is constructed.

Non-reciprocal Funding

Where the NCA retains control of the asset at completion and funding is received from a party other than a FMA agency, the transaction is non-reciprocal. The NCA recognises the full contribution as departmental revenue in the year of receipt in accordance with AASB 1004 Contributions and recognises departmental expenses as the asset is constructed in accordance with AASB 111 Constructions Contracts. Administered WIP asset and contribution revenue is recognised as the asset is constructed.

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1.21 Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments made from the Consolidated Revenue Fund

Section 83 of the Constitution provides that no amount may be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund except under an appropriation made by law.

The Australian Government continues to have regard to developments in case law, including the High Court’s most recent decision on Commonwealth expenditure in Williams v Commonwealth [2014] HCA 23, as they contribute to the larger body of law relevant to the development of Commonwealth programs. In accordance with its general practice, the Government will continue to monitor and assess risk and decide on any appropriate actions to respond to risks of expenditure not being consistent with constitutional or other legal requirements.

The NCA has received legal advice that indicated there could be breaches of Section 83 under certain circumstances with payments for long service leave, goods and services tax and payments under determinations of the Remuneration Tribunal. The NCA has reviewed its processes and controls over payments for these items to minimise the possibility for future breaches as a result of these payments. The NCA has determined that there is a low risk of the certain circumstances mentioned in the legal advice applying to the NCA. The NCA is not aware of any specific breaches of Section 83 in respect of these items.

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1.22 Reporting of Administered Activities

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the administered schedules and related notes.

Except where otherwise stated below, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account

Revenue collected by the entity for use by the Government rather than the entity is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the entity on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the schedule of administered cash flows and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

Revenue

All administered revenues are revenues relating to ordinary activities performed by the entity on behalf of the Australian Government. As such, administered appropriations are not revenues of the individual entity that oversees distribution or expenditure of the funds as directed.

Revenue generated from Diplomatic Leases is brought to account over the term of the lease. Other revenue is generated from building rent and use of assets administered on behalf of Government. Administered revenue is recognised when:

• The amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• The probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the NCA.

Contributions for Construction of Externally Sponsored Works

As externally sponsored works are constructed through the departmental program, the value of work complete is recognised as an administered asset and brought to account in other revenue as contributions for externally sponsored works.

Loans and Receivables

Where loans and receivables are not subject to concessional treatment, they are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Gains and losses due to impairment, derecognition and amortisation are recognised through profit or loss.

Property, Plant, Equipment and Intangibles

The policies stated for departmental assets at Notes 1.17 and 1.18 apply equally to administered assets in these financial statements.

Adjustments Relating to Prior Years

A material adjustment was identified during 2013-14 that relates to the 2012-13 reporting period. Accounting Standard AASB 108 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors dictates that, under certain conditions, the entity is required to make the correction within the set of financial statements immediately following by restating, where possible, the comparative amounts for prior periods as well as the opening assets and liabilities balances.

Gain on Termination of Crown Lease

On 17 January 2013, a Crown Lease was terminated on a diplomatic land site. In accordance with Section 5BA of the Leases (special purposes) Ordinance 1925, when a Crown Lease is surrendered, compensation may only be claimed for the value of any lessee owned improvements on the land. There is no provision for refund of the land rent premium.

As a consequence of the termination of the lease, prepaid rent, which had previously been recognised as deferred revenue, should have been realised as a gain to the Australian government. The 2012-13 financial reports failed to recognise the gain and effectively understated income and overstated liabilities in the administered schedules.

The adjustment is relevant to the 2012-13 financial year and, consequently, has no effect on the Schedule of Administered Assets and Liabilities as at 1 July 2012. The disclosures for the comparative year in the 2013-14 financial reports have been adjusted to incorporate the effect of the lease termination. The following tables summarise the impact of adjustment to the 2012-13 comparative disclosures:

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period

Departmental

No events have occurred after reporting date that should be brought to account or noted in the 2013-14 Financial Statements.

Administered

No events have occurred after reporting date that should be brought to account or noted in the 2013-14 Financial Statements.

Note 3: Expenses

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 3: Expenses (Con't)

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 4: Income

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs, other than quoted prices included within Level 1, that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

The NCA's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1. No departmental assets were transferred between level 1 and level 2 during 2014 (2013: Nil)

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements (Con't)

NOTE:

1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period.

Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation process

The NCA procurred valuation services from Preston Rowe Patterson (PRP) valuers and relied on valuation models provided by PRP. The NCA tests the procedures of the valuation model at least once every 12 months. PRP provided written assurance to the NCA that the model developed is in compliance with AASB 13.

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

Because the NCA uses a cost based approach to valuing its heritage and cultural assets, the fair value of these assets are not subject to market fluctuations that may be present should the valuations be based on private sales or professional appraisals of similar artwork.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements (Con't)

The NCA's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1. No transfers in or out of Level 3 occurred during 2014 (2013: Nil).

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 6: Financial Assets

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Buildings were revalued by an independent valuer as at 30 April 2014. At 30 June 2014, the independent valuer provided confirmation that gross carrying amounts were not materially different to fair value. A revaluation increment of $268,954 (2013: increment $160,147) was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.

Building assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Assets valued at $127,705 were found to be impaired (2013: Nil) and were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 1.

No buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Property, plant and equipment were revalued by an independent valuer as at 30 April 2014. At 30 June 2014, the independent valuer provided confirmation that gross carrying amounts were not materially dif ferent to fair value. A revaluation increment of $38,667 (2013: increment $27,886) was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.

Property, plant and equipment assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Assets valued at $37,448 (2013: $2,565) were found to be impaired and were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 1.

