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Old Parliament House (Museum of Australian Democracy)—Report for 2013-14


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Old Parliament House AnnuAl RePORt

2013-2014

i

Old Parliament House Annual Report 2013-14

© Commonwealth of Australia 2014

This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior permission from Old Parliament House.

ISSN 1837-2309

Contacts Physical address Old Parliament House 18 King George Terrace

Parkes ACT 2600

Mailing address Old Parliament House PO Box 7088

Canberra BC ACT 2610

General inquiries Contact Reception staff

Phone (02) 6270 8222

Fax (02) 6270 8111

Email info@moadoph.gov.au

Website moadoph.gov.au

Australian Prime Ministers Centre Contact Reference staff

Phone (02) 6270 8270

Email apmc@moadoph.gov.au

School programs Contact Bookings officer

Phone (02) 6270 8282

Email bookings@moadoph.gov.au

Published by Old Parliament House

Online version: This report is available for download at moadoph.gov.au/about/corporate-documents.

Inquiries about the content of this report should be directed to the annual report coordinator by phone at (02) 6270 8171, fax at (02) 6270 8235 or email at info@moadoph.gov.au.

Senator the Hon George Brandis QC Attorney-General Minister for the Arts Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I am pleased to forward to you the annual report on the operations of Old Parliament House for the year ended 30 June 2014, as required under section 70(1) of the Public Service Act 1999, for your presentation to parliament.

I certify that the annual report has been prepared in accordance with section 70 of the Public Service Act 1999 and the Requirements for annual reports for departments, executive agencies and FMA Act bodies approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit for 2013-14.

In addition, and as required by the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines, I certify that I am satisfied that Old Parliament House has prepared fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans; has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes that meet the agency’s needs; and has taken reasonable measures to minimise the incidence of fraud in the agency and to investigate and recover the proceeds of fraud against the agency. No cases of fraud were identified during the reporting year.

Yours sincerely

Daryl Karp Director 1 October 2014

COntentS

letteR Of tRAnSmitt Al iii

OuR ViSiOn vi

HiGHliGHtS Of tHe YeAR vii

mAjOR ACtiVitieS in 2013-14 ix

ADViSORY COunCil ’S ReVieW xi

DiReCtOR’S RePORt xii

AGenCY OVeRVieW 1

Profile 2

Structure 3

Executive 4

RePORt On PeRfORmAnCe 5

Performance overview 6

Program 1.1 deliverables 10

Manage the heritage values of Old Parliament House 10

Develop and manage the agency’s collections 10

Increase access, engagement and participation through onsite, online and outreach programs 14

mAnAGement AnD ACCOunt ABilitY 23

Corporate governance 24

External scrutiny 32

Freedom of information 32

Human resources management 33

Work health and safety 33

Disability Action Plan 34

Recognition for carers 35

Asset management 35

Procurement 35

Advertising and market research 36

Ecologically sustainable development 36

finAnCiAl St AtementS 39

Summary of financial management and performance 40

Financial statements and supporting notes for the year ended 30 June 2014 43

APPenDiCeS 131

Appendix A: Staffing statistics 132

Appendix B: Agency and outcome resources 135

Appendix C: List of requirements 138

ABBReViAtiOnS AnD ACROnYmS 142

inDeX 143

CONTENTS vii

OuR ViSiOn Celebrating the spirit of Australian democracy and the power of your voice within it

The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House plays a significant role in exploring and communicating the intrinsic value of democracy—the capacity for people to govern their own lives and to have their say. With an Australian perspective, in a country made up of over 200 nationalities, the museum provides a space not just to celebrate our democratic traditions, but also to truly engage with our audiences and stakeholders.

Through the lens of living democracy, we will build a vibrant community through exhibitions, talks, festivals, artists, celebrations, tours, films, markets, concerts and memorials. We want to enrich the quality of Australians’ lives by providing a place to connect with family and friends, and offer unprecedented opportunities to make this iconic building a rich and central part of our civic and individual experience.

Bold—Catalyst for uncensored conversations

Our collection, events, exhibitions, interpretation and learning programs will tell stories and provoke conversations that inspire and help Australians to remember, reflect on, celebrate and value the spirit of democracy.

Relevant—Empowered and engaged communities

Enhanced visitor experiences—onsite, online and through outreach activities—will be created for, by and about the people, community and democratic spirit of Canberra, the nation and the world. Our targeted activities will be timely and relevant, encouraging active engagement and dialogue.

Authentic—A welcoming and vibrant meeting place

In this nationally significant place, we will create a vibrant and welcoming town square as a rich and central part of our civic and individual experience. Progress will be achieved in harmony with heritage values which recognise, preserve and communicate the spirit of place.

Dynamic—A sustainable and thriving future

Our organisational culture will enable the museum and its valued staff to be nimble, courageous, democratic and efficient. Our actions and relationships will ensure ongoing relevance and financial sustainability, advancing the museum and the building as a critical asset for diverse sectors.

OlD PARliAment HOuSe ANNuAL REPORT 2013 -14 viii

HiGHliGHtS Of tHe YeAR

Exhibitions and events • The museum’s activity increased four-fold since last year, with 16 exhibitions of varying scale that combine the building, collection and partnerships to offer

multiple points of connection.

• Visits to the museum increased by 20 per cent compared with last year—the second highest since Old Parliament House reopened to the public in 1992.

Learning • Our school learning programs drew the highest number of visitors ever—81,604 students and teachers visited the museum.

• We also had a wide reach—1,432 educational institutions participated in organised school learning programs.

• Our learning programs continued to be highly regarded—100 per cent of teachers reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the overall experience of their visit and 100 per cent were satisfied with the relevance of our programs to classroom curriculum.

Heritage • We continued to expertly manage access needs and the heritage values of the place within budget constraints.

• We delivered a new five-year Heritage Management Plan in line with the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

• We developed a new Collection Development Plan that will inform our future acquisitions.

Research • We released a new five-year strategy for the Australian Prime Ministers Centre, with a refined research focus.

• The 2014 Australian Prime Ministers Centre seminar brought together more than 100 participants from research, arts, government and the community to engage with nine academics and writers on their work on prime ministers from Barton to Howard.

• A selection of the museum’s oral history collection of over 400 personal recollections and insights into the building and its people was made available on the museum’s website.

Corporate and finance • Excellent financial management delivered internal efficiencies and savings, while still achieving an unmodified audit opinion.

• The museum won the 2013 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion in Government Award for our commitment to encouraging, welcoming and supporting people with disability.

MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN 2013-14 ix OlD PARliAment HOuSe ANNuAL REPORT 2013-14 ix

ACT Motorcycle Riders’ Association Toy Run, December 2013. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

1901 Unearthed: The Lost Election Papers. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

‘Lost in the Museum’ October school holiday program. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 x

mAjOR ACtiVitieS in 2013-14

July • Model Global Parliament event

• Pop-up exhibition: Crown, Sword and Sceptre

August • The Hansard Monologues theatre performance

• Pop-up exhibition: 1901 Unearthed: The Lost Election Papers

• The People’s Parliament: ABC Radio broadcast event

• Declaration of ACT Senate nominations with the Australian Electoral Commission

• ACT Schools Constitutional Convention program with the National Archives of Australia and the ACT Legislative Assembly

• Model united Nations Assembly with Rotary District 9800

September • House & Garden: Work, Rest and Play at Old Parliament House exhibition

• Building History exhibition

• Pop-up exhibition: Silver Service: Silverware from the Parliamentary Table

• The 2013 Election! - super voting booth in King’s Hall

October • Insurgence exhibition and symposium

• Senate ballot announcement with the Australian Electoral Commission

November • About Face: The Art of Caricature exhibition

• Behind the Lines 2013: The Year’s Best Political Cartoons exhibition

• Pop-up exhibition: Season’s Greetings

December • Pop-up exhibition: Vale Nelson Mandela

• OpenMi Tours app launch giving multi-language audio access to Behind the Lines

• Australasian Parliamentary Educators Conference

January • Happy and Glorious: Commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the Queen’s Visit exhibition

February • Enlighten Festival, including Occupy Small Street and Deviator events

• Opening of the Zine Lounge

March • Beyond the Veneer: A Fresh Look at the Prime Minister’s Suite exhibition

• The Governors-General exhibition

• National Schools’ Constitutional Convention program with the National Archives of Australia

April • Pop-up exhibition: Power of Words

• Introduction of scaffold tours of the re-rendering project

• Canberra International Music Festival events

May • Michael Cook: Through My Eyes exhibition

• National Indigenous Youth Parliament program

• 101 Humans with Australian Capital Tourism

June • Queen’s Birthday weekend events

• Australian Prime Ministers Centre seminar

MAJOR ACTIVITIES IN 2013-14 xi

Original image by R.C. Strangman, between 1930 and 1950. National Library of Australia. an24895746-V. Photo: Coloured by Art Direction creative. Museum of Australian Democracy Collection.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 xii

ADViSORY COunCil ’S ReVieW

Senator the Hon George Brandis QC Attorney-General Minister for the Arts Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

This year I was pleased to be offered the opportunity to join and chair the Old Parliament House Advisory Council.

The Museum of Australian Democracy has now been in place at Old Parliament House for some six years, and under the leadership of its Director, Ms Daryl Karp, has been eager to demonstrate the skills and lessons of experience that have been acquired during that period, and to embark on a journey of strategic change.

The museum has stated as its goal to become a bold and dynamic institution, inspiring audiences to become informed about Australia’s unique democratic history and become active participant citizens in our society.

The year covered in this annual report has seen growing interest by the public in the museum, in ongoing exhibitions as well as in new exhibits and events. In 2013-14 the museum’s onsite visitor numbers increased by 20 per cent, with a significant increase in return visits. In offering a new range of points at which to connect, the museum has enticed visitors to come and see what is on offer, be part of the conversation, and be curious about what is coming next.

I am particularly pleased to see that the schools and teachers visiting the museum continue to have a valuable experience, with a 99 per cent satisfaction rate from students and a 100 per cent rating from teachers.

The team at the museum have embraced the challenges of strategic change and the members of the Advisory Council have been impressed by the skill and professionalism displayed across the organisation.

We thank you as Minister for the Arts, and the government, for your ongoing support to the museum as a public institution, a centre for research and a heritage resource.

I thank my fellow Advisory Council members for their continued commitment to the museum and their expert advice. This year the council farewelled Ms Natasha Stott Despoja AM and Ms Susan Mackay, and we thank them for their contribution to the development of the museum.

Yours sincerely

The Hon David Kemp Chair Old Parliament House Advisory Council 19 September 2014

ADVISORY COuNCIL'S REVIEW xiii

DiReCtOR’S RePORt What a year this has been and what reasons to celebrate! With significant increases in the number of exhibitions and activities, improved visitor numbers, new caterers, a revised Heritage Management Plan and new Collection Development Plan, major building works, installation of a wireless network, social media engagement, online oral history collection, organisational change, major festivals and events, theatre and debates in the Chambers, data gathering, improved procurement processes and an unmodified audit opinion, it is fair to say that the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House is in the process of transformative change.

A dynamic national icon In July 2013 we launched our new strategic plan to position the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House as a dynamic, contemporary space that celebrates the spirit of Australia’s democracy, and the power of your voice within it.

In one of the nation’s most loved and recognised buildings, we are creating a new kind of town square, a place where we can have bold conversations, support empowered and engaged communities, provide an authentic and welcoming meeting space, and enable staff to be courageous, democratic, nimble and efficient.

The new strategic plan focuses on diverse audiences, compelling stories and public space. Our strategy is based on four key pillars:

• to create bold agenda-setting content, known for its excellence and integrity

• to be relevant, inspiring a dramatic engagement with diverse audiences

• to have an authentic connection to the building, in harmony with its heritage values

• to be a dynamic organisation: contemporary, relevant and sustainable.

Engaged and informed Visitors are at the heart of what we do. Our exhibitions and activities celebrate, debate and explore stories—of the building and those who worked here, of the decisions that shaped Australia, of the visionaries who fought for change, and of Australia’s influence on world democracy.

In a country made up of hundreds of nationalities, the Museum of Australian Democracy provides a space not just to celebrate our democratic tradition, but also to truly collaborate with our audiences and stakeholders— through exhibitions, talks, festivals, celebrations, artists, memorials and more.

A continuum of experiences It is fitting that we began our new strategic plan with a festival for the 2013 federal election. We focused on creating a program with multiple and diverse points for engagement and connection. So whether your interest was theatre, politics, history, comedy or debate, there was something for you. On election day more than 6,000 people from around Australia cast their votes in King’s Hall.

We have extended this approach to all that we do, providing a continuum of experiences from online access to guided tours and everything in between. We have introduced quick-response, pop-up exhibitions and provocative temporary exhibitions, and re-energised building use through themed activities, often centred on music and food. Our digital offerings have focused on social media and audience engagement, leading to a five-fold increase in connectedness.

Our schools programs are operating at capacity, and continue to receive exceptional satisfaction ratings from students and teachers alike. The National Indigenous Youth Parliament provided a transformational leadership experience for high-potential young Indigenous leaders. The museum’s Zine Lounge is also giving a voice to the hard-to-access young adult market.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 xiv

Heritage Old Parliament House was—and continues to be—a landmark in the Parliamentary Triangle and in Canberra. It is firmly embedded in the zeitgeist of the country—as a symbolic, physical representation of democracy and our political processes.

Built in 1927 as our first Parliament House in Canberra, the building has adapted to the needs of those within it. There were major additions in the 1940s and 1970s to accommodate the growing numbers of parliamentarians. In 1988 it ceased as the home of the federal parliament when New Parliament House opened. In 2009, it was relaunched as the Museum of Australian Democracy.

Developing a thriving public space in harmony with heritage values is central to our strategic plan, and is underpinned by our updated Heritage Management Plan and the new Collection Development Plan.

Finance A hallmark of the year was excellent financial management in increasingly difficult conditions. Budgets remain static, against a backdrop of efficiency dividends and increasing fixed costs. A key priority was identifying opportunities for internal savings. This included refined stocktake processes, strategic profiling and aligning risk tolerance with our activities. A priority for the latter part of the year was preparing for shared corporate services across the national arts and cultural agencies.

Challenges and opportunities There are many challenges ahead for the museum in forging new ground in a complex and changing environment. The first is to continue to find new ways to tell the stories of democracy, including creating new permanent exhibitions.

We have begun work on developing our collection, strategically and with a clear understanding of our niche and purpose. We have the ongoing task of providing wide access to a heritage site and collection, while maintaining its values. We have to continually investigate and inquire into the expectations of our audiences.

We also have the opportunities of forging new partnerships and collaborations, such as the relationship with SBS and university of Canberra for the Power of One exhibition later in 2014, which marks the anniversary of 18-year-olds being able to vote and investigates how to engage young people in the formal democratic process.

We are extending our focus on prime ministers, with a fresh five-year strategy for the Australian Prime Ministers Centre. The new strategy emphasises research, scholarship and public engagement in the stories of those who have led the nation, their motivations and reflections, and the impact they have had on our political, social and economic life.

At this stage, unlike other national collecting institutions, the museum has limited capacity to retain earned income, which we are seeking to address. The life cycle plan for the Old Parliament House building is also underfunded, creating a future need for additional funding sources. To effectively engage with the story of democracy, additional funding opportunities need to be harnessed.

DIRECTOR'S REPORT xv

Acknowledgements I am immensely proud of our achievements this year, and want to acknowledge the contributions and support of all the following:

• our valued and strategic partners, who work with us to increase the reach and impact of the museum, including the Australian Electoral Commission and YMCA for the National Indigenous Youth Parliament; Craft ACT on Beyond the Veneer ; the Australian Human Rights Commission on Insurgence; the Canberra Zine Emporium; Griffith university and the Australian National university on the Australian Prime Ministers Centre annual seminar; and our colleagues in the national Network of Prime Ministerial Research and Collecting Agencies: the National Archives of Australia, the National Library of Australia, the National Film and Sound Archive, the Alfred Deakin Prime Ministerial Library, the Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Library, the Chifley Home, the John Curtin Prime Ministerial Library, the Curtin Family Home, Home Hill (Lyons Home), the university of Melbourne Archives (Malcolm Fraser Collection) and the Whitlam Institute

• the leadership team, incredible staff, and volunteers who bring their knowledge, skills and commitment to their work, to delivering a great experience for our audiences, and to supporting our strategic change of direction

• the Old Parliament House Advisory Council, which supports our work through counsel and connections. This year we welcomed a new chair, the Hon Dr David Kemp, and three new members: the Hon Graham Edwards AM, Sir David Smith KCVO, AO and Mrs Heather Henderson. We also farewelled with thanks two outgoing members: Ms Natasha Stott Despoja AM and Ms Sue Mackay

• the previous government under the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport portfolio and the minister responsible, the Hon Tony Burke MP. Following the federal election, the museum moved to the Attorney-General’s portfolio

• Senator the Hon George Brandis QC, Attorney-General and Minister for the Arts, and the executives and officers of the Ministry for the Arts in the Attorney-General’s Department.

Daryl Karp Director

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 xvi

AGENCY OVERVIEW

Photo: Adam McGrath 2013.

PROfile

Role To be the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House and to ensure that our audience is able to enjoy, appreciate and understand the role of democracy in the history of Australia, while conserving the significant national heritage site and the heritage collections for future generations.

Vision Celebrating the spirit of Australian democracy and the power of your voice within it.

Mission We are committed to fulfilling our vision and providing an inspirational experience for our audiences by:

• engaging with them to enrich their understanding of Australia’s past, present and future democracy

• providing a range of dynamic and engaging programs relevant to our vision

• managing, conserving, interpreting and presenting our heritage building and its collections.

Key objectives We will achieve our mission by:

• increasing access, engagement and participation through onsite, online and outreach programs

• managing the heritage values of Old Parliament House, ensuring the building is maintained, conserved and capable of sustainable use in accordance with legislative obligations and the highest heritage standards

• developing and maintaining the agency’s collections

• ensuring effective governance arrangements, planning structures and staffing capability.

Planned outcome

An enhanced appreciation and understanding of the political and social heritage of Australia for members of the public, through activities including the conservation and upkeep of, and the provision of access to, Old Parliament House and the development of its collections, exhibitions and educational programs.

Values We are committed to:

• upholding the values of the Australian Public Service—we are accountable and responsible for our decisions and actions

• providing the highest quality service in everything we do

• inclusiveness through diversity of participation, thought and action

• even-handedness, fairness and impartiality in our treatment of subjects and issues

• the national significance of the site and collections through best practice conservation

• our people and their personal and professional development.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 2

StRuCtuRe

Figure 1 Organisational structure at 30 june 2014

mAnAGeR

Facilities and Information Technology Mr Chris Grebert

CHief finAnCiAl OffiCeR

Finance, Procurement and Risk Ms Karen Hogan

mAnAGeR

Heritage and Collections Ms Edwina Jans

mAnAGeR

Human Resources, Governance and Strategic Planning Ms Lee Ann Pluis

DiReCtOR

Ms Daryl Karp

DePutY DiReCtOR

Business Operations and Heritage Mr Andrew Harper

mAnAGeR

Community Engagement Ms Rachael Coghlan

mAnAGeR

Content Development and Commissioning Mr Michael Evans

mAnAGeR

Lifelong Learning Ms Glenda Smith

DePutY DiReCtOR

Audience, Programs and Partnerships Mr Steven Fox

AGENCY OVERVIEW 3

eXeCutiVe

Ms Daryl Karp Director

Ms Karp commenced as Director on 2 April 2013. Previously the Chief Executive Officer of Film Australia, Ms Karp also had experience at ABC Television, where her roles included Head of Factual Programs and Head and Executive Producer of the Documentaries & Features and Science & Features departments.

She is currently a non-executive director of the SBS, and the Australian Government representative on the Australian Children’s Television Foundation.

Ms Karp is responsible for:

• managing the agency

• ensuring accountability to the government, parliament and public

• assisting the minister to fulfil accountability obligations, as required by the parliament, in relation to the agency’s operation and administration

• overseeing corporate governance and determining strategic priorities in consultation with the deputy directors and senior managers

• setting the broad strategic vision for the agency.

Mr Andrew Harper Deputy Director Business Operations and Heritage

Mr Harper joined Old Parliament House as a Deputy Director when the organisation became an executive agency in 2008. He previously worked in senior corporate management roles in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Department of Finance and Deregulation.

Mr Harper leads:

• human resources management

• financial services and procurement

• corporate management, including governance policies and operational procedures

• information and communications technology

• heritage management and conservation

• the conservation, security and upkeep of the building, including capital works

• operation of the Australian Prime Ministers Centre and associated programs

• tenant liaison and contracts

• support for the Advisory Council.

Mr Steven Fox Deputy Director Audience, Programs and Partnerships

Mr Fox became a Deputy Director in March 2012. He previously spent four years as the Chief Executive of Te Manawa Museums Trust in New Zealand. Before that he held senior positions in the National Museum of Australia, the National Film and Sound Archive, and Old Parliament House, where he worked for a number of years in curatorial and managerial roles.

Mr Fox leads:

• provision of visitor services

• lifelong learning programs

• collection development

• development and delivery of exhibitions, public programs and events

• marketing, public affairs and evaluation

• web, social media and digital engagement.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 4

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE

Sunday sessions and free caricatures. Photo: Paul Chapman 2013.

