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Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC)—Report for 2018-19


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A U S T R A L I A N B R O A D C A S T I N G C O R P O R A T I O N

ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Revellers at New Year’s Eve 2018 - The Night is Yours. Image: Jared Leibowtiz

Cover: Dianne Appleby, Yawuru Cultural Leader, and her grandson Zeke

11 September 2018

The Hon Paul Fletcher MP Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

The Board of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation is pleased to present its Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 2019.

The report was prepared for section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, in accordance with the requirements of that Act and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. It was approved by the Board on 11 September 2019 and provides a comprehensive review of the ABC’s performance and delivery in line with its Charter remit.

The ABC continues to be the home and source of Australian stories, told across the nation and to the world. The Corporation’s commitment to innovation in both storytelling and broadcast delivery is stronger than ever, as the needs of its audiences rapidly evolve in line with technological change.

Australians expect an independent, accessible public broadcasting service which produces quality drama, comedy and specialist content, entertaining and educational children’s programming, stories of local lives and issues, and news and current affairs coverage that holds power to account and contributes to a healthy democratic process. The ABC is proud to provide such a service.

The ABC is truly Yours.

Sincerely,

Ita Buttrose AC OBE Chair

Letter to the Minister iii

ABC Radio Melbourne Drive presenter Raf Epstein.

iv AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Contents 1

Contents Letter to the Minister 1

Foreword from the Chair 2

The Board 4

Purpose and Vision 8

The Executive Leadership Team 9

Where We Are 10

What We Do 12

Snapshot of the ABC in 2018-19 13

Message from the Managing Director 14

Quality, distinctive content in 2018-19 16

Yours in the Community 51

ABC Audiences 65

Annual Performance Statements 87

Working at the ABC 100

Responsibility 127

Accountability 141

Financial Statements 150

Appendices 208

Reference 263

The ABC is an essential part of the Australian social fabric. Even as an avid user of its programming and through my deep family ties to the organisation, I remain in awe of its significance and value to the community. More than two-thirds of the population connect with the ABC at some point each week. How many other Australian institutions can boast that level of constant engagement? Or the solid levels of trust and support?

In my short time as Chair of the ABC, I have sought to maintain those benchmarks. It has not been easy. The period covered by this Annual Report included some disruptive leadership issues culminating with the departure of both the former Managing Director and Chair in September 2018. As a result, the Board and management spent too much time in the latter half of 2018 being the news rather than producing it. That is now behind us.

Deputy Chair, Dr Kirstin Ferguson, assumed the role of Acting Chair following the resignation of Chair Justin Milne. On behalf of the Board our thanks to her for a job well done including successfully navigating the ABC through the Senate Inquiry and Departmental investigations. It was a challenging time for everyone on the Board. It is important to acknowledge the key finding of the Senate Inquiry that the Board’s decision to terminate Michelle Guthrie was made without reference to real or perceived political interference.

Staff morale was badly shaken, and my priority has been to reinvigorate it by restoring order and enhancing good governance with the help of Managing Director, David Anderson, and his management team. Our employees, in content areas and vital support functions, need a strong sense of direction and a feeling that management has their backs. I feel we are now providing it.

We continue to be recognised here and internationally for the quality of our programming, for our commitment to localism and our unique democratic role in fostering the national debate and informing the public. We are proud of the success of our homemade

kids’ series, Bluey, the compelling narrative and scenery that comprised Mystery Road, the strong public engagement nurtured by our local and national radio networks, and the breadth and depth of our federal election coverage. We are continuing to set the pace in areas like podcasting and app development and in uniting the community behind big events like Anzac Day, New Year’s Eve and the Invictus Games.

At a time of declining institutional trust across the globe, our value and trust scores remain high. The important role of the ABC has also been underscored in the Competitive Neutrality Report, commissioned by the Government and released in late 2018. The Report found that the ABC had not strayed beyond its charter and could not be blamed for the problems being encountered by the commercial sector. It endorsed the principle of a well-funded ABC taking full advantage of technological breakthroughs to serve new and existing audiences.

The Report highlighted how the media sector is arguably the one most disrupted by digital change. I sense many ongoing opportunities for the ABC in this landscape as we focus on our strengths: excellence, innovation, public service, and rewarding both niche and broad audiences with distinctive fare. There is no sense of complacency. We must always adapt, responding to audience trends and to the need to balance efficiency and effectiveness.

On that last point, our task has been made harder by the imposition of the three-year indexation freeze, which comes on top of a $50 million-a-year cut now embedded in our base. We will operate within our funding envelope. But the funding reduction, at a time of rising costs for production and acquired content, ever-increasing competition for audiences, and the need to replace obsolete equipment, will force tough choices and long-lasting decisions. We will continue to lobby the Government for financial security and the flexibility we need to invest in our future. We will continue to seek the support of our other stakeholders for that mission.

Foreword from the Chair

2 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The legislative environment in which we operate is another challenge. The AFP raid on our Ultimo headquarters, in pursuit of evidence relating to the 2017 publication of the so-called Afghan Files, has been a rude wake-up call for us and other media organisations. The legal framework and the mindset of our regulators and lawmakers is tilted too much towards secrecy and intimidation of journalists and whistleblowers. As I pointed out to Prime Minister Morrison, no journalist should face imprisonment for doing his or her job - informing the public. The ABC will fight the legality of the raid and seek the return of the seized information.

We will continue to campaign with our media colleagues for a shift in balance toward media freedom and the public’s right to know. Again, I come back to trust. The public trust us to speak truth to power. A hobbled ABC is

denied the ability, and indeed the fulfilment of its legislative duty, to inform the community. That is intolerable.

I have found the ABC to be remarkably resilient, powered by the energy and creativity of its staff and the admiration and respect of the community. It is an honour to oversee such a great combination. Whatever the challenges, we face the future with confidence.

Ita Buttrose

Chair, Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Chair Ita Buttrose with Richard Martin and Fiona Ellis-Jones. Image: Mridula Amin

Foreword from the Chair 3

The Board

Ita Buttrose AC, OBE Chair 7 March 2019 - 6 March 2024

Ita Buttrose has held executive and editing roles for major Australian media companies including Australian Consolidated Press (now Bauer Media), News Ltd and Fairfax, and has run her own media company, Capricorn Publishing. She has served on the boards of Australian Consolidated Press, News Corp Australia, and Television & Telecasters Properties Pty Ltd. (Network TEN). She has worked in print, radio and television and has written 11 books. She was inducted into the Australian Media Hall of Fame in 2017.

A founding member and former president of Chief Executive Women, Ita is a committed community and welfare contributor. She chaired Arthritis Australia from 2003 to 2006 and later Alzheimer’s (now Dementia) Australia from 2011 to 2014 and she is now National Ambassador for Dementia Australia.

She has been a member of the Sydney Symphony Council since 2010 and a Trustee of Centennial and Moore Park Trust in Sydney since 2012. She is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

David Anderson ABC Managing Director 6 May 2019 - 5 May 2024

David Anderson was appointed as the ABC’s Managing Director in May 2019 for a five-year term. David has enjoyed a successful career in the broadcast television and media industry for over 30 years, with a long history as a television executive and a strong track record in television production and commissioning successful programs across all genres.

Prior to his appointment as Managing Director, David served as Director Entertainment & Specialist from February 2018, expanding his previous role as Director Television to be responsible for all ABC radio music networks, podcasts and specialist radio content, as well as the ABC’s broadcast television networks, including on-demand products and services, and all associated websites and apps.

David was previously the Director of the ABC’s Digital Network and Strategy & Planning divisions, where he worked to refocus expenditure in the organisation towards audience-centred content, products and services; and as Director of Digital Network, David led the organisation’s digital transformation by looking at ways to engage new audiences online and creating a personalised and connected online network.

4 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Dr Kirstin Ferguson Deputy Chair

PhD (QUT), LLB (Hons) (QUT), BA (Hons) (UNSW)

12 November 2015 - 11 November 2020

A former CEO of an international consulting organisation and Air Force Officer, Dr Kirstin Ferguson is now a non-executive director on ASX-listed and private company boards including SCA Property Group Ltd, EML Payments Ltd and Hyne & Son Pty Ltd. Kirstin has contributed to the community through numerous voluntary roles including on the boards of the Layne Beachley Foundation, SheStarts, Queensland Theatre Company, and Queensland Rugby Union. She was also a mentor with Science and Technology Australia’s Superstars of STEM program and the Chair of the Women’s Agenda Leadership Awards.

Kirstin has a PhD in corporate culture, leadership and governance, and is an Adjunct Professor at the QUT School of Business. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a graduate of both the Company Director Course and International Company Director Course. An advocate for gender diversity and equality in the workplace, Kirstin is a member of national and international women’s organisations including Chief Executive Women, Women Corporate Directors and the Women’s Leadership Institute of Australia. Kirstin was the creator of the Our Watch/Walkley Award-nominated #CelebratingWomen campaign, and is the co-author of Women Kind.

Dr Jane Connors Staff-elected Director

PhD (UTS), Grad Dip Applied History (UTS), BA (Hons)(ANU)

1 May 2018 - 30 April 2023

Jane Connors has been with the ABC since completing an internship in 1989. Her previous roles included Executive Producer of the Social History Unit, Manager of Radio National, and Head of Industry Policy and Strategy at ABC Radio. Jane is currently an advisor with the Editorial Policies team. She has a PhD in Australian History and is the author of Royal Visits to Australia.

Jane is a member of several advisory bodies, including Sydney Living Museums and the Centre for Media History.

The Board 5

Donny Walford 24 November 2015 - 23 November 2020Donny Walford is the Founder and Managing Director of national businesses Bottom Line and behind closed doors®, and is currently on the boards of KeyInvest Ltd and the South Australian Venture Capital Fund. She is an advisory board member for NDA Law, an Executive Trustee of HealthStyle Choice Pty Ltd, and a Founding Member of International Women’s Forum Australia.Previously, Donny was a board director for Australian Associated Advisers Pty Ltd, the Australian Women Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Defence Teaming Centre, and the Heart Foundation (SA). She also served as Chair of the Australian Dance Theatre.Donny is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a graduate of the Institute’s Chairman’s mentoring and Mastering the Boardroom programs, and a graduate of the Macquarie University Executive Management program. Dr Vanessa

Guthrie Hon. D.Sc, PhD, BSc (Hons)

23 February 2017 - 22 February 2022

Vanessa Guthrie is an experienced non-executive director and Chair. Her career spans 30 years in the resources sector, living and working in remote and regional Australia. She has qualifications in geology, environment, law and business management, and was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Science from Curtin University in 2017 for her contribution to sustainability, innovation and policy leadership in the resources industry.

Vanessa is currently a non-executive director of Santos Ltd, Adelaide Brighton Ltd and Tronox Holding PLC, a council member of Curtin University, a councillor at the Association of Mining and Exploration Companies, and Deputy Chair of the Western Australian Cricket Association. She is an active member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and Chief Executive Women (CEW), and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE).

Peter Lewis2 October 2014 - 1 October 2019Peter Lewis is the Chairman of McGrath Ltd, a Non-Executive Director of Gravity Media Group Ltd, and a member of the Advisory Board for Anacacia Capital. He previously held a variety of board and advisory positions across a number of industries both domestic and international. He has extensive experience in financial management for media companies and has been the CFO of Seven Network Limited, Seven Group Holdings Limited, Seven Media Group, and Seven West Media Limited.Peter is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia, a member of Certified Practising Accountants (CPA) Australia, and a Fellow of the Governance Institute of Australia.6 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Georgie Somerset23 February 2017 - 22 February 2022Georgie Somerset is a rural industry leader and strategist with a background in regional development. Actively involved in running her family’s cattle business, she has board experience across the not-for-profit, government and industry sectors.Georgie is a director of the Royal Flying Doctor Service (Queensland section), the RFDS Foundation, and the Children’s Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, and she Chairs the Red Earth Community Foundation, South Burnett. She is President of AgForce Queensland Farmers and is a past president of the Queensland Rural, Regional and Remote Women’s Network. A Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Australian Rural Leadership Foundation, Georgie also serves on a range of industry and community committees. Joseph Gersh

AM

B Com LLB (Hons) (MU)

11 May 2018 - 10 May 2023

Joe Gersh practised law for 20 years as a senior partner and has had significant business experience with a range of public and private companies. He is currently the Founder and Executive Chairman of Gersh Investment Partners Ltd, a specialist real estate investment bank. He is also a director of The Sydney Institute. From 2003 to 2012, he was the inaugural Chair of the Australian Reinsurance Pool Corporation, and was a member of the Payments System Board of the Reserve Bank of Australia between 1998 and 2013.

Joe has also held numerous board positions in the arts community, including Deputy Chair of the Australia Council.

The Board 7

Purpose and Vision

The Investing in Audiences strategy provides a framework for our priorities:

• Creating extraordinary, relevant and valued content • An outstanding audience experience • Reaching and engaging more

people more frequently in the most relevant way • Building a great place to work

The ABC’s purpose is to fulfil its functions as set out in the ABC Act, particularly the ABC Charter

Our vision is to be the independent source of Australian conversations, culture, and stories

Image: David McMeekin

8 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The Executive Leadership Team

Craig McMurtrie Editorial Director

Michael Carrington Director Entertainment & Specialist (a)

Michael Millett* Director Public Affairs

Gaven Morris Director News, Analysis & Investigations

Rebekah Donaldson Chief People Officer Chief of Staff to Managing Director

Leisa Bacon Director Audiences

Melanie Kleyn Chief Financial Officer (a)

Judith Whelan Director Regional & Local (a)

Helen Clifton Chief Digital & Information Officer

* The ABC lost friend and colleague Mick Millett on 7 September 2019, just prior to this report going to press. On behalf of the Corporation, Managing Director David Anderson and the Board would like to acknowledge Mick’s distinguished reporting career, his enormous contribution to the ABC, and his tireless defence of public interest journalism.

The Executive Leadership Team 9

Esperance

Karratha

Longreach

Mount Isa

Alice Springs

Albany

Geraldton

Kalgoorlie

Kununurra

Katherine

Mackay

Bunbury

Perth

Broome

Darwin

Townsville

Cairns

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

Port Lincoln

Horsham

Renmark

Broken Hill

Adelaide

Port Pirie

Mount Gambier

Coffs Harbour

Lismore

Warrnambool

Dubbo

Wodonga

Tamworth

Orange

Mildura

Shepparton

Wagga Wagga

Port Macquarie

Newcastle

Muswellbrook

Bundaberg

Rockhampton

Launceston

Burnie

Bendigo

Ballarat

Toowoomba

Hobart

Wollongong

Gold Coast

Sale

Canberra

Bega

Maroochydore

Gosford

Nowra

Where We Are

International bureaux and news correspondents

Australian locations

London

Beirut

Jerusalem Nairobi

Beijing

New Delhi

Bangkok Jakarta

Tokyo Port Moresby Washington

For more information regarding the ABC’s domestic and international offices, see Appendix 14

on page 251.

10 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Esperance

Karratha

Longreach

Mount Isa

Alice Springs

Albany

Geraldton

Kalgoorlie

Kununurra

Katherine

Mackay

Bunbury

Perth

Broome

Darwin

Townsville

Cairns

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

Port Lincoln

Horsham

Renmark

Broken Hill

Adelaide

Port Pirie

Mount Gambier

Coffs Harbour

Lismore

Warrnambool

Dubbo

Wodonga

Tamworth

Orange

Mildura

Shepparton

Wagga Wagga

Port Macquarie

Newcastle

Muswellbrook

Bundaberg

Rockhampton

Launceston

Burnie

Bendigo

Ballarat

Toowoomba

Hobart

Wollongong

Gold Coast

Sale

Canberra

Bega

Maroochydore

Gosford

Nowra

Where We Are 11

What We Do

On the radio ABC NEWS on radio

a national, 24-hour news network for radio

National Radio Networks1

RN, ABC Classic, triple j

Capital City Local Radio2

available from all eight capital cities

Regional Local Radio3

available in regional locations around Australia

Digital Radio4

Double J, ABC Classic 2, ABC Jazz, ABC Country, ABC Grandstand, triple j Unearthed, and ABC KIDS listen5

Radio Australia

a news and information service for the Pacific region

On your screens ABC

the ABC’s primary television channel

ABC KIDS / ABC COMEDY

television for preschoolers until 7.30pm; then comedy for grown ups

ABC ME

a dedicated children’s channel

ABC NEWS on television

broadcasting national and breaking news 24 hours a day

ABC News Digital

in-depth journalism content, analysis and opinion

abc.net.au

your gateway to ABC news, information, and entertainment

ABC iview

the ABC’s online television catch-up and streaming service

Streaming

on ABC listen, ABC KIDS listen and via ABC websites

ABC Open6

where regional Australians tell their stories

Apps

for smartphones and tablets

Commercial Publishing and licensing

magazines, books and merchandise

Content sales and distribution

home entertainment, format and content sales, syndication

ABC Music and Events

a variety of music products and live events

Studios and Media Production

provision of production facilities to the market

International ABC Australia

television, radio and online services for audiences across Asia and the Pacific

ABC International Development (ABCID)

partnering with media, civil society and government organisations in the Asia-Pacific region, to assist in designing and delivering communication initiatives

1 Also available in mainland capital cities as a digital radio service, and nationally via digital satellite services.

2 Also available in mainland capital cities as a digital radio service. Some Local Radio services are available via digital satellite subscription services.

3 44 regional local radio services are available on AM or FM radio, with 43 available via streaming. Some Local Radio services are available via digital satellite subscription services.