No property, plant and equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

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Heritage and cultural assets were revalued by an independent valuer as at 30 April 2014. At 30 June 2014, the independent valuer provided confirmation that gross carrying amounts were not materially dif ferent to fair value. A revaluation increment of $8,028 (2013: increment $6,193) was credited to the asset revaluation reserve for heritage assets and an increment of $45,067 (2013: increment $2,982) was credited to the asset revaluation reserve for cultural assets and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.

Heritage and cultural assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. No indicators of impairment were found (2013: Nil).

No heritage and cultural assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

Intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Assets valued at $7,016 (2013: $80) were found to be impaired and were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 1.

No intangible assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

1. Prior to 2013-14, the NCA carried its intangible assets at fair value less accumulated amortisation and impairment losses. During 2013-14, the NCA changed its policy and now carries intangibles at amortised cost. The change to accounting policy was immaterial to the financial reports and, consequently , the 2012-13 comparative disclosures have not been restated.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

Note 8: Payables

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 9: Provisions

The NCA has one agreement for the leasing of premises which has provisions requiring the NCA to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. The NCA has made a provision to reflect the present value of this obligation.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation

Note 11: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Quantifiable Contingencies

The NCA had no quantifiable contingencies at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

Unquantifiable Contingencies

At 30 June 2013 and 30 June 2014, the NCA was pursuing a contractor seeking rectification of defects in a construction project. It was not possible to estimate the amounts of any eventual payments that may be recovered in relation to the claim.

Significant Remote Contingencies

The NCA had no significant remote contingencies at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

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NOTES:

1. Note 12A is prepared on an accrual basis (therefore the performance bonus expenses disclosed above may differ from the cash 'Bonus paid' in Note 12B).

2. Note 12A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where total remuneration expensed for a senior executive was less than $195,000.

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 12: Senior Executive Remuneration

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 12: Senior Executive Remuneration (con't)

NOTES:

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band.

2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following:

a. gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid' column);

b. reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' to account for tax benefits);

c. reportable employer superannuation contributions; and

d. exempt foreign employment income.

3. The 'contributed superannuation' amount is the average actual cost to the entity for the provision of superannuation benefits to substantive senior executives in that reportable renumeration band during the reporting period.

4. 'Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on individuals' payment summaries.

5. 'Bonus paid' represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year .

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 12: Senior Executive Remuneration (con't)

Note 12C: Average Annual Reportable Remuneration Paid to Other Highly Paid Staff

The NCA did not have any other staff whose reportable remuneration was equal to or greater than the Table C threshold during the reporting period (2013: Nil).

Note 13: Remuneration of Auditors

No other services were provided by the auditors of the financial statements.

Note 14: Financial Instruments

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Note 14: Financial Instruments (con't)

Note 14E: Credit Risk

The NCA's maximum exposure to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial asset is the carrying amount of those assets. The exposure is minimal as loans and receivables are predominantly cash and trade receivables.

The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default as a debtor. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade receivables and other financial assets. The NCA has assessed the risk of the default on payment as low and has made a Nil allocation in 2013-14 (2013: $4,474) to an allowance for impairment account.

The NCA manages its credit risk by undertaking background and credit checks prior to allowing a debtor relationship. In addition, the NCA has policies and procedures in place that guide employees debt recovery techniques that are to be applied.

The NCA has no significant exposures to any concentrations of credit risk and holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 14: Financial Instruments (con't)

Note 14F: Liquidity Risk

The NCA's financial liabilities are payables and other payables including credit cards with facility limit $200,000 (2013: $200,000), retentions and loans from related entities. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that the NCA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and internal policies and procedures in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

The NCA had no derivative financial liabilities in either 2014 or 2013.

Note 14G: Market Risk

The NCA holds basic financial instruments that do not expose the agency to certain market risks. The NCA is not exposed to currency or other price risks.

Note 15: Financial Assets Reconciliation

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 16: Administered - Expenses

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 17: Administered - Income

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 18: Fair Value Measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs, other than quoted prices included within Level 1, that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3:Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

The NCA's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1. No administered assets were transferred between level 1 and level 2 during 2014 (2013: Nil)

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS

Note 18: Fair Value Measurements (Con't)

NOTE:

1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period.

Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation process

The NCA procured valuation services from Preston Rowe Patterson (PRP) valuers and relied on valuation models provided by PRP. The NCA tests the procedures of the valuation model at least once every 12 months. PRP provided written assurance to the NCA that the model developed is in compliance with AASB 13.

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

Because the NCA uses a cost based approach to valuing its heritage and cultural assets, the fair value of these assets are not subject to market fluctuations that may be present should the valuations be based on private sales or professional appraisals of similar artwork.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 18: Fair Value Measurements (Con't)

The NCA's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1. No transfers in or out of Level 3 occurred during 2014 (2013: Nil).

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 14 3

NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 19: Administered - Financial Assets

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 20: Administered - Non-Financial Assets

Land and buildings were revalued by an independent valuer as at 30 April 2014. At 30 June 2014, the independent valuer provided confirmation that gross carrying amounts were not materially dif ferent to fair value. A revaluation decrement of $543,831 for land (2013: Nil) and an increment of $320,616 (2013: $209,961) for buildings were debited/ credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.

Land and building assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Land assets valued at $78,450 (2013: Nil) were found to be impaired and were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 1. No indicators of impairment were found for buildings (2013: Nil).

No land or buildings are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Property, plant and equipment were revalued by an independent valuer as at 30 April 2014. At 30 June 2014, the independent valuer provided confirmation that gross carrying amounts were not materially dif ferent to fair value. A revaluation increment of $5,348,420 (2013: $3,478,190) was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.