PeRfORmAnCe OVeRVieW Old Parliament House reports on its performance against the outcome and program structure set out in the 2013-14 Portfolio Budget Statements for the Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport portfolio. In 2013-14, the agency’s single outcome was delivered through a single program.

Outcome 1 An enhanced appreciation and understanding of the political and social heritage of Australia for members of the public, through activities including the conservation and upkeep of, and the provision of access to, Old Parliament House and the development of its collections, exhibitions and educational programs.

Program 1.1 Conserve, preserve, develop and present Old Parliament House as the Museum of Australian Democracy.

The objectives of Program 1.1 are to:

• manage the heritage values of Old Parliament House

• develop and manage the agency’s collections

• increase access, engagement and participation through onsite, online and outreach programs.

All national arts and cultural agencies report against a common reporting framework in order to standardise reporting against a range of cross-agency key performance indicators. The indicators were initially developed in 2012-13 and were further refined and added to in 2013-14 through consultation between the Ministry for the Arts and the national arts and cultural agencies.

Table 1 summarises our performance against the key performance indicators for Program 1.1 during 2013-14.

Senior students from International Grammar School participating in the ‘Dismissal’ program. Photo: Belinda Pratten 2013.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 6

Table 1 Results for Program 1.1 key performance indicators, 2013-14

Indicator Target Result

Visitor interactions

Total number of visits to the organisation 149,900 217,678

Total number of visits to the organisation’s website 400,000 460,430

Total number of onsite visits by students as part of an organised educational group 69,400 74,558

Participation in public and school programs

Number of people participating in public programs 16,000 46,092

Number of students participating in school programs 69,400 74,558

Quantity of school learning programs delivered

Number of organised programs delivered onsite 1,800 1,740a

Number of program packages available online 11 11

Number of educational institutions participating in organised school learning programs 1,380 1,432

Visitor satisfaction

Percentage of visitors that were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit 90% 94%

Program survey rating (by teachers)

Percentage of teachers reporting overall positive experience 95% 100%

Percentage of teachers reporting relevance to the classroom curriculum 90% 100%

Expenditure mix Expenditure on collection development (as a % of total expenditure) 4% 8%b

Expenditure on other capital items (as a % of total expenditure) 2% 4%

Expenditure on other (i.e. non-collection development) labour costs (as a % of total expenditure) 50% 47%

Other expenses (as a % of total expenditure) 44% 41%

Collection management and access

Number of acquisitions (made in the reporting period) 385 449

Total number of objects accessioned (in the reporting period) 385 1,218c

% of the total collection available to the public 49% 64%

% of the total collection available to the public online 52% 53%

% of the total collection available to the public on display 53% 42%d

% of the total collection available to the public on tour 0% 0%

% of the total collection digitised 60% 60%

a The number of organised programs delivered onsite was lower due to fewer school group bookings being received. Even though fewer bookings were received, the number of students in each group was on average larger than usual.

b The increase in expenditure on collection development was due to above target acquisitions, and increased maintenance, preservation and conservation activities.

c The total number of objects accessioned reflects progress made on reducing the backlog of accessioning from previous reporting periods.

d The reduction in collection items on display is a more realistic reflection of the agency’s current activities and strategic direction.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 7

nAtiOnAl inDiGenOuS YOutH PARliAment The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House and our surrounds are an important part of this nation’s history of Indigenous leadership and identity. We are committed to being in conversation with Indigenous people to tell these stories now and into the future.

The National Indigenous Youth Parliament (NIYP) is a partnership between the museum, the YMCA and the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC). It aims to harness and develop the skills of young Indigenous leaders between the ages of 16 and 25 years, enabling them to take the AEC’s voter participation messages back to their communities.

In May-June 2014, the NIYP brought together 50 young Indigenous leaders from across Australia to undertake leadership activities, culminating in a week-long intensive program in Canberra. This included a weekend youth parliament debate program in the House of Representatives Chamber.

Alongside the NIYP, the museum hosted related programs, including Michael Cook’s Through My Eyes exhibition and Marnti Warajanga, an exhibition of polaroids relating to the 1967 Referendum to remove discrimination against Indigenous Australians from the Constitution.

National Indigenous Youth Parliament in the House of Representatives Chamber. Photo: Andrew Taylor for the Australian Electoral Commission.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013 -14 8

Zine lOunGe In redefining how we connect with audiences, the museum realised that different communities have different ways of expressing themselves and different needs. One group that we have difficulty connecting with is the young adult group.

In 2013-14 the museum introduced the Zine Lounge in partnership with the Canberra Zine Emporium. The lounge is a comfortable and safe space where young people can hang out and read one of the many zines already on display, or make one of their own.

A zine is a handmade, self-published magazine that is distributed in limited numbers. A zine can be about anything its creator is interested in; they often contain photos, cartoons, reviews and personal essays by the maker. A zine provides an opportunity for the maker to express their ideas and connect with individuals who share similar interests, thoughts, taste and values.

The Zine Lounge volunteers and museum staff support those wanting to explore zine making, express themselves, and tap into their creativity. Since the lounge opened in February 2014, 700 young people have participated in facilitated programs, school holiday programs and community events.

Zine Lounge Manifesto. Photo: Text by Chiara Grassia, designed by Pounce Creative 2013.

Visitors making zines during Enlighten. Photo: Stefan Postles 2014.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 9

PROGRAm 1.1 DeliVeRABleS

Manage the heritage values of Old Parliament House

manage and conserve heritage values of the Old Parliament House building and collection through the Heritage management Plan

The museum is custodian of the remarkable building that is Old Parliament House. We are responsible for its maintenance and upkeep, in line with its heritage status and values.

During 2013-14 we reviewed and updated the Heritage Management Plan for Old Parliament House. Since the building was listed on the National and Commonwealth Heritage Lists, its heritage values were managed under the Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2008-2013. The plan was made pursuant with sections 324S and 341S of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and the review was done in line with those sections.

The review confirmed the success of the plan in integrating conservation and interpretation of heritage values with being vital and relevant. The independent assessment noted that the condition and values of Old Parliament House were generally stable and that the level of interpretation had improved.

Apply a strategic approach to the capital works program through the revised life Cycle Cost Plan

Despite an underfunded life cycle plan, some of the significant projects undertaken during the year were:

• completion of Stage 4 of the upgrade of the building’s render, which involved stripping and replacing the render on the eastern façade, the House of Representatives courtyard and the south-west wing internal courtyard

• replacement of the carpet in the Members’ Dining Room and corridor, including accessibility works (ramp and hearing loop)

• installation of a wireless network to provide internet access throughout much of the building, including public, staff and storage areas (for building management controls)

• completion of Stage 1 of the upgrade of the external and internal lighting systems, to improve maintenance and running costs

• commencement of replacement of the building management system, which controls the operation of heating, ventilation and air-conditioning plant and equipment. The current system is at the end of its life. The new system will also have capacity to control the new lighting systems and provide detailed energy monitoring and reporting

In addition, a floor management strategy has been developed that contains a floor conservation schedule to determine a comprehensive approach to protecting the floors and floor coverings.

ensure appropriate stewardship over the asset collection

A collections review project was undertaken in the context of strategic priorities and amendments to collection management policies in the updated Heritage Management Plan. The review resulted in the development of our new Collection Development Plan, which sets out a collection vision, a collection statement of significance, and collecting principles. The new plan is supported by updated collection management procedures and annual collecting priorities.

Changes were also made to stocktake arrangements following a review of previous stocktake results and legislative asset management requirements. Considerable work over recent years has resulted in very low stocktake variance rates and provided a platform for a revised approach that is less resource intensive, but retains an appropriately high level of stewardship over the collection.

Develop and manage the agency’s collections

increase public awareness of and access to the collection

The museum manages a collection of more than 40,000 objects, of which the building itself is the largest.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 10

These objects form the basis for much of our activities, including permanent, temporary and digital exhibitions. In 2013-14, we developed and began implementing a new long-term plan for content development and audience engagement. With a key focus on partnerships and events, we aligned our programming with seasonal campaigns (such as the Election Festival, Enlighten and Floriade), resulting in an increased number of exhibitions and activities across the year, and a 20 per cent increase in onsite visitor numbers.

A rigorous assessment process was applied to new activities to ensure increased access, deepened engagement, expanded capacity, and excellence— everywhere and always. This led to an increase in both new and repeat visitors over the past 12 months.

ensure that the museum has appropriate collections of exhibition, interpretation and research materials that meet agency, public and scholarly needs

In 2013-14 we undertook a major project to review our collection to ensure it will make a lasting contribution to understanding and interpreting the ideas, movements, individuals and events of Australian democracy.

The review led to a new Collection Development Plan, with a strong vision for the collection to be ‘connected to and located within the historical heart of Australian government, [capturing] the ideas, movements, individuals and events of Australian democracy’.

Five collecting areas have been articulated, connecting the collection with the core interests of the museum: democracy, prime ministers, political influencers and movements, Old Parliament House as a functioning parliament house, and the history of the place.

Notable additions to the collection during the year included:

• face boards from the National Tally Board, used in the National Tally Room at Exhibition Park in Canberra until 2010 (donated by the Australian Electoral Commission)

• the suit worn by Governor-General Quentin Bryce to swear in our first female prime minister (donated by Dame Quentin Bryce)

• nine bibles used by Sir Richard Casey when he was sworn in to his various positions as a federal government minister; the bibles are dated between 1907 and 1951 (purchased).

Bibles used by Sir Richard Casey. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

Suit donated by Dame Quentin Bryce. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 11

eleCtiOn feStiVAl One of the major successes for the year was the Election Festival in August and September 2013. It was an opportunity for the museum to live the new strategic plan.

The festival combined provocative theatre (the Hansard Monologues performed in the House of Representatives Chamber), politics (the Senate Ball Drop for nominations for the ACT), history (a pop-up exhibition of the election papers from Australia’s first election in 1901), media (In Canberra Tonight election special), public programs and debate. The finale to this month-long festival was a partnership with the Australian Electoral Commission to open a super voting booth in King’s Hall for the 2013 federal election. The booth provided an excellent opportunity to connect with our audiences in this historic and iconic building while experiencing democracy in action.

This was the first time the building had operated a super booth and initial expectations of numbers were around 600 people. The day dawned fine and from early on it was clear that Canberra had taken the idea of voting in King’s Hall to heart. Crowds of people arrived to vote and it was soon evident that numbers would exceed 600. A quick call went out to staff and everyone pitched in to help. We worked together to manage the crowds, handed out water to the waiting groups, gave impromptu mini tours while people were standing in line, and made badges and distributed them with special election pencils and fridge magnets.

In the end, the super booth attracted more than 6,000 people, many of whom waited over an hour to cast their vote. The people of Canberra (and the museum’s and Australian Electoral Commission’s staff) kept their sense of humour during the sometimes long wait, and the positive comments and friendly attitude of the voters created a buzz in the building that was amazing. We were a tired but very happy team at the end of the day.

The 2013 federal election and the Election Festival more generally demonstrate how the museum can enliven its space and create a meaningful experience of democracy in a historic and contemporary context. By using its content, resources, creativity and expertise, and working in partnership with key stakeholders, the museum is able to take strategic programming risks. The results speak for themselves: increased engagement, more visitors and higher awareness of our activities—truly the Museum of Australian Democracy brought to life.

Voters queue for sausages outside the super booth. Photo: Siobhan Heanue for ABC News.

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OCCuPY SmAll StReet During Occupy Small Street, second-hand toys, specially fitted with placards, gave a new community of museum-goers an opportunity to have a voice— sometimes with humour, and always with heart.

People of all ages came in their thousands to choose a toy (or avatar) to convey a message of personal significance. The messages were as diverse and unique as the people who made them—some were voices raised in protest, some in praise. Miniature dinosaurs complained about climate change and chickens suggested we eat more beef. There were also very specific requests, such as more Star Wars books in the Gunghalin Library.

The museum’s collaboration with Arts x Activism demonstrated the power of a simple but compelling idea that was well executed and promoted. The group took part in the annual Enlighten Festival in Canberra and gave families and people of all ages a chance to have hands-on experience of protest and freedom of speech.

Occupy Small Street was a major drawcard during the Enlighten Festival, which brought 8,500 people to the museum over two weekends (at the end of February and beginning of March 2014). Visitors reported a 100 per cent satisfaction rating with the event, an outstanding success.

Museum staff helped visitors make their own protest placards. Photo: Stefan Postles 2014.

Protest placards made by visitors. Photo: Stefan Postles 2014.

Arts x Activism artists. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

Protest placards made by visitors. Photo: Stefan Postles 2014.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 13

increase alignment of collection activities with target audiences and programs

Story and experience are at the heart of what we do. The museum provides a space not just to celebrate our democratic traditions, but also to truly collaborate with our audiences and stakeholders.

Our approach extends from digital dialogue at the one end to exhibitions at the other. We have created content that has many uses: creating once and using in many applications and interpretations.

In 2013-14 we continued to hold ‘pop-up’ exhibitions, mountable in days and weeks, and mini-exhibits that could also be up and running quickly. These sit alongside our more considered temporary and permanent offerings, and allow us to meet the challenge to be relevant to audiences and responsive to current events.

As a national collecting institution, the museum is responsible for managing and developing a collection of material culture that reveals the democratic heritage of our nation, with three distinct sub-collections:

• The Heritage Collection is all the objects that have a direct association with Old Parliament House.

• The Political and Parliamentary Collection is the collection of material culture that aligns with the purpose of the museum as a place to explore and communicate the ideas and issues around democracy and government in Australia.

• The Interpretation and Learning Collection is the group of reproduction and facsimile pieces, and learning and display props used to interpret the museum’s values through public and learning programs.

Increase access, engagement and participation through onsite, online and outreach programs

maintain 2012-13 visitation levels for onsite programs and increase online visitation

In 2013-14, the museum prioritised increasing the foot traffic to the Old Parliament House site to address a downturn in general visitors to the site. We stimulated the curiosity of potential visitors and audiences—asking them to come and check out what was new.

utilising our content strategy and ability to respond rapidly to partners and events, we increased the number of exhibitions and activities across the year, aligning our products with seasonal campaigns (such as the Election Festival, Enlighten and Floriade).

Table 2 shows the totals and trends for numbers of visitors attending school programs and onsite exhibitions, travelling exhibitions and outreach programs, and functions.

Crown, Sword and Sceptre. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

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The highest proportion of visitors came to view onsite exhibitions and to attend events, school programs and public programs. Total onsite visitation of 207,066 in 2013-14 represents an increase of 20 per cent on 2012-13. The increase is attributable to the forward planning undertaken to increase the number and range of exhibitions, events and programs.

The reduction of 57 per cent in travelling exhibition visitation in 2013-14 is largely due to the decision to place an increased focus on onsite activities and reduce the number of travelling exhibitions.

Function facilities numbers decreased by 12 per cent due to a changeover in the catering contract. uncertainty surrounding new caterers had an impact on forward bookings.

Figure 2 gives a breakdown of total visitation by activity for the past three years.

Figure 2 t otal visitation, by activity, 2011-12 to 2012-13

Provide a diverse range of high-quality onsite, online and outreach visitor experiences and programs

A dynamic and audience-focused program of exhibitions and public programs has brought people back to the museum, building new connections to the building and the collections.

Table 2 Trends in annual visitor numbers, 2011-12 to 2013-14

2011-12 2012-13 2013-14

Onsite visitors School programs (including teachers) 81,182 80,682 81,604

Exhibition areas 94,218 92,061 125,462

Total 175,400 172,743 207,066

Change since previous year 2% -2% 20%

Travelling exhibitions and outreach programs 32,692 66,446 28,501

Change since previous year 132% 103% -57%

Function facilities 58,405 64,406 56,669

Change since previous year -5% 10% -12%

Young visitors examine a model of the building. Photo: Belinda Pratten 2013.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 15

AuStRAliAn PRime miniSteRS CentRe In the ways they lead and the ways they live, our prime ministers reflect aspects of the Australian political and social context of their times. Prime ministers play a major role in orienting, influencing and managing Australia through war and peace, boom and bust, fire and flood.

The Australian Prime Ministers Centre (APMC) spearheads the museum’s efforts to find out more about our prime ministers and, through them, more about our nation and ourselves. Established in 2007, the APMC has grown into a hub for research and engagement around prime ministers.

This year we began implementing a new five-year strategy to further develop the APMC.

The APMC held three research seminars in 2013-14, including the relaunch of the annual Australian Prime Ministers Centre seminar as a major public event that brought arts and research together to explore our prime ministers.

The APMC seminar 2014 featured Professor Haig Patapan on Edmund Barton and the founding of democracy; Dr Jason Flanagan on John Howard and the appeal of political nostalgia; Ms Marija Taflaga on the influence of alternative prime ministers on major public debates; Ms Alana Valentine, playwright, on James Scullin versus King George V; Ms Sarah Howell, cartoonist and community artist, on the pressure of being prime minister through the eyes of Enid Lyons; Mr Mitchell Welch, writer, on poetic interpretation of Robert Menzies and John Curtin; and Dr Norman Abjorensen on prime ministerial exits. The seminar was presented in collaboration with Griffith university’s Centre for Governance and Public Policy and the Australian National university’s Centre for the Study of Australian Politics.

The day after the seminar, on 14 June 2014, APMC summer scholar and emerging poet Mitchell Welch delivered two events exploring the interplay between politics and poetry and the experience of using Old Parliament House as a creative space. The ‘Poetics of Power’ featured the rich history of poetry written by politicians, including Australian politicians Menzies, Curtin, Hasluck and Haylen, who composed poetry in Old Parliament House, and their international contemporaries, from Joseph Stalin to Barack Obama.

The Australian Prime Ministers Centre seminar 2014. Photo: Andrew Sikorski 2014.

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BeYOnD tHe VeneeR: A fReSH lOOk A t tHe PRime miniSteR’S Suite We invited five artists to interpret a room or set of rooms in the Prime Minister’s Suite in Old Parliament House. They were allowed to choose any room, art form or material, as long as the work reflected an aspect of the space, its historical use or the personalities of the people who used it.

This was the first collaboration between the museum and Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre, and part of the museum’s strategy to engage more with the community.

Canberra artists Kirstie Rea, Patsy Hely, Gilbert Riedelbauch and Dianne Firth, and American Russell Baldon, a visiting artist at the Australian National university’s School of Art Furniture Workshop, each brought their own responses and interpretations.

using diverse materials, including timber, ceramics, glass and textiles, the artists evoked the human presence and practices of the men and women who worked at Old Parliament House.

The exhibition took several months from conception to completion and the artists undertook a lot of research and spoke to former workers in the suite as well as visiting it to gain inspiration for their work. Beyond the Veneer was staged from April to July 2014, and was visited by 22,000 people wanting to engage with the historical stories of the house in new and innovative ways.

Beyond the Veneer artists at the launch of the exhibition. Photo: Andrew Sikorski 2014.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 17

In 2013-14 we implemented a new content strategy to deliver a full range of experiences: large-scale exhibitions, long-term and short-term exhibits of all sizes, projects to interpret the building, pop-up exhibitions, major events and open days. We also continued to provide community activities, research activities, touring exhibits and online events.

There was a significant increase in activities as we focused on meeting audiences on their own terms, and trialled ways to engage new and diverse audiences and new interpretations of the space. We launched 16 new small- to medium-scale exhibitions during the year and delivered more than 56 events and public programs.

With visitors at the heart of what we do, we focused on developing the presentation and interpretation skills of our visitor service officers, developing short ‘snapshot’ presentations to complement the longer regular tours.

We developed new self-exploration trails for children. A backpack activity pack proved very successful for family groups, as did special events for families. The Zine Lounge also provided a getaway for young adults.

The schools program continued to be a major success story for the museum. In 2013-14, we had 81,604 participants in our facilitated learning programs for primary and high school students—the highest number ever. These visits are supported through the Parliament and Civics Education Rebate program. We are also trialling a self-directed learning experience for schools, which will be launched in 2015.

Alongside school visits, we provided professional development sessions for teachers and tours for interstate education tourism providers.

Develop online access to programs, content and research

During the year, we continued to expand our social media presence and connected with many people through these platforms. A greater focus on engaging with visitors and stakeholders through social media resulted in a 195 per cent increase in Facebook and Twitter engagement (see Figure 3).

Figure 3 facebook and t witter activity, 2012-13 and 2013-14

Facebook likes Twitter followers

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

Number

2012-13 2013-14

Senior students from North Sydney Girls High participate in a school learning program. Photo: Belinda Pratten 2013.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 18

New websites and content included the Oral Histories website, the highlights of the collection, and the Menzies’ 1941 Diary website. As a result, website use continued to trend upwards in 2013-14, with a 7 per cent increase compared to the previous year (see Figure 4). A selection of our more than 400 oral history personal recollections and insights into the building and its people were made available on our website.

The Behind the Lines exhibition is popular with our local and interstate visitors. Developed alongside the exhibition is the Behind the Lines website, which presents the cartoons in an engaging online environment for those who cannot make it to the exhibition. The site is arranged thematically and in an easy-to-access manner, so that online audiences can engage with the content of the exhibition using a variety of devices including mobile tablets. Online visitors can also vote for their favourite cartoon to help select the top 10 people’s choice.

Figure 4 Online visitation, 2011-12 to 2013-14

For the 2013 Behind the Lines exhibition, we also trialled a Behind the Lines mobile application using the OpenMi Tours app. The app is specifically designed to improve accessibility for deaf and hearing-impaired audiences by providing an AuSLAN audio tour. The app also provides English audio with Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish captions.

evaluate and maximise strategic benefits from partnerships with other organisations

Throughout the year we focused on building relationships with existing stakeholders and identifying new partners to extend our offering. We formed new partnerships with cultural, research and media institutions, such as the Australian War Memorial, the Australian National university and the ABC, to support an ambitious program of exhibitions and events in 2014-15.