4 All available as DAB+ stations and streams, except ABC Classic 2 which is only available as a stream.

5 Double J and ABC Jazz are also available on free-to-air digital and subscription television services. 6 ABC Open was decommissioned on 30 June 2019. All contributions have been retained and are available. The ABC’s new audience-image portal, ABC My Photo, will be launched in 2019-20.

12 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Snapshot of the ABC in 2018-19 82% of Australians believe the ABC performs a valuable role in the community81% trust the ABC425 high-impact waste reduction initiatives inspired by War on Waste10 Logies19 Walkley Awards2.7 million Hottest 100 votes128,000 Classic 100 votes30 years of Gardening AustraliaABC listen app 1.4 million livestreams 580,000 on-demand streams per week Invictus Games - audience reach of 5.8 million10 international versions of You Can’t Ask That256 emergency events coveredFederal election week coverage reached an estimated 10 million Australians.7 But there’s just one Bluey(with more than 100 million iview plays) 7 ABC Federal Election Study (ABC Audience Data & Insights) (n=1,500).Ball Park Music on The Set. Image: Georgia MoloneySnapshot of the ABC in 2018-19 13

Message from the Managing Director For much of the period covered by this report, I had the privilege to serve as the Corporation’s Acting Managing Director. This was, to a significant extent, a caretaker period, during which my primary responsibilities were to stabilise the organisation and ensure that it continued to provide the people of Australia with the programs and services they expect of it. During the year, I travelled to ABC offices around the country talking with and, most importantly, listening to the staff who are the creative engine of the Corporation.

Since my formal appointment in May 2019, I have engaged the ABC Leadership Team in detailed work on developing a Five-Year Plan to best position the organisation for the future. I anticipate announcing the new Plan in March 2020. As part of this process, the Leadership Team is also developing an Annual Content Plan that publicly articulates the Corporation’s creative remit and ambitions in line with its Charter responsibilities. I will bring this Plan forward before the end of 2019.

I am strongly committed to the Corporation looking and sounding like contemporary Australia across its programming and its workforce. In 2019, the ABC will launch a new three-year Diversity Strategy to drive and measure this transformation.

The new ABC Elevate Reconciliation Action Plan 2019-2022, which will come into effect on 1 July 2019, sets out concrete and measurable ways in which the Corporation will contribute to reconciliation between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians. Central to this fourth ABC RAP is the ambition to embed Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages and names in ABC programming so that they may might in turn become embedded in the vocabulary of the nation. The Elevate RAP also strengthens the Corporation’s on-going commitment to telling Indigenous stories and creating employment and business opportunities for Indigenous individuals and organisations.

In the final quarter of 2019, the ABC will launch Australia Talks, an ambitious project to understand and promote a

national conversation about the key issues affecting life in modern Australia, including Australians’ concerns, health and happiness, and perceptions of their nation. The project will encourage people to participate in an anonymous survey that provides personalised insights about their lives. The trends emerging from the aggregated results will be presented through content initiatives across ABC platforms, including a factual entertainment program on ABC Television.

In December we will celebrate 80 years of ABC international media services. From their beginnings in international radio, these services have expanded to include broadcast television, digital and mobile channels that reach millions of people through social media, video on demand and streaming. A range of programs and events are being planned to mark this milestone, including a special edition of Q&A broadcast from the Pacific and a documentary on the history of the ABC’s international services.

While I believe we made a strong case to government for a reversal of a foreshadowed pause in the indexation of its triennial funding, that pause was confirmed in the May 2019 Budget. Accordingly, the ABC’s budget will need to identify additional savings. By the final year of the current triennium, these savings will need to be more than $40 million per annum on an ongoing basis.

The media environment in which the ABC operates has not stood still. For more than a decade, audiences have continued to embrace a widening array of digital media services that allow them to access content how, when and where it suits them. Feeding this fragmentation is the growth of global-scale technology companies that are either directly competing with traditional media organisations for the attention of audiences or operating platforms whose algorithms directly shape audiences’ access to content.

In responding to these changes, the ABC is adapting its offerings and the ways in which it distributes them, including shifting activity to cloud services and increasing the use of

14 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

data to deliver more personalised experiences to audiences. However, the Corporation’s ability to invest in refreshing its capabilities is constrained by the matching need to maintain scheduled broadcast media services, which are expected to continue for the foreseeable future, and to replace end-of-life technology assets that have been ‘sweated’ in the pursuit of past efficiencies.

At the same time, the cost of creating and acquiring quality content continues to rise, particularly due to greater competition in the Australian media landscape, especially from global distributors. The average cost per hour of Australian TV drama in the local production industry has increased by approximately 3.3% per annum over five years and 6.5% per annum over the last three years.

In response to greater competition from global technology companies, public service media organisations around the world are increasingly exploring collaboration and content sharing as a means of reducing costs and increasing overall program budgets. The ABC has already begun to pursue such collaboration opportunities and in June 2019 signed a memorandum of understanding with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to co-develop a range of English-language programming.

The raid of the Corporation’s Ultimo office by the Australian Federal Police in June 2019 cast into sharp relief the legislative regime under which journalists at the ABC and other media organisations operate. The ABC is adamant that it cannot fulfil its obligation to deliver accurate, impartial and objective journalism if its staff are intimidated or treated like criminals for simply doing their jobs. Accordingly, in 2019-20, we will seek legislative changes to ensure the public’s right to know is protected.

I believe the ABC enters 2019-20 confident of its ability to respond to the significant challenges that it, like all media organisations, faces in the next few years.

David Anderson Managing Director, Australian Broadcasting Corporation

MD David Anderson with ABC Broken Hill Chief of Staff Andrew Schmidt. Image: Rebekah Donaldson

Message from the Managing Director 15

16 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Mark Coles Smith in Will Australia Ever Have a Black Prime Minister?

Quality, distinctive content in 2018-19

Contents News, Analysis & Investigations 18

Federal Election 2019 22

Entertainment & Specialist 24

Regional & Local 38

Content Ideas Lab 43

ABC Commercial 48

From early 2018, the reorganisation of the ABC into broad genre content-making areas saw the creation of new Content Teams to produce and deliver innovative, distinctive and engaging content. The enhanced efficiency and flexibility provided by the restructure has assisted content-makers to meet their audiences’ expectations for high-quality content, on all platforms and devices available to them.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 17

News, Analysis & Investigations In 2018-19, News, Analysis & Investigations (NA&I) pursued issues and told stories that spoke directly to the concerns of all Australians, through high-quality, in-depth journalism and comprehensive coverage of major events. ABC news and current affairs programs continued to play a pivotal role in raising and investigating issues in the national interest.

Internally, teams continued to transform production and output, and move towards a high-value integrated broadcast and digital offering for audiences.

Major domestic audience highlights for the year included the May federal election coverage, which delivered a new record audience for the ABC (see page 22), as well as coverage of the federal leadership challenge, a royal visit, the Invictus Games, the New South Wales and Victorian state elections, the Banking and Aged Care Royal Commissions, the Townsville floods, and the prosecution of George Pell.

Internationally, the ABC’s teams covered significant events including the Thai caves rescue, the Christchurch mosque attacks and the Indonesian earthquakes, and closely followed political developments in the US, Europe, Latin America and the Asia Pacific.

The Specialist Reporting team, ABC Investigations and the Digital Story Innovation team delivered Australia’s most consequential, original journalism across a range of programs and channels. Flagship television programs maintained strong traditional broadcast viewing numbers as well as attracting new audiences with online treatments.

Audiences continued to benefit from Audio Current Affairs’ regular radio and NewsRadio broadcasts, and the team increased their production of podcasts to meet demand for content on the popular ABC listen platform. Behind the News (BtN), the ABC’s long-running, unique news and current affairs program for schoolchildren, had high engagement on broadcast and online platforms, and maintained its reputation for content innovation.

For NA&I audience data by platform, please see ABC Audiences pp 65-86.

Equal Digital Life From 2016 to 2019 NA&I pursued a three-year strategy known as ‘Equal Digital Life’ (EDL), with the aim of ensuring the best stories and coverage were made accessible and provided value to all Australians on any platform they chose to use. News teams significantly changed their ways of working, and transformed the output and distribution of stories to reach larger audiences while increasing the scope and quality of digital production. As the EDL strategy nears its close this calendar year, News is on track to meet the core targets set in 2016. Those targets were:

• to lift the activity all of News teams to devoting 30% of their effort to digital output

• to grow digital audience reach to 40% per month (as measured by Nielsen)

• to lift audience engagement on ABC news sites to industry-leading rates

• to reach a greater number of younger audiences

• to be Australia’s leading news organisation on third-party platforms.

The ABC is the market leader on third party news platforms, reaching audiences via outlets such as Apple News, YouTube, msn and Facebook, and it has cemented its No. 2 ranking among Australian online news brands. Average time per user for ABC News is the highest among the leading local news providers, while commercial syndication to a range of domestic and international news providers extends the ABC’s reach.

The best stories from NA&I’s broadcast teams now reach larger digital audiences than ever and the team leads industry measures for digital engagement.

18 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Network Newsgathering The Network News team includes the Business & Finance, International, and Sport desks, as well as the Specialist Reporting Team and Parliament House, Canberra, each of which produce output for television, radio and digital.

In 2018-19, the business team was expanded to add greater digital capacity, which enhanced online reporting on issues such as property prices, superannuation, the Banking Royal Commission and the impact of digital disruption on retailers. The International desk covered key stories such as the US mid-term elections and the change in government in Papua New Guinea.

Major stories from the Specialist Reporting Team included coverage of the 2019 flu epidemic and the exposure of telecommunication services selling unaffordable contracts to vulnerable people. ABC Sport continued to cover the major sporting codes and also appealed to a broad audience with stories on unusual events and people in the sporting arena.

State coverage The Local Journalism Initiative, launched in April 2018, successfully introduced structural reforms in all eight state and territory newsrooms, driving innovation, responsiveness and digital capability, as well as improving the quality of local journalism.

The reforms led to the effective attraction and retention of audiences for digital content.

Innovation in local newsrooms improved the distribution of breaking and in-depth news on social media and digital news channels. One popular example was the ‘property blacklist’, a data-driven interactive map for every major city which enabled users to identify the riskiest suburbs for home loan lending.

ABC News employs 1270 journalists and content makers and more than 90% of its

funding is directly invested in journalism and content creation.

Local newsrooms collaborated more closely with capital city and regional content makers to improve usage of regional storytelling. The Townsville floods in February challenged News and Regional & Local teams to deliver fast, accurate and comprehensive reporting of a major natural disaster, which continued long after the floodwaters receded. During the coverage, digital engagement and Queensland television audiences were exceptionally high.

Oliver Gordon, Walkley Young Australian Journalist of the Year. Image: Hamish Harty

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 19

Investigative & In-depth Journalism The ABC’s current affairs teams continue to provide the nation’s highest quality in-depth journalism through broadcast programming and aligned bespoke digital content.

In 2018-19, Four Corners highlights included: ‘A Form of Madness’, a rapid turnaround report on the Liberal leadership spill; ‘Proud Country’, a portrait of regional Australia in the grip of drought; ‘Crime and Panic’, an investigation to find the truth surrounding ‘African’ crime in Melbourne; ‘Meet the Scammers’, which unmasked cyber scammers stealing hearts and money; an hour-long special on the dramatic Thai cave rescue; and an analysis of the disruptive business model of Uber.

7.30 underwent a successful overhaul of production, style and content, to give audiences an improved experience delivered in high definition. An increased focus on storytelling was rewarded with stable television audiences in an otherwise declining market for nightly current affairs.

Weekly current affairs programs Australian Story and Foreign Correspondent are now running shorter seasons and are focusing on quality of storytelling, and engaging digital as well as broadcast audiences. Australian Story - frequently the ABC’s highest rating current affairs program on television - grew its iview audience over 2018-19, while a change in broadcast timeslot resulted in a larger audience for Foreign Correspondent.

Discussion and debate programs Insiders, The Drum and Q&A succeeded in engaging audiences around issues of public interest, particularly during the federal election campaign where a series of ‘on the road’ programs proved a successful foray into cost-effective live broadcasting from all parts of Australia (for more on federal election coverage, see page 22).

A crowdsourced investigation into aged care received more than 4,000 submissions from members of the public, demonstrating the magnitude of concern over the quality of aged care. Four Corners dedicated two episodes to the issue and prompted the Federal Government to call a Royal Commission.

ABC News is Australia’s most trusted news and information source1, continuing to achieve quality and distinctiveness

scores above 80%.2

20 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Now on ABC main channel in an extended early evening timeslot, The Drum grew viewership and offered Australia’s most diverse guest line-up. In its 11th year, Q&A continued to provide Australians with a rare opportunity to directly question and hold to account politicians and key opinion leaders.

As part of the ABC’s content reorganisation, RN Breakfast, RN Drive and Background Briefing joined AM, PM and The World Today to produce an integrated Audio Current Affairs team. The team also produced podcasts including The Signal and Russia, If You’re Listening. Notably, digital treatment of Background Briefing investigations helped extend the reach of the program’s journalism, which included investigating ANZ’s plans to thwart one of Australia’s biggest-ever financial investigations, and an examination of ‘doxxing’, the new weapon of choice among cyberbullies and trolls.

In its first full year of operation, ABC Investigations produced an outstanding array of stories for all programs across all platforms. The unit delivered more than 500 stories to 7.30, Four Corners, News Digital, the 7pm News, Audio Current Affairs, ABC News Channel and radio news.

ABC Investigations includes a small specialist team of digital producers dedicated to high-impact online storytelling, including data journalism, social analysis and breaking news. Their work during the year included detailed insights into property prices, weather extremes, the challenge of conquering Mount Everest, the changing sounds of triple j’s Hottest 100, and the ferocity of the Queensland bushfires as seen from space.

News Digital Based in Brisbane, News Digital curates and publishes content across national news, mobile, social, and video, as well as acting as an innovation hub and source of expertise for news teams.

Under the Local Journalism Initiative, digital editors were recruited for each capital city newsroom, digital editing responsibility was devolved to local newsrooms and the Brisbane newsroom was relieved of some subbing and publication duties, enabling it to focus on innovation. A strategy to reduce the quantity of online stories in order to improve the quality and depth of articles was highly successful, driving user engagement metrics to industry-leading levels. Across the year, ABC News had a unique monthly digital audience of 8.6 million, representing 35% of Australians.3

Sitting within News Digital, the Digital Story Lab explored new ways of presenting information. These included the ‘Chart of the Day’, which covered data representations of topics as diverse as the cost of Australian natural disasters and the best superhero (do Australian kids prefer Batman or Wonder Woman), as well as special reports such as ‘Private health insurance: Should you have it, and what are the benefits?’, ‘Hey stranger, what’s on your phone?’ and ‘Where do migrants to Australia come from?’.

1 ABC Corporate Tracking Program.

2 ABC Quality and Distinctiveness Study, March 2019 (n=6,541). 3 Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years. ABC reporter Jeremy Fernandez. Image: Jared Leibowitz

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 21

Federal Election 2019

ABC television coverage of the federal election across the ABC main channel and ABC NEWS channel was the most watched on election night, reaching 5.3 million Australians across the day, with a network metropolitan overnight share of 30.6%.5

ABC NEWS was also the nation’s top digital news brand across the federal election weekend and the ABC’s radio coverage, simulcast on three ABC Radio networks for the first time, reached listeners across Australia. Poll night was the culmination of five weeks of coverage, with the ABC’s news, radio and regional teams reporting from every one of Australia’s 151 electorates.

The ABC’s Australia Votes campaign was launched on the day the election was called and ran for five weeks across all platforms. Public awareness of the ABC’s contribution to the election process was supported by a dedicated publicity campaign directing audiences to the ABC’s lead-up content, including use of the Vote Compass tool, and finally to the election night coverage.

triple j’s Hack provided extensive coverage for young people across radio and digital, including explainer videos. Hack also went on the road for a ‘Swinging Voters’ tour stopping in Wollongong, Coffs Harbour, Hobart and Adelaide. The Society & Culture team provided in-depth analysis of key issues and policies, including an eight-part season of The Economists.

Capital City radio used the Matters of State podcast series, the You Ask We Answer campaign, Vote Compass, outside broadcasts, voter forums and election night coverage to canvass metropolitan sentiment throughout the election. Regional bureaux and local stations discussed and investigated issues of importance to local communities via interviews, panels and talkback on policy and politics.

5 OzTAM overnight data.

ABC Radio Darwin’s Jo Laverty and Adam Steer host an outside broadcast candidates’ forum in the seat of Solomon. Image: Stephen McLelland

22 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Local teams across the country hosted forums and candidate debates, ensuring audiences were able to ask questions directly of candidates and discuss their concerns.

The ABC visited dozens of communities in every state and territory, producing more than 60 election-related outside broadcasts: 7pm News bulletins across the country produced 13 outside broadcasts, and programs including The Drum, News Breakfast, AM and Hack also went on the road to explore the issues confronting voters in marginal seats. Q&A went to Townsville to highlight the concerns of North Queenslanders.

ABC Investigations and the Digital Story Innovations team created Hidden Campaign to engage with the Australian public on federal election campaigning. The teams asked people to provide screenshots and photos of the election material they were encountering in their daily lives, with contributions collated in order to generate compelling, exclusive

coverage delving into modern electioneering processes, to expose targeting tactics and, in some cases, the misinformation being spread across online platforms.