Property, plant and equipment assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Assets valued at $3,493,942 (2013: $2,014,963) were found to be impaired and were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 1.

No property, plant and equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Heritage assets were revalued by an independent valuer as at 30 April 2014. At 30 June 2014, the independent valuer provided confirmation that gross carrying amounts were not materially different to fair value. A revaluation increment of $1,714,445 (2013: $561,615) was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in the equity section of the statement of financial position. All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1.

Heritage assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Assets valued at $3,459 (2013: Nil) were found to be impaired and were written down in accordance with the policy stated at Note 1.

No heritage assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS

Note 20: Administered - Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 20: Administered - Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

Intangible assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. No indicators of impairment were found (2013: Nil).

No intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 20: Non-Financial Assets (Con't)

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

Note 21: Administered - Payables

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 22: Administered - Cash Flow Reconciliation

Note 23: Administered - Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Quantifiable Administered Contingencies

The schedule of administered contingencies reports contingent liabilities for construction contract security retentions of nil (2013: $4,789). The amount represents an estimate of the NCA's liability to release security retentions at completion of a number of construction projects. The NCA has no quantifiable contingent assets at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

Unquantifiable Administered Contingencies

The NCA had no unquantifiable contingencies at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

Significant Remote Administered Contingencies

The NCA had no significant remote contingencies at 30 June 2014 (2013: Nil).

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Note 24B: Net Income and Expense from Financial Assets

The net income/expense from financial assets at fair value in 2013-14 is nil (2012-13: Nil).

Note 24C: Net Income and Expense from Financial Liabilities

The net income/expense from financial liabilities at fair value in 2013-14 is nil (2012-13: Nil).

Note 24D: Fee Income and Expense

The net fee income/expense from financial liabilities at fair value in 2013-14 is nil (2012-13: Nil).

Note 24E: Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying amount of all financial assets and liabilities as at 30 June 2014 and 30 June 2013 approximates the fair value.

NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 24: Administered - Financial Instruments

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS

Note 24: Administered - Financial Instruments (Con't)

Note 24F: Credit Risk

The NCA's maximum exposure to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial asset is the carrying amount of those assets. The exposure is minimal as loans and receivables are predominantly cash and trade receivables.

The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default as a debtor. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade receivables. The NCA has assessed the risk of the default on payment and has made a $105,025 allocation in 2013-14 (2013: $145,725) to an allowance for impairment account.

The NCA manages its credit risk by undertaking background and credit checks prior to allowing a debtor relationship. In addition, the NCA has policies and procedures in place that guide employees debt recovery techniques that are to be applied.

The NCA has no significant exposures to any concentrations of credit risk and holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk.

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NOTES TO THE SCHEDULE OF ADMINISTERED ITEMS Note 24: Administered - Financial Instruments (Con't)

Note 24G: Liquidity Risk

The NCA's financial liabilities are trade and other payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that the NCA will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities. This is highly unlikely due to appropriation funding and internal policies and procedures in place to ensure there are appropriate resources to meet its financial obligations.

The entity had no derivative financial liabilities in both the current and prior financial year .

Note 24H: Market Risk

The NCA holds basic financial instruments that do not expose the agency to certain market risks. The NCA is not exposed to currency or other price risks.

Note 25: Administered - Financial Assets Reconciliation

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 26: Appropriations

NOTES:

1. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (Nos. 1,3&5) 2013-14: sections 10, 11, and 12 and under Appropriation Acts (Nos. 2,4&6) 2013-14: sections 12,13, and 14. Departmental appropriations do not lapse at financial year-end. However, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of a departmental appropriation is not required and request the Finance Minister to reduce that appropriation. The reduction in the appropriation is effected by the Finance Minister's determination and is disallowable by Parliament.

As with departmental appropriations, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of an administered appropriation is not required and request that the Finance Minister reduce that appropriation. For administered appropriations reduced under section 11 of Appropriation Acts (Nos. 1,3&5) 2013-14 and section 12 of Appropriation Acts (Nos. 2,4&6) 2013-14, the appropriation is taken to be reduced to the required amount specified in Table E of this note once the annual report is tabled in Parliament. All administered appropriations may be adjusted by a Finance Minister’s determination, which is disallowable by Parliament.

Departmental ordinary annual services: This variance was caused by the draw down of prior year appropriations and various timing differences.

Administered items: This variance was caused by the draw down of retained appropriations to fund projects in accordance with the approved capital management plan.

Administered assets and liabilities: This variance was caused by the draw down of retained appropriations to fund projects in accordance with the approved capital management plan.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 26: Appropriations (Con't)

NOTES:

1. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (Nos. 1 & 3) 2012-13: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15 and under Appropriation Acts (Nos. 2&4) 2012-13: sections 12, 13, 14 and 17. Departmental appropriations do not lapse at financial year-end. However, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of a departmental appropriation is not required and request the Finance Minister to reduce that appropriation. The reduction in the appropriation is effected by the Finance Minister's determination and is disallowable by Parliament.

As with departmental appropriations, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of an administered appropriation is not required and request that the Finance Minister reduce that appropriation. For administered appropriations reduced under section 11 of Appropriation Acts (Nos. 1,3&5) 2012-13 and section 12 of Appropriation Acts (Nos. 2,4&6) 2012-13, the appropriation is taken to be reduced to the required amount specified in Table E of this note once the annual report is tabled in Parliament. All administered appropriations may be adjusted by a Finance Minister’s determination, which is disallowable by Parliament.

Departmental ordinary annual services: This variance was caused by the draw down of prior year appropriations and various timing differences.