The museum convened the 2013 Round Table of Prime Ministerial Research and Collecting Agencies in September 2013 (at Home Hill, the residence of former Prime Minister Joseph Lyons and his family). The annual roundtable is part of our commitment to providing leadership and enhancing the connectedness of prime ministerial collections nationally.

In August 2013 our new caterers, Restaurant Associates, took up (temporary) residence in the Courtyard Terrace before moving to the refurbished front cafe. This partnership provides yet another point to connect with audiences in Canberra, including through special events aligned with our program of activities.

Menzies’ 1941 Diary from the museum Twitter feed. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

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SCAffOlD tOuRS Of tHe HOuSe Of RePReSent AtiVeS COuRtYARD Re-RenDeRinG PROjeCt In 2013-14, the museum opened up its collection in new and surprising ways, including literally exposing the building’s raw or unfinished state.

During the re-rendering of the House of Representatives courtyard, we provided an exclusive opportunity for history and architecture enthusiasts to tour the scaffold and see what was happening during the restoration. The removal of the layers of paint uncovered hidden stories, allowing for greater knowledge and understanding of the construction of the building.

Different styles of bricks side by side showed where the library had been extended in 1938 using lower quality bricks than those used in 1927, while two parallel blue chalk lines on the 1948 third storey of the eastern wing indicated where builders had used a plumb bob to line up the window sills. Luckily they had two attempts, as the top line is not straight!

A decorative paint scheme was discovered on the walls of what is now an open terrace, indicating where the non-members’ bar was extended in 1946. We have left evidence of this paint scheme for visitors to see.

Through opportunities like this, we share the process of discovery and conservation with our audiences, allowing them special and once-only access to the ‘secrets’ within the walls of Old Parliament House.

The scaffold tours were part of the ACT and Surrounds Heritage Festival, held on 5-21 April. The tours created great media interest and, although a niche offering, were fully booked.

Visitors enjoying the scaffold tours led by Edwina Jans, Manager Heritage and Collections. Photo: Museum of Australian Democracy collection.

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Queen’S BiRtHDAY lOnG WeekenD One of the final major events for the museum this year was held in June on the Queen’s Birthday long weekend. Over the three days, the museum smoothly ran multiple activities for a cross-generational audience.

The success of the weekend demonstrated that we are now connecting to our ‘leisure’ audiences—4,240 people participated in a range of activities, including building the Mega Lego Queen (made up of 92,170 lego bricks), dress-ups and the ‘In Royal Footsteps’ trail. The Happy and Glorious exhibit commemorated the Queen’s visit to Australia in 1954, especially the central role Old Parliament House played in her visit. Here she was the first sitting monarch to open parliament in Australia.

Bringing together these activities and events into one weekend also shows the success we have had in transitioning to a matrix management style, maximising resources and increasing audiences and productivity. These complex events are only possible with a strong strategic direction and great teamwork.

Visitors building the Mega Lego Queen. Photo: Andrew Sikorski 2014.

REPORT ON PERFORMANCE 21

The museum was a partner in the Australia ICOMOS Conference in 2013. ICOMOS (the International Council on Monuments and Sites) is committed to improving conservation philosophy and practice for culturally significant places. Papers presented by international and Australian speakers covered topics such as cultural landscapes, Indigenous heritage, heritage management in Asia, audience engagement, sustainability and digital heritage.

The Director was admitted to the Council of Australasian Museum Directors in February 2014. The council brings together the directors and chief executives of the major national, state, territory and regional museums in Australia and New Zealand, and represents collections across a vast range of topics such as natural science, social history, anthropology, art and moving images, industry, technology, design and heritage. The benefits of membership include being part of a forum for the sharing of information and ideas among members, and it gives us access to the latest thinking and research across the museum sector.

The Model Global Parliament was held in July 2013. Supported by the Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National university, the Canberra event involved 80 university students from over 30 countries, who are studying in Australia. The National Schools’ Constitutional Convention was again held at the museum in March 2014 in collaboration with the National Archives of Australia. The National Indigenous Youth Parliament was held in May 2014. The museum worked with our partners—the Australian Electoral Commission and the YMCA—to deliver this dynamic and engaging program for future Indigenous leaders. The Australasian Parliamentary Educators Conference was held in December 2013, with representatives from the Australian government and the states and territories, plus Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Cook Islands. The conference was organised in partnership with New Parliament House and the ACT Legislative Assembly.

Prepare the Audience Development Strategy

understanding our visitors is a key element in determining how we engage with them, in terms of both the experience we provide and the way in which we communicate. Significant work was done during the year on reviewing existing and new research data and visitor feedback information, as well as digital engagement,

and targeted market research to identify trends and opportunities.

This was further enhanced by branding and marketing research which was undertaken in late 2013. The research identified segmentation in the audience and the manner in which they engage. This led to the development of market-specific activities and events, as well as a broader strategy for engagement for 2014-15.

Commence research for any future development of the museum

The museum is committed to exploring issues around political leadership, including the contributions of all our prime ministers. We do this in the museum, online and with our research and collections partners around Australia. Our projects set the agenda and stimulate conversations—providing leadership and making academic research and contemporary thinking available to the widest audiences.

As part of implementation of the new five-year strategy for the Australian Prime Ministers Centre, the centre’s annual seminar was relaunched in June 2014 as the premier national public event for research-driven engagement around prime ministers. Content development will continue to source ideas and research from the broadest range of researchers, writers and academics, building on the experiences of 2014.

With digital partner SBS, social research partner Ipsos and academic partner the university of Canberra, we will test emerging ideas in a truly national conversation about the shape of our democracy now and in the future. How do four different generations of Australians imagine their democracy?

The museum aims to build a high-performance organisation that is rewarding, creative and an employer of choice in the cultural sector. This is a challenge as we cannot compete in terms of budgets or exhibition size. However, by focusing on our own values we can offer a unique working experience, which may not be possible in larger and more hierarchical institutions.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 22

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY

Visitors making protest placards for Occupy Small Street as part of Enlighten. Photo: Stefan Postles 2014.

CORPORAte GOVeRnAnCe To oversee corporate governance and determine strategic priorities, the Director acts in consultation with the deputy directors and senior managers, with input from the Advisory Council.

Management committees Details of the roles and membership of the key senior management committees and other committees that assist in the management of the agency are outlined in Table 3.

Table 3 Management committees, 2013-14

Committee membership Role and meetings

Executive Management Group

Chair: Director

Members: Deputy directors

Observers:

Chief Financial Officer

Manager, Human Resources, Governance and Strategic Planning

Makes key decisions on agency-wide matters.

Develops strategic planning priorities.

Oversees risk management.

Manages and is responsible for the agency’s budget.

Ensures compliance with workplace health and safety obligations.

Meets fortnightly.

Senior Management Group

Chair: Director

Members: Deputy directors and all section managers

Provides a venue for decision-making, consultation and feedback on operational issues.

Develops and implements internal plans and policies.

Promotes risk management, regularly reviews and assesses key risks, and ensures appropriate linkages between risk management and planning processes.

Acts as the agency’s security committee and project management committee.

Meets fortnightly.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 24

Committee membership Role and meetings

Audit Committee

Chair: External member

Deputy chair: Deputy Director, Business Operations and Heritage

Members:

Deputy Director, Audience, Programs and Partnerships

Manager, Content Development and Commissioning

Assistant Manager, Learning

Observers:

Chief Financial Officer

Manager, Human Resources, Governance and Strategic Planning

Australian National Audit Office representatives

Internal audit service provider representatives

Secretariat: Human Resources, Governance and Strategic Planning

Enhances the control framework.

Assists in complying with legislative and other obligations.

Improves the objectivity and reliability of published financial information.

Provides assurance to the Director in relation to her responsibilities under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

Reports to the Director on its activities.

Meets approximately four times a year.

Heritage Actions Committee

Chair and agency delegate: Deputy Director, Business Operations and Heritage

Members:

Deputy Director, Audience, Programs and Partnerships

Manager, Heritage and Collections

Manager, Facilities and Information Technology

Manager, Content Development and Commissioning

Manager, Lifelong Learning

Assistant Manager, Heritage

Secretariat: Heritage and Collections

Discusses action proposals in accordance with Policy 2.1 of the Heritage Management Plan.

Makes recommendations for the chair to consider in their capacity as delegate under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

Suggests independent advice where relevant.

Provides input on proposed actions to ensure that decisions made regarding use and change in and on Old Parliament House and its curtilage will not have a significant adverse impact on the heritage values of the place.

Reports to the Executive Management Group and the Advisory Council on its activities.

Meets every three weeks.

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 25

Committee membership Role and meetings

Acquisition Committee

Chair and delegate for acquisition approvals: Deputy Director, Audience, Programs and Partnerships

Members:

Manager, Heritage and Collections

Manager, Content Development and Commissioning

Senior Historian

Manager, Australian Prime Ministers Centre

Manager, Lifelong Learning

Assistant Manager, Content Development

Assistant Manager, Heritage

Secretariat: Heritage and Collections

Discusses and determines appropriate additions to the collection for approval by the delegate in accordance with Policy 3.3 of the Collection Management Policy.

Reports to the Executive Management Group and the Advisory Council on its activities.

Meets monthly.

Work Health and Safety Committee

Chair: Deputy Director, Business Operations and Heritage

Members:

Manager, Facilities and Information Technology

First aid officers

Designated work group health and safety representative and deputy representative

Representatives of Facilities and Information Technology, Lifelong Learning

Secretariat: Facilities and Information Technology

Oversees health and safety matters.

Identifies, develops and implements consistent strategies to address work health and safety requirements.

Reports to and advises both employees and the Executive Management Group on relevant matters.

Meets approximately four times a year.

Workplace Consultative Committee

Chair: Director

Members:

Manager, Human Resources, Governance and Strategic Planning

Three staff representatives

Secretariat: Human Resources, Governance and Strategic Planning

Considers and advises employees and the Executive Management Group on workplace matters referred by employees and employee representatives.

Facilitates communication, consultation, cooperation and input from staff on matters that affect the workplace.

Meets quarterly.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 26

Advisory Council The Old Parliament House Advisory Council provides expert advice to the minister and the agency on the agency’s role, functions and activities.

The Advisory Council met three times during 2013-14, and council members:

• provided expert advice on the museum’s development, programs and management

• participated in advisory groups on particular areas, such as the Australian Prime Ministers Centre

• represented the museum in various activities and forums.

Advisory Council members are drawn from a range of relevant backgrounds and areas of expertise, and are appointed by the minister. During 2013-14 five new members were welcomed to the council:

• Mr Barrie Cassidy (appointed as chair)

• the Hon Dr David Kemp (appointed as chair following Mr Cassidy’s resignation)

• the Hon Graham Edwards AM

• Mrs Heather Henderson

• Sir David Smith KCVO, AO.

Three members departed:

• Mr Barrie Cassidy resigned as chair in October 2013

• Ms Sue Mackay resigned from the council in November 2013

• Ms Natasha Stott Despoja’s term ended in February 2014.

Ms Sally Basser, a representative of the Ministry for the Arts in the Attorney-General’s Department, acted as an official observer of the council in 2013-14.

The Advisory Council contributed to the museum’s activities by:

• participating in expert advisory groups and meetings. This included, in particular, contributions from Dr Griffin, Professor Darian-Smith and Dr Kemp

• making a range of suggestions and representations regarding potential future partnerships with outside organisations, possible venues and new audiences

• providing input into the review of the agency’s Heritage Management Plan

• engaging on key strategic matters.

The Advisory Council also continued to provide advice on the agency’s ongoing operations, including:

• providing input to important agency planning documents, including the strategic plan

• suggesting potential contributors to the Oral History program

• commenting on potential acquisitions and providing contacts for sources of appropriate items for the collections

• providing input to the development of activities and exhibitions

• providing individual expertise in specific relevant areas. A noteworthy example was Professor Darian-Smith’s contribution to the development of the five-year strategy for the Australian Prime Ministers Centre

• continuing to effectively represent the museum and promote it to a range of outside individuals and enterprises, including the media, other cultural institutions and places of learning, potential donors, partners and key stakeholders.

At 30 June 2014, the Advisory Council had eight members and two vacancies. Table 4 provides details of the council’s membership.

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 27

Table 4 Old Parliament House Advisory Council members, 30 June 2014

Role Name Background Current term

Chair The Hon Dr David Kemp Educationalist, former member of

the House of Representatives and former minister

12 December 2013 to 11 December 2016

Deputy chair The Hon Susan Ryan Former senator and minister 29 August 2011 to

28 August 2014

Member The Hon Paul Calvert Former President of the Senate 29 August 2011 to

28 August 2014

Member Dr Janette Griffin Academic and educationalist 29 August 2011 to

28 August 2014

Member Professor Kate Darian-Smith Academic and historian 30 April 2013 to

29 April 2016

Member The Hon Graham Edwards Former member of the House of Representatives and former member of the Legislative Council of Western Australia

12 July 2013 to 11 July 2016

Member Mrs Heather Henderson Author 12 December 2013 to

11 December 2016

Member Sir David Smith Former public servant and Official

Secretary to the Governor-General 12 December 2013 to 11 December 2016

Strategic planning The work of the agency is guided by the Old Parliament House Strategic Plan 2013-18. The plan establishes a five-year vision for the museum, with a detailed underpinning framework. The vision is based on living democracy and community building, and four core priorities:

• Bold—Catalyst for uncensored conversations

• Relevant—Empowered and engaged communities

• Authentic—A welcoming and vibrant meeting place

• Dynamic—A sustainable and thriving future.

Plans and policies A framework of corporate and operational plans and policies enables Old Parliament House to meet its governance responsibilities and achieve its objectives. The Senior Management Group oversees the development and implementation of plans and policies.

Table 5 summarises the main plans and policies that underpinned management and operations in 2013-14.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 28

Table 5 Corporate and operational plans and policies, 2013-14

Plan/policy Purpose Period

Asbestos Survey and Management Plan

Ensures the occupants of Old Parliament House receive the highest standard of work health and safety in relation to in situ asbestos, and assists in protecting the occupants of the building from exposure to airborne asbestos fibres and the potential consequences of asbestos-related disease.

2014

Australian Prime Ministers Centre Strategy Articulates the vision and purpose of the centre and guides the development of its research and engagement activities.

2013-18

Building and Collection Disaster Recovery Plan Manages the agency’s response to and recovery from emergencies, disasters and other disruptive events.

2013-14

Business Continuity Plan Outlines processes designed to ensure that the agency resumes normal operations quickly and efficiently following disruptions. 2013-14

Chief Executive’s Instructions Ensure compliance with the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act). 2013-14

Collection Management Policy Sets out guidelines for the management, maintenance and development of the Old Parliament House collections. 2008-13

Community Learning Strategy Provides a focus for groups with specialist needs and programs such as people with English as a second language, families, young people and the socially disadvantaged.

2011-14

Disability Action Plan Sets out the agency’s commitment to improving the visitor experience for people with disability. 2011-14

Fraud Control Policy and Fraud Control Plan Provides guidance to staff on the policy and procedures for dealing with fraud, and meets agency obligations under the

Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

2014-16

Heritage Management Plan Meets agency obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and provides appropriate guidance and direction on managing the site.

2008-13

Internal Audit Program Provides the agency with a level of independent assurance on the appropriateness of the internal controls and business risk management that meet the agency’s obligations under the FMA Act.

2013-14 (revised at each Audit Committee meeting)

Life Cycle Cost Plan Guides activity for necessary conservation, refurbishment and cyclical building works for a 15-year period. 2013-28

Multicultural Plan Provides a framework to ensure more equitable outcomes for all Australians. 2013-15

Operational Environmental Management Plan Provides a framework for improved environmental management. 2012-14

Privacy Policy Outlines the agency’s obligations for managing personal information in accordance with the Australian Privacy Principles as specified in the Privacy Act 1988.

2014-16

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 29

Plan/policy Purpose Period

Risk Management Policy and Framework Provides the agency and its staff with tools to identify and manage risk.

2014-16

Security policies and plans Covers personnel security, information security and physical security, in accordance with the Australian Government Protective Security Policy Framework.

2013-15

Staff Guidelines on the APS Code of Conduct Provides staff with guidance on the standards of behaviour with which they are expected to comply under the Australian Public

Service Code of Conduct.

2013-14

Visitor Experience Plan Guides activities to enable museum visitors to tailor their visits to meet their particular needs or interests, while delivering the museum’s key messages and themes.

2011-14

Work Health and Safety Strategy Assists the agency to maintain a safe and healthy workplace in compliance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

2013-14

Audit arrangements The Audit Committee operates under the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 (FMA Act) and is directly accountable to the Director.

In 2013-14, the committee met four times and considered the progress and outcomes of external and internal audit reviews. Completed internal audits covered:

• a review of the Fraud Control Plan and an assessment of the agency’s fraud risks

• an assessment of the project management framework

• an assessment of work health and safety policies and practices to ensure compliance with the current legislation and ensure they are fit for purpose in terms of Old Parliament House’s specific operations as a museum and heritage building.

The committee also undertook a range of ongoing audit-related functions, including:

• overseeing risk management

• considering registers of whole-of-government and Old Parliament House-specific audit recommendations

• receiving and considering update briefings from the Australian National Audit Office

• considering and endorsing proposed control framework measures

• reviewing and endorsing the agency’s annual financial statements

• reviewing financial reports from the Chief Financial Officer.

The committee acted in accordance with its role and obligations under the Old Parliament House Audit Committee Charter. The charter was reviewed for compliance with the requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, which came into effect on 1 July 2014.

Ernst & Young provided internal audit services under contract during the year.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 30

Ethical standards The agency places a high priority on ensuring a safe, healthy, supportive and productive workplace, preventing discrimination or harassment, and fostering ethical behaviour on the part of staff and managers.

Such standards are guided by the Australian Public Service (APS) Values, Employment Principles and Code of Conduct, the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines and the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, and reinforced by the agency’s:

• Risk Management Policy and Framework

• Fraud Control Policy, Fraud Control Plan and Fraud Risk Register

• Workplace Harassment Guidelines

• Public Interest Disclosure Policy

• Staff Guidelines on the APS Code of Conduct.

A number of these documents were revised and updated during 2013-14.

Client Service Charter The Client Service Charter sets out the standards of service which visitors can expect; information about the agency’s aims, standards and code of conduct; and ways to contact the museum or provide feedback. It commits the museum to:

• engage with, inform, educate and entertain our visitors

• continually strive to improve the visitor experience

• take account of the diverse backgrounds, needs and expectations of all of our clients and stakeholders.

The charter is available from the museum’s website, along with a feedback form that can be downloaded or completed online. Overall feedback was positive and indicated that the museum was providing its services to a high standard in 2013-14.

Remuneration of executives Remuneration for the Director is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal under the Public Service Act 1999.

At the start of 2012-13, remuneration for the two Senior Executive Service officers was determined in line with the guidelines of the then Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport. The remuneration of each officer was negotiated between the individual officer and the Director. The conditions were prescribed in individual section 24 (1) determinations.

Risk management During 2013-14, the agency’s Risk Management Policy and Framework were updated to articulate the agency’s risk appetite, to provide tools with agency-specific examples and to streamline documents. The Register of Key Business Risks was regularly reviewed and updated, identifying the major risks the museum faces and treatments for their mitigation and control. Risk management training was undertaken by the majority of staff members.

The agency participated in the annual Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey, achieving a score of 8 (an increase from 7.9 in 2012-13) and upgrading our overall risk management rating from ‘Top Down’ to ‘Structured’ for the first time.

Business continuity and disaster management The Business Continuity Plan and Building and Collection Disaster Recovery Plan outline the agency’s response in the event of a serious incident or disaster, taking into account Old Parliament House’s status as a major heritage site and collecting agency.

The Business Continuity Plan was reviewed and updated during 2013-14, and awareness training was provided to all staff.

A memorandum of understanding with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet allows the museum to make use of the department’s premises and information technology resources as an offsite base in the event of an incident that disrupts business operations in Old Parliament House.

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 31

Fraud control Old Parliament House has in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, reporting and data collection procedures and processes that meet the specific needs of the agency, in compliance with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines.

There were no cases of suspected fraud reported or investigations undertaken during 2013-14. Following a review by the agency’s internal auditors, the Fraud Control Policy, Fraud Control Plan and Fraud Risk Register were all reviewed and updated.

Protective security The agency’s level of compliance with the Protective Security Policy Framework 2010 is now 100 per cent.

eXteRnAl SCRutinY As Table 6 shows, no external scrutiny measures affected the agency in 2013-14.

fReeDOm Of infORmAtiOn Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme. This requirement is in Part II of the Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a section 8 statement in an annual report.

Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the Information Publication Scheme requirements. Information published in accordance with the requirements is available on the Old Parliament House website at moadoph.gov.au/ about/freedom-of-information.

Table 6 External scrutiny, 2013-14

Type Activity

Auditor-General The agency was the subject of a financial statements audit by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). In August 2014, the ANAO issued an unmodified audit opinion on the agency’s 2013-14 financial statements. The ANAO identified one category C findings and rated the agency highly against the ANAO Better practice guide for the preparation of financial statements by public sector entities .