Democracy Sausage, hosted by Chris Taylor and Craig Reucassel, took a satirical approach to the 2019 election. The program was broadcast on local and regional radio stations as well as the ABC listen app and was produced as a television series. On election night, local radio broadcast election results with a panel hosted by ABC Melbourne’s Raf Epstein.

The election results online page was redesigned to provide a better user experience and ABC RMIT Fact Check produced distinctive stories revealing the truth behind the political rhetoric. Policy explainers were prepared by the ABC’s Parliament House reporters, by Hack and by the Special Reporting Team.

The day after election poll day, News Digital set a new industry record for daily unique audience with 2.9 million users. Time spent per user was its highest ever across the website, mobile engagement and the ABC NEWS app.

Vote Compass

Vote Compass is a survey tool developed by political scientists to explore how the views of citizens and candidates align. During its federal election coverage, the ABC received a record 1.6 million Vote Compass responses, analysis from which was used to generate stories across digital, local radio

and the nightly 7pm News bulletins.

You Ask We Answer

You Ask We Answer gave audiences the opportunity to ask questions about election issues that were important to them. The federal election callout received a huge 15,000 queries from ABC audiences, with content teams producing articles and explainers responding to many of those questions throughout the campaign, up until and including election night.

Questions covered major policy positions, practical election queries on the voting process and other more specific matters. Respondents asked for information regarding party positions on such things as education, the protection of native species, Newstart, dental care and negative gearing.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 23

The ABC’s Entertainment & Specialist (E&S) team is Australia’s leading creative voice, producing quality drama, comedy, Indigenous, music, children’s, entertainment and factual content across television, radio and digital products and services. The E&S team also cover the specialist genres of arts, science, education, society & culture and religion & ethics, and oversee the ABC Audio Studios podcast creation hub.

The integration of content teams which began in early 2018 continued to enhance E&S’s coverage of significant national events throughout 2018-19, including the 2018 Invictus Games, and the Australia Day and New Year’s Eve celebrations. The new structure also supported greater overall collaboration between teams, such as the Music and Entertainment partnership that brought Australian music back to our screens in The Set.

In 2018-19, E&S built on its commitment to diverse and inclusive content by supporting established and emerging talent to reflect and celebrate Australian culture, stories and conversations through programs such as Mystery Road and The Heights. For E&S audience data by platform, please see ABC Audiences pp 65-86.

Children’s ABC KIDS and ABC ME are Australia’s highest-rating children’s entertainment networks, reaching up to 43% of children under 15 years.6 Australian children enjoy the ABC’s high-quality, culturally distinctive programs on radio, television, on-demand services, iview, and via the ABC KIDS, ABC KIDS listen and ABC ME apps.

ABC KIDS For younger children, ABC KIDS offers dedicated, advertising free spaces to watch, listen, learn, play and explore in a safe media environment. Preschoolers enjoy world-class children’s entertainment that follows the routine of their days: the iconic Play School in the morning, the world’s biggest preschool brands Bluey,

Peppa Pig, Octonauts, PJ Masks and Hey Duggee throughout the day, and the gentle Giggle and Hoot lullaby that signals time for bed.

Australian content made its mark in 2018-19. Breakout Brisbane-based animated program Bluey took the top spot for ABC KIDS with a record-breaking 100 million program plays on iview,7 cementing its position in the hearts and homes of Australian families. Giggle and Hoot celebrated its 10th birthday, and the indelible Play School continued to enrich the lives of Australian children through music, movement, play and story sharing.

ABC KIDS continued to support Australian music education for children with content such as The Wiggles, Emma!, Lah Lah’s Big Live Band, The Justine Clarke Show and Teeny Tiny Stevies. The team also expanded on their range of content offered in various languages including AUSLAN, Indigenous Australian languages and Mandarin.

In January 2019, ABC KIDS listen was embedded into the ABC Children’s Preschool Content Team to deliver targeted content for preschool audiences, facilitate collaboration between radio and television content makers, and better engage with the early childhood sector. ABC KIDS listen opened up new ways to serve audiences, from entertaining families in the car to becoming a beloved companion through the bedtime routine and helping children sleep through the night. The audio service has increased the reach of ABC KIDS and provides screen-free alternatives for young families across digital and broadcast platforms.

Entertainment & Specialist

6 OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 28 Data; 24-hour average weekly reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

7 OzTAM Begin Event data.

24 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

8 Facebook Insights January - June 2019. Bluey with her mum Chilli, little sister Bingo and dad Bandit, in Bluey.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 25

Bluey

Bluey launched on ABC KIDS in October 2018. It was an instant phenomenal success, quickly becoming ABC iview’s most successful series ever, with more than 100 million plays. Prior to the program’s release, an extended campaign was created

to introduce Bluey to Australia and the world, including the launch of a special preview on the ABC KIDS Facebook page asking people to send in a video of their family dancing to the opening song titles. Within a week there were 1200 entries,

which were edited into a music video and then shared on social media channels and on ABC KIDS TV. Bluey content on the ABC KIDS for Parents Facebook page was also the top performing content on that property.8

Australian kids and parents love Bluey!

ABC ME Throughout 2018-19, world-class digital children’s service ABC ME continued to innovate, and reflect the diverse experiences of primary school-aged children.

Character-driven stories were standout hits with young audiences. Indigenous teenager Fuzzy Mac was the reluctant cultural guardian who just wanted have fun in ABC ME’s adaptation of Grace Beside Me and the diverse cast of Hardball, set in Western Sydney, featured a young actor with a disability in a lead role. Hardball launched in April 2019 and had great success across digital and broadcast platforms for young and co-viewing (watching with friends and family) audiences.

The Inbestigators, the follow-up series from the makers of the hugely popular Little Lunch, proved again that world-class Australian co-productions resonate with audiences.

ABC ME Best Fests continually deliver peak viewing for digital audiences throughout the school holidays, providing complete series of comedy and drama franchises on demand, such as The Secret Life of Boys, Odd Squad,

local favourites Little Lunch, Nowhere Boys, Mustangs FC, Grace Beside Me, and animated series The Deep and Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug & Cat Noir.

Distinctive factual programs put primary school-aged kids in the driving seat by inspiring and entertaining their peers with innovative ideas and solutions to life’s challenges. Project Planet empowered dynamic young people from regional Australia to transform their schools into waste-wise wonderlands. Good Game Spawn Point explored current culture and debates around one of the biggest topics for our young audience - gaming. The ‘life hackers’ on How To Do Stuff Good shared step-by-step guides on arts and crafts, cooking and pranks to encourage experimentation, collaboration and imagination, while Stacked, a dynamic new short-form multiplatform program provided kids with everything from the latest pop culture news, to life advice, to the best slime recipes. Perennial favourite Behind the News (BtN), the ABC’s bespoke children’s news service, continued to deliver the best breaking news and current affairs programming for primary-school-aged children and their teachers.

Erin Choy (Tiffany), Helen Dallimore (Ms Crapper), Semisi Cheekham (Mikey), Reannah Hamdan (Salwa) and Logan Reberger (Jerry) in Hardball.

26 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

9 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM data. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM.

10 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data.

11 OzTAM VPM data July 2018 - June 2019.

12 Khoros; engagement rate defined as engagements (likes and comments) divided by impressions.

Indigenous ABC Indigenous is the proud home of vibrant Indigenous voices and stories told from an Indigenous perspective, with content across comedy, drama, factual, social media, digital drama and radio.

Black Comedy returned for a third series, offering satirical perspectives from new Indigenous voices, with 12 new Indigenous writers receiving training in the art of sketch comedy on the show. Factual content included

Will Australia Ever Have a Black Prime Minister?, which explored the gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, while also celebrating emerging generations of talented young Indigenous people.

The team marked NAIDOC Week 2018 with the digital program HerStory, a roundtable discussion featuring prominent female Indigenous actors, writers and producers, and the Indigenous Radio Unit celebrated the 100th episode of its ABC language podcast Word Up, notably in the UNESCO International Year of Indigenous Languages. The unit also continued to cover Indigenous art, culture and current affairs through Awaye! and Speaking Out.

ABC Indigenous on social Indigenous content on social media had a huge year. The ABC Indigenous Instagram account had a 426% rise in followers over 2018-19 and was ranked

fifth out of all ABC Instagram accounts based on engagement rate.12 A bespoke ABC Indigenous channel created for the Giphy gif platform had more

than 16 million views.

Drama Great Australian drama helps define who we are. In 2018-19, the ABC remained the home of distinctive quality drama, broadcasting more than 50 hours of original scripted content, produced in diverse locations across Australia.

Shot in Melbourne, the second series of Jack Irish delivered a total audience of 1.8 million across television and iview,9 up 17% on the previous series and 20% on the Sunday night timeslot,10 making it one of the ABC’s most successful drama franchises. Showcasing Western Australia’s rugged north, the Indigenous crime drama Mystery Road continued to make its mark by winning the 2019 Logie Award for Most Popular Drama, along with acting awards for some of its stars. Logie-winning miniseries The Cry, filmed in Victoria, broke audience records to become the number one Australian non-kids series on iview11, and political thriller Pine Gap featured the stunning landscapes of South Australia and Alice Springs in the Northern Territory.

The second series of Brisbane-based audience favourite Harrow highlighted ABC Drama’s success with international co-financing models and the show is set to find audiences worldwide via Hulu.

The ABC’s commitment to inclusive content was exemplified by the 30-episode drama The Heights, produced out of its Perth studios. The serial drama has become the industry leader in nurturing new Australian talent in front of and behind the camera. Series 1 attained gender parity across the cast and crew, while 30% of the cast received their first screen credit and two-thirds of the core ensemble were from diverse backgrounds.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 27

Comedy The Comedy team continued to deliver bold and compelling scripted content for television, social media and podcasts in 2018-19.

Five new scripted television series went to air during the year. They included Superwog, a co-production between the ABC and YouTube, which was broadcast on both networks and achieved more than 30 million views on the latter. The second season of Get Krack!n’ went out with a bang, with its final episode about attitudes towards Indigenous Australians praised as TV’s “most searing half hour in living memory”.13 Shot in Tasmania and led by the Logie-winning Celia Pacquola and Luke McGregor, Series 3 of Rosehaven attracted a combined metropolitan, regional and iview average audience of 1.1 million.14

ABC Comedy’s awards success included the 2018 Logie for Most Popular New Talent for Utopia’s Dilruk Jayasinha, the 2018 AACTA Award for Best TV Comedy Series for The Letdown and the 2019 Rockie Award for Best International Web Fiction Series for Wrong Kind of Black.

ABC Comedy’s commitment to developing new talent featured a co-funded initiative with the Information and Cultural Exchange and Create NSW to produce three digital comedy series from Western Sydney content makers. The team also worked with ABC Entertainment to produce four half-hour pilots from emerging talent under the Fresh Blood banner. Other collaborations included work with ABC Audio Studios on popular podcasts Finding Drago, The Alice Fraser Trilogy and Santo, Sam and Ed’s Total Football.

Factual ABC Factual programs provide a pathway for Australians to better understand themselves and the world, through stories that are thought-provoking, informative and inspiring. The team produces high-quality, award-winning programs that connect with people and communities across all ABC platforms.

In 2018-19, ABC Factual continued to appeal to younger audiences through social media content for programs such as Employable Me, War on Waste and Don’t Stop the Music.

Ten years after Australia’s deadliest bushfires, Aftermath: Beyond Black Saturday chronicled stories of loss and grief alongside displays of the strength and spirit of those affected. Don’t Stop the Music saw a school principal join forces with singer Guy Sebastian to transform the lives of her pupils through the power of music. A related social impact campaign culminated in 8000 musical instruments being donated for students in underprivileged schools.

The second series of War on Waste had wide-ranging impact, with a combined metropolitan, regional and iview average audience of 1.5 million,15 with 68% of viewers reporting behavioural changes in response to the program.16 A report by the University of Technology Sydney and the ABC identified 452 high-impact waste-reduction initiatives by schools, hospitals, businesses, governments and community groups that were inspired by the series. Employable Me Series 2 again celebrated the nation’s most extraordinary job seekers. The uplifting series uncovered the skills of people with conditions such as cerebral palsy, autism and Tourette Syndrome as they searched for meaningful employment.

13 https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/one-for-the-history-books-abc-s-get-krack-n-bows-out-with-a-bang-20190328-p518ax.html 14 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM data. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM.

15 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM.

16 ABC Quality and Distinctiveness Study (n=449, Those who watched War on Waste).

17 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Ranked on series. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM.

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Hawke: The Larrikin & The Leader was re-screened in May 2019 after the death of former Prime Minister, the Honourable Bob Hawke AC, GCL. The fourth series of the popular

Anh’s Brush with Fame began in April 2019 and features 14 prominent Australians sharing their unique life journeys. Guests on this series include Leah Purcell, Tim Minchin, Michael Clarke and Lindy Chamberlain.

Entertainment ABC Entertainment made Australians laugh and learn in 2018-19.

Multi award-winning series You Can’t Ask That continued to reach new audiences and was honoured with the Walkley Award for Media Diversity for episodes sharing the experiences of deaf people, African Australians and intersex people.

ABC New Year’s Eve…The Night Is Yours brought 2019 in with a bang, featuring musicians such as Christine Anu, Tim Minchin and Baker Boy. The Spicks and Specks Reunion Special had huge reach across all age groups and

The Recording Studio opened up the doors of the ABC to give everyday Australians the chance to professionally record a song and demonstrate the healing power of music. The Set celebrated the best new live music in a house party setting. Its co-host Dylan Alcott won the Logie for Most Popular New Talent, which also recognised his role in the ABC’s Invictus Games coverage.

Gruen was number one in its timeslot, with host Wil Anderson and his panel of advertising experts attracting a complete audience of 1.4 million.17 Shaun Micallef’s Mad as Hell remained Australia’s leading political satire program and Sammy J enjoyed an ever-growing digital fanbase, with his Brexit Yoga attracting almost 6 million views on Facebook.

The Weekly with Charlie Pickering, Tomorrow Tonight and Julia Zemiro’s Home Delivery intrigued and entertained audiences, and it was a golden year for Hard Quiz host Tom Gleeson, who took home the Gold Logie after an irreverent but strongly-supported media campaign.

Hosts Dylan Alcott and Linda Marigliano on The Set. Image: Jess Gleeson

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 29

Music The Music team crammed a lot into 12 months across seven radio brands, hundreds of live concert broadcasts, a new live music television program and the continued refinement of their digital and video content. Digital-only radio networks and online platforms grew audiences throughout 2018-19, while traditional radio networks held strong - with ABC Classic hitting a new high for numbers of listeners.

triple j triple j’s Hottest 100 countdown at the beginning of 2019 was the largest to date, with some 2.7 million votes cast in the world’s biggest music poll. In the second year since the countdown was moved from Australia Day, Ocean Alley’s Confidence was crowned the number one song. An estimated 3.2 million people engaged with the Hottest 100 countdown on 27 January. As part of the campaign triple j teamed up with LifeLine, the leading provider of crisis support and suicide prevention in Australia, and raised more than $700,000 for the charity.

In September 2018, triple j held its biggest One Night Stand concert on record, with 20,000 people attending the free event in St Helens, Tasmania, to watch performances by musicians such as Vance Joy and Tkay Maidza (for more, see page 59). Hack helped young Australians make

The ABC continues to seek out, support and celebrate Australian music talent. AusMusic Month in November 2018 showcased leading Australian artists and included a live performance by Missy Higgins

& Friends, the world premiere broadcast of Mary Finsterer’s opera Biographica, a live Gala Concert broadcast from Sydney’s City Recital Hall in Angel Place, and the annual J

Awards, which recognise some of the best established and emerging Australian music and musicians, including talent found through ABC initiatives

such as Unearthed.

Kwame and CLYPSO perform at the triple j Unearthed showcase at BIGSOUND. Image: Dave Kan

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sense of the 2019 federal election with extensive coverage across radio and digital (see page 22), and triple j’s annual ‘What’s Up In Your World’ survey took the pulse of young people on issues such as politics, equality, housing, education, sex, drugs and mental health.

Digital station Double J enjoyed another year of audience growth, finishing the year as the third-most popular digital-only network in Australia.

triple j’s Unearthed High also had another successful year with more than 1000 high school artists entering the competition. Kian from Castlemaine Secondary College in Victoria won the competition, and subsequently placed at number 20 in the Hottest 100. Kian’s winning single Waiting has had more than 42 million streams on Spotify alone. He went on to sign a record deal with Republic Records in the USA.

ABC Classic In January 2019, Classic FM and ABC Classics rebranded as ABC Classic and brought all the ABC’s classical radio and commercial output under the same banner for the first time.

In June, the Classic 100 countdown was a huge success for the network, with a record 127,971 votes cast by listeners. The classical music poll saw Beethoven named as Australia’s favourite classical composer. Across the long weekend of the broadcast, the ABC Classic website had close to half a million page views.

In April, the ABC was the host broadcaster for International Jazz Day, delivering for listeners on digital radio and streaming online around the world with a highlights program on ABC TV. ABC Jazz celebrated 10 years as a digital radio station in June 2019.

James Morrison and William Barton provided the Welcome to Country at the 2019 International Jazz Day concert. Image: James Kennedy

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 31

Video New live music program The Set launched in November with a five-episode pilot season, meeting demand from audiences and the Australian music industry for more live performances on television. Artists featured on the program included Vera Blue, Baker Boy, Mallrat and Angus & Julia Stone.

triple j’s digital video reach is one of the largest for the ABC, with triple j Instagram videos enjoying 24% growth in 2018-19 and close to one million YouTube subscribers to the triple j channel. In February 2019, Denzel Curry performing Rage Against the Machine’s Bulls on Parade became the biggest Like A Version to date, with more than 5.5 million views on YouTube. The video trended at number two worldwide on YouTube after its release.