Administered items: This variance was caused by the draw down of retained appropriations to fund projects in accordance with the approved capital management plan.

Administered assets and liabilities: This variance was caused by the draw down of retained appropriations to fund projects in accordance with the approved capital management plan.

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NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 26: Appropriations (Con't)

NOTES:

1. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts. For more information on ordinary annual services appropriations, please see Table A: Annual appropriations.

2. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5) 2013-14: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15 or via a determination by the Finance Minister.

3. Payments made on non-financial assets include purchases of assets and expenditure on assets which have been capitalised.

NOTES:

1. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts. For more information on ordinary annual services appropriations, please see Table A: Annual appropriations.

2. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No.1,3,5) 2012-13: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15 or via a determination by the Finance Minister.

3. Payments made on non-financial assets include purchases of assets and expenditure on assets which have been capitalised.

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 155

NOTES:

1. Administered items for 2014 were reduced to these amounts 2. Amount required as per Appropriation Act when these financial statements were tabled in Parliament (Act 1 s. 11; Act 2 s. 12).

as part of the NCA's 2014 annual report. This reduction was 3. Total amount appropriated in 2014. effective in 2015, but the amounts were reflected in Table A in the 2014 financial statements in the column 'Appropriations 4. Total reduction effective in 2015.

reduced' as they were adjustments to 2014 appropriations.

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 26: Appropriations (Con't)

NOTES:

1. Administered items for 2013 were reduced to these amounts 2. Amount required as per Appropriation Act when these financial statements were tabled in Parliament (Act 1 s. 11; Act 2 s. 12). as part of the NCA's 2013 annual report. This reduction was 3. Total amount appropriated in 2013. effective in 2014, but the amounts were reflected in Table A in the 2013 financial statements in the column 'Appropriations 4. Total reduction effective in 2014.

reduced' as they were adjustments to 2013 appropriations.

156 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 27: Special Accounts

Appropriation: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 section 20.

Establishing Instrument: Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 section 20.

Purpose: For the receipt of monies temporarily held on trust or otherwise for the benefit of a person other than the Commonwealth.

Abolition: The Minister for Finance and Deregulation made a determination (No: 2012/02) to abolish the Special Account (Other Trust Moneys Account) with an effective date 20 June 2012.

Note 28: Compensation and Debt Relief

Compensation and Debt Relief - Departmental

No ‘Act of Grace’ expenses were incurred during the reporting period (2013: No expenses).

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (2013: No waivers).

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period (2013: No payments).

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period (2013: No payments).

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 (PS Act) during the reporting period (2013: No payments).

Compensation and Debt Relief - Administered

No ‘Act of Grace’ expenses were incurred during the reporting period (2013: No expenses).

No waivers of amounts owing to the Australian Government were made pursuant to subsection 34(1) of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (2013: No waivers).

No payments were provided under the Compensation for Detriment caused by Defective Administration (CDDA) Scheme during the reporting period (2013: No payments).

No ex-gratia payments were provided for during the reporting period (2013: No payments).

No payments were provided in special circumstances relating to APS employment pursuant to section 73 of the Public Service Act 1999 (PS Act) during the reporting period (2013: No payments).

APPENDIX 3 Independent Audit Report and Financial Statements | 157

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note 29: Reporting of Outcomes

Outcomes 1 is described in Note 1.1. Net costs shown included intra-government costs that were eliminated in calculating the actual Budget Outcome. Refer to Outcome 1 Resourcing Table of this Annual Report.

The sole objective of the NCA is to contribute to Outcome 1 of the Infrastructure and Regional Development portfolio as described in Note 1.1.

158 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Note 29: Reporting of Outcomes (Con't)

Outcomes 1 is described in Note 1.1. Net costs shown included intra-government costs that were eliminated in calculating the actual Budget Outcome. Refer to Outcome 1 Resourcing Table of this Annual Report.

Note 30: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

1. From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements, where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

GLOSSARY Annual Report 2013-2014 | 159

GLOSSARY ACT Government The body politic established under the Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Act 1988. Includes the Executive of that body, and agencies established by it, whether by enactment or otherwise.

amendment of the National Capital A function of the NCA is to keep the National Capital Plan under constant review and to Plan propose amendments to it as necessary. The statutory provisions for amending the Plan are set out in sections 14 to 22 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. The amendment process includes public consultation. After

approval by the Minister, amendments are subject to disallowance by either House of the Australian Parliament.

APS Australian Public Service

Australian Capital Territory Australian Government legislation that provides the overarching legal framework for (Planning and Land Management) planning and land management in the Australian Capital Territory. Act 1988 Australian Capital Territory The Australian Capital Territory was created to house the nation’s capital, Canberra.

AWA Australian Workplace Agreement

Central National Area Includes the Parliamentary Zone and its setting, Lake Burley Griffin and its foreshores, Government House, the Australian National University, the Australian Defence Force Academy, Duntroon, Campbell Park, Canberra International Airport and the Royal Australian Air Force Base at Fairbairn.

Also included are the diplomatic areas of Yarralumla, O’Malley and West Deakin and individual diplomatic sites in the suburbs of Red Hill, Forrest and Deakin.

Designated Area An area of land specified as having the special characteristics of the National Capital as provided for by section 10(1) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. All ‘works’ in Designated Areas are subject to approval by the NCA (see also Works).

Detailed conditions of planning Section 10(2)(c) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Design and development Act 1988 states that the National Capital Plan may specify areas of land that have the special characteristics of the National Capital to be Designated Areas. The Act provides for the Plan to set out detailed conditions of planning, design and development in

Designated Areas and to specify the priorities in carrying out planning, design, and development in Designated Areas.