Privacy Commissioner The Privacy Commissioner made no reports under the Privacy Act 1988 concerning the agency’s practices or actions.

Australian Information Commissioner No decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner had, or may have, a significant impact on the operations of the agency.

Commonwealth Ombudsman The Commonwealth Ombudsman considered no matters involving the agency.

Freedom of information requests No applications for access to information under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 were received.

Parliamentary committees Other than Senate estimates committees, the agency did not appear before any parliamentary committees. No reports on matters specifically relevant to Old Parliament House were made by parliamentary committees.

Administrative Appeals Tribunal No decisions by the agency were the subject of review by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal.

Judicial decisions The agency was the subject of no judicial decisions.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 32

HumAn ReSOuRCeS mAnAGement The success of Old Parliament House and the Museum of Australian Democracy is achieved through the efforts and commitment of our people. We value our staff and volunteers and recognise the importance of their personal and professional development.

Staff profile At 30 June 2014, the agency employed 88 staff, including the Director and two deputy directors. Of these, 58 were female and 30 were male, and 61 were ongoing, eight were non-ongoing and 19 were casual. The full-time equivalent number of employees for the year was 63.26 (excluding casuals). Three new employees were engaged on an ongoing basis.

The voluntary turnover of staff equated to the departure of nine ongoing employees (13.95 per cent of ongoing staff). The turnover included four transfers, two resignations and three voluntary redundancies.

Detailed staffing statistics are provided in Appendix A.

Terms and conditions During 2013-14 the terms and conditions for all non-Senior Executive Service staff were governed by the agency’s Enterprise Agreement 2011-14, which is available at moadoph.gov.au/about/employment.

The agreement commenced on 1 July 2011 and nominally expired on 30 June 2014. It complies with the Fair Work Act 2009, the Public Service Act, the National Employment Standards and the Australian Public Service Bargaining Framework. The agency consulted with staff on the new Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy and will commence bargaining for a new enterprise agreement in 2014-15.

No performance pay provisions were in place for employees. Details of salary ranges for staff are provided in Appendix A.

Learning and career development The agency’s learning and development framework is aligned with the priorities and outcomes of the Strategic

Plan 2013-18, enduring commitments and individual performance agreements.

The principal objectives of the framework are to:

• maintain a coherent approach to learning and development, with clearly defined responsibilities for implementing learning and development programs and greater accountability for outcomes

• strengthen linkages between learning and development activities and the agency’s business strategy and goals, and demonstrate the value of learning and development to business needs.

During the year, all staff completed the mandatory training sessions on security and heritage, and 88 per cent completed privacy training.

Recruitment In 2013-14, the agency maintained its standard of completing all recruitment and selection processes within a target time of six weeks, and implemented regular training for selection panel members.

Privacy Following the review of the Privacy Act and the introduction of the Australian Privacy Principles, a new Privacy Policy was developed and introduced in 2013-14. The document outlines the agency’s obligations for managing personal information and is available on the Old Parliament House website at moadoph.gov.au/ about/privacy.

WORk HeAltH AnD SAfetY The agency’s work health and safety (WHS) arrangements are in line with the requirements set out for Australian Government agencies in the Work Health and Safety Act 2011.

The agency’s WHS activities include:

• providing ongoing training to all employees, volunteers and contractors to ensure that they are aware of their responsibilities as workers under the Act

• ensuring WHS awareness is a mandatory module in the induction program for new employees, volunteers and contractors

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 33

• ensuring that WHS representatives are trained in line with legislative requirements

• maintaining a dedicated intranet page that provides information to all employees on WHS legislation and responsibilities, as well as notification and reporting tools

• establishing procurement and contracting procedures that outline legislative requirements and the responsibilities of contractors in relation to WHS

• aligning human resource policies and procedures with WHS legislative requirements

• offering a health and wellbeing program to all staff to promote a culture of maintaining a healthy work and life balance.

In promoting a healthy and supportive working environment, the agency provides staff and their families with access to an employee assistance program that offers a confidential counselling service and career advice and helps to manage work-related or personal matters.

The health and wellbeing program is also available to all staff and includes workstation assessments, health checks, flu vaccinations and access to a career counselling service.

The Work Health and Safety Committee met four times in 2013-14; the minutes of meetings were made available to all staff on the intranet within five days.

One incident was reported to Comcare, and one incident was reported to Comcover, in 2013-14. An investigation was carried out; however, no findings were recorded.

DiSABilitY A CtiOn PlAn At a ceremony at New Parliament House in December 2013, the museum won the 2013 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion in Government Award. The judges’ comments included, ‘Despite the limitations of its location in a heritage building, the museum proactively solves barriers impeding access and has also implemented a comprehensive range of inclusion practices.’

It is due to the implementation of the agency’s Disability Action Plan 2011-14 that the award was possible. The support from the Disability Reference Group—which includes representatives from peak organisations supporting people with physical and mental disabilities as

well as museum staff—has been essential in ensuring the progress that has been made. The plan will be reviewed in the next financial year and a new plan developed.

Achievements under the Disability Action Plan 2011-14 have included:

• targeted professional development for museum presentation staff

• using an accessibility checklist during the construction of exhibitions

• making various modifications to areas around the building to reduce impediments to physical access to the heritage site

• reviewing the emergency plan and enhancing staff training to ensure that people with disability can be safely evacuated

• installing hearing loops in the function and schools orientation spaces within the building

• trialling accessible apps that provide audio tours in captions and sign language.

Changes to disability reporting in annual reports Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007-08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available on the Australian Public Service Commission’s website (www.apsc.gov.au). Since 2010-11, departments and agencies have no longer been required to report on these functions.

The Commonwealth Disability Strategy has been overtaken by the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020, which sets out a 10-year national policy framework to improve the lives of people with disability, promote participation and create a more inclusive society. A high-level two-yearly report will track progress against each of the six outcome areas of the strategy and present a picture of how people with disability are faring. The first of these reports will be available in late 2014 on the Department of Social Services website (www.dss.gov.au).

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 34

ReCOGnitiOn fOR CAReRS Although Old Parliament House is not a ‘public service care agency’ as defined in the Carer Recognition Act 2010, it endorses the aim of the Act, to ‘increase recognition and awareness of carers and acknowledge the valuable contribution they make to society’.

The agency has taken measures to ensure its compliance with the requirements of the Act, including:

• developing and implementing the Disability Action Plan, in which carers are key stakeholders

• ensuring that all employees have access to carer provisions and appropriate workplace flexibility where required

• participating in the ACT Companion Card scheme, under which free entry is granted to the companion or carer of a person with disability who requires assistance

• offering free entry for people with disability and accompanying carers attending museum events on the International Day of People with Disability.

ASSet mAnAGement Best practice asset management principles are applied to the agency’s facilities and associated assets. Energy consumption, waste management, recycling and environmental management are considered when planning, acquiring, operating and disposing of assets.

The management of assets forms part of the agency’s integrated planning and management framework, and is facilitated by:

• an asset management system that accurately identifies, values and tracks existing and new assets

• the Asset Management Administrative Procedure, which is used to manage acquisitions, disposals and stewardship responsibilities

• the Heritage Management Plan, which is used to manage the heritage assets of the building and the heritage collection of furniture and fittings.

Condition assessments and strategic life cycle planning are used to develop asset replacement plans for key assets. These asset replacements are prioritised in line with funding, as funding for the Life Cycle Cost Plan is insufficient to cover the total cost.

PROCuRement All procurement and purchasing activities in 2013-14 were conducted in accordance with the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, the Chief Executive’s Instructions, and administrative procedures and accounting policies. All of these were available to staff online or in hard copy, and the Finance Section provided relevant advice and training.

Although the agency has a dedicated procurement and contract officer to coordinate and advise on procurement, it operates a devolved framework that places responsibility for procurement activity with line area managers.

Purchaser-provider arrangements The agency had no purchaser-provider arrangements in 2013-14, as it is not appropriated funds to deliver outcomes through purchaser-provider arrangements.

Consultancies Consultants are engaged when the agency requires specialist expertise or when independent research, review or assessment is required. Consultants are typically engaged to investigate or diagnose a defined matter; carry out defined reviews or evaluations; or provide independent advice, information or creative solutions to assist in decision-making. Prior to engaging consultants, the agency takes into account the skills and resources required for the task, the skills available internally, and the cost-effectiveness of engaging external expertise. The decision to engage a consultant is made in accordance with the FMA Act and related regulations including the Commonwealth Procurement Rules and relevant internal policies.

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 35

During 2013-14, five new consultancies were entered into, involving total actual expenditure of $62,361 (GST inclusive). These were for the provision of brand advice, horticultural studies, and exhibition and accounting advice. No consultancy contracts were ongoing from 2012-13.

No contract with a value of $100,000 or more was entered into without provision for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of contracts and consultancies with a value of $10,000 or more (GST inclusive) is available on the AusTender website (www.tenders.gov.au).

Grants The agency did not make or administer grants in 2013-14.

ADVeRtiSinG AnD mARket ReSeARCH The total payment by Old Parliament House to advertising and market research organisations in 2013-14 was $217,149 (GST inclusive), and comprised payments to:

• market research organisations

• media advertising organisations.

During 2013-14, the agency conducted no advertising campaigns within the definitions of the Guidelines on information and advertising campaigns by Australian Government departments and agencies. All advertising was for non-campaign purposes, primarily to publicise the agency’s exhibitions, public programs and other visitor services.

Table 7 lists the individual payments of more than $12,400 (GST inclusive).

Table 7 Payments of more than $12,400 for advertising and market research, 2013-14

Company

Amount (GST inclusive) Purpose

Mediabrands Australia Pty Ltd trading as universal McCann

$192,261.25 Non-

campaign advertising

eCOlOGiCAllY SuSt AinABle DeVelOPment Old Parliament House plans and conducts its operations in accordance with the principles of ecologically sustainable development set out in the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

The agency’s outcome, program and projects contribute to ecologically sustainable development both by conserving and maintaining unique heritage assets for future generations and by promoting awareness of the economic, environmental, social and equity considerations that have shaped decision-making and development in Australia.

The heritage management framework, including the Heritage Management Plan and the Heritage Actions Committee, ensures that the principles of ecologically sustainable development are considered when decisions are made that may affect the heritage values and environment of the building and its surroundings.

The agency is continuing to follow the Operational Environmental Management Plan that was introduced in 2011-12. This provides a framework and recommendations through which the agency improves its environmental management.

All building operations are effectively managed to achieve optimal energy performance. As it manages and occupies a heritage-listed building, the agency aims to achieve as closely as possible the energy-intensity targets set out in the Australian Government’s Energy Efficiency in Government Operations policy. All major refurbishments undertaken during 2013-14 met the minimum energy performance standard set out in the policy.

Table 8 lists measures carried out in 2013-14 to minimise the impact of the agency’s activities on the environment.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 36

Table 8 Environmental measures, 2013-14

Category Measures

Energy efficiency To maximise energy efficiency, the following principles were applied:

• where practical, purchasing equipment that has an Energy Star standard of 4 stars or better

• using energy management options that enable office equipment to power down when not in use

• not allowing energy-intensive or unapproved electrical items for personal use.

Other energy-saving measures included:

• switching off all non-essential lights at appropriate times

• using curtains or blinds at appropriate times to maximise the effectiveness and efficiency of air-conditioning and heating systems

• installing new light-emitting diode (LED) exhibition lighting

• installing a new heating system, which has reduced gas consumption by 1,717 gigajoules (a reduction of 13.9 per cent)

• commencing installation of a new building management system, which will reduce both electricity and gas consumption once complete in late 2014.

Water conservation A number of water-saving measures were undertaken:

• conducting regular inspections and repairs on all heritage taps and cisterns

• installing 11 new irrigation controllers with remote access

• replacing leaking irrigation valves

• scoping water conservation measures in all new works where possible, having regard to heritage responsibilities.

Paper use Paper use was minimised by the use of print management software, clearing all print queues daily and having double-sided printing as the default setting.

Waste Recycling facilities were used to minimise the amount of waste going to landfill.

MANAGEMENT AND ACCOuNTABILITY 37

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Front façade. Photo: Stefan Postles 2014

SummARY Of finAnCiAl mAnAGement AnD PeRfORmAnCe

How the agency was funded Parliament, via the Appropriation Acts, provides the agency with five funding types:

• departmental operating—to deliver the objectives of conserving Old Parliament House as a significant national heritage site and delivering the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House

• departmental capital—to replace assets used to deliver services at the museum

• departmental collection capital—to add to the departmental heritage collection

• administered capital—to replace building components and administered museum exhibition assets

• administered collection capital—to maintain the heritage furniture collection.

How financial performance is measured Financial forecasts are published through the year as part of the Budget Papers. The key reference point is the Portfolio Budget Statements, released on budget night.

The agency’s financial focus is to provide accurate estimates and to achieve as close to a break-even position as possible, while ensuring the efficient, effective, ethical and economical use of resources.

Key results in 2013-14 An unmodified audit opinion was received on the 2013-14 financial statements from the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), with only one minor finding during the year. The ANAO also again rated the agency’s financial statement preparation highly against the ANAO Better practice guide for the preparation of financial statements by public sector entities.

Departmental finances

Table 9 Departmental finances compared to budget (including depreciation), 2013-14

Budget $m

Actual $m

Change %

Income and Expenses

Employee expenses 7.889 7.990 -1

Supplier expenses 6.100 5.979 2

Depreciation and amortisation 0.228 0.243 0

Total expenses 14.217 14.212 0

Other own-source revenue 0.050 0.212 324

Net cost of services 14.167 14.000 1

Revenue from government 13.939 13.921 0

Operating result (0.228) (0.079) - 65

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 40

Budget $m

Actual $m

Change %

Balance Sheet

Financial assets 2.975 3.055 3

Non-financial assets 3.201 3.144 -2

Liabilities 2.363 2.237 -6

Net Assets 3.813 3.962 4

Table 10 Departmental finances, 2013-14 compared to 2012-13 (including depreciation)

2012-13 $m

2013-14 $m

Change %

Income and Expenses

Employee expenses 7.359 7.990 -9

Supplier expenses 6.040 5.979 1

Depreciation/amortisation/writedown 0.360 0.243 33

Total expenses 13.759 14.212 - 3

Other own-source revenue 0.141 0.212 50

Net cost of services 13.618 14.000 - 3

Revenue from government 13.592 13.921 2

Operating result (0.026) (0.079) - 204

Balance Sheet

Financial assets 4.524 3.055 32

Non-financial assets 2.765 3.144 -14

Liabilities 2.541 2.237 12

Net Assets 4.748 3.962 17

The agency had a deficit of $0.079 million compared to the estimated $0.228 million. The primary reason for the difference of $0.149 million was an increase in own-source revenue from donated assets ($0.080 million) and redundancy funding which was not fully utilised in 2013-14 ($0.042 million).

All other expenses were in line with budget.

The agency’s net asset position at the end of the financial year was 4 per cent better than anticipated mainly because leave liabilities were lower due to the payout of three redundancies and the resignation of a fourth person who had significant leave balances.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 41

The agency had a deficit of $0.079 million in 2013-14, compared to a deficit of $0.026 million in 2012-13.

Salary expenses increased by 9 per cent, mainly due to the payout of redundancies of $0.226 million, a salary increase impact of approximately $0.150 million in line with the enterprise agreement and lower staff turnover in 2013-14 which resulted in positions being filled for the whole year. Supplier expenses were essentially the same in 2012-13.

Depreciation and amortisation were lower in 2013-14 as more assets reached the end of their useful lives and were not replaced.

Revenue from government increased by $0.329 million, mainly due to redundancy funding of $0.168 million, parameter adjustments of $0.208 million and new funding for the cultural sector announced in the 2012-13 Budget, which increased revenue by $0.182 million in 2013-14. This was partly offset by $0.175 million in efficiency dividends, $0.052 million in savings measures and other minor changes.

Net assets were lower in 2013-14 as the agency returned unspent appropriations of $0.900 million which will not be re-appropriated until 2014-15.

Administered finances Table 11 Administered finances compared to budget, 2013-14

Budget $m

Actual $m

Change %

Income and Expenses

Revenue 1.145 1.203 5

Other gains - - 0

Total income 1.145 1.203 5

Depreciation and amortisation 5.037 5.072 -1

Writedown and impairment of assets - 0.031 100

Total expenses 5.037 5.103 -1

Net cost of services 3.892 3.900 0

Balance Sheet

Financial assets 0.077 0.124 38

Non-financial assets 87.131 86.916 0

Liabilities 0.357 0.228 -57

Net Assets 86.851 86.812 0

The net cost of services in 2013-14 was $3.900 million compared to the budget estimate of $3.892 million. This was essentially the same as the budget estimate, as were net assets.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 42

Table 12 Administered finances, 2013-14 compared to 2012-13

2012-13 $m

2013-14 $m

Change %

Income and Expenses

Revenue 1.269 1.203 -5

Other gains 0.072 - -100

Total income 1.341 1.203 -10

Depreciation and amortisation 5.394 5.072 6

Writedown and impairment of assets 0.052 0.031 40

Total expenses 5.446 5.103 6

Net cost of services 4.105 3.900 5

Balance Sheet

Financial assets 0.119 0.124 4

Non-financial assets 89.684 86.916 -3

Liabilities 0.262 0.228 -15

Net Assets 89.541 86.812 -3

The net cost of services in 2013-14 was $3.900 million against $4.105 million in 2012-13, which is a reduction of 5 per cent. The primary difference is that depreciation and amortisation were lower in 2013-14 as more assets reached the end of their useful lives and were not replaced. This is also reflected in lower net assets. Both shortfalls are due to a funding shortfall compared to the life cycle cost plan required to replace administered assets.

finAnCiAl St AtementS AnD SuPPORtinG nOteS fOR tHe YeAR enDeD 30 june 2014

This section comprises:

• the independent auditor’s report from the Auditor-General

• the statement by the CEO/Director and the Chief Financial Officer

• the financial statements, including notes.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 43

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 44

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 45

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 46

Old Parliament House Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Employee benefits 3A 7,990 7,359

Supplier 3B 5,979 6,040

Depreciation and amortisation 3C 243 358

Write-down and impairment of assets 3D - 2

Total expenses 14,212 13,759

Own-source income Own-source revenue Rendering of services 4A 5 6

Other revenue 4B 72 85

7 7 e u n e v e r e c r u o s - n w o l a t o T 91

Gains Other gains 4C 135 50

5 3 1 s n i a g l a t o T 50

Total own-source income 212 141

Net cost of (contribution by) services 14,000 13,618

Revenue from Government 4D 13,921 13,592

Surplus (Deficit) attributable to the Australian Government (79) (26)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Changes in asset revaluation surplus - 263

Total other comprehensive income - 263

Total comprehensive income (Deficit) attributable to the Australian Government (79) 237

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 47

Old Parliament House

2014 2013

Notes $’000 $’000

ASSETS Financial Assets Cash and cash equivalents 6A 42 158

Trade and other receivables 6B 3,013 4,366

5 5 0 , 3 s t e s s a l a i c n a n i f l a t o T 4,524

Non-Financial Assets Heritage and cultural assets 7A,C 1,734 1,584

Property, plant and equipment 7B,C 1,236 996

Intangibles 7D,E 139 144

Other non-financial assets 7F 35 41

4 4 1 , 3 s t e s s a l a i c n a n i f - n o n l a t o T 2,765

9 9 1 , 6 s t e s s A l a t o T 7,289

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 8A 436 481

Other payables 8B 240 376

6 7 6 s e l b a y a p l a t o T 857

Provisions Employee provisions 9A 1,561 1,684

1 6 5 , 1 s n o i s i v o r p l a t o T 1,684

7 3 2 , 2 s e i t i l i b a i L l a t o T 2,541

2 6 9 , 3 s t e s s A t e N 4,748

EQUITY Parent Entity Interest Contributed equity 4,048 4,755

Reserves 614 614

Retained surplus (accumulated deficit) (700) (621)

2 6 9 , 3 y t i u q E l a t o T 4,748

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2014

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 48

Old Parliament House Statement of Changes in Equity

2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013

$’000 $'000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period (621) (595) 614 351 4,755 4,561 4,748 4,317

Adjustment for errors - - - - - - - -

Adjustment for changes in accounting policies - - - - - - - -

Adjusted opening balance (621) (595) 614 351 4,755 4,561 4,748 4,317

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income - - - 263 - - - 263

Surplus (Deficit) for the period (79) (26) (79) (26)

Total comprehensive income (79) (26) - 263 - - (79) 237

of which:

Attributable to the Australian Government (79) (26) - 263 - - (79) 237

Transactions with owners Distributions to owners Returns of capital:

Returns of capital: - - - - (2,626) - (2,626) -

Contributions by owners Equity injection - Appropriation - - - - 52 52 52 52

Equity injection - Employee provisions - - - - 1,462 - 1,462 -

Departmental capital budget - - - - 405 142 405 142

Sub-total transactions with owners - - - - (707) 194 (707) 194

Closing balance as at 30 June (700) (621) 614 614 4,048 4,755 3,962 4,748

Closing balance attributable to the Australian Government (700) (621) 614 614 4,048 4,755 3,962 4,748

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

for the period ended 30 June 2014

surplus

Asset revaluation

Total equity

Contributed equity/capital Retained earnings FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 49

Old Parliament House

2014 2013

Notes $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Appropriations 15,243 13,504