Specialist The ABC’s Specialist teams produce arts, science, and religion & ethics content, along with the wide spectrum of subjects covered by ABC RN such as law, history, economics and media. Specialist also encompasses the ABC’s long-standing commitment to education, providing online resources to students and teachers, and is home to ABC Audio Studios, which is behind the ABC’s growing number of digital-first podcasts.

In 2018-19, Specialist’s decision to consolidate its digital teams resulted in considerable growth in online audiences for articles, social media content and video. For ABC TV, Science developed the successful Bee Challenge and Clinic formats, while Religion & Ethics flagship program Compass increased its audience by returning to the 6.30pm Sunday timeslot. Arts also increased its slate of one-off documentaries for television.

ABC RN is the home of the ABC’s specialist radio content. In 2018-19, the ideas network built audiences for new programs such as Soul Search and renewed its commitment to sports content with the launch of Sporty. The Society & Culture team co-ordinated coverage of major events on RN, including the centenary of the

Armistice in November 2018, and produced landmark series including Who Runs this Place?, an examination of power in Australia.

Arts The Arts team’s mission is to create arts programs that attract the widest possible spectrum of audiences. In 2018-19, the digital team drove growth in social media engagement for ABC Arts content and saw improvements in the volume and quality of online coverage on ABC News Arts & Culture page. A major article on gender disparity in Australian theatre, commissioned by ABC Arts digital, won the Arts Journalism Prize at the 2019 Walkley Mid-Year Celebration.

On RN, Arts successfully relaunched its suite of weekday morning programs under new titles and commissioned a new show, Lost and Found, for Saturday mornings. RN’s Screen Show was joined by a second presenter and critic, Lauren Carroll Harris, in order to expand coverage of television programming. ABC TV presented a short season of documentaries about Australian painters including portraits of Sir Sidney Nolan and the impressionist John Peter Russell.

The generation of ‘68 was the subject of Finding the Field, produced as part of the ABC’s partnership with the National Gallery of Victoria. Documentaries broadcast in 2019 included China Love and China’s Artful Dissident, which focused on the culture and politics of contemporary China, There Goes Our Neighbourhood, which linked art and social protest, and The Bikes of Wrath, which brought literature and cycling together.

Science ABC Science has established itself as an industry leader in cross-platform production, offering high-quality content across television, radio and digital services, supported by a team of specialist reporters and producers. ABC Science’s projects serve audiences by uncovering evidence and using it as the basis to test ideas, building scientific literacy among Australians.

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Highlights in 2018-19 included television show The Great Australian Bee Challenge, which gave novice local beekeepers the chance to appreciate the latest scientific research on bee behaviour. The first photograph of a black hole - a major science event - was covered in detail by a team of specialist reporters for ABC News and by Catalyst in the special Black Hole Hunters. RN’s science-meets-adventure series The Chase - Science on the Run, produced in collaboration with the BBC, brought a rich storytelling style to explaining new discoveries and scientific pursuits.

For National Science Week in August 2018, ABC Science launched the two-part Catalyst program ‘Feeding Australia’, and partnered in the online citizen-science collaboration Virtual Reef Diver, to enhance understanding of the pressures on the Great Barrier Reef.

Religion & Ethics Religion & Ethics is the home of in-depth reporting and analysis of stories about faith, belief and ethics.

In 2018-19, the team provided expert analysis on major national issues including the aftermath of The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, and the trial and conviction of Cardinal George Pell.

Religion & Ethics provides six weekly programs for radio - five on RN and one on ABC Classic. In 2019, Soul Search with Dr Meredith Lake successfully replaced The Spirit of Things, following the retirement of Dr Rachael Kohn AO, Australia’s foremost religion journalist who produced ‘Paws for Thought’ on animals an spirituality for Compass on ABC TV and was previously producer and presenter of The Ark for RN.

A new Religion & Ethics webpage was launched in September 2018 to house content from multiple platforms, and the team publishes up to 10 new articles a week including opinion and analysis. Entomologist Dr Tanya Latty on The Great Australian Bee Challenge.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 33

Society & Culture Society & Culture produces a wide-ranging suite of content for RN, including 17 ongoing programs, several occasional series and a wealth of online material. The unit explores the most significant social and cultural changes across politics, the law, economics, the workplace and technology. Coverage offers a deeper understanding of issues in national and world affairs, and personal stories illustrate the impact of those issues on people and communities.

In August 2018, RN devoted a week of programming to China in Focus, including hosting a public forum moderated by Saturday Extra’s Geraldine Doogue on the Australia-China relationship. RN also explored the personal stories of Chinese Australians such as pioneering barrister Willam Ah Ket, contemporary dancer Amy Zhang and writers Jasmine Sue and Jieh-Young Lo.

Society & Culture played a significant role in building understanding of our democracy, providing in-depth analysis of key issues and policies during the 2019 federal election campaign (see page 22). RN also produced the highly acclaimed four-part series Who Runs This Place?, with host Richard Aedy examining where power in Australia resides and how it is exercised.

Over the Christmas/New Year period, Society & Culture offered audiences a collection of heartwarming stories from local communities and around the world with Stories to Brighten Your Day.

Education ABC Education provides a leading online portal for Australian teachers and students seeking educational content mapped to the Australian national curriculum. In 2018-19, the site averaged 220,000 unique users per month.18

Throughout the year, ABC Education curated and repurposed content from across the ABC, including programs such as War on Waste, You Can’t Ask That, Gardening Australia, BtN, Catalyst, Compass and Fierce Girls. The team also produced original short-form content, often in conjunction with leading cultural institutions such as the Australian National Maritime Museum (Endeavour digibook), Sydney Living Museums (Convict Children and Susannah Place digibooks) and First Languages Australia (the Indigenous Song Competition).

The year’s highlights included the ABC’s inaugural national Media Literacy Week, developed with the aim of helping people of all ages navigate the modern media landscape. An associated new education portal offered 50 unique video and interactive resources on media literacy, drawing on expertise from around the ABC, to assist teachers and students to understand misinformation, bias and the value of news (for more see page 131).

ABC Education also incorporated Learn English, the portal for English Language Learners in Australia and overseas, which has the largest Facebook community in the ABC at 4.8 million followers. Content highlights included English in 60 Seconds and Weather on the Go.

Audio Studios ABC podcasts continued to hold mass appeal in 2018-19.

A 2017 public call-out for ideas, supported by the ABC’s $1 million podcast fund for emerging audio talent, resulted in the release of several new podcasts including No Feeling Is Final, Parental Guidance Recommended and Animal Sound Safari.

18 Google Anaytics.

34 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Audio Studios collaborated with ABC Comedy in producing the comedy-meets-investigation series Finding Drago and the new ABC Comedy Presents podcast featuring stand-up comedians from across Australia. Sport and comedy came together in new episodes of Santo, Sam and Ed’s Total Football, which were also filmed for broadcast on ABC iview. The Alice Fraser Trilogy was selected by Apple Podcasts in the list of best Australian podcasts of 2018.

The team from Unravel True Crime was incorporated into Audio Studios in 2019 and created several compelling series appealing to younger and predominately female audiences. Unravel: Barrenjoey Road also appeared as a documentary on ABC TV, while Unravel: Last Seen Katoomba exposed issues in the police and court systems. Unravel was a 2018 Walkley Award winner for its inaugural series Unravel: Blood On The Tracks.

Hit series Fierce Girls, which celebrates inspiring Australian women through history, won best family show at the 2019 Australian Podcast Awards and was named in Apple’s list of the most downloaded shows in 2018. The popular children’s ethics podcast Short & Curly was also turned into a successful book. The intensely personal podcast The Parenting Spectrum told the story of a family navigating life with a child on the autism spectrum, while Parental As Anything was hosted by Australia’s parenting expert Maggie Dent.

Distinctive podcast content that appealed to women included The Pineapple Project, which was awarded best lifestyle show at the 2019 Australian Podcast Awards. Audio Studios experimented with the podcast format in a short-form narrative podcast designed for on the go consumption called Little Tiny and through the meditation series Mindfully.

Digital ABC iview continued to respond to audience interest in video-on-demand (VOD) services with an average 16 million program plays a week in 2018-19.19 The standout program was animated series Bluey (see page 25).

The launch of the new triple j app in October 2018 provided a streamlined listening experience, allowing users to easily move between triple j, Double J and triple j Unearthed. The new app has been downloaded 234,000 times since its launch. Between January and June 2019, it averaged 95,000 average weekly users.20

In 2018-19, there were 363,000 new downloads of the ABC listen app. On average, 1.4 million livestreams and 580,000 on-demand streams are listened to each week via the app. A highlight for the period was the 960,000 plays of live cricket broadcasts.21

Bespoke content for social media platforms included an ABC Indigenous channel through Giphy, which attracted more than 16 million views. ABC Comedy’s decision to release Superwog on ABC TV and YouTube achieved a remarkable 30 million views by the end of June 2019 on the social media platform. ABC Comedy also released digital-only series for audiences, including the all-female emerging talent project The Housemate, released on Facebook and iview.

ABC Classic welcomed their new digital team in 2018 with a refreshed website, which saw a 46% increase in average monthly visitors against last year.22

Innovative digital tools designed to enhance the content of factual program Exposed: The Case of Keli Lane included the use of a Facebook messenger bot to release curated images and text encouraging users to interact with detectives. Exposed achieved another first for the ABC by broadcasting on-screen callouts for information during each episode, to engage audiences in real time. The team also communicated with audiences on Facebook immediately after each episode, producing the most popular Facebook Lives by an ABC program to date.

19 OzTAM Begin Event data.

20 Google Analytics.

21 Google Analytics.

22 Google Analytics.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 35

Distribution E&S Distribution facilitates the scheduling, curation and publishing of content on television, radio, online, on ABC digital platforms and apps and on third party platforms in order to showcase the ABC’s broad mix of quality programming.

As with the ABC’s traditional channels on television and radio, the team carefully curate on-demand digital services. In 2018-19, Distribution continued to develop the ABC’s technological capabilities through initiatives such as personalisation and discovery, to improve efficiency and value and allow audiences to watch what they want, when they want it, on their platform of choice.

As traditional broadcast reach declines across the Australian industry, the team is seeking new ways of engaging audiences to build the overall reach and relevance of ABC content. Measures such as ‘stacking’ - where episodes of television programs that are broadcast via the ABC’s traditional channels are simultaneously released on iview - formed part of their responsive strategic approach in 2018-19. Distribution also met audience expectations by selectively offering ‘box sets’, where all episodes of a program were made available on iview at the same time as the first episode was broadcast on television.

Operations The Operations team provides the resources and facilities necessary for the creation and management of original Australian high-quality content, for delivery in a timely and cost-effective manner. ABC Operations is the backbone of support for the Corporation’s distinctive Australian content, including radio and television production and outside broadcasts.

The 2018 integration of Audio/Radio Operations into the existing Operations Team led to more efficient and cost-effective workflows. The move also resulted in greater collaboration within the team, including the standardisation of equipment across areas.

The television studio and production team in Melbourne provided resourcing in the Southbank studios for programs such as Shaun Micallef’s Mad As Hell, The Weekly with Charlie Pickering and Hard Quiz. In Sydney, the Ultimo Studios produced Play School, Giggle and Hoot, Q&A and Gruen, and the Lanceley Place studio was highly utilised throughout 2018-19 by internal productions and external production companies that leased the studio’s spaces.

Operations’ television and radio OB vans support more than 550 events each year including Anzac Day services, New Year’s Eve celebrations, National Press Club addresses and the Garma Festival of Traditional Cultures, plus sporting and cultural events such as music and writers’ festivals. The radio team provides operational support for music, spoken-word broadcasts and ABC podcasts, and also provides training to regional staff to ensure Australians across the country are provided with high-quality audio in their local area.

The post-production services team provides audio post and colour grading for internal and external clients while the Presentation, Systems and Assets team provides captioning and related assets. In April 2019, the latter collaborated with ABC News to showcase live automatic captioning at the National Association of Broadcasters Show.

Industry engagement E&S is a leading supporter of Australia’s independent production sector helping to deliver outstanding local content to audiences. The team partners with Screen Australia and state screen agencies, as well as liaising with the Screen Producer’s Association and other craft guilds.

The Drama, Comedy, Indigenous, Factual and Children’s teams were active participants at major industry events throughout 2018-19, including Series Mania Melbourne, Screen Forever and the Australian International Documentary Conference (AIDC), and had multiple engagements with regional and metropolitan organisations including the Vivid Sydney Festival, the Melbourne International

36 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Comedy Festival, and the Sydney Opera House. Industry engagement in 2018-19 included screenings of You Can’t Ask That at AACTA events in Sydney and Melbourne, with the producers of that program also presenting on panels at the AIDC and Vivid Sydney.

ABC Entertainment was a key partner of the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, and the Comedy team collaborated with Parramatta’s Information and Cultural Centre and Create NSW to develop, fund, and produce digital series from emerging Western Sydney program-makers.

ABC Classic partnered with major musical organisations, orchestras and festivals to record and broadcast live performances, while triple j, Double J and triple j Unearthed partnered with major music festivals and music industry events to support emerging Australian talent.

RN’s Society & Culture team partnered with the Wheeler Centre in Melbourne on regular talks, while team members also spoke at the Vivid Festival’s 2019 Audiocraft Podcast Festival. The ABC’s Ozpod conference brought together the audio industry’s finest content creators, platforms and production houses.

The Science team co-hosted the World Congress of Science and Factual Producers in Brisbane, and ABC Children’s expanded its engagement with the Australian Early Childhood Sector including attending the Aboriginal Early Childhood Conference and Australian Council for Education Leaders. ABC TV Education and ABC Children’s Distribution, in conjunction with the ABC’s regional teams, developed partnerships with The Bureau of Meteorology, Narragunnawali (part of Reconciliation Australia), and First Languages Australia. These partnerships saw high-quality content created and enhanced specifically for young audiences.

Business Affairs Business Affairs negotiates the rights and deal terms required by the ABC for content produced, commissioned and acquired by the ABC’s content teams, as well as associated rights required by ABC Commercial. Business Affairs plays an important governance role in ensuring

the ABC’s investment in content delivers value for audiences, and is responsible for ensuring the ABC’s rights closely align to the ABC content strategy.

In 2018-19, Business Affairs continued to secure the rights to extend the ABC’s digital offering, to ensure the ABC remains relevant and accessible. Digital expansion included binge viewing, live events on social media, and an experimental vertical format for viewing on mobile phones.

The team negotiated deal terms for content co-produced with international partners, such as ABC Studios International US, Netflix, Sky Comedy and BBC Studios. Business Affairs also contributed to the successful live music program The Set, forging new deals with artists and record labels to reach audiences on digital platforms.

Business Affairs facilitated joint initiatives with state and federal screen agencies to foster emerging and diverse talent including the ABC/ Screen Australia initiatives International Day of the Girl, Art Bites and DisRupted; Indigenous initiatives Short Blacks with Screen Australia, Deadly Portraits with the South Australian Film Corporation and Originate with Screenwest; and a digital-first comedy initiative with Create NSW and the Information and Cultural Exchange. Business Affairs continued to provide support and guidance to new producers through these initiatives, developing business skills in the industry.

Business Affairs continued to work closely with Screen Producers Australia (SPA) and attended industry feedback sessions on ABC terms of trade at SPA producer events in December 2018 and May 2019. The team also provided networking sessions for producers at the annual SPA Screen Forever conference.

Business Affairs has been working with all ABC teams on a whole-of-business analysis of how the Corporation sources and distributes content, with a view to implementing an ABC-wide rights management system from 2019-20. To maximise the effectiveness of this project, the team has exchanged information with rights teams at the BBC (UK), BBC Studios (UK) and PBS (US).

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 37

No matter where they are, all Australians have access to the ABC network and the opportunity to tell their story. The ABC’s Regional & Local (R&L) team span the country, making content that connects people and places.

The team’s 800 staff share a common purpose - to engage, strengthen and celebrate communities, by bringing audiences the local content and the wide range of community perspectives they are looking for across all platforms.

R&L’s business planning in 2018 focused on establishing shared objectives. ABC Emergency’s strategy was updated, and included increasing the number of dedicated emergency broadcasting roles. Other focus areas included increased skills training for staff, creating closer working relationships with ABC News teams in capital cities to bring metropolitan audiences more investigative reporting and coverage of local and state news, and working to provide a better local content experience for digital audiences with greater discoverability. Finally, R&L committed to developing more screen content

by producing increased national celebration coverage and stories of common interest and shared experience.

The close working relationship between the different parts of the team has had positive outcomes for content as it has enabled R&L to deliver genuinely comprehensive coverage tailored to different programs, platforms and audiences. For R&L audience data by platform, please see ABC Audiences pp 65-86.

Rural & Regional bureaux In 2018-19, the ABC’s rural and regional bureaux consolidated gains made under the Connecting Communities project, with a focus on training and quality to ensure that the additional resources and funding provided by the project resulted in a strong increase in audience reach.

Regional & Local

23 Regional Video Log.

24 Khoros.

Taylor Pfeiffer performs at the ABC Gardener’s Market. Image: Malcolm Sutton

38 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Key training initiatives concentrated on video production and features writing, complemented by a commitment to improving the quality of local radio programming, which saw ABC’s 48 regional bureaux transformed from local radio stations to multiplatform production hubs producing content for local and national audiences.