Development approval see Works An approval for works, as defined in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

Development Control Plan (DCP) A plan prepared to guide and control development including design, siting, scale, purpose, timing and phasing, construction, landscaping and other relevant matters. Section 10(2) (d) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 details that Development Control Plans may be required in areas where ‘special requirements’ apply and may include maps, drawings, photographs, specifications and written statements. A Development Control Plan may apply to National Land or Territory Land sites (or areas) provided they are not included in Designated Areas.

Diplomatic precincts Those areas of Yarralumla, West Deakin and O’Malley that have diplomatic uses permissible under the National Capital Plan.

Environment Protection and Australian Government legislation that provides a legal framework to protect and manage Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 nationally and internationally important flora, fauna, ecological communities and heritage places.

ESD Ecologically Sustainable Development

160 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

FOI Freedom of Information

General Policy Plan - Australian Capital Territory Figure 1 of the National Capital Plan, describes the National Capital Open Space System beyond the metropolitan areas. It is supported by principles and policies in the Plan.

General Policy Plan - Metropolitan Canberra Figure 1 of the National Capital Plan being a part of the strategic plan for the Australian Capital Territory, describes areas planned for urban development, non urban, rural, the

open space system and the primary road and public transport system indicative routes. It is supported by principles and policies in the Plan.

GST Goods and Services Tax

IGC inter-governmental committee

KPI Key Performance Indicator

Lease and development conditions Prepared for vacant land sites by the relevant planning authority before the sites are leased and developed. These conditions form the basis for considering development applications for approval.

Masterplans Comprise area-specific policies intended to guide the planning, design and development of a large site area. Some masterplans, once approved by the NCA, are given statutory effect by inclusion in the National Capital Plan through an amendment to the Plan.

National Capital Exhibition The National Capital Exhibition tells the story of Canberra, Australia’s National Capital. Through interactive displays, the Exhibition illustrates Canberra’s vital role as a symbol of Federation.

National Capital Open Space System The system of open space in the Territory comprising the hills, ridges and buffer spaces that surround and frame the urban areas, Lake Burley Griffin, the river corridors, and the

mountains and bushlands to the west of the Murrumbidgee River.

National Capital Plan The Australian Government’s plan for the Capital prepared and administered by the NCA in accordance with Part III of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

National Land Used by, or on behalf of, the Australian Government. Some of that land is designated in writing by the Minister (under section 6(g) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988) as land required for the special purposes of Canberra as the National Capital; this land is managed by the NCA.

National significance Section 9 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 sets out the object of the National Capital Plan, which is to ensure that Canberra and the Territory are planned and developed in accordance with their national significance. The Plan sets out Matters of National Significance in the planning and development of Canberra and the Territory.

NCA The National Capital Authority

Parliamentary approval Parliamentary approval is required for works proposed within the Parliamentary Zone under the provisions of the Parliament Act 1974 or the Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988.

Parliamentary Precincts An area of land specified by the Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988. Parliamentary Precincts is part of the Parliamentary Zone and consist of all land contained within (the inner side of ) Capital Circle surrounding Parliament House.

Parliamentary Zone An area of land specified as the Parliamentary Zone by the Parliament Act 1974. It consists of the area bounded by the southern edge of Lake Burley Griffin, Kings Avenue, State Circle and Commonwealth Avenue.

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

Special purpose payments Payments made by the Commonwealth as ongoing contributions to the states and territories. The ACT Government receives allowance for the special circumstances of the Territory, including those National Capital factors that result in additional costs.

GLOSSARY Annual Report 2013-2014 | 161

Special requirements Those planning requirements as set out by section 10(2)(d) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. Developments in areas where special requirements apply, which conform to a Development Control Plan, and are approved by the NCA, unless otherwise specified in the Plan.

Temporary work Work that is erected for a specific event and will be removed after the event has been held, under Regulation 2 of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

Territory Australian Capital Territory

Territory Land Land administered by the ACT Government on behalf of the Australian Government. The classification of land as either Territory Land or National Land is provided for in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 and relates entirely to land management and administration. The classification does not determine planning responsibilities, which are established separately under the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 and are subsequently expressed through the National Capital Plan and the Territory Plan.

Territory Plan The plan prepared and administered by the Territory planning authority under Part IV of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. The Territory Plan cannot be inconsistent with the National Capital Plan.

Territory planning authority The planning body established under Part IV of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 in accordance with planning laws proclaimed under that Part by the Legislative Assembly for the Australian Capital Territory.

The Authority The board of the National Capital Authority

The Lake Lake Burley Griffin was named after Canberra’s designer, Walter Burley Griffin. The lake is Canberra’s centrepiece as a significant number of national institutions and national public places are located near its shores.

The Plan The National Capital Plan made under Part III of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. See also National Capital Plan.

Variations to the Territory Plan Are prepared in accordance with relevant provisions of the Planning and Development Act 2007 (ACT).

Works As defined in the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 include:

a. construction, alteration, extension or demolition of buildings or structures

b. landscaping

c. tree-felling, or

d. excavations,

but excludes anything done inside buildings or structures.