Sponsorship funds 64 88

Rendering of services - -

Other income (79) 55

Net GST received 485 492

3 1 7 , 5 1 d e v i e c e r h s a c l a t o T 14,139

Cash used Employees 8,126 7,421

Suppliers 6,213 5,956

Section 31 receipts transferred to OPA 299 375

8 3 6 , 4 1 d e s u h s a c l a t o T 13,752

Net cash from (used by) operating activities 10 1,075 387

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of heritage and cultural assets 70 50

Purchase of property, plant and equipment 388 263

Purchase of intangibles 26 123

4 8 4 d e s u h s a c l a t o T 436

) 4 8 4 ( s e i t i v i t c a g n i t s e v n i ) y b d e s u ( m o r f h s a c t e N (436)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Contributed equity 1,919 194

9 1 9 , 1 d e v i e c e r h s a c l a t o T 194

Cash used Return of equity (2,626) -

) 6 2 6 , 2 ( d e s u h s a c l a t o T -

) 7 0 7 ( s e i t i v i t c a g n i c n a n i f ) y b d e s u ( m o r f h s a c t e N 194

) 6 1 1 ( d l e h h s a c n i ) e s a e r c e d ( e s a e r c n i t e N 145

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 158 13

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 6A 42 158

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Cash Flow Statement for the period ended 30 June 2014

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Old Parliament House Schedule of Commitments

2014 2013

BY TYPE $’000 $’000

Commitments receivable Net GST recoverable on commitments (242) (235)

Total commitments receivable (242) (235)

Commitments payable Capital commitments Infrastructure, plant and equipment 77 12

Intangibles 24 -

Total capital commitments 101 12

Other commitments Suppliers 2,558 2,569

Total other commitments 2,558 2,569

Total commitments payable 2,659 2,581

Net commitments by type 2,417 2,346

BY MATURITY Commitments receivable Other commitments receivable One year or less (196) (180)

From one to five years (46) (55)

Over five years - -

Total other commitments receivable (242) (235)

Commitments payable Capital commitments One year or less 101 12

From one to five years - -

Over five years - -

Total capital commitments 101 12

Other Commitments One year or less 2,057 1,944

From one to five years 501 625

Over five years - -

Total other commitments 2,558 2,569

Total commitments payable 2,659 2,581

Net commitments by maturity 2,417 2,346

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

as at 30 June 2014

Note: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. The nature of capital commitments in 2013 and 2014 were primarily items required for exhibition spaces. Other commitments relate to building maintenance, cleaning and the provision of information technology services

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 51

Old Parliament House Schedule of Contingencies as at 30 June 2014

There are no departmental contingent assets or liabilities in 2013 or 2014.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 52

Old Parliament House Administered Statement of Comprehensive Income for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $'000 $'000

NET COST OF SERVICES Expenses Depreciation and amortisation 16A 5,072 5,394

Write-down and impairment of assets 16B 31 52

Total expenses administered on behalf of Government 5,103 5,446

Own-source income Own-source revenue Rendering of services 17A 169 178

Rental income 17B 1,034 1,063

Other revenue 17C - 28

Total own-source revenue administered on behalf of Government 1,203 1,269

Gains Reversal of previous asset write-downs and impairments 17D - 50

Other gains 17E - 22

Total gains - 72

Total own-source income administered on behalf of Government 1,203 1,341

Net cost of (contribution by) services (3,900) (4,105)

Surplus (Deficit) attributable to the Australian Government (3,900) (4,105)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to profit or loss Changes in asset revaluation reserves (18) 1,279

Total other comprehensive income (18) 1,279

Total comprehensive income (loss) attributable to the Australian Government (3,918) (2,826)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 53

Old Parliament House

as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $’000 $’000

ASSETS

Financial assets Trade and other receivables 19A 124 109

Other financial assets 19B - 10

4 2 1 s t e s s a l a i c n a n i f l a t o T 119

Non-financial assets Buildings 20A,D 80,400 81,688

Heritage and cultural assets 20B,D 5,516 5,516

Property, plant and equipment 20C,D 854 1,310

Intangibles 20E,F 146 1,170

6 1 9 , 6 8 s t e s s a l a i c n a n i f - n o n l a t o T 89,684

Total assets administered on behalf of Government 87,040 89,803

LIABILITIES

Payables Suppliers 21A 197 233

Other payables 21B 31 29

Total payables 228 262

228 262

Net assets/(liabilities) 86,812 89,541

Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Total liabilities administered on behalf of Government

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 54

Old Parliament House

as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Opening administered assets less administered liabilities as at 1 July 89,541 91,288

Adjustment for change in accounting policies - -

Adjustment for errors - -

Adjusted opening assets less liabilities 89,541 91,288

Net (cost of) contribution by services Plus: Administered income 1,203 1,341

Less: Administered expenses (non CAC) (5,103) (5,446)

Other comprehensive income:

Administered revaluations taken to/(from) reserves (18) 1,279

Administered transfers to/from Australian Government:

Appropriation transfers from the Official Public Account:

Administered assets and liabilities appropriations 2,706 2,639

Transfers to the Official Public Account (1,517) (1,560)

86,812 89,541

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Administered Reconciliation Schedule

Closing administered assets less administered liabilities as at 30 June

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 55

Old Parliament House

for the period ended 30 June 2014

2014 2013

Notes $’000 $’000

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Sales of goods and rendering of services 1,307 1,470

Other - -

Net GST received 150 90

Total cash received 1,457 1,560

Net cash flows from (used by) operating activities 22 1,457 1,560

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash used Purchase of building works, property, plant and equipment 2,647 2,639

Total cash used 2,647 2,639

) 7 4 6 , 2 ( s e i t i v i t c a g n i t s e v n i ) y b d e s u ( m o r f s w o l f h s a c t e N (2,639)

Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash Held (1,190) (1,079)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period Cash from Official Public Account for: -Appropriations 2,707 2,639

2,707 2,639

Cash to Official Public Account for:

- Refund of administered receipts (1,517) (1,560)

(1,517) (1,560)

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period - -

Cash Flow Statement

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 56

Old Parliament House

as at 30 June 2014

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

BY TYPE Commitments receivable Rental income (515) (935)

Net GST recoverable / (payable) on commitments (93) (119)

Total commitments receivable (608) (1,054)

Commitments payable Capital commitments Land and buildings 1,542 2,245

Infrastructure, plant and equipment - -

Total capital commitments 1,542 2,245

Total commitments payable 1,542 2,245

Net commitments by type 934 1,191

BY MATURITY Commitments receivable Operating lease income One year or less (538) (604)

From one to five years (70) (450)

Over five years - -

Total operating lease income (608) (1,054)

Commitments payable Capital commitments One year or less 1,542 1,239

From one to five years 1,006

Over five years - -

Total capital commitments 1,542 2,245

Total commitments payable 1,542 2,245

Net commitments by maturity 934 1,191

Note: Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant.

The nature of the capital commitments is projects carried into next year.

This schedule should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Schedule of Administered Commitments

The nature of commitments receivable is the rental income from rental contracts in the building.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 57

Old Parliament House Schedule of Administered Contingencies as at 30 June 2014

There are no administered contingent assets or liabilities in 2013 or 2014.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 58

OlD PARliAment HOuSe

nOteS tO AnD fORminG PARt Of tHe finAnCiAl St AtementS for the period ended 30 june 2014

t able of contents Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 60

Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period 73

Note 3: Expenses 74

Note 4: Income 76

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements 77

Note 6: Financial Assets 81

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets 82

Note 8: Payables 87

Note 9: Provisions 88

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation 89

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration 90

Note 12: Remuneration of Auditors 93

Note 13: Departmental Contingent Assets and Liabilities 93

Note 14: Financial Instruments 94

Note 15: Financial Assets Reconciliation 98

Note 16: Administered Expenses 99

Note 17: Administered Income 100

Note 18: Administered Fair Value Measurement 101

Note 19: Administered Financial Assets 105

Note 20: Administered Non-Financial Assets 107

Note 21: Administered Payables 112

Note 22: Administered Cash Flow Reconciliation 113

Note 23: Administered Contingent Assets and Liabilities 114

Note 24: Administered Financial Instruments 115

Note 25: Administered Financial Assets Reconciliation 119

Note 26: Appropriations 120

Note 27: Compliance with Statutory Conditions

for Payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund 128

Note 28: Reporting of Outcomes 129

Note 29: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements 130

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 59

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

1.1 Objectives of OPH

Old Parliament House (OPH) is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objectives of the agency are twofold: to conserve Old Parliament House as a significant national heritage site and to deliver the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House.

OPH is structured to meet one outcome:

An enhanced appreciation and understanding of the political and social heritage of Australia for members of the public, through activities including the conservation and upkeep of, and the provision of access to, Old Parliament House and the development of its collection, exhibitions and educational programs.

The continued existence of OPH in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continuing funding by Parliament for the agency’s administration and programs.

Agency activities contributing toward these outcomes are classified as either departmental or administered. Departmental activities involve the use of assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by OPH in its own right. Administered activities involve the management or oversight by OPH, on behalf of the Government, of items controlled or incurred by the Government.

Departmental activities are identified under one program which conserves and manages OPH as a site of national heritage significance and develops and presents OPH as a major museum of political, parliamentary and social history.

1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 49 of the Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:  Finance Minister’s Orders (FMO) for reporting periods ending on or after 1 July 2011; and  Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian

Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values and are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars, unless otherwise specified.

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1.2 Basis of Preparation of the Financial Statements (Cont’d)

Unless an alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard or the Finance Minister’s Orders, assets and liabilities are recognised in the statement of financial position when and only when it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity or a future sacrifice of economic benefits will be required and the amounts of the assets or liabilities can be reliably measured. However, assets and liabilities arising under executor contracts are not recognised unless required by an accounting standard. Liabilities and assets that are unrecognised are reported in the schedule of commitments and the schedule of contingencies.

Unless alternative treatment is specifically required by an accounting standard, income and expenses are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income when, and only when, the flow, consumption or loss of economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured.

The Australian Government continues to have regard to developments in case law, including the High Court’s most recent decision on Commonwealth expenditure in Williams v Commonwealth [2014] HCA 23, as they contribute to the larger body of law relevant to the development of Commonwealth programs. In accordance with its general practice, the Government will continue to monitor and assess risk and decide on any appropriate actions to respond to risks of expenditure not being consistent with constitutional or other legal requirements.

1.3 Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates

No accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next accounting period.

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

No accounting standard has been adopted earlier than the application date as stated in the standard.

Other new standards and amendments to standards that were issued prior to the sign off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a financial impact, and are not expected to have a future financial impact on the entity.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 61

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.4 New Australian Accounting Standards (Cont’d)

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

The following new standards, amendments to standards or interpretations have been issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board prior to the sign off date, which are expected to have a financial impact on the entity for future reporting periods.

AASB 9 Financial Instruments AASB 1031 Materiality AASB 1055 Budgetary Reporting ASB 2010-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 9

(December 2010)

AASB 2012-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities

AASB 2013-3 Amendments to AASB 136 - Recoverable Amount Disclosures for Non-Financial Assets AASB 2013-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities - Control and

Structured Entities

AASB 2013-9 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Conceptual Framework, Materiality and Financial Instruments

Other new standards or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign off date and are applicable to the future reporting periods are not expected to have a future financial impact on the entity.

1.5 Revenue

Revenue from rendering of services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date. The revenue is recognised when:

a) the amount of revenue, stage of completion and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and b) the probable economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

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OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.5 Revenue (Cont’d)

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when OPH gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned.

Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

1.6 Gains

Resources Received Free of Charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense.

Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements.

Sale of Assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

1.7 Transactions with the Government as Owner

Equity Injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Other Distributions to Owners

The Finance Minister’s Orders require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless in the nature of a dividend.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 63

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.8 Employee Benefits

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

The nominal amount is calculated with regard to the rates expected to be paid on settlement of the liability.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligations at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. No provision has been made for personal leave as all personal leave is non-vesting and the average personal leave taken in future years by employees of OPH is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement for personal leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including OPH’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary as at 30 June 2014. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation using the shorthand method.

Separation and Redundancy

No provision is required for separation and redundancy of employees.

Superannuation

Staff of OPH are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap) or a superannuation fund of their choice.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

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OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.8 Employee Benefits - superannuation (Cont’d)

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance administered schedules and notes.

OPH makes employer contributions to the employee’s superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. OPH accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans. Contributions to other funds are at the same rate as the applicable PSSap rate.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

1.9 Fair Value Measurement

OPH deems transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy to have occurred at the end of the reporting period.

1.10 Cash

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include:

a) cash on hand; b) cash held on deposit for catering events; and c) cash held with outsiders.

1.11 Financial Assets

OPH classifies its financial assets as loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition.

Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through profit or loss.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 65

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.11 Financial Assets (Cont’d) Receivables

Trade receivables and other receivables that have fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market are classified as ‘receivables’. Receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment. Interest is recognised by applying the effective interest rate.

Impairment of Financial Assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at each reporting date. If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an allowance account. The loss is recognised in the statement of comprehensive income.

1.12 Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. OPH only holds other financial liabilities.

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon the ‘trade date’.

Other Financial Liabilities

Other financial liabilities are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

1.13 Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the relevant schedules and notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

OPH has no contingent liabilities or assets at balance date.

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OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.14 Acquisition of Assets

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition or transfer except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

1.15 Property, Plant and Equipment

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $2,000, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total). The asset capitalisation threshold of $2,000 has not changed since the agency was established.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment and heritage and cultural assets are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class Fair value measurement

Property, plant and equipment Depreciated replacement cost

Heritage and cultural assets Market comparison and Sales of similar assets

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 67

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.15 Property, Plant and Equipment (Cont’d)

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

OPH obtained independent valuations at 30 June 2013 for the Property Plant and Equipment assets and the Heritage and Cultural Assets. There have been no significant movements in market values at this reporting date.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to OPH using, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset class 2014 2013

Property, Plant and Equipment 2 to 10 years 2 to 20 years

Heritage and Cultural Assets Indefinite 25 years to indefinite

Intangibles 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years

The useful lives of heritage and cultural assets have been reassessed, taking into account the Heritage Management Plan and accounting standards. The heritage and cultural assets in departmental effectively have an indefinite useful life and are not depreciated.

The useful lives of Property, Plant and Equipment were amended in line with advice from the independent valuer at 30 June 2013 no other indicators of impairment were noted at 30 June 2014 to change this assessment.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment as at 30 June 2014. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if OPH were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

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1.15 Property, Plant and Equipment (Cont’d)

Derecognition

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Heritage and Cultural Assets

OPH has a variety of items in the departmental Collection which relate to the buildings use as the seat of parliament and/or democracy which are used primarily for purposes that relate to their cultural significance. These include the Replica Mace, Replica Crown Jewels, dispatch boxes, portraits, prints, books and political cartoons.

The Research Library includes books on democracy and political history and it is used as a research resource.

OPH has adopted appropriate curatorial and preservation policies for these items and they are deemed to have an indefinite useful life and hence are not depreciated.

The curatorial and preservation policies are publicly available at: http://static.oph.gov.au/ophgovau/media/docs/heritage/oph-hmp-master.pdf .

1.16 Intangibles

OPH’s intangibles comprise licensed software, software purchased for exhibitions, accounting, website development and digital licences for exhibitions. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of OPH’s software are 3 to 5 years (2013: 3 to 5 years).

All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2013.

1.17 Taxation / Competitive Neutrality

OPH

•

•

is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of GST except: where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office; and for receivables and payables.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 69

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.18 Reporting of Administered Activities

OPH administered assets are the Old Parliament House building, heritage furniture and the assets associated with the development of the Museum of Australian Democracy. The administered activities relate to the improvement of these assets.

Administered revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities and cash flows are disclosed in the schedule of administered items and related notes.

Except where otherwise stated below, administered items are accounted for on the same basis and using the same policies as for departmental items, including the application of Australian Accounting Standards.

Significant Accounting Judgements and Estimates In the process of applying the accounting policies listed in this note, the entity has made a judgement that has a significant impact on the amounts recorded in the financial statements; the fair value of buildings has been taken to be the market value, determined by calculating the depreciated replacement value, as determined by an independent valuer. In our case, the OPH building was purpose built and as such may in fact realise more or less than expected in the market.

Administered Cash Transfers to and from the Official Public Account

Revenue collected by OPH for use by the Government rather than OPH is administered revenue. Collections are transferred to the Official Public Account (OPA) maintained by the Department of Finance. Conversely, cash is drawn from the OPA to make payments under Parliamentary appropriation on behalf of Government. These transfers to and from the OPA are adjustments to the administered cash held by the entity on behalf of the Government and reported as such in the schedule of administered cash flows and in the administered reconciliation schedule.

Revenue

All administered revenues are revenues relating to the course of ordinary activities performed by OPH on behalf of the Australian Government.

Revenue is generated from fees charged for entry into the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House. Administered fee revenue is recognised when access occurs.

Revenue is also generated from the rental of building spaces. This rental revenue is recognised when due under the terms of the rental agreements.

All funds are returned to the Official Public Account and are thus not shown as revenue in OPH.

Collectability of debts is reviewed at balance date. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is judged to be less, rather than more likely.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 70

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.18 Reporting of Administered Activities (Cont’d)

Property, Plant and Equipment

Revaluations Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset Class Fair value measured at

Buildings Depreciated replacement cost

Heritage and cultural assets Market comparison and sale of similar assets Other property, plant and equipment Depreciated replacement cost

A revaluation of the building was conducted on 30 June 2014 by an independent valuer. The valuation decreased by $18,045 to $80,325,000 (excluding work in progress). The revaluation decrement by building class has been credited to the asset revaluation reserve, as shown in Administered Reconciliation Schedule.

A revaluation was conducted on the heritage furniture collection by an independent valuer at June 2013. There have been no significant movements in market values at this reporting date. The 2013 valuation increased the collection value by $1,704,151 to $5,516,130. This is primarily due to two reasons:

a. The heritage furniture is in use throughout the building either on display or in staff areas and thus it has been depreciated with a useful life of 25 years. The valuation indicates that the conservation procedures are maintaining the market value.

b. The independent valuer, Harding Alford, valued the Prime Ministers Desk at $500,000. The desk was returned to Old Parliament House from new Parliament House in 2008. At the time the value was assessed at zero on the Deed of Gift. The desk was designed by the OPH building architect John Smith Murdoch and was used from 1927 to 1974 and then again from 1996 to 2007 by the Prime Ministers of Australia.

A revaluation was also conducted on the property, plant and equipment of OPH in 2013. This resulted in a valuation decrease of $44,532 to $1,195,500. This has been recognised in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income. There have been no significant movements in market values to this reporting date.

Any accumulated depreciations at the revaluation date were eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset was restated to the revalued amount.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 71

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 1: Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

1.18 Reporting of Administered Activities (Cont’d)

Depreciation

Building assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to OPH using the reducing balance method, in line with advice from the independent valuer.

Property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to OPH using, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

Asset class 2014 2013

Buildings 11 to 74 years 10 to 74 years

Property, Plant and Equipment 1 to 25 years 3 to 10 years

Heritage and Cultural Assets Indefinite 25 years

Intangibles 3 to 5 years 3 to 5 years

The useful lives of heritage and cultural assets have been reassessed, taking into account the Heritage Management Plan and accounting standards. The heritage and cultural assets in administered effectively have an indefinite useful life and are not depreciated.

The useful lives of Property, Plant and Equipment have been amended in line with advice from the independent valuer at 30 June 2013 and no other indicators of impairment were noted at 30 June 2014 to change this assessment.

Impairment

All assets were tested for impairment at 30 June 2014. Indications of impairment existed on the render of the building and the building valuer quantified the extent of the impairment in the valuation. The impairment loss related to the revalued asset class of buildings and thus the reduction in value has been treated as a revaluation decrease.

Receivables

Where receivables are not subject to concessional treatment, they are carried at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Gains and losses due to impairment derecognition and amortisation are recognised through the Comprehensive Income Statement.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 72

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 2: Events After the Reporting Period

OPH had no events occurring after the statement of financial position date requiring disclosure in either departmental or administered.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 73

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 3A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 5,893 5,636

Superannuation:

Defined contribution plans 598 598

Defined benefit plans 520 465

Leave and other entitlements 686 593

Other employee expenses 67 67

Separation and redundancies 226 -

Total employee benefits 7,990 7,359

Note 3B: Supplier Goods and services Consultants 86 108

Professional Services 1,132 1,280

IT & Data Communication 659 605

Building services & maintenance 2,554 2,439

Travel 88 92

Other Suppliers 1,352 1,428

Total goods and services 5,871 5,952

Goods and services are made up of: Provision of goods - related entities 3 6

Provision of goods - external parties 256 280

Rendering of services - related entities 900 901

Rendering of services - external parties 4,712 4,765

Total goods and services 5,871 5,952

Other supplier expenses Workers compensation expenses 108 88

Total other supplier expenses 108 88

Total supplier expenses 5,979 6,040

Note 3C: Depreciation and Amortisation Depreciation: Infrastructure, plant and equipment 205 316

Research Library - 10

Total depreciation 205 326

Amortisation:

Intangibles:

Computer software 38 32

Total amortisation 38 32

Total depreciation and amortisation 243 358

Note 3: Expenses

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 74

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 3D: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets Asset write-downs and impairments from:

Impairment of infrastructure, plant and equipment - 2

Total write-down and impairment of assets - 2

Note 3E: Operating Expenditure for Heritage and Cultural Assets†

Operating expenditure 1,168 648

Total 1,168 648

† Operating expenditure is contained in the statement of comprehensive income; however, it is not disclosed as a separate line item. It is merely a representation of expenditure relating to heritage and cultural assets.