Dedicated regional current affairs radio show Australia Wide drew positive audience reaction and R&L’s video strategy saw distinctive stories supplied to ABC news programs including ABC flagships News Breakfast, the 7pm News bulletins and 7.30, and the ABC NEWS channel. All bureaux can now send live video, and this capacity is being used daily by ABC News. The R&L team is currently producing on average 500 video stories and segments per month.23

Increased audio training for all reporters improved traditional field recording, audio editing and studio skills. Continued collaboration with news and capital city radio stations saw regional stories attain greater platform coverage, resulting in larger audiences for locally-focused content.

In 2018-19, the ABC Rural teams extended their reach beyond the traditional Country Hour and Rural Reports programs, with rural reporters producing stories for the major News platforms that are written to appeal to both regional and metropolitan audiences. The Rural & Regional social media strategy saw the total number of Facebook followers for regional accounts grow 37% to 1.4 million overall, and engagement rise 43% to 197 million engagements.24 While the number of digital articles produced by the team dropped slightly, an improved focus on quality and better commissioning saw the average views per article rise from 17,800 in 2017-18 to 35,300 in 2018-19.

R&L’s four Regional newsletters and two national Rural newsletters continue to perform at or above the ABC’s newsletter performance benchmarks, with a combined subscriber base of close to 19,000.25 Subscribers to the Regional newsletters grew 120% in the past 12 months to 5,700.26

Regional & Local screen After 30 years, Gardening Australia continues to resonate with Australian audiences.

In 2019, the program received industry recognition, winning two Logies for Most Popular Presenter and Most Popular Lifestyle Program, and gaining a Gold Logie nomination for host Costa Georgiadis. Gardening Australia is also successfully reaching audiences on digital platforms, with more than 700,000 monthly page views27, making it one of the top ABC TV program websites. The program’s Facebook page has a following of 350,000+ and its YouTube channel, launched in October 2018, had more than 10,000 subscribers at the close of 2018-19. Almost half the YouTube channel’s viewers are aged between 25 and 44 years old.28

Landline continues to gain high scores for quality and distinctiveness, achieving scores of 95% and 91% respectively in the most recent ABC Quality & Distinctiveness study.29 The show regularly mentors regional and rural reporters and broadcasts stories with a strong local identity. In 2018-19, the show started producing specials, with the first, a special on veganism, increasing broadcast audience and Facebook engagement. Tapping into regional and rural life, Landline’s Facebook account is one of the most active social media accounts across the ABC network. Landline digital news articles averaged 46,000 views per story, with eight of the articles published each achieving more than 100,000 views, demonstrating the significant interest online audiences have for quality Australian regional content.30

25 Salesforce.

26 Salesforce.

27 Google Analytics.

28 YouTube studio analytics.

29 ABC Quality & Distinctiveness Study, March 2019.

30 ABC News Story Stats.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 39

Back Roads remains extremely popular, with Series 4, broadcast over summer 2018-19, reaching a combined average audience of 1.4 million.31 Guest hosts included Paul West and Joe O’Brien, with the addition of Lisa Millar for the 2019 winter series. Back Roads continued its tradition of featuring strong local regional characters, and this year had a focus on Dreaming stories.

Capital City Radio Network In 2018-19, the eight metropolitan stations in the Capital City Radio Network continued to connect local audiences to the stories and events that shape their communities.

Close collaboration with content teams across the ABC resulted in comprehensive coverage of significant events such as the Australia Day celebrations and Australian of the Year nominations, International Women’s Day, Anzac Day, NAIDOC Week, the Victoria and New South Wales state elections, and the federal election (see page 22).

Trends in the key measures of share, reach and time spent listening have shown that while there were minor falls in engagement with the capital city stations due to uncertainty over the schedule changes made in 2018, audience numbers steadied during the first half of 2019. Overall, there has been modest growth in reach and share for metropolitan Breakfast programs while Drive audiences have remained steady or seen minor falls. The team has continued to focus on community engagement and better representation of audience diversity.

Capital City radio content achieved strong digital and social media growth during 2018-19. An average of 39,000 views per digital article published represented a 48% increase in average views on the previous year. 32 Capital City Facebook accounts increased overall followers by 33% to 850,852 and overall engagement by 95% to 146.5 million engagements.33

Events ABC Events continued to deliver high impact, live national events to screens, radio, and digital platforms throughout 2018-19.

The New Year’s Eve broadcasts attracted the ABC’s biggest audience of the year, while international and domestic coverage of Anzac Day and the Centenary of Armistice played across all ABC platforms. Regional teams contributed stories to the Anzac Day broadcasts and digital content and the eight state and territory marches were livestreamed for the first time on local ABC Facebook accounts.

Australia Day coverage was expanded in 2019 to include the WugulOra Morning Ceremony from Barangaroo in Sydney, and Australia Day Live - a two-hour live concert from the forecourt of the Sydney Opera House. The ABC’s regional bureaux contributed a wealth of video content for the day, including packages for prime-time broadcasts and for sharing across social media.

The Australian of the Year Awards format was rejuvenated for 2019 and took place at Canberra’s National Arboretum. The Awards had an average audience of 584,000,34 and programming across Australia Day attracted a total combined metropolitan and regional reach of 1.96 million.35

Two important commemorative services were also broadcast in 2018-19 - the 50th anniversary of the battle of Binh Ba, and the 75th anniversary of another dark passage in Australian history, the forced labour of POWs on the Thai-Burma Railway.

31 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Episodes 9-16. Includes first run, encores and VPM. 32 ABC News Story Stats. 33 Khoros.

34 OzTAM and Regional TAM 28 day consolidated data.

35 OzTAM and Regional TAM 28 day consolidated data.

40 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Invictus Games 20-27 October 2018 As the Official Broadcast Partner of the Invictus Games, the ABC was once again delighted to bring the Games to audiences during October 2018. The event brought 500 competitors from 18 nations together in Sydney to compete across 11 sports. ABC coverage of this extraordinary event garnered strong audience support, reaching 5.8 million Australians.36

The opening and closing ceremonies of the Games were broadcast across ABC television, iview and Grandstand digital. The entertainment program Invictus Games Today was broadcast daily on prime time television, keeping audiences up to date on the day’s events and achievements. Games highlights and profiles of Invictus competitors were featured across television and radio throughout each day. Each sport had events streamed on iview, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, and comprehensive coverage was supplemented with news, documentaries and stories across ABC Children’s programming and flagship programs such as Australian Story, Conversations, Catalyst and Gardening Australia. A key theme was the important role sport plays in the rehabilitation process for many servicemen and women. The Australian Story Invictus special had a complete audience of 2 million.37

36 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data. 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

37 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM.

Members of the ‘Wheeling Diggers’, Australia’s 2018 Invictus Games wheelchair basketball squad. Image: Brad Cone

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 41

Sport ABC Sport had a big year, adding two new events to its television coverage, a more comprehensive cricket offering on radio, and reshaping of the team to support digital requirements.

During the year ABC Sport broadcast the Australian Women’s Open golf and introduced the Vic Open to its television offering. Radio continued as the backbone of ABC Sport as the team retained broadcast rights for all major sports, including the AFL and NRL. The first season of the NRL Women’s Premiership was broadcast in full and the AFLW continued to engage audiences through live broadcasts.

Under a new radio rights agreement with Cricket Australia, ABC Grandstand broadcast the full season of the Women’s Big Bash League (WBBL), commentating on all 43 matches. Jim Maxwell and Alison Mitchell led the commentary team.

In 2018-19, ABC Sport highlighted and supported Grandstand’s broad content with increased related social media output, and Offsiders on ABC television went from strength to strength, generating strong ratings throughout the year.

Partnerships In 2018-19, the Regional & Local Content Partnerships team managed external partnerships with organisations in their focus areas of youth, weather, rural Australia, Indigenous languages, and disability, while also contributing support and advice to key ABC program and platform initiatives.

The 2019 UN Year of Indigenous Languages was one such focus area, with R&L leading the ABC’s content offering. Working closely with ABC Indigenous, Partnerships assisted ABC teams to create content around Indigenous languages.

The Heywire Regional Youth Summit, delivered in partnership with the federal government, continued to provide an important opportunity for young people in rural and regional Australia to tell their stories (for more, see page 57). The Trailblazers project, an offshoot of Heywire, once again promoted the leadership of young,

regional change-makers (18-28 years old) by allowing them to tell their stories on the ABC. The project is run in partnership with the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development.

The Regional Storyteller Scholarship initiative develops regional writers and content makers in the disability community. The inaugural winner of the scholarship, Eliza Hull, produced a successful eight-part RN radio and six-part ABC Life online series about parenting with disabilities, and went on to work with RN, ABC Life, ABC ME and ABC Bendigo. A partnership with Department of Social Services has enabled two scholarships to be offered in 2019-20.

Distribution R&L has structured its Distribution team around digital production and content innovation, audience engagement and social media, digital product engagement, and content quality management.

The R&L Distribution team works closely with content makers to ensure that content is commissioned and optimised for the range of platforms audiences are using, with a particular focus on more compelling video content and audio being made available to audiences ‘on demand’.

The team focuses on engaging through social media, and its priority is to reach new and existing audiences with relevant local content. To achieve this, the team form collaborations across the ABC, working closely with the NA&I and E&S teams to provide R&L content to national audiences.

In 2019, R&L Distribution focused on localisation of digital content strategies across metropolitan and regional bureaux; better online discoverability of local content; improved audio and podcasting strategies; updating social and User Generated Content strategies to support local distribution; building on sport digital output and distribution; delivering digital strategies for new screen programming; improving the quality of Rural digital output; and continuing the development of content innovation.

42 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Working collaboratively with other ABC content areas, the Content Ideas Lab team concentrates on content innovation, by identifying and incubating new and distinctive ideas specifically aimed at the 30% of Australians who don’t consume ABC content on a weekly basis.

In 2018-19, the team finalised the development of the successful Great Ideas Grant (GIG) pitches from the 2017 round, transitioning three of the four active GIG projects out of Content Ideas Lab into the ABC’s ongoing business. Content Ideas Lab also played a pivotal role in coordinating pan-ABC content strategy, supporting the development of prospective major pan-ABC content initiatives, and developing models for continuous innovation through collaboration.

Throughout 2018-19, Content Ideas Lab’s two primary responsibilities were ABC International Strategy, and the lifestyle and wellbeing content portal known as ABC Life. Additional priorities were informed by two new pan-ABC groups, the Content Collaborations Working Group, and the Emerging Content Steering Group.

Great Ideas Grant (GIG)

ABC KIDS listen ABC KIDS listen is a radio station and accompanying app for 2-5-year-old children. Originally a GIG project, KIDS listen completed a smooth transition into the ABC Children’s team in January 2019. The change opened up the station and app to a larger cross-disciplinary team of children’s content makers.

ABC KIDS listen’s highlights for the year included a collaboration between ABC Classic FM, Ensemble Offspring and composer Brenda Gifford, which resulted in Music for The Dreaming, a live show for young children performed at the Sydney Opera House in August 2018. A recording of the show was later distributed as a podcast for a broader audience to enjoy.

Content Ideas Lab

Narrator Luke Carroll with Kirra Quokka, the protagonist of podcast and live show Classic Kids: Sounds Like Australia.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 43

Unravel The Unravel True Crime project brings together ABC television, podcast, and digital teams to produce compelling investigative content examining Australian true-crime stories.

In 2018-19, Unravel True Crime launched two new podcasts, Barrenjoey Road and Last Seen Katoomba, which were supported by related television programming and innovative digital stories. Barrenjoey Road achieved an average complete audience of 845,000 across its three television episodes.38 Based on average downloads per episode, the Unravel True Crime podcast remains one of the ABC’s top-ranking programs.

In January 2019, the Unravel podcast team moved from Content Ideas Lab into ABC Audio Studios, to establish the series as ongoing ABC content.

38 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data, October-November 2018; OzTAM VPM.

39 Facebook and Spredfast analytics; as at 31 May 2019.

40 Facebook, YouTube and Spredfast analytics.

RetroFocus Launched in July 2018, RetroFocus unearths gems from the wealth of the ABC’s archives, sharing the nostalgia and historic insights with appreciative audiences across ABC and external digital platforms.

The project is tracked monthly and continues to exceed initial KPIs for reach, engagement and retention. In 2018-19, RetroFocus videos surpassed 100 million Facebook views and had more than 5.7 million views on YouTube.39 Successful collaborations for the project have included work with the News Digital, Arts, Regional, Rural, Indigenous and Science teams, with more initiatives planned for the coming year.

Popular RetroFocus offerings included a video showing Professor Julius Sumner-Miller’s brilliant reaction to a live experiment’s unexpected result (20 million Facebook views) and a Four Corners ‘Voice of the People’ segment from 1961 which asked unsuspecting passers-by “Should husbands help with the weekend housework?” (610,000 YouTube views).40

Unravel: Barrenjoey Road

Professor Julius Sumner-Miller, Retrofocus.

44 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Content Content is the ABC’s first scripted series in vertical video format. The seven-part comedy is designed to be viewed on a smartphone, with the world of BFFs Lucy and Daisy revealed through texts, calls, and app interactions. A co-production with Ludo Studios and the ABC, Content is an experimental program targeting younger audiences. Completed and due for release in September 2019, the series will be distributed across ABC social platforms.

ABC Life ABC Life emerged from a GIG initiative, its primary aims being to reach new Australian audiences, and to trial innovative ways of working and presenting content in order to achieve that goal.

Working with ABC Product & Content Technology, the team launched the ABC Life online service in August 2018. Content on the site covers a broad range of lifestyle and wellbeing topics, with key editorial themes in 2018-19 including mental health and wellbeing, issues with alcohol, personal finance literacy, rights at work, cyber safety and social isolation.

ABC Life’s goal to reach one million monthly users onsite in 12 months was exceeded in February 2019 - a mere six months after its launch. The service approached its one year milestone reaching 1.2 million monthly users onsite in June 2019, with 63% of the audience being female and 54% aged 44 and younger.41 User survey information collected by ABC Audience Data & Insights in February 2019 indicated that ABC Life has been resonating with Australians across both metropolitan and regional areas as well as those with Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and non-CALD backgrounds. The platform is successfully reaching and engaging the new audiences it set out to attract and hold.

These strong audience outcomes were made possible by forging new ways of working that built on the existing talents of ABC staff. ABC Life provided professional development opportunities through the secondment of more than 20 members of staff from different ABC departments and locations around Australia.

One such secondment resulted in a Background Briefing investigation by Osman Faruqi into online abuse, which became a finalist in the 2019 mid-year Walkley Awards. Reporter Grace Jennings-Edquist also achieved industry recognition through the Michael Gordon Social Justice Fellowship, which led to an ABC Life series exploring the lives of refugees in regional Australia. In June 2019, ABC Life material was used by the Australian Human Rights Commission in its guide on how to conduct conversations about racism.

For the broader ABC digital ecosystem, ABC Life has served as a hub, enhancing discovery of content created across the organisation by driving well over 6 million onward journeys to other ABC content destinations since its launch.

41 Google Analytics.

Gemma Bird Matheson (Daisy) and Charlotte Nicdao (Lucy) in Content. Image: Mia Forrest

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 45

Content Innovation

Emerging Content Steering Group Led by Content Ideas Lab, this cross-divisional group holds regular conversations on emerging content opportunities, with the aim of creating future content-creation priorities. Decision from this group inform ‘hack’ days where a particular idea - such as new content for the ABC homepage, sports content for CALD audiences or ethics content for younger audiences - is explored, and the best are piloted. Each ‘hack’ day held in 2018-19 produced new approaches to storytelling delivered primarily through ABC Life but also via featured pieces on 7.30, News Breakfast and triple j.

Content Collaborations Working Group Throughout 2018-19, Content Ideas Lab stayed connected to other parts of the organisation through creating and supporting a new approach to commissioning pan-ABC events. The Content Collaborations Working Group supported major initiatives such as the Australia Talks survey and TV program, and annual events such as NAIDOC week.

International Strategy In 2018-19, the ABC continued to tailor its international activities to keep pace with the changing media environment by focusing on providing digital media services to international audiences. In the reporting period, the ABC achieved an average overall international audience reach of 9.3 million per month on its digital platforms.42

The core elements underpinning the ABC’s international strategy are:

• investment in new digital services while maintaining a focus on the traditional broadcast mass-reach platforms of ABC Radio Australia and ABC Australia (television)

• increasing understanding of international audiences through targeted audience research

• creating and sharing content to priority audience segments - Australians abroad, people in the Pacific, across Asia, and CALD audiences in Australia - this includes investment in a digital storytelling unit within the ABC’s Asia-Pacific Newsroom

• embedding international audience needs across the organisation and increasing collaboration while maintaining centralised management of the ABC’s international activities through the International Strategy team

• internationalising the ABC’s brand and core digital services, including removal of the geoblock from abc.net.au and the ABC NEWS app.

Following is a snapshot of international activities in 2018-19.

Rebranding the ABC’s international activities On 1 July 2018, the ABC retired the international facing Australia Plus brand. The ABC’s international television service was renamed ABC Australia. The Australia Plus apps, websites and social media accounts were retired, merged or transformed. All ABC flagship social accounts are now using the ABC Australia logo to establish a consistent brand presence for international and domestic audiences.