Works approval see Development approval

162 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

COMPLIANCE INDEX DESCRIPTION PAGE

Letter of transmittal

Table of contents

Index

Glossary

Contact officer(s)

Internet home page address and Internet address for report

I

III

157

xiv

xiv

Review by Chief Executive

Review by Chief Executive

Summary of significant issues and developments

Overview of agency’s performance and financial results

Outlook for following year

Significant issues and developments - portfolio

ix

ix

ix-xii

xii

n/a

Agency overview

Role and functions

Organisational structure

Outcome and program structure

Where outcome and program structures differ from PBS/PAES or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills (other portfolio statements), details of variation and reasons for change

Portfolio structure

1

67

xiii

n/a

n/a

COMPLIANCE INDEX Annual Report 2013-2014 | 163

DESCRIPTION PAGE

Report on performance

Review of performance during the year in relation to programs and contribution to outcomes

Actual performance in relation to deliverables and KPIs set out in PBS/PAES or other portfolio statements

Where performance targets differ from the PBS/ PAES, details of both former and new targets, and reasons for the change

Narrative discussion and analysis of performance

Trend information

Significant changes in nature of principal functions/ services

Performance of purchaser/ provider arrangements

Factors, events or trends influencing agency performance

Contribution of risk management in achieving objectives

Social inclusion outcomes

Performance against service charter customer service standards, complaints data, and the agency’s response to complaints

Discussion and analysis of the agency’s financial performance

Discussion of any significant changes from the prior year or from budget.

Agency resource statement and summary resource tables by outcomes

5-10

8

n/a

9

i-83

n/a

n/a

71

81

72

9-10

n/a

89-90

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY

Corporate governance Agency heads are required to certify that their agency comply with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

Statement of the main corporate governance practices in place

Names of the senior executive and their responsibilities

Senior management committees and their roles

Corporate and operational planning and associated performance reporting and review

Approach adopted to identifying areas of significant financial or operational risk

Policy and practices on the establishment and maintenance of appropriate ethical standards

How nature and amount of remuneration for SES officers is determined

70

68

68

67-68

68-70

71

71

74

External scrutiny Significant developments in external scrutiny

Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals

Reports by the Auditor-General, a Parliamentary Committee or the Commonwealth Ombudsman

81

82-83

81-82

164 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

DESCRIPTION PAGE

Management of human resources Assessment of effectiveness in managing and developing human resources to achieve agency objectives

Workforce planning, staff turnover and retention

Impact and features of enterprise or collective agreements, individual flexibility arrangements (IFAs), determinations, common law contracts and AWAs

Training and development undertaken and its impact

Work health and safety performance

Productivity gains

Statistics on staffing

Enterprise or collective agreements, IFAs, determinations, common law contracts and AWAs

Performance pay

Assessment of effectiveness of assets management Assets management Assessment of purchasing against core policies and principles Purchasing The annual report must include a summary statement detailing the number of new Consultants consultancy services contracts let during the year; the total actual expenditure on

all new consultancy contracts let during the year (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were active in the reporting year; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST). The annual report must include a statement noting that information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website.

Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the Auditor-General Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

Contracts exempt from the AusTender Exempt contracts Financial Statements Financial statements Other mandatory information Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011)

Advertising and Market Research (Section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918) and statement on advertising campaigns

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (Section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999)

Compliance with the agency’s obligations under the Carer Recognition Act 2010

Grant programs

Disability reporting - explicit and transparent reference to agency-level information available through other reporting mechanisms

Information Publication Scheme statement

Spatial reporting - expenditure by program between regional and nonregional Australia