The above expenditure includes employee expenses to manage the collection and the direct costs of repairs, maintenance and preservation activities.

Note 3: Expenses (Continued)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 75

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE

Note 4A: Rendering of Services Rendering of services - external parties 5 6

Total rendering of services 5 6

Note 4B: Other Revenue Sponsorship 64 84

Other 8 1

Total other revenue 72 85

GAINS

Note 4C: Other Gains Resources received free of charge:

Donation of collection items at no cost 80 -

Audit services 55 50

Total other gains 135 50

REVENUE FROM GOVERNMENT

Note 4D: Revenue from Government Appropriations: Departmental appropriation 13,921 13,592

Total revenue from Government 13,921 13,592

Note 4: Income

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 76

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined as:

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Note 5A: Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period by hierarchy for assets and liabilities in 2014

Fair value Level 1 inputs Level 2 inputs Level 3 inputs

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Non-financial assets Heritage and cultural -Library Collection 497 - - 497

-Associated Collection 1,237 - - 1,237

Property, plant and equipment 1,236 - 1,236

Total non-financial assets 2,970 - - 2,970

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 2,970 - - 2,970

The highest and best use of all non-financial asset are the same as their current use.

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period using

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 77

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 5B: Level 1 and Level 2 Transfers for Recurring Fair Value Measurements Note 5C: Valuation Technique for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Category (Level 2 or Level 3)

Fair value

$'000

V aluation

technique(s)

1

Inputs used Range

2,3

Non-financial assets Heritage and cultural Assets -Library Collection Level 3 497 Depreciated

replacement Cost

Market value of similar asset Depreciated Replacement

Costs

$7 per item to $90 per item in

the collection

-Associated Collection Level 3 1,237 Market

Comparison Sales of similar Assets Depreciation

Trends

$50 per item to $280,000 per

item

Property, Plant and Equipment Level 3 1,236 Market Values /

Depreciated Replacement Costs

Market value of similar asset Depreciated Replacement

Costs

$300 per item to $91,500 per

item

1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period. 2. Significant unobservable inputs only. Not applicable for assets or liabilities in the Level 2 category. 3. Due to the range of values no weighted average has been calculated.

Level 2 and 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities in 2014

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

There has been no transfers between levels.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 78

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 5C: Valuation Technique for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurements (Continued) Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs Heritage and cultural assets: Library Collection The significant unobservable input used in the fair value measurement of the entity's Library Collection is the market value of similar assets.

Significant increases (decreases) in the input would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

Heritage and cultural Assets The entity procured the services of Harding Alford for the year ended 30 June 2013 to value the Heritage and Cultural Assets. Due to the nature of these assets and current conservation preservation arrangements, these assets are assumed to have an indefinite life. No depreciation is charged on the Heritage and Cultural Assets but they are tested for impairment by the entity's heritage and finance team personnel who posess appropriate qualifications, knowledge and experience.

Property, Plant and Equipment The entity procured the services of the Australian Valuation Office (AVO) for the year ended 30 June 2013 to value the Property, Plant and Equipment. Property, Plant and Equipment were written-off to their residual values over their estimated useful lives (2 to 20 years) to OPH using the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates (useful lives) and residual values were reviewed and necessary adjustments were recognised. Property, Plant and Equipment were also tested for impairment by the entity's finance, facilities and exhibition content team personnel who possess appropriate qualifications, knowledge and experience.

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

Property, Plant and Equipment The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the entity's Property, Plant and Equipment are market value of similar assets and depreciated replacement costs. Significant increases (decreases) in the input would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

Associated Collection The significant unobservable input used in the fair value measurement of the entity's Associated Collection is sales of similar types of assets and depreciation trends. Significant increases (decreases) in the input would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 79

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 5D: Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets Non-financial assets Heritage and Cultural

Property, Plant and Equipment

Total

2014 2014 2014

$'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance

1,584 931 2,515

- (205) (205)

Purchases/gifts 150 510 660

Closing balance

1,734 1,236 2,970

1. These losses are presented in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income under Depreciation and Amortisation. The entity's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.

Note 5: Fair Value Measurements

Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income

1

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 80

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 6A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 41 157

Cash held by outsiders 1 1

Total cash and cash equivalents 42 158

Note 6B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and Services: Goods and services - related entities - -

Goods and services - external parties 2 9

Total receivables for goods and services 2 9

Appropriations receivable:

For existing programs 2,920 4,249

Total appropriations receivable 2,920 4,249

Other receivables:

Other receivables 11 -

GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 80 108

Total other receivables 91 108

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 3,013 4,366

Total trade and other receivables (net) 3,013 4,366

Receivables are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 3,013 4,366

More than 12 months - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 3,013 4,366

Receivables are aged as follows: Not overdue 3,011 4,357

Overdue by:

0 to 30 days 2 9

31 to 60 days - -

61 to 90 days - -

More than 90 days - -

Total receivables (gross) 3,013 4,366

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for trade and other receivables.

Note 6: Financial Assets

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 81

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 7A: Heritage and Cultural Assets

Collections:

Work in progress - -

Fair value 1,237 1,087

Accumulated depreciation - -

Total collections 1,237 1,087

Research Library Work in progress - -

Fair value 497 497

Accumulated depreciation - -

Total research library 497 497

Total heritage and cultural assets 1,734 1,584

Note 7B: Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, Plant and Equipment:

Work in progress 124 65

Fair value 1,317 931

Accumulated depreciation (205) -

Total property, plant and equipment 1,236 996

No indicators of impairment were found for heritage and cultural.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. The collection was last externally valued on the 30 June 2013 by Harding Alford and the research library was valued at the same time by the Australian Valuation Office (AVO). The heritage collection increased by $179,855 and the library collection by $12,648.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. The Property, Plant and Equipment was last externally valued on 30 June 2013 by the Australian Valuation Office (AVO). This asset class increased by $70,066. (Refer to Note 7C).

No heritage and cultural assets are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment.

No property, plant or equipment is expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 82

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Heritage and cultural1

Property, plant and equipment Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 1,584 996 2,580

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - - -

Net book value 1 July 2013 1,584 996 2,580

Additions by purchase 70 445 515

By donation/gift 80 - 80

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - - -

Depreciation expense - (205) (205)

Disposals - - -

Net book value 30 June 2014 1,734 1,236 2,970

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 1,734 1,441 3,175

Accumulated depreciation - (205) (205)

1,734 1,236 2,970

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Continued)

Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Heritage and Cultural Assets and Property, Plant and Equipment (2014)

1 Plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item was disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 83

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Heritage and cultural1

Property, plant and equipment Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 1,351 2,603 3,954

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (1,577) (1,577)

Net book value 1 July 2012 1,351 1,026 2,377

Additions by purchase 50 217 267

Revaluations and impairments recognised in comprehensive income 193 70 263

Depreciation expense (10) (316) (326)

Disposals - (1) (1)

Net book value 30 June 2013 1,584 996 2,580

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by:

Gross book value 1,584 996 2,580

Accumulated depreciation - - -

1,584 996 2,580

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 7D: Intangibles Computer software:

Internally developed - in progress - -

Purchased - in progress 14 105

Internally developed - in use 76 76

Purchased 348 224

Total computer software (gross) 438 405

Accumulated amortisation (299) (261)

Total computer software (net) 139 144

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Continued)

Note 7C: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Heritage and Cultural Assets and Property, Plant and Equipment (2013)

1 Plant and equipment that met the definition of a heritage and cultural item were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

No intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

No indicators of impairment were found for intangible assets.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 84

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Computer software internally developed

Computer software purchased Total

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 76 329 405

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (67) (194) (261)

Net book value 1 July 2013 9 135 144

Additions by purchase - 33 33

Amortisation expense (4) (34) (38)

Disposals - - -

Net book value 30 June 2014 5 134 139

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 76 362 438

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (71) (228) (299)

5 134 139

Computer software internally developed

Computer software purchased

Total

Intangibles

$’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 76 223 299

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (60) (169) (229)

Net book value 1 July 2012 16 54 70

Additions by purchase - 106 106

Amortisation expense (7) (25) (32)

Disposal - - -

Net book value 30 June 2013 9 135 144

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by:

Gross book value 76 329 405

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (67) (194) (261)

9 135 144

Note 7E: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles (2014)

Note 7E: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles (2013)

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Continued)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 85

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 7F: Other Non-Financial Assets Prepayments 35 41

Total other non-financial assets 35 41

No more than 12 months 35 41

More than 12 months - -

Total other non-financial assets 35 41

No indicators of impairment were found for other non-financial assets.

Note 7: Non-Financial Assets (Continued)

Total other non-financial assets - are expected to be recovered

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 86

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 8A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 436 481

Total supplier payables 436 481

Supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months: Related entities 57 146

External parties 379 335

Total supplier payables 436 481

Note 8B: Other Payables Salaries and wages 200 202

Superannuation 33 33

GST payable 2 1

Other income in advance 5 11

Other - 129

Total other payables 240 376

Total other payables are expected to be settled within 12 months.

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Note 8: Payables

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 87

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 9A: Employee Provisions Leave 1,561 1,684

Total employee provisions 1,561 1,684

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 649 675

More than 12 months 912 1,009

Total employee provisions 1,561 1,684

Note 9: Provisions

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 88

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Balance Sheet to Cash Flow Statement

Cash and cash equivalents as per: Cash flow statement 42 158

Balance sheet 42 158

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities:

Net cost of services (14,000) (13,618)

Add revenue from Government 13,921 13,592

Adjustments for non-cash items Depreciation / amortisation 243 358

Net write-down of non-financial assets - 2

Donations of assets (80) -

Changes in assets / liabilities (Increase) / decrease in net receivables 1,353 (96)

(Increase) / decrease in non-financial assets 6 (2)

Increase / (decrease) in supplier payables1 (109) 92

Increase / (decrease) in other payables (136) 108

Increase / (decrease) in employee provisions (123) (49)

Net cash from (used by) operating activities 1,075 387

Note 10: Cash Flow Reconciliation

Note 1 : Accrued expenses include capital items and these are therefore excluded from the above operating reconciliation.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 89

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Note 11A: Senior Executive Remuneration Expense for the Reporting Period

2014 2013

$ $

Short term employee benefits: Salary 580,069 313,361

Performance bonus - -

Other 1

50,032 49,840

Total short-term employee benefits 630,101 363,201

Post-employment benefits: Superannuation 105,690 56,888

Total post-employment benefits 105,690 56,888

Other long-term benefits: Annual leave accrued 60,909 29,588

Long service leave 14,567 418

Total other long-term benefits 75,476 30,006

Total employee benefits 811,267 450,095

Notes: 1. "Other" includes motor vehicle allowances.

4. In 2013, the position of Agency Head changed and was vacant for some months. The 2014 disclosure includes the Agency Head position for the full year.

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration

2. Note 11A is prepared on an accrual basis. 3. Note 11A excludes acting arrangements and part-year service where total remuneration expensed as a senior executive was less than $195,000.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 90

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 11B: Average Annual Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives During the Reporting Period Average annual remuneration

1

Substantive senior Executives Reportable

Salary

2

Contributed superannuation

3

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus Paid

5

Total

No. $ $ $ $

Total remuneration: less than $195,000 - - - - - -

$195,000 to $224,999 1 183,047 31,724 - - 214,771

$225,000 to $254,999 1 199,157 35,550 - - 234,707

$255,000 to $284,999 - - - - - -

$285,000 to $314,999 - - - - - -

$315,000 to $344,999 1 293,732 45,235 - - 338,967

$345,000 to $374,999 - - - - - -

Total 3

Average annual remuneration

1

Substantive senior Executives Reportable

Salary

2

Contributed superannuation

3

Reportable allowances

4

Bonus Paid

5

Total

No. $ $ $ $

Total remuneration:

less than $195,000 1 62,819 9,674 - - 72,493

$195,000 to $224,999 1 188,073 27,672 - - 215,745

$225,000 to $254,999 1 199,035 29,007 - - 228,042

$255,000 to $284,999 1 245,934 35,895 - - 281,829

$285,000 to $314,999 - - - - - -

$315,000 to $344,999 - - - - - -

$345,000 to $374,999 - - - - - -

Total 4

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration (Continued)

2014

2013

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 91

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 11B (Cont'd): Average Annual Remuneration Paid to Substantive Senior Executives During the Reporting Period Notes:

d) exempt foreign employment income.

Note 11C: Other Highly Paid Staff

The agency had no other highly paid staff in 2013-14 and 2012-13.

3. The 'contributed superannuation' amount is the average cost to the entity for the provision of superannuation benefits to substantive senior executives in that reportable remuneration band during the reporting period.

4. 'Reportable allowances' are the average actual allowances paid as per the 'total allowances' line on individuals' payment summaries.

5. 'Bonus paid' represents average actual bonuses paid during the reporting period in that reportable remuneration band. The 'bonus paid' within a particular band may vary between financial years due to various factors such as individuals commencing with or leaving the entity during the financial year.

1. This table reports substantive senior executives who received remuneration during the reporting period. Each row is an averaged figure based on headcount for individuals in the band. Table 11B is calculated on a paid basis and includes long service leave and annual leave provision payments whereas Table 11A is on an accrual basis and only includes long service leave and annual leave expenses.

2. 'Reportable salary' includes the following: a) gross payments (less any bonuses paid, which are separated out and disclosed in the 'bonus paid' column); b) reportable fringe benefits (at the net amount prior to 'grossing up' to account for tax benefits); c) reportable employer superannuation contributions; and

Note 11: Senior Executive Remuneration (Continued)

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 92

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Financial statement audit services were provided free of charge to the entity by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO)

Fair value of the services provided Financial statement audit services 55 50

55 50

No other services were provided by the auditors of the financial statements.

evidence

Note 12: Remuneration of Auditors

Note 13: Departmental Contingent Assets and Liabilities

There were no departmental contingent assets or liabilities in 2013 or 2014.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 93

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$'000 $'000

Note 14A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Receivables:

Cash and cash equivalents 42 158

Trade and other receivables 2 9

Total 44 167

Carrying amount of financial assets 44 167

Financial Liabilities At amortised cost:

Suppliers 436 481

Other payables 238 375

Total 674 856

Carrying amount of financial liabilities 674 856

Note 14B: Net Income and Expense from Financial Assets

Note 14C: Net Income and Expense from Financial Liabilities

Note 14D: Fair Value of Financial Instruments

There is no interest or other income from financial assets not at fair value through the comprehensive income statement in the year ending 2013 and 2014.

There is no interest expense from financial liabilities not at fair value through the comprehensive income statement in the year ending 2013 and 2014.

The fair value of the carrying amount for short-term trade receivables and payables is a reasonable approximation of fair value in the year ending 2013 and 2014.

Note 14: Financial Instruments

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 94

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 14: Financial Instruments (Continued)

Note 14E: Credit Risk

Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired Not past due nor impaired

Not past due nor impaired

Past due or

impaired

Past due or

impaired

2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables Cash and cash equivalents 42 158 - -

Trade and other receivables 2 9 - -

Total 44 - -

OPH holds no collateral to mitigate against credit risk as OPH has no significant exposure to any concentrations of credit risk.

OPH is exposed to minimal credit risk as financial assets are cash and trade receivables. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the risk that arises from potential default of a debtor. This amount is equal to the total amount of trade receivables (2014: $2,000 and 2013: $9,000). OPH has assessed the risk of the default on payment and has not made an allocation for impairment allowance (2014: Nil and 2013: Nil) as the risk of default is low. The majority of the trade receivables were paid in July 2014.

167

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 95

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 14: Financial Instruments (Continued)

Note 14E: Credit Risk (Continued)

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2014 0 to 30 61 to 90 90+

days days days Total

Receivables $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade and other receivables 2 - - 2

Total 2 - - 2

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2013 0 to 30 61 to 90 90+

days days days Total

Receivables $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Trade and other receivables 9 - - 9

Total 9 - - 9

No indicators of impairment were identified for trade and other receivables in either 2013 or 2014.

31 to 60 days $'000 -

-

31 to 60 days $'000 -

-

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 96

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 14F: Liquidity Risk Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2014 On 1 to 2 2 to 5 > 5

demand years years years Total

At amortised cost: $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Suppliers 436 - - - 436

Other payables 238 - - - - 238

Total 674 - - - - 674

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2013

On 1 to 2 2 to 5 > 5

demand years years years Total

At amortised cost: $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Suppliers 481 - - - 481

Other payables 375 - - - - 375

Total 856 - - - 856

OPH has no derivative financial liabilities in both 2013 or 2014. OPH is not subject to market or price risk.

OPH financial liabilities are suppliers and other payables. The exposure to liquidity risk is based on the notion that OPH will encounter difficulty in meeting its obligations associated with financial liabilities.

Note 14: Financial Instruments (Continued)

year $'000 -

-

This is highly unlikely as OPH is appropriated funding from the Australian Government and OPH manages its budgeted funds to ensure it has adequate funds to meet payments as they fall due. In addition, OPH has policies in place to ensure timely payments are made when debts are due and has no past experience of default.

within 1 year $'000 -

within 1

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 97

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Financial Assets Notes

Total financial assets as per balance sheet 3,055 4,524

Less: non-financial instrument components:

Appropriation receivable 6B 2,920 4,249

GST receivable 6B 80 108

Total non-financial instrument components 3,000 4,357

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 55 167

Note 15: Financial Assets Reconciliation

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 98

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$'000 $'000

EXPENSES

Note 16A: Depreciation and Amortisation Depreciation:

Buildings 3,316 3,431

Heritage and cultural - 171

Infrastructure, plant and equipment 656 669

Total depreciation 3,972 4,271

Amortisation:

Intangibles 1,100 1,123

Total amortisation 1,100 1,123

Total depreciation and amortisation 5,072 5,394

Note 16B: Write-Down and Impairment of Assets Asset write-downs and impairments from:

Loss on sale of building components 20 8

Loss on disposal of Intangibles 11 -

Revaluation decrement - Infrastructure, plant and equipment - 44

Total write-down and impairment of assets 31 52

Note 16C: Operating Expenditure for Heritage and Cultural Assets

Operating expenditure is recognised in Departmental only - -

Total - -

Operating expenditure is contained in the departmental statement of comprehensive income; however, heritage and cultural asset expenses are not disclosed as a separate line item. The heritage and cultural assets managed include the departmental associated collection and the administered furniture collection. The number disclosed is merely a representation of expenditure relating to heritage and cultural assets.

Note 16: Administered Expenses

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 99

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$'000 $'000

OWN-SOURCE REVENUE

Non-Taxation Revenue

Note 17A: Sale of Goods and Rendering of Services Rendering of services - external parties 169 178

Total sale of goods and rendering services 169 178

Note 17B: Rental Income Rental income 1,034 1,063

Total rental income 1,034 1,063

Rental income is based on estimated turnover for the catering contractor. This year includes a credit note adjustment of $53,876 (excluding GST) based on audited turnover figures of the caterer from 2012-13.

Note 17C: Other revenue Insurance claims - 28

Total other revenue - 28

Note 17D: Reversal of Previous Asset Write-Downs and Impairments

Asset revaluation increment - -

Reversal of impairment losses - 50

Total reversals of previous asset write-downs and impairments - 50

Note 17E: Other Gains Donation of collection items at no cost - -

Change in fair value of H&C assets through profit and loss - 22

Total other gains - 22

Note 17: Administered Income

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 100

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 18: Administered Fair Value Measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at measurement date. Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Note 18A: Administered Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period by hierarchy for assets and liabilities in 2014

Fair value

Level 1 inputs Level 2

inputs

Level 3 inputs

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Non-financial assets: Buildings 80,400 - - 80,400

Heritage and Cultural Assets 5,516 - 5,516

Property, Plant and Equipment 854 - 854

Total non-financial assets 86,770 - - 86,770

Total fair value measurements of assets in the administered schedule of assets and liabilities 86,770 - - 86,770

The highest and best use of all non-financial asset are the same as their current use.

Note 18B: Level 1 and Level 2 Transfers for Recurring Fair Value Measurements

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting

There has been no transfers between levels.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 101

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 18: Administered Fair Value Measurements

Note 18C: Valuation Technique and Inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Level 2 and 3 fair value measurements - valuation technique and the inputs used for assets and liabilities in 2014 Category (Level 2 or Level

3)

Fair value

V aluation

technique(s)

1

Inputs used Range

2,3

$'000

Non-financial assets Building Level 3 80,400 Depreciated

Replacement Cost

Replacement costs Useful life of similar type assets.

Building

components range from $355,000 to $38,030,000

Heritage and Cultural Assets Level 3 5,516 Market

Comparison Sales of similar Assets Depreciation Trends

$5 per item to $500,000 per item

Property, Plant and Equipment Level 3 854 Market Values

/ Depreciated Replacement Costs

Market value of similar asset Depreciated Replacement Costs

$200 per item to $180,000 for an exhibition

1. No change in valuation technique occurred during the period. 2. Significant unobservable inputs only. Not applicable for liabilities in the Level 2 category. 3. Due to the range no weighted average has been calculated.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 102

Note 18C: Valuation Technique and Inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurements (Continued) Recurring and non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - valuation processes

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

Heritage and Cultural Assets The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the entity's Heritage and Cultural assets are sales of similar types of assets. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

Buildings The entity procured services of Maloney Field Services to value the Building and relied on the valuation models provided by the valuer. The enity tests the procedures of the valuation model at least once every 12 months. The valuer provided written assurance to the enitity that the model developed is compliant with AASB 13.