42 Google Analytics.

46 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Australia The ABC’s international television service is available in 37 countries and territories across the Asia Pacific and the Indian subcontinent. The ABC Australia schedule is comprised of approximately 80% ABC news and current affairs content, with the remaining 20% being kids and factual content produced in-house or acquired from SBS/NITV and independent production companies.

ABC Australia has for many years broadcast drama and sport from commercial free-to-air networks across the region. International Strategy has also funded the production of short-form English language learning programs with ABC Education, such as Everyday English and Weather on the Go, for broadcast on the service.

While measurement of international broadcast audiences remains difficult, according to the Ipsos Affluent Asia Report 2018 there were 406,000 ‘affluent’ viewers of ABC Australia television each month in 2018, across nine markets. This represents a growth of 38% from the previous year.

ABC Radio Australia ABC Radio Australia is broadcast as an FM service across the Pacific and in Timor-Leste, streamed online, and is available as audio-on-demand via the web and the ABC listen app.

The station provides Pacific audiences with the bespoke program Pacific Mornings and the half-hour news and current affairs shows Pacific Beat and Pacific Review . Audiences across PNG, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu are also served by the long-running daily Tok Pisin news and current affairs program Wantok. Responding to a need to connect with younger audiences across the Pacific, Island Music was launched in June 2019, providing a weekly two-hour program dedicated to reggae and related musical genres. The remainder of the ABC Radio Australia schedule is built around specialist RN and relevant Local Radio content.

Chinese audiences While international broadcasters, including the ABC, do not have television landing rights within the People’s Republic of China (PRC), the ABC has designed a range of initiatives that enable it to achieve our Charter objectives in this market, and to serve content to the Chinese diaspora both across the region and domestically. In 2018-19 these activities included:

• reciprocal arrangements with a number of Chinese broadcasters to schedule a ‘Window Week’ - approximately five hours of ABC content is provided for partners to broadcast over a week, during prime time hours, to their mainland television audiences

• the distribution of the Sydney New Year’s Eve fireworks highlights to 32 international broadcasters, which reached more than 200 million people in the PRC through playback on national television and social media channels43

• the provision of programs of high relevance and interest to the Chinese diaspora in Australia - such as the Four Corners episode ‘Tremble and Obey’ and China’s Artful Dissident - subtitled in Simplified Chinese and made available on domestic iview shortly after initial broadcast

• the launch of a media campaign on Chinese social media channels Weibo and WeChat, and curated special collections with commemorative branding, to celebrate Lunar New Year

• the publishing of selected audio, video and text content produced by ABC KIDS listen, ABC Education, and Regional & Local on prominent Chinese social and distribution channels like Youku, iQiyi, QQ, Miaopai, Weibo and WeChat, to meet demand for English-language learning.

43 Data supplied by Chinese media partner networks.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 47

ABC Commercial

44 Excluding ABC Retail closure costs.

A continued commitment to restructuring, reorganising and refocusing ABC Commercial’s business in order to improve efficiency and profitability saw positive returns in what was a successful year.

In early 2019, the team separated from the Finance division to become an independent business unit of the ABC. ABC Commercial is self-funded, and in 2018-19 provided a $4.4 million profit to the ABC to support content production.44 Commercial also paid over $9 million in royalties and advances to the external creative industry for various productions and content, and a further $1.9 million to the ABC for shared services and content.

ABC Content Sales and Distribution ABC Content Sales and Distribution (CS&D) acquires and distributes television and ABC news content to the domestic and international marketplace. The team licenses programs and program formats globally. Its extensive television sales catalogue reflects the depth and breadth of ABC content.

CS&D’s subscription video on demand (SVOD) business continues to grow with strong five-year deals with major platforms within Australia.

The ABC News video syndication platform ABC NOW continues to be positioned as the ultimate online destination for organisations and content publishers wanting to source world-class video news.

ABC Library Sales also had a strong year, securing numerous footage-licensing deals with broadcasters and filmmakers around the world. A key highlight was the sale of ABC archive footage to the producers of the documentary film The Final Quarter which premiered at the Sydney Film Festival in June 2019.

Other highlights for the year included the following:

• You Can’t Ask That continued to enjoy considerable momentum with more than 10 international versions now broadcast or in production. In the last year, the program was made in Israel (in both Hebrew and Arabic), Canada (in both English and French), The Netherlands, Norway and Finland; and a second season was commissioned or was in production in four territories (Canada, Israel, Spain and France).

ABC Commercial: Gross revenue by activity

Investment & Collection Agencies 9.4%

Music 23.8%

Other Revenue 0.3%

Studio & Media Productions 6.2%

Publishing 5.7%

Content Sales 54.5%

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• Exposed: The Case of Keli Lane resonated strongly with international audiences and sales discussions continue for further expansion.

• Catalyst continued to expand its international footprint. While sales to linear broadcasters (including in the United States, Hong Kong, Thailand, South East Asia and Sweden) continued strongly, the program’s first ever standalone format - The Great Australian Bee Challenge - was sold into the United Kingdom, The Netherlands and Belgium, with further territories expected to take up options shortly.

• Dream Gardens captured the attention of international buyers with sales to free-to-air or pay TV clients secured in the United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, France, Germany, Poland, Bulgaria and sub-Saharan Africa.

• Restoration Australia resonated globally, thanks to the program’s combination of unique properties and locations with relatable characters and storylines. Sales to free-to-air or pay TV clients have been secured in Canada, New Zealand, Thailand and sub-Saharan Africa, and to SVOD clients in Australia and New Zealand.

• The Wiggles continued to build their international profile, with a renewed and enlarged presence in Australia and New Zealand, North America and the UK.

ABC Music and Events ABC Music is a leading independent record label in the Australian market. It releases music across a range of genres, from children’s and adult contemporary to blues and roots, rock, and country. The label also releases triple j albums, and represents Australia’s leading classical music artists and Australian classical music organisations, including symphony orchestras and ensembles.

In 2018-19, ABC Music saw significant growth in revenue from streaming services within Australia and globally. ABC Music released 140 physical titles - 58 titles for ABC Classics and 82 titles for Contemporary, including 32 ABC KIDS titles - and 126 albums were released digitally across several platforms.

Highlights for the year were as follows:

• ABC Classics 21 releases made it into the 2018 ARIA Core Classical Albums chart, representing 42% of the chart for the year.

• Fourteen ABC Music releases made it into the 2018 ARIA Country Albums Chart.

• Three ABC Music children’s music releases ended up in the top 50 ARIA Australian Artist Albums chart (all genres) for 2018.

• ABC Music received several nominations and industry awards, including three ARIA awards across multiple categories at the 2018 ceremony (see page 257).

ABC Events stages concerts and events for ABC audiences across Australia. During 2018-19, more than 550,000 people around Australia were entertained at shows produced under the ABC Events brand.

Thelma White from Darwin answered questions about African Australians in You Can’t Ask That Series 4.

Quality, Distinctive Content in 2018-19 49

ABC Publishing and Licensing Australian storytelling remained at the heart of ABC Books publishing program in 2018-19, with 44 new books published in partnership with HarperCollins Australia.

The year’s successes included Richard Glover’s bestseller The Land Before Avocado, biographies including Grantlee Kieza’s Banjo and Trevor Marshelsea’s Winx, the release of a book companion to the popular ABC series Back Roads, and two more books in Matt Stanton’s bestselling Funny Kid children’s series. Liam Cochrane retold one of the biggest news stories of the year, the Thai cave rescue, in The Cave, and Jen Storer’s multi-award-winning Stella Montgomery trilogy came to an end with the publication of Wakestone Hall.

ABC Audio releases a large range of audiobooks for adults and children under licence with Bolinda Publishing. In 2018-19 the team released 90 titles in both physical and digital formats.

ABC Magazines produces three titles under license agreements with magazine publisher nextmedia. During the reporting period, ABC Gardening Australia magazine continued to outperform industry trends, with a readership of 601,000, an increase of 3.1% on the previous year. ABC Organic Gardener celebrated 20 years of publication in 2018-19, and increased to eight issues a year.

ABC Licensing extends ABC brands into a wide range of consumer products. During the reporting period, ABC Licensing launched the triple j merchandise online shop (triplejstore.com.au) and began work on a new product range for Gardening Australia. Successful brand licensing agreements continued with ABC Reading Eggs and the ABC KIDS World precinct at Dreamworld.

ABC Studios and Media Production ABC Studios and Media Production (SMP) markets the ABC’s facilities to the broader production and entertainment industry.

Clients for these facilities include ABC TV co-production partners, commercial television networks, television production companies, film and theatre production companies, state symphony orchestras, podcast producers, independent production companies and individual groups seeking specialist support from our services. Rehearsal rooms at the ABC’s Ultimo site are also hired out to leading musical production companies, consolidating the rooms as the ‘go-to’ pre-performance spaces for major musical theatre companies in Australia.

Highlights for 2018-19 include the expansion of SMP services through the opening of ABC radio studios in Melbourne to external hire - more than 100 bookings were secured during the year - and the reopening of the Iwaki auditorium at the ABC Southbank Centre in Melbourne following the completion of building works, which resulted in a significant rise in orchestra bookings and the provision of an invaluable resource to the Australian music industry.

ABC Retail ABC Retail continued to be affected throughout 2018-19 by the general disruption being experienced in the Australian retail sector, as well as the accelerating decline of CD and DVD distribution. Some costs were reduced through increased efficiencies, but ABC Retail continued to operate at a loss, as was forecast.

After exploring a number of options to reduce costs and improve profitability for ABC Retail, the decision was made to close the ABC Shop Online business and the ABC Centre franchise network. This was announced to the public in August 2018. All retail operations ceased in December 2018, and the ABC Centre franchise network closed in February 2019. Licensed ABC products remain available through a wide array of approved ABC retailers.

50 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Yours in the Community 51

Gardening Australia presenter Sophie Thomson speaks to the crowd at the ABC Gardeners Market in Adelaide. Image: Malcolm Sutton

Yours in the Community

Contents ABC Advisory Council 52

Community Engagement 57

Content Teams and community 58

Connecting Communities - rural and regional Australia 60

National events 61

State election coverage 61

Emergency broadcasting 62

International development (ABCID) 64

The ABC Advisory Council was established in 1983 under the provisions of section 11 of the ABC Act, to provide advice to the Board on matters relating to the Corporation’s broadcasting programs.

There are currently 12 members of the Advisory Council including the Chair, appointed by the Board. Applications to join the Council are invited through promotions on ABC services.

In 2018-19, the Advisory Council welcomed three new members: Josephine Buontempo, Sarah Curran and Jason Li. The members of the Advisory Council represent a wide range of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives, and have deep connections to the communities they represent. The Council is made up of:

Professor Andrea Hull AO Chair (Albert Park, Vic) Andrea has had a distinguished career in the arts, arts education and cultural policy, and was Director/CEO of the Victorian College of the Arts from 1995 to 2009.

Previously, she was CEO of the WA Department for the Arts and a Director of the Australia Council. She is Chair of the Melbourne Recital Centre and also Melbourne Forum. She is a Board member of the Florey Neuroscience Institute and its Foundations, and of the Melbourne Prize Trust, and she recently retired as Deputy Chair of both the National Museum of Australia and the Breast Cancer Network of Australia. She is a fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

Andrea currently has a consultancy practice and is an executive coach.

ABC Advisory Council

Standing, L-R: Sarah Curran, Linda Cho, Dr Jason Jingshi Li, Josephine Buontempo, Michelle McDonagh. Sitting, L-R: Jacob Matysek, Andrea Hull AO, Sam Almaliki. Not present: Fiona Duggan, Amara Barnes, Nkosana Mafico.

52 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Sam Almaliki (South Melbourne, Vic) Sam Almaliki is cofounder and CEO of ConvX, an online digital conveyancing platform, and commercial director of Acusensus, a pioneering road-safety-enforcement camera provider. He is a business leader with expertise in the sporting, start-up, and not-for-profit sectors. Sam is currently Chairperson of the Caulfield Racecourse Reserve Trust. He was previously the Head of Community Engagement at Cricket Australia and from 2013 to 2017 grew the diversity of cricket participation to record levels. Sam is a former commissioner of the Victorian Multicultural Commission and Chairperson of the Loddon Mallee Regional Advisory Council.

Fiona Duggan (Tamar Valley, Tas) Fiona is a veterinary surgeon and President of the Tasmanian Division of the Australian Veterinary Association. She lives in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley and is actively involved in local school and sporting groups.

Amara Barnes (Wollongong, NSW) Amara Barnes is a proud Wiradjuri woman from central west NSW. Amara currently works with Tribal Warrior Aboriginal Corporation where she is driving social outcomes through enterprise development in order to provide cultural and financial sustainability for future Redfern communities.

Prior to this, Amara worked with the University of Wollongong where she was responsible for developing the University’s inaugural Reconciliation Action Plan. She was the Manager of Indigenous Careers at Westpac Group and was an Emerging Leader on the Westpac Indigenous Advisory Committee. Amara is currently completing a Master of Business Administration with the University of Sydney and is a recipient of the University of Sydney Business School’s inaugural Indigenous Leaders MBA Scholarship.

Linda Cho (Yorkeys Knob, Qld) Linda is a lawyer with Legal Aid Queensland specialising in criminal law, child protection and mental health review tribunal matters. She was born in South Korea and migrated to Australia with her family in 1996. She graduated from the University of Queensland with a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) and a Bachelor of Arts (Political Science and International Relations). She volunteers for the Cairns Community Legal Centre and Calvary Christian Church, and is an active committee member of the Far North Queensland Law Society and the Asian Australian Lawyers Association. 

Nkosana Mafico (Sinnamon Park, Qld) Nkosana is a PhD scholar at the University of Queensland, where he graduated with First Class Honours in Business Management and as Valedictorian of the Business School. As a researcher, he focuses on cross-cultural psychology and social entrepreneurship. Outside of academia, he founded the Council for Young Africans Living Abroad (CYALA), and for three years was its Managing Director. Nkosana is also a board director of the World Economic Forum’s Global Shapers Community in Australia.

Jacob Matysek (Cairns, Qld) Jacob was born in Whakatane, New Zealand and has close family connections both in Australia and New Zealand. He is of Maori and Torres Strait Islander descent and strongly connects to Erub (Darnley Island) and Ugar (Stephens Island) in the eastern Torres Strait. He holds a Bachelor of Laws and Diploma of Information Technology from James Cook University. He is a member of the Australian Army Reserve and serves on the management committee of the Far North Medico Legal Society.

Jacob works for LawRight in Cairns, is the Managing Director of Lani’s Wild Caught Torres Strait Seafood, and works closely with a number of Indigenous Corporations and public interest groups.

Yours in the Community 53

Michelle McDonagh (Junction Hill, NSW) Michelle is the Principal of Grafton Public

School and has a background in Special Education. She is involved in numerous education committees and is passionate about mental health and disability advocacy within the Clarence region. She has previously served on many local sporting committees.

Josephine Buontempo (North Fremantle, WA) Josephine has 25 years executive and senior management experience in the social services, legal, government and corporate sectors. She has qualifications in social science, migration law and training, and has worked across a wide range of civil society and for-purpose organisations.

Jo has developed and managed corporations, services, and community initiatives in the areas of community law, education and training, social housing, employment, disability, family, youth and children’s services, refugee and humanitarian protection and resettlement programs, and grant-making. She has been a participant of the International Fellows Program on Philanthropy and Civil Society at the City University of New York.

Jo is a Non-Executive Director of Foundation Housing Ltd, an independent director of regional Aboriginal corporations, and is Managing Director of a global Australian migration consultancy company.

Sarah Curran (Tennant Creek, NT) Sarah is a primary-school teacher and business owner in the remote town of Tennant Creek. She grew up in Tennant Creek and returned there in 2010, after completing her university studies. Sarah has worked in a variety of roles in the Education Department, including Families as First Teachers Educator in three local communities, and Network Leader in the Learning and Performance team, Schools South. In 2015, Sarah and her husband took over her family’s plumbing business, which covers more than one million square kilometres, including Aboriginal communities and cattle stations.

Dr Jason Jingshi Li (Canberra, ACT) Jason is a software developer based in Canberra. He has more than a decade of experience in artificial intelligence research and development, and currently leads the technical delivery of AI solutions to public and financial sectors. He holds a PhD in Computer Science from the Australian National University, and was previously a research scientist at the ANU and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). He co-founded the Black Mountain Piano Quartet, where he also serves as the principal violinist.

54 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Dr Jason Jingshi Li with Rachael and Teo on the set of Play School.

Overview of the Council’s activities 2018-19 The Advisory Council met in Sydney three times during the year: October 2018, February 2019, and June 2019. Either the ABC Board’s Chair (or Acting Chair) or the Managing Director (or Acting Managing Director), or both, met with the Advisory Council at each meeting. Members of the Executive Leadership Team also met with the Council to discuss programming-related matters.

Over the year, the Council participated in ‘immersion’ workshops related to the ABC’s iview, ABC listen and ABC Life platforms. Council members were asked to ‘immerse’ themselves in each platform’s content over a two to three week period, and to canvass sentiment in their communities towards that content in order to provide feedback directly to ABC project managers at Council meetings.

The Advisory Council also participated in discussions regarding programming initiatives - for example ABC content projects related to Australia Talks and the UN Year of Indigenous Languages - and strategies to improve audience reach. The Council members played a key role in representing the ABC by facilitating discussions between the ABC and the community at events including the Heywire Regional Youth Summit and the ABC Education Forum.