Correction of material errors in previous annual report

List of requirements

73-74

78

74-75

73-74

80

n/a

14-80

74-75

75

64

63

63

63

63

93-156

78-80

85

86-87

n/a

n/a

88

85

n/a

n/a

160

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | 165

ALPHABETICAL INDEX A

‘A Capital Collection - Our History in Fashion’ 26

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent 33, 78, 88

Academy of Design Australia 31

Acton OBE, Dr Prue 31

ACT Government viii, xi, 10, 17, 19, 21, 33, 47, 50, 54, 59, 61, 87

‘ACT Guidelines for Recreational Water Quality (ACT Health, 2010)’ 47

ACT Rural Fire Service 42, 72

administered performance 10

advertising and market research 87

Agency Resources and Summary Resource Tables 91

annual public forum xi, 24, 35, 37, 53

ANZAC Day 27, 28, 45, 50, 72,

Anzac Parade 14, 21, 32, 33, 34, 35, 39, 41, 42, 43, 45, 52, 61, 72

Aspen Island 27, 28

asset management 10, 41, 64

audit 35, 41, 56, 88

Financial Statements 93

internal 69

Audit Committee 68, 69, 70

Audit Report, Independent 93

Australia Day Achievement Medallions 73

Australia Day xiv, 23, 27, 50

Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management)Act 1988

i, vii, 1, 11, 23, 39, 55, 65,75

Australian National University xi, 11, 14, 21, 28

Australian Parliament, relationship with 6

Authority x, xii, 6, 65, 66, 67, 68

Authority membership 65

B

Blundells Cottage xiv, 22, 27,32, 33, 35, 36, 41, 43, 50, 69

Board, see Authority

boat permits 41, 49, 53

Bowen Place crossing xi, xii, 14, 56, 89

Brick by Brick: Build Your Own Capital xii, 24, 25, 31, 32, 34, 52

Briggs MP, The Hon Jamie i, 2, 17, 31, 85

Bureau of Meteorology 46

Bushfire Operations Plan 90

Business Continuity Plan 70

business planning 68

C

Canberra a Capital Place: Report of the Independent Review of the

National Capital Authority 10

Australian Government response 10

Canberra as the National Capital, awareness of 23, 25, 31

Canberra Day XIV, 23, 27, 50

Canberra Guide, The 24, 33, 53

Capital Works Program 56-62

Capitals Alliance 38

Captain Cook Memorial Jet 18, 25, 39, 41, 48

Carillon Frolic 27, 28

Centenary of Canberra VII, 26, 59

Certificate of Compliance 69, 85

Chair 65, 66,

Report vii-ix

Changi Chapel, Campbell 21, 22, 45

Chief Executive ix, 11, 12, 63, 65-70, 74-78, 95

delegation of powers to 6

year in review and outlook x-xii

City Hill 11, 14, 28

Colliers International (ACT) Pty Ltd 27, 72

Commitment to Community Engagement (August 2011) 36, 83

Commonwealth Avenue 18, 35, 41, 43

Commonwealth Ombudsman 83-84

Commonwealth Ombudsman, complaints to 84

Commonwealth Park xiv, 4, 23, 24, 35, 41, 43, 50, 52

Commonwealth Place xiv, 38, 43, 45, 50

Commonwealth Procurement Rules 63-64

Community vii, x, xi, 7, 16, 21, 34 - 36, 41, 43, 47, 49, 53, 55, 65, 66

collaboration 72

engagement practice 83

Community Programs Association 45

consultation website, ‘Have Your Say’ xiv, 24, 36

166 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

consultants 63-64, 112

contact details xiv

contracts xiii, 6, 41, 63-64, 80-81

performance monitoring 64

Core, Peter viii, 66

corporate governance 65, 68

Cosaert, Koen 28

cost recovery 10

courts and tribunals 83-84

customer service 72

D

de minimis non curat lex principle 6

delegations and authorisations 6

Denyn, Jef 28

departmental operating deficit 9

departmental performance 9

Designated Areas 10, 12, 21, 55,

development and works approval 12

development assessment 11, 67

Development Control Plans 68, 73

diplomatic

estates 11, 16, 33, 39

leases 62

sites, investigation into 16

disability reporting 90

Draft Amendment 82 - Amtech Estate 36

Draft Amendment 84 - Pialligo 19, 36

E

ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance 87

education and training see learning and development 71, 73

education portal 24, 32, 83

electronic document and records management system 73

employment agreements 74

Employee Assistance Program 80

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 21, 42, 87

Enterprise Agreement 69, 71, 74

workplace diversity 78, 80

ethical standards 71

external scrutiny 83

F

Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 6, 63, 83, 85

financial overview 7

financial performance see Departmental Performance 9

financial statements i, 69, 81, 83

First World War 28, 33, 35

flag display see International flag display 38, 44

flag supply 45

flood events 47

Floriade xi, 50

Foreign Affairs and Trade, Department of 51

fountains xi, 41, 43, 45

fraud control plan 69-70

Freedom of Information xiv, 81

Friends of Grasslands 72, 90

G

Gaby’s Food Van 50

goals, NCA 1

Government funding xii, 7, 9, 10

grasslands, conservation management of 39, 41-42

Greening Australia 72, 90

governance, corporate 65, 68

H

‘Have Your Say’ xiv, 24, 36

health and safety 64, 68, 74, 80,

High Court of Australia 5, 28

horticulture volunteers 34

Human resources 73

I

‘In Their Footsteps’ 32

‘Infrastructure and Regional Development, Department of ’ 2, 7, 17, 85

Information Publication Scheme (IPS) 81

Information and Communications Technology 70

International Flag Display 38, 44

international relationships 38

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | 167

J

Jerrabomberra Wetlands 28

Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External

Territories 6, 17, 83

K

key performance indicators 8, 64

King George V memorial 21-22, 36, 45

Kings Park 4, 41, 45, 50, 56, 60

Kings Avenue Overpass ii, 58

Koomarri 45, 72

L

Lake Burley Griffin (the Lake)