Heritage and Cultural Assets The entity procured the services of Harding Alford for the year ending 30 June 2013 to value the Heritage and Cultural Assets. As the useful life of the assets is estimated to be 300-500 years, under the current conservation and preservation arrangements, the depreciation on such assets was ceased on 1 July 2013. Heritage and Cultural Assets are tested for imparment by the entity's heritage team perssonel who possess appropraite qualifications, knowledge and experience.

Property, Plant and Equipment The entity procured the services of the Australian Valuation Office (AVO) for the year ended 30 June 2013 to value the Property, Plant and Equipment. Property, Plant and Equipment were written-off to their residual values over their estimated useful lives (3 to 10 years) to OPH using the straight-line method of depreciation. Depreciation rates (useful lives) and residual values were reviewed and necessary adjustments were recognised. Property, Plant and Equipment were also tested for impairment by the entity's finance and heritage team personnel who posess appropriate qualifications, knowledge and experience.

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 18: Administered Fair Value Measurements

Buildings The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the entity's Buildings are replacement costs and useful life of similar type assets. Significant increases (decreases) in any of those inputs in isolation would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 103

Note 18C: Valuation Technique and Inputs for Level 2 and Level 3 Fair Value Measurements (Continued) Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - sensitivity of inputs

Note 18D: Reconciliation for Recurring Level 3 Fair Value Measurements

Recurring Level 3 fair value measurements - reconciliation for assets

Buildings Heritage and Cultural Assets

Property, Plant and Equipment

Total

2014 2014 2014 2014

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Opening balance

81,460 5,516 1,196 88,172

Total gains/(losses) recognised in other comprehensive income

1

(3,334) - (676) (4,010)

Purchases 2,274 - 334 2,608

Closing balance

80,400 5,516 854 86,770

1. These losses are presented in the Administered Schedule of Comprehensive Income under Depreciation and Amortisation. The entity's policy for determining when transfers between levels are deemed to have occurred can be found in Note 1.

Property, Plant and Equipment The significant unobservable input used in the fair value measurement of the entity's Property, Plant and Equipment are market value of similar assets and depreciated replacement costs. Significant increases (decreases) in the input would result in a significantly lower (higher) fair value measurement.

Non-financial assets

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 18: Administered Fair Value Measurements

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 104

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

FINANCIAL ASSETS

Note 19A: Trade and Other receivables Goods and services: Goods and services receivable - related entities - -

Goods and services receivable - external parties 51 40

Total receivables for goods and services 51 40

Other receivables: GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 73 69

Total other receivables 73 69

Total receivables (gross) 124 109

Total trade and other receivables (net) 124 109

Receivables are expected to be recovered in: No more than 12 months 124 109

More than 12 months - -

Total trade and other receivables (net) 124 109

Receivables were aged as follows: Not overdue 73 69

Overdue by:

0 to 30 days 51 40

31 to 60 days - -

61 to 90 days - -

More than 90 days - -

Total receivables (gross) 124 109

No indicators of impairment were found in receivables.

Note 19: Administered Financial Assets

Goods and services receivables terms range between 30 to over 90 days for rental income.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 105

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Note 19A: Trade and Other receivables (Con't)

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 19B: Other Financial Assets Accrued revenue - 10

Total other financial assets - 10

No more than 12 months - 10

More than 12 months - -

Total other financial assets - 10

Note 19: Administered Financial Assets (Continued)

Total other financial assets - are expected to be recovered in:

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 106

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS

Note 20A: Buildings Work in progress 75 228

Buildings at fair value 80,325 81,460

Accumulated depreciation - -

Total Buildings 80,400 81,688

Note 20B: Heritage and Cultural Heritage and cultural: Work in progress - -

At fair value 5,516 5,516

Accumulated depreciation - -

Total heritage and cultural 5,516 5,516

Note 20C: Property, Plant and Equipment Property, plant and equipment:

Work in progress 145 114

Property, plant and equipment at fair value 1,252 1,196

Accumulated depreciation (543) -

Total other property, plant and equipment 854 1,310

No indicators of impairment were found for property, plant and equipment.

Note 20: Administered Non-Financial Assets

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. On 30 June 2014, an independent valuer, Maloney Field Services, conducted the revaluation of the building. This resulted in a devaluation of $18,045 which was reversed back to the asset revaluation reserve.

No indicators of impairment were found for building assets.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. On 30 June 2013, Harding Alford valued the heritage and cultural furniture collection. This resulted in a revaluation of $1,704,151. The most singular item identified in the valuation is the Prime Ministers' Desk which has been valued at $500,000 for the first time this year.

No indicators of impairment were found for heritage and cultural assets.

Heritage and cultural assets are not expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy stated at Note 1. On 30 June 2013, an independent valuer, the Australian Valuation Office, conducted a revaluation of property, plant and equipment. This resulted in a devaluation of $44,532.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 107

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Land and Buildings

Heritage and cultural

1

Other

property, plant and equipment Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 81,688 5,516 1,310 88,514

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - - - -

Net book value 1 July 2013 81,688 5,516 1,310 88,514

Additions:

By purchase 2,046 - 220 2,266

By donation/gift - - - -

Revaluations and impairments recognised in the asset revaluation reserve (18) - - (18)

Disposal - - (20) (20)

Impairments recognised in the operating result - - - -

Depreciation expense (3,316) - (656) (3,972)

Net book value 30 June 2014 80,400 5,516 854 86,770

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 80,400 5,516 1,397 87,313

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - - (543) (543)

80,400 5,516 854 86,770

Note 20D: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment (2013-14)

Note 20: Administered Non-Financial Assets (Continued) 1 Where land buildings and other property, plant and equipment meet the definition of a heritage and cultural item, they were disclosed in the heritage and cultural assets class.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 108

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 20: Administered Non-Financial Assets (Continued)

Land and Buildings

Heritage and cultural

1

Other property, plant and equipment Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 83,530 4,376 3,607 91,513

A ccumulated depreciation and impairment - (491) (1,800) (2,291)

Net Book Value 1 July 2012 83,530 3,885 1,807 89,222

A dditions: By Purchase 2,014 76 224 2,314

By donation/gift - - - -

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income (425) 1,704 (44) 1,235

Disposal - - (8) (8)

Reversal of impairments recognised in the operating result - 22 - 22

Depreciation expense (3,431) (171) (669) (4,271)

Net book value 30 June 2013 81,688 5,516 1,310 88,514

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by:

Gross book value 81,688 5,516 1,310 88,514

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - - - -

81,688 5,516 1,310 88,514

Note 20D: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment (2012-13

)

1 Where land buildings and other property, plant and equipment meet the definition of a heritage and cultural item, they were disclosed in the heritage and cultural asset class.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 109

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 20E: Intangibles Computer software: Internally developed - in progress - 9

Internally developed - in use 4,663 5,426

Total computer software (gross) 4,663 5,435

Accumulated amortisation (4,517) (4,265)

Total computer software (net) 146 1,170

Total intangibles 146 1,170

Note 20F: Intangibles

Computer software internally developed Total

$’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2013 Gross book value 5,435 5,435

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (4,265) (4,265)

Net book value 1 July 2013 1,170 1,170

Additions 87 87

Disposal (11) (11)

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income - -

Revaluations recognised in the operating result - -

Impairments recognised in the operating result - -

Reversal of impairments recognised in the operating result - -

Amortisation expense (1,100) (1,100)

Net book value 30 June 2014 146 146

Net book value as of 30 June 2014 represented by:

Gross book value 4,663 4,663

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (4,517) (4,517)

146 146

Note 20: Administered Non-Financial Assets (Continued)

No indicators of impairment were found for intangible assets.

No intangibles are expected to be sold or disposed of within the next 12 months.

TABLE B: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles (2013-14)

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 110

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Note 20F: Intangibles

Computer software internally developed Total

$’000 $’000

As at 1 July 2012 Gross book value 5,392 5,392

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (3,141) (3,141)

Net book value 1 July 2012 2,251 2,251

Additions 42 42

Amortisation expense (1,123) (1,123)

Net book value 30 June 2013 1,170 1,170

Net book value as of 30 June 2013 represented by:

Gross book value 5,435 5,435

Accumulated amortisation and impairment (4,265) (4,265)

1,170 1,170

Note 20: Administered Non Financial Assets (Continued)

TABLE B (Cont'd): Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Intangibles (2012-13)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 111

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 21A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 197 233

Total suppliers 197 233

Supplier payables expected to be settled within 12 months: Related entities - -

External parties 197 233

Total suppliers 197 233

Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

Note 21B: Other Payables Prepayments received/unearned income 24 23

GST payable 7 6

Total other payables 31 29

Total other payables are expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 31 29

More than 12 months - -

Total other payables 31 29

Note 21: Administered Payables

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 112

Note 22: Administered Cash Flow Reconciliation

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents as per Administered Schedule of Assets and Liabilities to Administered Cash Flow Statements

Cash and cash equivalents as per: Schedule of administered cash flows - -

Schedule of administered assets and liabilities - -

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities Net cost of services (3,900) (4,105)

Net GST on sale of goods and services 240 242

Adjustments for non-cash items Depreciation /amortisation 5,072 5,394

Other gains in fair value of assets - (22)

Write-down of assets 31 52

Changes in assets / liabilities (Increase) / decrease in net receivables (15) 8

(Increase) / decrease in other financial assets 10 (10)

(Increase) / decrease in accrued revenue - -

Increase / (decrease) in creditors and accruals 17 -

Increase / (decrease) in other payables 2 1

Net cash from (used by) operating activities 1,457 1,560

Note: Supplier movement is for asset purchases not operating costs and GST on asset purchases are excluded from the above.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 113

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 23: Administered Contingent Assets and Liabilities

There were no administered contingent assets or liabilities in 2013 or 2014.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 114

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Note 24A: Categories of Financial Instruments Financial Assets Receivables:

Receivables 51 40

Other financial assets - 10

Total 51 50

Carrying amount of financial assets 51 50

Financial Liabilities At amortised cost:

Suppliers 197 233

Other payables 24 23

Total 221 256

Carrying amount of financial liabilities 221 256

Note 24B: Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The net fair values of cash and non-interest bearing monetary financial assets approximate their carrying amounts. The net fair values for trade creditors and accruals which are short term in nature are approximated by their carrying amounts.

Note 24: Administered Financial Instruments

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 115

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 24C: Credit Risk Credit quality of financial instruments not past due or individually determined as impaired Not past due nor impaired

Not past due nor impaired

Past due or

impaired

Past due or

impaired

2014 2013 2014 2013

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables Trade and other receivables 51 40 - -

Other financial assets - 10 - -

Total 51 50 - -

Note 24: Administered Financial Instruments (Continued)

The administered activities of OPH are not exposed to a high level of credit risk as the majority of financial assets are trade receivables for tenants who occupy rental space within Old Parliament House. OPH has policies and procedures in place to monitor the debt and guide employees on debt recovery techniques where appropriate. An impairment of trade receivables was recognised in 2011-12 and this has been reversed in 2012-13. There are no issues in 2013-14.

OPH's maximum exposures to credit risk at reporting date, in relation to each class of recognised financial assets, is the carrying amount of trade receivables of $37,000 (2013: $40,000).

OPH holds a bank guarantee which mitigates against credit risk where the risk is concentrated.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 116

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Note 24C: Credit Risk

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2014 0 to 30 61 to 90 90+

days days days Total

Receivables $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables 51 - - 51

Other financial assets - - - - -

Total 51 - - 51

Ageing of financial assets that were past due but not impaired for 2013 0 to 30 61 to 90 90+

days days days Total

Loans and receivables $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Receivables 40 - - 40

Other financial assets 10 - - - 10

Total 50 - - 50 -

31 to 60

-

days $'000 -

Note 24: Administered Financial Instruments (Continued)

$'000 -

31 to 60 days

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 117

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 24D: Liquidity Risk Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2014 On 1 to 2 2 to 5 > 5

demand years years years Total

At amortised cost: $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Suppliers 197 - - - - 197

Other payables 24 - - - - 24

Total 221 - - - - 221

Maturities for non-derivative financial liabilities 2013 On 1 to 2 2 to 5 > 5

demand years years years Total

At amortised cost: $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

Suppliers 233 - - - - 233

Other payables 23 - - - 23

Total 256 - - - - 256

OPH has no derivative financial liabilities in both the current and prior year. OPH is not subject to market or price risk.

-

year $'000

within 1 year $'000

within 1

OPH is appropriated funding from the Australian Government. OPH manages its budgeted funds to ensure it has aqequate funds to meet

p a y ments as the

y fall due.

Note 24: Administered Financial Instruments (Continued)

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 118

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE Note 25: Financial Assets Reconciliation

2014 2013

$’000 $’000

Financial Assets Notes

Total financial assets as per balance sheet 124 119

Less: non-financial instrument components:

GST receivable 16A 73 69

Total non-financial instrument components 73 69

Total financial assets as per financial instruments note 51 50

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 119

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

A nnual

Appropriation

A ppropriations reduced

(a)

AFM Section 30 Section 31 Section 32

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

DEPARTMENTA

L

Ordinary annual services 14,326 (2,607) - - 300 - 12,019 (14,787) (2,768)

Other services Equity 1,514 (18) - - - - 1,496 (56) 1,440

Total departmental 15,840 (2,625) - - 300 - 13,515 (14,843) (1,328)

ADMINISTERED Ordinary annual services Administered items 2,329 (3) - - - - 2,326 (2,380) (54)

Other services

Administered assets and liabilities 155 - - - - - 155 (27) 128

Total administered 2,484 (3) - - - - 2,481 (2,407) 74

Notes:

Note 26: Appropriations

a) Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No. 1,3 and 5) 2013-14: sections 10, 11 and 12 and under Appropriation Acts (Nos. 2,4 and 6) 2013-14: sections 12,13 and 14. Departmental appropriations do not lapse at financial year-end. However, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of a departmental appropriation is not required and request the Finance Minister to reduce that appropriation. b) The above table represents the movement in appropriations in 2013-14. Departmental ordinary annual services includes $1,268,643 in prior year amounts and equity applied includes prior year amounts of $256,014 in the Appropriation applied 2014 column. Administered ordinary annual services include $233,479 in prior year amounts and administered assets and liabilities includes prior year amounts of $26,920 in the Appropriation applied 2014 column.

FMA Act

Total

appropriation

Table A: Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

A ppropriation applied in 2014 (current

and prior years) Variance

(b)

2014 Appropriations

Appropriation Act

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 120

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

A nnual

Appropriation

A ppropriations reduced

(a)

AFM Section 30 Section 31 Section 32

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

DEPARTMENTA

L

Ordinary annual services 13,734 - - - 375 - 14,109 (13,987) 122

Other services Equit

y

52 - - - - - 52

(82 )

(30 )

Total departmental 13,786 - - - 375 - 14,161 (14,069) 92

ADMINISTERED Ordinary annual services

A dministered items 2,319

(38 )

- - - - 2,281

(2,322

)

(41 )

Other services -

A dministered assets and liabilities 155 - - - - - 155

(75 )

80

Total administered 2,474 (38) - - - - 2,436 (2,397) 39

Notes:

A ppropriation applied in 2013 (current

and prior years) Variance

(b)

Appropriation Act FMA Act

Total

appropriation

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

Table A: Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

a) Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No. 1,3 and 5) 2012-13: sections 10, 11 and 12 and under Appropriation Acts (Nos. 2,4 and 6) 2012-13: sections 12,13 and 14. Departmental appropriations do not lapse at financial year-end. However, the responsible Minister may decide that part or all of a departmental appropriation is not required and request the Finance Minister to reduce that appropriation. b) The above table represents the movement in appropriations in 2012-13. Departmental ordinary annual services includes $406,866 in prior year amounts and equity applied includes prior year amounts of $32,114 in the Appropriation applied 2013 column. Administered ordinary annual services include $274,074 in prior year amounts and administered assets and liabilities includes prior year amounts of $55,738 in the Appropriation applied 2013 column.

2013 Appropriations

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 121

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

FMA Act

Annual Capital Budget

A ppropriations reduced

2

AFM

(b)

Section 32

Total Payments

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

DEPARTMENTA

L

Ordinary annual services - Departmental Capital budget

1

405 - - - 405 (428) - (428) (23)

ADMINISTERED

Ordinary annual services - Administered Capital Budget

1

2,329 - - - 2,329 (2,380) - (2,380) (51)

Notes:

Table B: Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

1. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (no.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services, shown in Table A and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts. For more information on ordinary annual services appropriations, please see Table A: Annual Appropriations.

2. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No. 1,3,5) 2013-14: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15 or via a determination by the Finance Minister.

3. Payments made on non-financial assets include purchases of assets and expenditure on assets which has been capitalised. The payments for non-financial departmental assets include $256,014 from prior year appropriations and administered assets include $233,480 from prior year appropriations.

2014 Capital Budget Appropriations Capital Budget Appropriations applied in 2014 (current and prior year)

Variance

Appropriation Act Total Capital

Budget

Appropriations

Payments for non-financial assets

3

Payments for Other Purposes

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 122

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

FMA Act

Annual Capital Budget

A ppropriations reduced

2

AFM

(b)

Section 32

Total Payments

$'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000 $'000

DEPARTMENTA

L

Ordinar

y annual services - Departmental Capital bud

g et

1

142 - - - 142

(354

)

-

(354

)

(212

)

ADMINISTERED

Ordinar

y annual services - Administered Capital Bud

g et

1

2,319

(38 )

- - 2,281

(2,322

)

-

(2,322

)

(41 )

Notes.

Table B: Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

Total Capital Budget Appropriations

Payments for non-financial assets

3

Payments for Other Purposes

Appropriation Act

1. Departmental and Administered Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (no.1,3,5). They form part of ordinary annual services, and are not separately idenitified in the Appropriation Acts. For more information on ordinary annual services appropriations, please see Table A: Annual Appropriations.

2. Appropriations reduced under Appropriation Acts (No. 1,3,5) 2011-12: sections 10, 11, 12 and 15 or via a determination by the Finance Minister.

3. Payments made on non-financial assets include purchases of assets and expenditure on assets which has been capitalised. The payments for non-financial departmental assets include $354,292 from prior year appropriations and administered assets include $274,074 from prior year appropriations.

Variance

2013 Capital Budget Appropriations Capital Budget Appropriations applied in 2013 (current and prior year)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 123

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$'000 $'000

DEPARTMENTAL Appropriation Act (No.1) 2008-09 - 37

Appropriation Act (No.4) 2008-09 - 18

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2009-10 - 2,571

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2010-11 - 346

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2011-12 - 391

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2012-13 95 883

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2013-14 1,243 -

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2011-12 - 1

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2012-13 - 2

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2013-14 - -

Appropriation Act (No.3) 2013-14 78 -

Appropriation Act (No.4) 2013-14 1,462 -

Appropriation Act (No.5) 2013-14 42 -

Cash on hand 42 158

Total 2,962 4,407

ADMINISTERED Appropriation Act (No.1) 2010-11 6 6

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2011-121 - -

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2012-131 - 271

Appropriation Act (No.1) 2013-141 182

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2010-11 - -

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2011-12 - -

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2012-13 108 135

Appropriation Act (No.2) 2013-14 155 -

Total 451 412

1 Appropriation before application of S.11 reduction

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

Table C: Unspent Departmental Annual Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Authority

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 124

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

Type Purpose $ $

Refund 59,600 181

Total 59,600 181

Appropriation applied

Authority Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997 s.28(2), Administered

To provide an appropriation where an Act or other law requires or permits the repayment of an amount received by the Commonwealth and apart from this section there is no specific appropriation for the repayment.

Table D: Special Appropriations ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 125

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Total amount required

3

Total amount appropriated

4

Total

reduction

5

Act (No.1) Act (No.3) Act (No.5)

Outcome 1 2,326,081.29 - - 2,326,081.29 2,329,000.00 2,918.71

Other Services Act (No.2) Act (No.4)

Act (No.2)

Non-Operating 155,000.00 - - 155,000.00 155,000.00 -

Amount required

3 - by Appropriation Act

Ordinary Annual Services

Table E: Reduction in Administered Items ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

2014

Notes:

1. Numbers in this section of the table must be disclosed to the cent.

2. Administered items for 2014 were reduced to these amounts when these financial statements were tabled in Parliament as part of the agency's 2014 annual report. This reduction is effective in 2015, but the amounts are reflected in Table A in the 2013-14 financial statements in the column 'Appropriations reduced' as they are adjustments to 2013-14 appropriations.

3. Amount required as per Appropriation Act (Act 1 s. 11; Act 2 s. 12).

4. Total amount appropriated in 2014. 5. Total reduction effective in 2015.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 126

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Total amount required

3

Total amount appropriated

4

Total

reduction

5

Act (No.1) Act (No.3) Act (No.5)

Outcome 1 2,281,402.67 - - 2,281,402.67 2,319,000.00 37,597.33

Other Services Act (No.2) Act (No.4)

Act (No.2)

Non-Operating 155,000.00 - - 155,000.00 155,000.00 -

3. Amount required as per Appropriation Act (Act 1 s. 11; Act 2 s. 12).

Note 26: Appropriations (Continued)

Table E: Reduction in Administered Items ('Recoverable GST exclusive')

4. Total amount appropriated in 2013. 5. Total reduction effective in 2014.

Notes: 1. Numbers in this section of the table must be disclosed to the cent.