Recommendations In 2018-19, the Advisory Council made two recommendations to the Board in connection with its immersive workshops into ABC News and ABC iview. A recommendation regarding the ABC listen workshop, held in February and June, will be made to the Board later in 2019.

Recommendation regarding News The aim of the workshop was to explore the relevancy and community impact of ABC News coverage and reporting. The Advisory Council endorsed the work undertaken by the ABC News, Analysis & Investigations team to strengthen local coverage. The Council also endorsed a renewed focus on rural, regional and Indigenous reporting. The Council recommended that ABC News improve local news coverage on weekends, coverage of state and local government reporting, the discoverability of local, regional and Indigenous news, and personalisation options on digital apps and portals.

These recommendations have been taken into account in a number of initiatives put in place since the Advisory Council workshop to:

• ensure more regional and rural stories are commissioned for ABC digital and broadcast news platforms

• strengthen local reporting on weekends

• sharpen the focus on state and local policy debates

• ensure the ABC delivers an outstanding audience experience across platforms.

Yours in the Community 55

Some of the initiatives were:

• ABC NEWS app: more local and regional stories featuring prominently in the main app story list and distribution of state-based alerts to app users highlighting strong local content

• Apple News: more local story alerts being sent to the 2 million+ Apple News alert subscribers

• Email newsletters: launch of the first curated ABC email newsletter, Weekend Reads with Virginia Trioli - other newsletters followed, including Australia Votes with Annabel Crabb and regional area newsletters providing local news and information relevant to the community

• Election/policy: in addition to extensive state and federal election coverage, launch of the Australia Talks initiative to understand the thoughts and feelings of Australians from all walks of life and create a national conversation around those insights (see page 60 for more on Australia Talks)

• Smart devices: local news audio flash briefings for smart speakers and devices - work is underway on video flash briefings

• YouTube series: launch of an ABC co-production series with YouTube, A Dog Act, which explored the disappearance of Paddy Moriarty - the series has been shortlisted for numerous awards.

Recommendation regarding iview The aim of the workshop was to explore to what degree iview is relevant, meaningful and useful to the Advisory Council members and their communities. The Advisory Council recommended that the ABC continue its work to increase awareness of the platform, improve consistency of experience across different devices, work toward greater personalisation of the platform, and improve accessibility by developing capability to allow programs to be downloaded for offline viewing.

These recommendations have been taken into account in further development of the iview platform. In 2018-19, the iview Product Team delivered a range of improvements as part of the iview roadmap. With recommendations from the Advisory Council taken into consideration, an overview of the key developments included:

• Consistency of Experience Across Different Devices: In May 2019, iview launched an Android TV application and refreshed the Apple TV app. Both reflect the improved ‘show page’ experience, bringing iview’s big screen experience in line with viewer expectations. Rebuild on the iview Smart TV (i.e. internet connected TV) app began, with delivery planned within the next 6-12 months.

• Personalisation continued to be a key priority, with work to add login to iview across mobile, Android TV and Apple TV progressed for delivery in late 2019. This will allow viewers to synchronise their iview experience across devices.

• Increasing Awareness of the Platform: Product Marketing ran summer and winter campaigns to increase iview awareness, with a strong focus on iview content ‘binges’.

56 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Community Engagement programs are aimed at bringing the ABC to life in Australian communities by creating relationships with new and existing audiences and connecting them with the ABC in a way that is both meaningful and beneficial. In 2018-19, the Community Engagement team’s focus was to reach younger Australians, their families, and the wider communities to which they belong.

To achieve this vision, the team utilised the diverse resources of the ABC - its dedicated and passionate employees, vast network of studios across the country and outstanding content. Key engagement initiatives included the Regional Schools Program and the Open House Program.

The Community Engagement Regional Schools Project (RSP) The RSP was launched in July 2018. The program aimed to create and build on partnerships between the ABC and regional primary and secondary schools, to make the ABC and its content relevant and valuable to school-aged children and educators, as well as to their wider regional communities. The RSP network now comprises 463 schools around Australia. The 2019 program focused on Media Literacy, and to date there have been media literacy workshops run by local journalists in each of the 48 regional communities in which the ABC is located.

The Open House Program From July to November 2018 the Community Engagement team worked with regional and metropolitan staff around the country to open the doors of the ABC to their local communities. The Open House Program saw staff in locations from Broome to Hobart and Mackay to Perth welcome locals in to tour the facilities, meet ABC personalities and view key sets and props from some of the ABC’s most popular programs, for example Play School and You Can’t Ask That.

Heywire In February 2019, Heywire winners took over Canberra for the week-long Heywire Regional Youth Summit. Heywire brings together young people aged between 16 and 22 from all over rural and regional Australia for a week of storytelling, ideas, friendship and leadership.

At the summit, 34 Heywire winners and 15 Trailblazers (aged 18-28 years old) shared their stories of regional life. They were given the opportunity to pitch their ideas for tackling community issues - such as youth mental health, celebrating diversity, and supporting farmers - to members of parliament, government departments and community leaders. Their ideas have been supported to become reality through $100,000 in philanthropic grants provided by Heywire partners.

Mentors from across the ABC supported and gave guidance to the young people throughout the summit. Their stories were featured on local radio, ABC TV’s News Breakfast, RN’s Life Matters, ABC Education website, and triple j’s Hack.

In attendance were Deputy Prime Minister, the Hon Michael McCormack MP, who applauded the young people’s boldness in sharing their stories and ideas, and the ABC’s Managing Director David Anderson.

Community Engagement

Heywire and Trailblazers winners’ stories and ideas can be found at https://www.abc.net.au/heywire/

Yours in the Community 57

ABC content is made with the assistance of, and is produced for, all Australians. ABC staff work closely with local communities and organisations to be a part of their world, and to reflect and share their stories.

In 2018-19, Regional & Local (R&L) teams attended and broadcast from a large and diverse range of events across the country. Examples included the Port Fairy Folk Festival, the Tamworth Country Music Festival and the Golden Guitar Awards, Perth’s Sculpture by the Sea at Cottesloe Beach, the World Science Festival, and the Brisbane Comedy Festival.

Teams also attended ABC-initiated events that have become part of local communities such as the ABC Gardener’s Market. ABC Adelaide has hosted the biannual market for more than 25 years. The April 2019 event attracted approximately 8,000 people and raised more than $20,000 for the Friends of the Botanic Gardens Adelaide.

R&L teams respond to issues affecting their communities by initiating activities and partnering with local organisations to help bring people together when needed. In 2018-19 ABC Brisbane supported strawberry farmers (see feature box page 60), while New South Wales and ACT teams worked with ABC News to launch a drought appeal on 10 August 2018, which raised $1.2 million for affected farmers. In November 2018 ABC Sydney and Regional NSW teams also supported the Band Together Farmers concert in Parkes. More than 3,000 people attended the concert with Australian musicians such as the Hoodoo Gurus and ARC Supergroup performing to raise money for rural mental health and suicide prevention.

In response to the bushfires in Tasmania at the beginning of 2019, ABC Hobart and ABC Northern Tasmania partnered with the Tasmanian government to put on a series of events in fire-affected communities such as Geeveston, Zeehan and Miena. ABC presenters hosted each event, with communities gathering to share stories of recovery and resilience. Australia All Over’s Ian McNamara joined the

event in Geeveston and the program then broadcast live from Grove in the Huon Valley the following morning.

Entertainment & Specialist (E&S) teams also sought to provide support for fire-affected communities. The Factual team held screenings of the Black Saturday documentary Aftermath for those who experienced the disaster firsthand, giving them a safe space to watch and support each other. The 10-year anniversary of Black Saturday was also acknowledged with a whole day of outside broadcasts conducted by ABC Radio Melbourne from the communities affected in 2009.

An episode of E&S’s The Recording Studio saw a volunteer rural firefighter from Tathra recording a song to support his community as they continued to recover from the devastation of the March 2018 fires.

The E&S team creates and contributes to myriad events, initiatives and celebrations involving local metropolitan and regional communities. The Don’t Stop the Music Family Fun Day in Centennial Park Sydney in November 2018 featured performances from public primary schools and workshops for children. For younger listeners, Play School live concerts toured throughout regional areas, delighting children across the country.

During the second series of War on Waste, educational resources and a Community Action Toolkit created with Good For The Hood were provided to empower community groups and individuals to take action on waste reduction. For more on the community impact of War on Waste, see page 137.

The Operations team completed three outside broadcasts over five days, with ABC Adelaide staff travelling around 1,000 kilometres throughout the Murray Darling Basin for Dancing on the Darling, which brought together drought-affected communities from across the region.

For more information on the social impact of ABC content in the community, see pages 136-7.

Content Teams and community

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One Night Stand

In September 2018, triple j held its biggest ever One Night Stand concert with 20,000 people enjoying fireworks and performances by musicians such as Peking Duk, Vance Joy, Tkay Maidza, Middle Kids and Alex The Astronaut in St Helens,

Tasmania. The concert also raised $25,000 for local charities.

Each year the One Night Stand event gives regional communities the chance to enjoy a free, all-ages concert featuring some of Australia’s biggest music acts, and encourages Australians - in particular young people - to travel to, explore and support

some of the country’s more remote regional areas.

Tkay Maidza performs at the triple j One Night Stand in St Helens, Tasmania. Image: Damien Peck

Yours in the Community 59

Australia Talks In late 2019 the ABC will launch Australia Talks, an unprecedented project across multiple content areas that aims to understand what it’s like to live in modern Australia. The centrepiece of Australia Talks is an innovative digital survey of Australians from all walks of life that will provide insights on:

• Perspectives - what they care about, their thoughts on Australia’s biggest social issues, and what divides and unites Australians as a country

• Wellbeing - how happy and healthy Australians are and whether they are optimistic or pessimistic about the future

• National identity - how they see themselves as Australians and as part of the world.

These insights will be used to create content on the thoughts and feelings of communities across the country, where the findings of the survey will be reflected in a wide range of content across all ABC platforms - including a live factual and entertainment program on ABC TV. They will also inform future commissioning of ABC programs.

Announced by the ABC in March 2017, the Connecting Communities initiative increased investment in rural and regional Australia. The initiative provided an additional $15 million per annum for 80 new jobs to support audience and content initiatives and a one-off investment of $4 million for tools and production equipment. To date, 80% of the project has been delivered, including the recruitment of the new positions.

New equipment has enhanced coverage of regional news and all regional bureaux now have the capacity to broadcast live breaking news. In 2018-19, a strong focus on training to improve the capacity of teams to use this equipment delivered positive results.

The volume and quality of regional content continues to increase with national audiences engaging positively with regional content. In the 18 months to March 2019, average total monthly page views for regional digital articles on national platforms increased from 3.6 million to 13.4 million.1

The remote communities initiative continues, enabling journalists to spend time in rural communities that are rarely represented in the media to bring their stories to local and national attention. Destinations in 2018-19 included Parnngurr and Kalumburu in Western Australia, Ivanhoe in New South Wales, Christmas Island and Norfolk Island.

Connecting Communities - rural and regional Australia

1 ABC News Story stats.

A Day of Sundaes In September 2018, ABC Brisbane partnered with The Prince Charles Hospital Foundation to support Queensland strawberry farmers with a day selling the famous Ekka Strawberry

Sundae. ABC Brisbane programs from Breakfast through to Drive broadcast live from King George Square where 14,000 sundaes were

sold and more than $50,000 raised for the farmers.

ABC Radio Brisbane’s Craig Zonca at the Day of Sundaes. Image: Hannah Turner

60 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The ABC brings together Australians to celebrate, reflect on and participate in events of national importance.

In 2018-19 the ABC joined with communities for New Year’s Eve, Australia Day, Anzac Day, NAIDOC week, and the federal election (see page 22). It told the stories of milestones such as the Centenary of Armistice and celebrated the nation’s cultural and artistic traditions during events such as the Garma Festival and AusMusic month.

Coverage of Anzac Day services and commemorations in 2019 featured eight live-to-air Australian-based outside television broadcasts and two international broadcasts - including one from ANZAC Cove in Gallipoli - as well as extensive radio programming across the country. The ABC marked the Centenary of Armistice with comprehensive coverage across ABC platforms. The Remembrance Day Service at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra and

the Australian Service at Villers-Bretonneux were broadcast live on ABC television, with prominent coverage on ABC Radio including live broadcasts from Adelaide, Hobart and the War Memorial. Programs across the ABC reflected on the significance of WWI, including a four-part series on Conversations looking at how the Great War shaped our world.

NAIDOC week coverage in July 2018 included a live broadcast in Melbourne and children’s programming showcasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander talent, characters and stories. In August 2018 ABC crews travelled to the Garma Festival in the Northern Territory to cover stories of Indigenous culture, explored through song, dance and truth-telling.

National events

Victorian State Election Regional & Local teams delivered coverage and analysis of the important election issues to voters throughout Victoria including outside broadcasting from key electorates. Voters Voice Forum featured an expert panel answering questions from a live audience and local radio along with the ABC NEWS channel broadcast a debate series which was also livestreamed on Facebook. Matters of State analysed the key issues shaping the election and on election night Jon Faine hosted a state-wide broadcast in front of a live audience.

New South Wales Election Local teams delivered election content across a range of programs and platforms during the New South Wales state election campaign period. RN Focus featured analysis from reporters around the state, and ABC Radio Sydney’s Wendy Harmer and Richard Glover hosted Matters of State, a seven-episode podcast series. Afternoons presenter James Valentine and HG Nelson hosted two Town Hall meetings for their satirical planning body The Even Greater Sydney Planning Committee. ABC Radio Sydney broadcast live on election night, with a panel providing comprehensive analysis of the count.

State election coverage

Yours in the Community 61

Management of broadcasting services The ABC remains committed to working with lead emergency authorities to inform and prepare the public before, during and after emergency events. ABC emergency broadcasting is usually undertaken by staff working in the 55 ABC Local Radio stations around the country.

The ABC partners with lead agencies in each Australian jurisdiction in order to provide the best possible information to the public. These partnerships can include legal memorandums of understanding with state governments or their emergency delegates to provide timely and accurate information regarding significant threats to life and property.

The ABC is a member of the Australian Fire and Emergencies Council Public Information and Warnings Group. This allows the organisation to work directly with the emergency sector at a national level. In so doing, the ABC has contributed to the writing of the Emergency Warnings Handbook. In several states, ABC managers are also members of their local or regional emergency management committees, allowing the ABC to have strong partnerships in place before disasters hit a community.

In four state jurisdictions (WA, NT, ACT and NSW) the ABC has negotiated to have a manager work in a liaison role with the emergency agencies’ state operation centres during major emergency events. This has streamlined information sharing, enabling key emergency messages and advice to be delivered faster to affected communities. These roles were active during Cyclone Veronica (WA, March 2019), Cyclone Trevor (NT, March 2019) and bushfires around the NSW communities of Tingha and Tabulam (March 2019).

Emergency broadcasting in 2018-19 The 2018-19 year was a particularly challenging one for communities with a sharp escalation in the number and nature of emergency events affecting communities.

Overall, the ABC handled 371 emergency broadcast events throughout 2018-19, an increase of around 120 events compared to 2017-18. The longest period in 2018-19 in which no emergency broadcasting was required was seven weeks.

Emergency broadcasting

ABC Emergency Broadcast events by state 2017-18 and 2018-19

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

2017-18 2018-19

QLD ACT Tas NT WA Vic

256 events in 2017-18

371 events in 2018-19

SA NSW

93

121

63 66

45

28

42

56

41

65

30

14

18

26

10

4

62 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Bushfire emergencies no longer remained a summer affair. Four states experienced emergency-level bushfires during winter with the increased activity continuing through spring. This posed challenges as fires occurred outside the period in which the ABC has traditionally rostered emergency broadcast coordinator roles or weekend staff dedicated to broadcasting emergency updates as they occur. To address this escalation in events, the R&L team increased their emergency broadcasting resources year-round.

Fires were by far the most common hazard requiring emergency broadcasting in 2018-19, followed by storms and floods. Every jurisdiction was involved in emergency broadcasting, although ABC bureaux in Queensland handled far more than those in the other states and territories. Work in Queensland included coverage of the state’s first ever catastrophic bushfire conditions in November-December 2018 and the floods which affected Townsville and western Queensland in February 2019.

Other major events during the year included fires in Tasmania in January and Victoria in March and cyclones that affected WA and the NT simultaneously over one weekend in March.

WHS, training and support During 2018-19, R&L conducted training in emergency broadcasting for all Local Radio bureaux and stations. In most cases, training was implemented face to face and involved radio and social media content-makers and their managers, and reporters likely to work in the field during emergencies. Training reinforced key messages about the help available through the ABC’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) and the ABC’s Peer Support program. Emergency team and senior managers in the R&L team received trauma and resilience training.

All bureaux and stations have kits of Personal Protective Equipment designed to protect content-makers working in flood, fire and cyclone zones. Risk assessments have been specifically designed by the ABC WHS team to establish that all measures are taken to ensure staff safety in those zones. In 2018-19, R&L also worked with the WHS team and designed and implemented emergency coverage training for News, Investigations & Analysis staff based in capital cities.

ABC Gippsland’s Kellie Lazzaro and Beth Gibson speak to Darryl Burns of Parks Victoria after the Rosedale fire. Image: Anthea Clarke

Yours in the Community 63

ABC International Development (ABCID) uses the Corporation’s strengths in organisational management and public broadcasting to improve citizens’ access to media content and services in the Indo-Pacific region. It focuses on improving skills and abilities in content production and research to enable partner organisations to pursue quality journalism, develop engaging storytelling and build strong connections with their communities.