administration 35, 46

blue-green algae 47

debris removed from 47

hydrometric data services 46

Lake User Group 49

level lowering 47

macrophyte restoration 41, 47, 53, 90

permits and agreements 49

recreational use 41, 46, 49

water abstraction 47

water quality xii, 41, 47, 49

Lakes Ordinance 1976 2, 7, 46, 49

Langberg, Peter 28

Laue, Thomas 28

learning and development 71, 73

leases and licences 12, 50, 68

library 28

Legislative Instruments Act 2003 5, 17

Lindsay Pryor National Arboretum 41-42, 72, 90

M

Magarry, Tim 28

Magna Carta Place 28, 33

Main Corner 31, 32

management and accountability 65, 67-81

mandatory reporting 87

Maria’s Coffee Van 50

Marist College students 72

‘Mechanical Toys’ 32

Melbourne Fashion Festival 31

memorials 7, 32, 34, 41, 45

Mills, Carol 26

Minister 2, 6, 17, 19, 22

Minister, Assistant 2, 17, 31, 85

Minister’s powers 2

minor works 5-6, 52, 58

missions 16, 38, 50

Mount Gambier 24, 31, 32, 52

Murrumbidgee River Corridor viii, 16, 28

Museums Australia 24, 26, 32, 52

N

National Capital Authority 1-10

public forum, see annual public forum 35-36, 53

National Capital Development Commission 26, 28

National Capital Estate 39-54

National Capital Exhibition (the Exhibition) 23, 88

location xiv

opening hours xiv

temporary exhibition 26

virtual tour 32

visitor numbers 8

National Capital Functions 8, 92

Program 1.1 7-8, 11, 23, 39, 55, 92

National Capital Open Space System (NCOSS) review viii, 12, 16

National Capital Plan (the Plan) vii, 1-2, 10, 11-22, 38, 55, 73, 83-84, 87,

Amendment 82 - Amtech Estate 17-19, 36, 84

Amendment 84 - Pialligo 19, 36, 84,

National Capital Planning Commission, Washington DC 38

National Capital Works 1, 11, 23, 39, 55-62

National Carillon xii, 21, 24, 27, 32-34, 41, 43, 72

National Disability Strategy 90

National Heritage Festival 33, 34

National Land 2, 6, 22, 35, 38, 41, 50, 61, 84, 87

events on and use of 8, 39, 50, 53, 87, 90

management of 2, 90

National Land (Parking) Repeal Ordinance 2014 2, 84

National Land (Parking) Ordinance 1994 2

168 | NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014

National Land (Parking) (Consequential Amendments) Ordinance 1994 2

National Land (Road Transport) Ordinance 2014 2, 83-85

National Nurses Forum 34

National Rose Garden 21, 41, 88

National Workers Memorial 9, 10, 53, 58

O

Occupational Health and Safety 64

Old Parliament House Gardens 21, 33, 34, 41

Ombudsman see Commonwealth Ombudsman 83-84

online event registration xiv, 38

online outreach tools 24

organisational structure 66

outcome xiii, 1

P

Parliament xii, 3, 6, 17

Portfolio Budget Statements 7

Parkes Way 22, 38, 41

Parliament Act 1974 6

Parliamentary Committees 83-84

Joint standing Committee on the National Capital and External

Territories 6, 17, 83

Parliamentary Precincts Act 1988 6

Parliamentary Zone 5-6, 11, 22, 39, 41-42, 50

partnerships 72

Peace Park 61

Penn, Shelley i, vii, 65-66

performance management 71, 75

performance report 69

personnel services 75

Planning and Land Authority of the Environment and Sustainable

Development Directorate (ESDD) 19

planning studies 16

procurement 54, 63-64

Privacy Commissioner, complaints to 84

program and exception reporting 64

Protective Security Coordination Centre (PSCC) 51

Pryor, Professor Lindsay 42

public consultation topics 36, 83

public forum see annual public forum xi, 24, 35, 37, 53

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 71

purchasing 63-64

advertising and market research 87

consultants 63

quality assurance certification 64

quality management plans 64

Q

Queen Elizabeth II 25, 27, 28, 49

Quote/Unquote 25-26

R

Rake, Gary x

Reconciliation Place 33, 34, 41, 45

records management 64, 73

regulating development 12

regulation review 83-84

Remembrance Day 45

Remuneration 68, 74

review of operations 7

risk management 68, 71, 87

Rond Terrace 21

Royal Military College Duntroon 14

Russell Drive 22

Rankine, the Hon. Jennifer 31

S

salary processing 75

Scrivener Dam (the Dam) xi, 41, 45-46, 56, 61-62

anchor bolt corrosion 45-46, 56

anchor bolt remediation project xi, 49, 56, 58

annual safety and surveillance inspection 45-46, 56

operation and maintenance 46

safety and surveillance 46

security 22, 71, 73

Senate Estimates 83

senior executives 68

remuneration 68, 74

Service Charter 72, 163

performance against 163

Sitsky AM, Larry 28

skills development see staff learning and development 71, 73-74

NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY Annual Report 2013-2014 | 169

Smith, Andrew ix-x, 67-68

social inclusion 163

social justice and equity 83

social media, use of xii, 44, 83

sponsorship 27, 72

staff

learning and development 71, 73-74

retention and turnover 78

summary and profile 75

State Library of South Australia 31, 32

‘Stillness and the Night’ January recital program 27, 72

‘Story of Canberra’ 25-26, 32-33, 160

sustainable development 19, 87

T

temporary trader permits 50

tenders 63

Territory Plan 10, 17, 19-20, 35, 161

Torres Strait Islanders see Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent

33, 78, 88

Touring Exhibitions 31

Treasury Fountain 45

trees, removal and replacement 5, 42, 88

twitter xii, 24, 34, 36, 53, 83

U

Urban Design Guidelines 8

V

values 2

vision x, 83

visual communications 73

volunteers 34, 52, 72

horticulture 34

interpretive 35

research 35

W

Walker-Kaye, Alison 67-68

water abstraction see Lake Burley Griffin 47

water quality see Lake Burley Griffin xii, 41, 47, 49

Weber, Terry 66

Weddings xi, 38, 50

Weiss, Leonard 28

Wendouree Drive 21, 27, 50, 56, 59, 61

Williamstown Library 31

Windsor Walk 59

Women 75-78

Wong, Anna 28

work health and safety 80

workplace diversity plan 78

works, definition 12

works approvals 12

Designated Areas 12

number completed 8

valued at $1 million or more 14

World War I and World War II Memorials see First World War 28, 33, 35

XYZ

Yarralumla Bay 28, 47

Yarramundi Reach 41-42, 72

York Park Oak Plantation 59

T H I S P U B L I C A T I O N I S P R I N T E D O N K N I G H T P A P E R

Knight is Smooth is FSC certified, sourcing pulp from managed plantations and responsible forests. The fibre used to produce Knight is elemental chlorine free.

THE FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL IS AN INTERNATIONAL NOT FOR-PROFIT, MULTI-STAKEHOLDER ORGANIZATION ESTABLISHED IN 1993 TO PROMOTE RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT OF THE WORLD’S FORESTS. MIX PAPER FROM

RESPONSIBLE SOURCES WWW.FSC.ORG

FSC™

F O R E S T S T E W A R D S H I P C O U N C I L

N A T I O N A L C A P I T A L A U T H O R I T Y

THE NATIONAL CAPITAL AUTHORITY IS ESTABLISHED UNDER the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988.

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T E L E P H O N E : + 6 1 2 6 2 7 1 2 8 8 8 FA X : + 6 1 2 6 2 7 3 4 4 2 7

E M A I L : N A T C A P @ N A T C A P . G O V . A U

W W W . N A T I O N A L C A P I T A L . G O V . A U