2. Administered items for 2013 were reduced to these amounts when these financial statements were tabled in Parliament as part of the agency's 2013 annual report. This reduction is effective in 2014, but the amounts are reflected in Table A in the 2012-13 financial statements in the column 'Appropriations reduced' as they are adjustments to 2012-13 appropriations.

2013

Amount required

3 - by Appropriation Act

Ordinary Annual Services

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 127

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE







All items were reviewed as at 30 June 2014 and no issues of compliance with Section 83 have been identified. The value of Section 28 payments in 2013-14 equated to $59,599.60 (2012-13:$180.71).

Note 27: Compliance with Statutory Conditions for Payments from the Consolidated Revenue Fund

Section 83 of the Constitution provides that no amount may be paid out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund except under an appropriation made by law.

During 2011-12, the agency developed a plan to review exposure to risks of not complying with statutory conditions on payments from appropriations. The plan was updated in 2013-14 and involved:

The agency identified one appropriation involving statutory conditions for payment, comprising of the standing appropriation under Section 28 of the FMA Act, to spend money from the consolidated revenue fund in order to make repayments.

all payments made from a special appropriation were investigated to ensure that payments were being made in accordance with the law;

the agency assessed the risk as low;

determining the risk of non-compliance by assessing the difficulty of administering the statutory conditions and assessing the extent to which existing payment systems and process satisfy those conditions.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 128

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

Note 28A: Net Cost of Outcome Delivery

2014 2013 2014 2013

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Departmental Expenses 14,212 13,759 14,212 13,759

Own-source income 77 91 77 91

Administered Expenses 5,103 5,446 5,103 5,446

Own-source income 1,203 1,269 1,203 1,269

Net cost/(contribution) of outcome delivery 18,035 17,845 18,035 17,845

Total Outcome 1

Note 28: Reporting of Outcomes

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 129

OLD PARLIAMENT HOUSE

2014 2013

$’000 $'000

Total comprehensive income (loss) less depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriations1 (79) (26)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation expenses previously funded through revenue appropriation 243 358

Total comprehensive income (loss) - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income 164 332

1. From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements, where revenue appropriations for depreciation/amortisation expenses ceased. Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations. Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required.

Note 29: Net Cash Appropriation Arrangements

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 130

APPENDICES

Friday night drinks in the House of Representatives courtyard. Photo: Paul Chapman 2013.

APPenDiX A: St AffinG St AtiStiCS This appendix provides statistics on staffing, including numbers, gender and salaries. All staff were employed in the Australian Capital Territory.

Table 13 Staff members, by classification, gender and employment status, 30 June 2014

Casual

Casual total

Full-time Full-

time total

Part-time Part-

time total Total Female Male Female Male Female Male

APS 2 1 - 1 - - - - - 1

APS 3 16 2 18 2 5 7 6 5 11 36

APS 4 - - - 1 3 4 2 - 2 6

APS 5 - - - 8 2 10 1 1 2 12

APS 6 - - - 6 3 9 - 1 1 10

EL 1 - - - 7 4 11 1 - 1 12

EL 2 - - - 5 2 7 - - - 7

PAO 3 - - - 1 - 1 - - 1

SES 1 - - - - 2 2 - - - 2

Agency head - - - 1 - 1 - - - 1

Total 17 2 19 31 21 52 10 7 17 88

APS = Australian Public Service level; EL = Executive Level; PAO = Public Affairs Officer grade; SES = Senior Executive Service band

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 132

Table 14 Full-time equivalent staff members, by classification and gender, 30 June 2013 and 30 June 2014

2013 2014

Female Male Total Female Male Total

APS 3 7.37 4.55 11.92 6.34 7.28 13.62

APS 4 5.60 3.00 8.60 2.00 2.00 4.00

APS 5 11.00 2.80 13.80 6.60 4.80 11.40

APS 6 5.60 6.84 12.44 8.00 3.84 11.84

EL 1 10.40 4.00 14.40 7.40 4.00 11.40

EL 2 4.00 2.00 6.00 5.00 2.00 7.00

PAO 3 2.00 - 2.00 1.00 - 1.00

SES 1 - 2.00 2.00 - 2.00 2.00

Agency head 1.00 - 1.00 1.00 - 1.00

Grand Total 46.97 25.19 72.16 37.34 25.92 63.26

APS = Australian Public Service level; EL = Executive Level; PAO = Public Affairs Officer grade; SES = Senior Executive Service band Note: Based on ongoing and non-ongoing staff (casual staff excluded).

Table 15 Employment arrangements, by classification, 30 June 2014

Remuneration Tribunal determination Enterprise agreement

Section 24(1) determination Total

APS 2 - 1 - 1

APS 3 - 36 - 36

APS 4 - 6 - 6

APS 5 - 12 - 12

APS 6 - 10 - 10

EL 1 - 12 - 12

EL 2 - 7 - 7

PAO 3 - 1 - 1

SES 1 - - 2 2

Agency head 1 - - 1

Total 1 85 2 88

APS = Australian Public Service level; EL = Executive Level; PAO = Public Affairs Officer grade; SES = Senior Executive Service band

APPENDICES 133

Table 16 Salary ranges available under the enterprise agreement and section 24(1) determinations, 30 June 2014

Level Minimum ($) Maximum ($)

APS 1 41,984 47,174

APS 2 50,004 53,005

APS 3 54,777 59,854

APS 4 61,654 66,505

APS 5 67,371 71,470

APS 6 73,617 84,761

EL 1 90,795 102,638

PAO 94,929 118,524

EL 2 115,071 135,193

SES 1 156,500 182,142

APS = Australian Public Service level; EL = Executive Level; PAO = Public Affairs Officer grade; SES = Senior Executive Service band Note: This table does not include the position of Agency Head, whose remuneration is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 134

APPenDiX B: AGenCY AnD OutCOme ReSOuRCeS

Table 17 Agency resource statement, 2013-14

Actual available appropriation 2013-14

$’000

-

Payments made in 2013-14 $’000

=

Balance remaining 2013-14 $’000

Ordinary annual servicesa

Departmental appropriation

Prior year departmental appropriationb 1,619 1,524 95

Departmental appropriationc 14,326 12,963 1,363

Section 31 relevant agency receipts 300 300 -

Total 16,245 14,787 1,458

Administered expenses

Prior year administered appropriationd 239 233 6

Outcome 1e 2,329 2,147 182

Total 2,568 2,380 188

Total ordinary annual services 18,813 17,167 1,646

Other services

Administered expenses

Departmental non-operating

Prior year equity injections 4 4 -

Equity injectionsf 1,514 52 1,462

Total 1,518 56 1,462

Administered non-operating

Prior year administered assets and liabilitiesg 135 27 108

Administered assets and liabilitiesh 155 - 155

Total 290 27 263

Total other services 1,808 83 1,725

Total available annual appropriations 20,621 17,250 3,371

Total net resourcing for agency 20,621 17,250 3,371

APPENDICES 135

Notes to Table 17 a Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2013-14.

b Balance carried forward from previous year.

c Includes an amount of $0.405 million for the departmental capital budget. For accounting purposes this amount has been designated as ‘contributions by owners’.

d The opening balance reported in the 2012-13 annual report was $0.277 million, and this was reduced by $0.038 million in the section 11 process as published in the 2012-13 statements.

e Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2013-14.

f Departmental Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2013-14.

g Administered Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2012-13.

h Administered Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2013-14.

Note: All figures are GST exclusive.

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 136

Table 18 Resources for Outcome 1, 2013-14

Outcome 1: An enhanced appreciation and understanding of the political and social heritage of Australia for members of the public, through activities including the conservation and upkeep of, and the provision of access to, Old Parliament House and the development of its collections, exhibitions and educational programs

Original budget 2013-14 $’000

(a)

Changes to budget available 2013-14

$’000 (b)

Actual expenses 2013-14 $’000

(c)

Variation 2013-14 $’000 (a)+(b)-(c)

Program 1: Old Parliament House

Administered expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1)a 2,329 - 2,326 3

Prior year ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 15 120 27 108

Other services (Appropriation Bill No. 2) 155 - - 155

Prior year ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 2)b - - 6 (6)

Special appropriations (section 28) - - 60 (60)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 5,400 - 5,103 297

Departmental expenses

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 13,912 - 12,670 1,242

Prior year ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 1) 3,862 364 1,524 2,702

Extinguishment of prior year (Appropriation Bill No. 1) - (2,607) - (2,607)

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 3) - 246 168 78

Equity injection (Appropriation Bill No. 4) - 1,462 - 1,462

Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Bill No. 5) - 168 126 42

Revenues from independent sources (section 31) c - 300 300 -

Other services (Appropriation Bill No. 2) 52 - 52 -

Prior year other services (Appropriation Bill No. 2) 27 (5) 4 18

Extinguishment of prior year (Appropriation Bill No. 2) - (18) - (18)

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the budget year 408 - 298 110

Total expenses for Outcome 1 26,160 30 22,664 3,526

2012-13 2013-14

Average staffing level (number) 72 71

a Administered excludes a section 11 reduction in 2013-14 of $2,918.71 but includes accruals of $179,000.

b The budget estimate compared to actual was returned in a section 11 reduction for 2012-13. Accruals in 2012-13 were estimated to be $0.276 million but were actually $0.233 million (variance of $0.006 million).

c Section 31 funding for revenues from independent sources includes GST refunds and other balance sheet items, which are not expenses but have been included above to ensure compliance with the appropriation note. The resource statement in the 2013-14 Portfolio Budget Statements equated to $20.352 million plus $5.400 million in administered expenses and $0.408 million not requiring appropriation, which equates to $26.160 million. The agency had multiple changes to the budget throughout the year, but with a net increase in resources of $0.030 million.

APPENDICES 137

APPenDiX C: liSt Of ReQuiRementS Requirement Page

Letter of transmittal iii

Table of contents v

Index 143-6

Glossary [abbreviations and acronyms] 142

Contact officer(s) ii

Internet home page address and internet address for report ii

Director’s review

Review by Director xii-xiv

Summary of significant issues and developments xii

Overview of agency’s performance and financial results xiii

Outlook for following year xiii

Significant issues and developments—portfolio xii-xiv

Agency overview

Role and functions 2

Organisational structure 3

Outcome and program structure 6

Where outcome and program structure differs from Portfolio Budget Statements, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements or other portfolio statements accompanying any other additional appropriation bills, details of variation and reasons for change

none to report

Portfolio structure na

Report on performance

Review of performance during the year in relation to programs and contribution to outcomes 6-22

Actual performance in relation to deliverables and key performance indicators set out in the Portfolio Budget Statements, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements or other portfolio statements

6-22

Where performance targets differ from the Portfolio Budget Statements or Portfolio Additional Estimates Statements, details of both former and new targets, and reasons for the change none to report

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 138

Requirement Page

Narrative discussion and analysis of performance 6-22

Trend information 6-22

Significant changes in nature of principal functions/services none to report

Performance of purchaser-provider arrangements 35

Factors, events or trends influencing performance 6-22

Contribution of risk management in achieving objectives 29, 30, 31, 32

Performance against service charter customer service standards, complaints data and the agency’s response to complaints 31

Discussion and analysis of the agency’s financial performance 40-3

Discussion of any significant changes in financial results from the prior year, from budget or anticipated to have a significant impact on future operations 40-3

Agency resource statement and summary resource tables by outcomes 135-7

Management and accountability

Corporate governance 24-32

Certification by Director that agency has complied with the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines iii

Statement of the main corporate governance practices in place 24-32

Names of the senior executives and their responsibilities 3-4

Senior management committees and their roles 24-6

Corporate and operational planning and associated performance reporting and review 28-30

Internal audit arrangements, including approach adopted to identifying areas of significant financial or operational risk and arrangements to manage those risks 30-2

Policy and practices on the establishment and maintenance of appropriate ethical standards 2, 31

How nature and amount of remuneration for Senior Executive Service officers is determined 31

External scrutiny 32

Significant developments in external scrutiny none to report

Judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner 32

Reports by the Auditor-General, a parliamentary committee, the Commonwealth Ombudsman or an agency capability review 32

APPENDICES 139

Requirement Page

Management of human resources 33-4

Assessment of effectiveness in managing and developing human resources to achieve agency objectives 33-4

Workforce planning, staff turnover and retention 33

Impact and features of enterprise or collective agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, determinations, common law contracts and Australian workplace agreements 33

Training and development undertaken and its impact 33

Work health and safety performance 33-4

Statistics on staffing 132-4

Enterprise or collective agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, determinations, common law contracts and Australian workplace agreements 33, 132-4

Performance pay 33

Assets management 35

Assessment of effectiveness of assets management 35

Purchasing 35-6

Assessment of purchasing against core policies and principles 35-6

Consultants 35-6

A summary statement detailing the number of new consultancy services contracts let during the year, the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts let during the year (inclusive of GST), the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were active in the reporting year and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST); and a statement noting that information on contracts and consultancies is available through the AusTender website

36

Australian National Audit Office access clauses 36

Absence of provisions in contracts allowing access by the Auditor-General 36

Exempt contracts

Contracts exempted from publication on AusTender none to report

Financial statements

Financial statements 44-130

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 140

Requirement Page

Other mandatory information

Work health and safety (Schedule 2, Part 4 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011) 33-4

Advertising and market research (section 311A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 ) and statement on advertising campaigns 36

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance (section 516A of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 ) 36-7

Compliance with the agency’s obligations under the Carer Recognition Act 2010 35

Grant programs 36

Disability reporting—explicit and transparent reference to agency-level information available through other reporting mechanisms 34

Information Publication Scheme statement 32

Correction of material errors in previous annual report

APPENDICES 141

ABBReViAtiOnS AnD ACROnYmS Section 5(1)(c) of Attachment A of the Requirements for annual reports for departments, executive agencies and FMA Act bodies (May 2014) states that an annual report must contain ‘a glossary to make clear the meanings of any abbreviations and acronyms used’. This list of abbreviations and acronyms fulfils that requirement.

AEC Australian Electoral Commission

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

APMC Australian Prime Ministers Centre

APS Australian Public Service

FMA Act Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997

GST goods and services tax

ICOMOS International Council on Monuments and Sites

na not applicable

NIYP National Indigenous Youth Parliament

WHS work health and safety

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 142

inDeX

A

ABC, 19

accessibility, 10, 19, 34

Acquisition Committee, 26

ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion in Government Award, 34

ACT Companion Card scheme, 35

administered finances, 42-3

advertising, 36

Advisory Council, xiv, 24, 27-8

membership, 28

review by, xi

agency resource statement, 2013-14, 135

APS Statistical Bulletin, 34

Arts x Activism, 13

Asbestos Survey and Management Plan, 29

asset management, 35

Attorney-General and Minister for the Arts, xiv

Attorney-General’s Department, xiv

Audience Development Strategy, 22

audit arrangements, 29, 30

Audit Committee, 25, 29, 30

Australasian Parliamentary Educators Conference, 22

Australian Electoral Commission, 8, 11, 12, 22

Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), 30, 32, 40

Australian National university, 19

Australian Prime Ministers Centre (APMC), 16, 22, 27, 29

five-year strategy, vii, xiii

2014 seminar, vii, 16, 22

Australian Privacy Principles, 29, 33

Australian Public Service (APS)

Values, Employment Principles and Code of Conduct, 31

Australian Public Service Commission

State of the Service Report, 34

Australian War Memorial, 19

B

Behind the Lines exhibition and website, 19

Beyond the Veneer exhibition, 17

Building and Collection Disaster Recovery Plan, 29, 31

Business Continuity Plan, 29, 31

C

Canberra Zine Emporium, 9

capital works program, 10

Carer Recognition Act 2010, 35

Chief Executive’s Instructions, 29, 35

Client Service Charter, 31

Code of Conduct (APS), 30, 31

Collection Development Plan, xii, xiii, 10, 11

Collection Management Policy, 29

collections

access and engagement, 14

additions, notable, 11

management, 10-11

number of objects, 10

stewardship, 10

sub-collections, 14

Comcare, 34

Comcover, 34

Comcover Risk Management Benchmarking Survey, 31, 34

Commonwealth Disability Strategy, 34

Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines, iii, 31, 32

Commonwealth Procurement Rules, 35

143 INDEX

Community Learning Strategy, 29

consultancies, 35-6

corporate governance, 24-32

corporate plans and policies, 28-30

Council of Australasian Museum Directors, 22

Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre, 17

Crawford School of Public Policy, Australian National university, 22

D

deliverables

Manage the heritage values of Old Parliament House, 10

Develop and manage the agency’s collections, 10-14

Increase access, engagement and participation, 14-22

Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport, 31

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 31

departmental finances, 40-2

Director

remuneration, 31

review by, xii-xiv

role, 4

Disability Action Plan 2011-14, 29, 34, 35

Disability Reference Group, 34

e

ecologically sustainable development, 36

Election Festival, 2013, xii, 12

Employment Principles (APS), 31

Energy Efficiency in Government Operations policy, 36-7

Enterprise Agreement 2011-14, 33

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, 10, 25, 29, 36

environmental measures, 37

Ernst & Young, 30

ethical standards, 31

Executive, 4

Executive Management Group, 24

exhibitions, vii, ix, xii, 8, 11, 18, 19, 21

visitor numbers, 15

external scrutiny, 32

f

Fair Work Act 2009, 33

Financial Management and Accountability Act 1997, 25, 29, 30, 35

financial management and performance, xiii, 40-3

financial statements, 43-130

fraud control, 30, 32

policy and plan, 29

Freedom of Information Act 1982, 32

funding, agency, 40

G

grants, 36

Guidelines on information and advertising campaigns by Australian Government departments and agencies, 36

H

Happy and Glorious exhibit, 21

health and wellbeing program, 34

Heritage Actions Committee, 25, 36

Heritage Collection, 14

Heritage Management Plan, xii, xiii, 10, 27, 29, 35, 36

highlights of 2013-14, vii

House of Representatives courtyard re-rendering, 20

human resources management, 33

i

Information Publication Scheme, 32

internal audit, 29, 30

International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), 22

Interpretation and Learning Collection, 14

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 144

k

key performance indicators, 7

l

letter of transmittal, iii

Life Cycle Cost Plan, 10, 29, 35

m

management committees, 24-6

market research, 36

memorandum of understanding

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, 31

Menzies’ 1941 Diary website, 19

Ministry for the Arts, xiv, 6, 27

mission, agency, 2

mobile applications

audio tours, 19, 34

OpenMi Tours, 19

Model Global Parliament, 22

Multicultural Plan, 29

n

National Archives of Australia, 22

National Indigenous Youth Parliament, xii, 8, 22

National Student Constitutional Convention, 22

O

objectives

agency, 2

Program 1.1, 6

Occupy Small Street, 13

Old Parliament House Advisory Council, xiv, 24, 27-8

membership, 28

review by, xi

Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2008-2013, 10

Old Parliament House Audit Committee Charter, 30

Old Parliament House Strategic Plan 2013-18, 28, 33

online access to programs, content and research, 18, 19

OpenMi Tours mobile application, 19

Operational Environmental Management Plan, 36

operational plans and policies, 28-30

organisational structure, 3

outcome, 2, 6

P

Parliament and Civics Education Rebate Program, 18

partnerships, xiv, 19, 22

plans, 28-30

policies, 28-30

Political and Parliamentary Collection, 14

pop-up exhibitions, ix, 12, 14

Portfolio Budget Statements, 6, 40

Privacy Policy, 29, 33

Privacy Act 1988, 33

procurement, 35

Program 1.1

key performance indicators, 7

objectives, 6

performance report, 10-22

protective security, 32

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, 30

Public Service Act 1999, 31, 32

purchaser-provider arrangements, 35

Q

Queen’s Birthday long weekend events, 21

APPENDICES 145

R

recruitment, 33

Register of Key Business Risks, 31

remuneration

Director, 31

senior executives, 31, 134

Remuneration Tribunal, 31

research, 22

resources for Outcome 1, 2013-14, 137

Restaurant Associates, 19

Risk Management Policy and Framework, 30, 31

role

Advisory Council, 27

agency, 2

Director, 4

management committees, 24-6

senior executives, 4

Round Table of Prime Ministerial Research and Collecting Agencies, 2013, 19

S

salaries, 134

SBS, 22

scaffold tours, 20

schools programs, xii, 9, 15, 18

Security Policies and Plans, 30

Senior Executive Service officers, 31

Senior Management Group, 24, 28

social media activity, 18-19

staff

employment terms and conditions, 33

learning and development, 33

profile, 33

statistics, 132-4

strategic plan, xii, 28, 33

t

teachers

feedback, vii

professional development activities, 18

terms and conditions, employment, 33

2013 Election Festival, xii, 12

u

university of Canberra, 22

V

values

agency, 2

APS, 31

vision, agency, vi, 2

Visitor Experience Plan, 30

visitors

online activity, 18-19

outreach experiences and programs, 15, 18

statistics, 15

W

websites, 19

work health and safety, 33-4

Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 30, 33

Work Health and Safety Committee, 26, 34

Work Health and Safety Strategy, 30

Workplace Consultative Committee, 26

Y

YMCA, 8, 22

Z

Zine Lounge, xii, 9, 18

Old Parliament HOuse AnnuAl RepoRt 2013-14 146

Celebrating the spirit of Australian democracy and the power of your voice within it