The ABCID team provides expertise, training, technical and program support to partner organisations. It works with local media organisations, regional bodies, development assistance bodies and international development donors.

As the international media development branch of the ABC, it sits within the Public Affairs team and supports the Corporation’s regional presence and international engagement.

ABCID projects in 2018-19

Media Development Initiative (MDI) The MDI supports Papua New Guinea media to generate content that promotes a greater range of citizen voices and increased accountability among decision-makers. Support included training in multiplatform content-making, Women in Media research and the development of storytelling formats for social media. MDI works at both the national level (such as supporting National Press Club events to promote national discussion) and provincial level (working with local communities to use their voice on local issues and encourage the responsiveness of local officials).

Pacific Media Assistance Scheme (PACMAS) PACMAS works across the Pacific region with media organisations, media associations, regional bodies and civil society groups. It supports the facilitation of independent and balanced discourse across Pacific government,

business and civil society. PACMAS capacity development activities include training of trainers for economic and business reporting, broadcast technicians training, journalism education and social media training. In 2018-19, a major PACMAS project saw the replacement of Samoa’s Radio 2AP AM transmitter. The station provides critical information to communities during natural disasters.

Women in News and Sports (WINS) The WINS program champions women journalists to join the traditionally male-dominated world of sports media and aims to increase coverage of women in sport. The ABC’s expertise in sports broadcasting helps train and mentor women journalists in the Indo-Pacific so they are given opportunities to cover major regional sporting events. Coverage in 2018-19 included the 2018 Commonwealth Games, 2019 Arafura Games and a podcast on female participation in the 2019 Pacific Games in Samoa.

Cambodia Communications Assistance Project (CCAP) In 2018-19, CCAP supported provincial radio stations to produce robust talkback discussions inspired by ABC regional and local programs, creating a platform for citizens’ voices and participation, and promoting greater accountability and transparency among local authorities. While funding for the long-running CCAP ended in March 2019, talkback remains prominent on the participating radio stations.

International development (ABCID)

64 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Audiences 65

ABC ME host Pip Rasmussen.

ABC Audiences

Contents Quality, distinctiveness and trust 66

Measures of community satisfaction 67

Reach and share 71

The ABC Corporate Tracking Program provides insights into community perceptions and beliefs about the value of the ABC’s contribution to Australian society. The Program comprises surveys that are conducted nationally three times per year among a nationally representative sample of people aged 18-75 years, via an online methodology.

In 2018-19, overall community sentiment towards the ABC remained relatively unchanged compared with the previous year. A large majority of Australians - 82% - believe the ABC performs a valuable role in the Australian community, with 36% rating the ABC’s role as ‘very valuable’.

Respondents were asked about their views on the quality of ABC Television. Consistent with previous surveys, most Australians (80%) believe that ABC television provides good quality programming, and 69% feel it does a ‘good job’ in terms of the number of shows it provides and that they like to watch. By contrast, 69% of respondents felt commercial TV provided good quality programming.

Regarding ABC Radio, 62% of Australians believe the quality of programming on ABC Radio is ‘good’, while 59% of the population believe that commercial radio offers good quality programming.

Respondents were asked about their usage of the ABC website and online services. Among those who ever use the ABC website, the vast majority (86%) believe the quality of content is ‘good’, with 36% of ABC online users rating the quality as ‘very good’. 84% of users also feel that ABC Online does a ‘good job’ on the amount of relevant content it provides.

The ABC Corporate Tracking Program also explores public perceptions about the ABC’s performance in relation to specific aspects of the Corporation’s Charter.

The majority of Australians believe that the ABC is doing ‘a good job’ fulfilling its various Charter obligations. 79% of respondents believe the ABC does a ‘good job’ of being distinctively Australian, while 74% believe the ABC does a ‘good job’ of being ‘accurate and impartial’ when reporting news and current affairs.

The ABC continues to outperform commercial media in the provision of news and information on country and regional Australia among both city based (79%) and country/regional (77%) populations. Overall, 77% of Australians believe that the ABC does a ‘good job’ covering country and regional issues compared with 61% for commercial media.

81% of Australian adults aged 18-75 years trust the information that the ABC provides. significantly higher than the levels of trust recorded for Internet Search Engines like Google (71%), commercial radio (60%), commercial TV (59%), newspaper publishers (57%) and Facebook (32%).1

Quality, distinctiveness and trust

1 ABC Corporate Tracking Program (n=4,583), online methodology people, 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights.

66 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Providing a quality service: 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015

% of people who believe the ABC provides quality programming

Television 80 81 78 78 78

Radio 62 65 63 62 61

Online (among ABC Online users) 86 88 91 89 90

% of people who believe the ABC is accurate and impartial when reporting news and current affairs 74 75 74 77 77

Providing a valuable service: 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015

% of people who value the ABC and its services to the community 82 83 83 86 84

Meeting the ABC’s Charter obligations 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015

% of people who regard the ABC to be distinctively Australian and contributing to Australia’s national identity 79 80 78 81 82

% of people who believe the ABC reflects the cultural diversity of the Australian community 76 80 78 79 80

% of people who consider the ABC:

• encourages and promotes Australian performing arts such as music and drama 77 78 76 77 77

• provides programs of an educational nature 80 82 82 82 84

• achieves a good balance between programs of wide appeal and specialised interest 76 77 75 80 82

% of people who perceive the ABC to be innovative 72 72 69 73 74

Providing an efficient service: 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015

% of people who believe the ABC is efficient and well managed 66 68 65 69 69

2015-2016 Source: Based on those aged 14 years and over who ever visit the website. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016 (n=1,500).

2017-2019 Source: ABC Corporate Tracking Program 2016-17 (n=2,546), 2017-18 (n=4,564), 2018-19 (n=4,583), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights.

Measures of community satisfaction

Anna Cooke (Maudie), Jamil Smyth-Secka (Kyle), Aston Droomer (Ezra) and Abby Bergman (Ava) in The Inbestigators. Image: Amelia Stanwix.

ABC Audiences 67

Overall value of the ABC

ABC Radio: quality of programming

ABC Online: quality of content

2016 Source: Based on those aged 14 years and over. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016 (n=1,500).

2017-2019 Source: ABC Corporate Tracking Program 2016-17 (n=2,546), 2017-18 (n=4,564), 2018-19 (n=4,583), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights.

2015-2016 Source: Based on those aged 14 years and over who ever listen to radio. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

2017-2019 Source: ABC Corporate Tracking Program, 2016-17 (n=2,546), 2017-18 (n=4,564), 2018-19 (n=4,583), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights.

2015-2016 Source: Based on those aged 14 years and over who ever visit the website. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Source: Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016 (n=1,500).

2017-2019 Source: ABC Corporate Tracking Program 2016-17 (n=2,546), 2017-18 (n=4,564), 2018-19 (n=4,583), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights.

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

82

36

83

37

83

37

86

49

84

47

Total Valuable Very Valuable

2015 2016 2018 2019 2017 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100% Total Good

2015 2016 2018 2019 2017

Very Good

89

40

91

40

89

35

88

36

86

36

-60%

-40%

-20%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

62

22

13

4

63

20

9

2

62

21

13

3

65

21

11

2

51

12

33

13

50

13

33

13

65

14

25

8

63

16

20

6

2015 2016 2018 2019 2017

ABC Radio Commercial Radio

2015 2016 2018 2019 2017

Total Good Very Good Total Poor Very Poor

62

19

11

2

59

15

19

5

68 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Television: quality of programming

2015-2016 Source: Based on those aged 14 years and over who ever watch television. Does not include ‘Don’t Know’ or ‘Poor’ responses. Newspoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2015; OmniPoll, ABC Appreciation Survey 2016.

2017-2019 Source: ABC Corporate Tracking Program, 2017 (n=2,546), 2018 (n=4,564), 2019 (n=4,583), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years.

-60%

-40%

-20%

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

78

24

11

4

78

24

10

2

81

24

13

2

81

26

12

3

40

6

52

19

42

6

52

19

67

15

28

6

70

18

25

5

2015 2016 2018 2019 2017

ABC Television Commercial Television

2015 2016 2018 2019 2017

Total Good Very Good Total Poor Very Poor

80

26

13

3

69

19

25

6

ABC current affairs on local radio: overall quality

Source: ABC Quality and Distinctiveness Study. Base sizes: ABC Local Radio listeners, who listened to AM (n=3,951), The World Today (n=3,521), and PM (n=3,042).

Note: People were asked to rate the quality of the current affairs programs on their ABC Local Radio station.

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

AM

(Mon-Fri 8am - 8.30 am)

PM

(Mon-Fri 6.30pm - 7pm)

The World Today (Mon-Fri midday - 12.30 pm)

Excellent Good Average Poor Very Poor

60%

30%

8% 2%

1%

60%

32%

1%

6% 1%

57%

32%

1%

8% 2%

ABC Audiences 69

ABC news and current affairs: belief that programming is high quality ‘[Program] is high quality’ Strongly Agree % + Agree %

Source: ABC Quality and Distinctiveness Study.

Base sizes:

ABC TV NewsCaff Australian Story

Four Corners

Foreign Correspondent Insiders 7:30

ABC News 7PM

NEWS Breakfast The Drum Q&A

12,631 904 1,487 682 1,515 1,828 2,475 1,228 1,435 1,077

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

ABC News Caff TV

89%

Australian Story

95%

Four Corners

94%

Foreign

Correspondent

94%

Insiders

91%

7:30

88%

ABC News 7PM

88%

NEWS Breakfast

85%

The Drum

84%

Q&A

82%

ABC news and current affairs: belief that coverage is accurate and impartial* ‘The information presented in the [Program] was accurate and impartial’ Strongly Agree % + Agree %

* Wording for this question was changed slightly in 2018 from ‘fair and balanced’ to ‘accurate and impartial ’ based on recommendations from the Editorial Director and to better reflect the ABC’s editorial standard.

Source: ABC Quality and Distinctiveness Study.

Base sizes:

ABC TV NewsCaff

Foreign Correspondent Four Corners

Australian Story

ABC News 7PM 7:30 Insiders

NEWS Breakfast The Drum Q&A

12,631 682 1,487 904 2,475 1,828 1,515 1,228 1,435 1,077

0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

ABC TV NewsCaff

82%

Foreign

Correspondent

89%

Four Corners

89%

Australian Story

87%

ABC News 7PM

85%

7:30

84%

Insiders

83%

NEWS Breakfast

82%

The Drum

71%

Q&A

65%

70 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Combined reach The ABC’s combined national audience reach across television, radio and online was estimated to be 68.3% over a period of a week in 2019, a decrease of 1.9 percentage points compared to the ABC’s net reach in 2018 (70.2%).2 This change reflects the continuing decline in the reach of broadcast television.

Radio

Total ABC Radio Average weekly reach in the five-city metropolitan markets for ABC Radio (including DAB+) was 4.92 million people aged 10+ in 2018-19, up 128,000 listeners on the 2017-18 result. Audience share was up 0.4 share points on 2017-18 to 23.1%.3 62% of Australians believe the quality of programming on ABC Radio is ‘Very Good’ or ‘Good’.4

DAB+ ABC’s DAB+ stations include Double J, ABC Jazz, triple j Unearthed, ABC Grandstand, ABC Country and ABC KIDS listen. Average weekly reach in the five-city metropolitan markets for ABC DAB+ stations was 764,000 in 2018-19, up 12% from 2017-18. Audience share of total listening was 1.6%, slightly up from 1.4% in 2017-18. 5

Local Radio ABC Local Radio’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 1.92 million, down 1.8% from 1.95 million in 2017-18. Audience share was 8.3%, down 0.4 points on 2017-18 (8.7%).6 There were

58 million unique podcast downloads of ABC Local Capital Cities content in 2018-19, up 23% compared to 2017-18.7

triple j ABC’s national youth network triple j recorded increases in broadcast audiences in 2018-19. Five-city metropolitan average weekly reach among people aged 10 and over was 1.9 million in 2018-19, up from 1.82 million in 2017-18. Audience share was 6.3%, up 0.3 points from 6.0% in 2017-18.8 triple j recorded a total of 20 million unique podcast downloads in 2018-19, up 23% from 2017-18.9

RN RN’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 645,000 in 2018-19, up 5.6% on the 2017-18 result of 611,000. Audience share increased slightly to 2.6% in 2018-19, compared with 2.4% in 2017-18.10 RN recorded a total of 75 million unique podcast downloads in 2018-19, up 11% compared to 2017-18.11

ABC Classic ABC Classic’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 744,000 in 2018-19, up from 736,000 in 2017-18. Audience share was steady in 2018-19 at 2.9%, compared with 2.8% in 2017-18.12

ABC NEWS on Radio ABC NEWS’s five-city metropolitan average weekly reach was 718,000 in 2018-19, up 4.1% from 690,000 in 2017-18. Audience share remained relatively steady at 1.5%.13 There were 26 million unique downloads of ABC NEWS podcasts in 2018-19, down 7% compared to 2017-18.14

Reach and share

2 ABC Corporate Tracking Program (n=4,564), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights. 3 GfK, people aged 10+, five-city metropolitan data, 5.30am-midnight. 4 ABC Corporate Tracking Program (n=4,583), online methodology, people aged 18-75 years. ABC Audience Data & Insights. ‘Total Good’ includes ‘Good’ and ‘Very Good’ responses.

5 GfK. Share of total listening. 6 GfK.

7 ABC Podsights (powered by ABC Audience Data & Insights).

8 GfK.

9 ABC Podsights (powered by ABC Audience Data & Insights).

10 GfK.

11 ABC Podsights (powered by ABC Audience Data & Insights).

12 GfK.

13 GfK

14 ABC Podsights (powered by ABC Audience Data & Insights).

ABC Audiences 71

News and current affairs on radio News and current affairs programs on Local Radio and RN reached on average 1.6 million people aged 10 and over in the five-city metropolitan market each week in 2018-19. This was down 3% on 2017-18. 15

15 GfK from Survey 5 2018 - Survey 4 2019. Includes Local Radio programs Early AM (Mon-Fri 6am-6.15am), 7am News (Mon-Sun 7am-7.15am), 7.45am News (Mon-Sun 7.45am-8am), AM (Mon-Sat 8am-8.30am), The World Today (Mon-Fri 12pm-12:30pm) and PM (Mon-Fri 6.30-7pm), and RN programs AM (Mon-Sat 7am-7.30am), The World Today (Mon-Fri 1pm-1.30pm), and PM (Mon-Fri 5pm-5.30pm).

16 Google Analytics.

ABC Radio: average weekly reach (five-city metropolitan market)

ABC Radio: aggregate audience share (five-city metropolitan market)

Source: GfK, Monday-Sunday 5.30am-midnight.

Source: GfK, Monday-Sunday 5.30am-midnight.

^ GfK began reporting DAB+ from Survey 1, 2017. This report only includes DAB+ from 2017-18 onwards.

0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5

Local Radio

RN

triple j

ABC Classic

ABC NEWS on radio

Millions

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19

0 5 10 15 20 25 30

Sydney

Melbourne

Brisbane

Adelaide

Perth

Five-city metro

%

2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18^ 2018-19

72 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Radio websites and apps: unique audience

Source: Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years.

Includes ABC Radio websites, ABC listen app, ABC KIDS listen app and the triple j app.

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

Jul 18 Aug 18 Sep 18 Oct 18 Nov 18 Dec 18 Jan 19 Feb 19 Mar 19 Apr 19 May 19 Jun 19

ABC listen The ABC listen app launched in September 2017 replacing the existing Radio app. The listen app provides access to both live ABC radio streams and ABC podcasts. There were 456,000 monthly active users of the app in 2018-19.16

Podcasts The ABC recorded a total of 201 million unique downloads of podcasts in 2018-19. This was a monthly average of 16.7 million unique downloads, up 15% compared to 2017-18.17

In 2018-19, ABC Audio Studios (see page 34) recorded a total of 13.6 million unique digital-first downloads, or a monthly average of 1.1 million downloads, up 69% on 2017-18 figures. The Audio Studios team produced some of the top ranked podcast programs in Australia, based on average downloads per episode.18

Top ranked digital-first podcasts in 2018-19 covered a variety of genres and included true crime podcast Unravel, women’s health, sexuality and relationship podcast Ladies, We Need To Talk, consumer finance podcast The Pineapple Project, news and current affairs investigative podcasts Russia If You’re Listening and daily podcast The Signal, ethics podcast for families Short & Curly and political podcast The Party Room.

Conversations with Richard Fidler and Sarah Kanowski consistently records the largest volume of unique downloads across ABC podcasts and was named Australia’s most downloaded podcast by Apple in 2018.

17 ABC Podsights (powered by ABC Audience Data & Insights). 18 ABC Audio Studios do not produce all of the ABC’s podcasts.

ABC Audiences 73

Television Shifts in the media landscape over the past few years continued to affect television audiences in 2018-19, with Australians now able to access an unprecedented range of content on a multitude of screens and devices. In 2019, each Australian home has an average of 17 devices, up 25% since 2017, with the majority being internet capable.19

Despite year-on-year declines, broadcast television remains a popular choice for viewing, with a reach of 19.4 million Australians each week in 2018-19.20 However, over the past year, there has been increased competition in the viewing landscape with the rise in popularity of Subscription Video on Demand (SVOD) services. Australians have embraced the flexibility and choice that the SVOD services provide, to the detriment of traditional broadcast viewing. Video on Demand (VOD) viewing as a whole was recorded at its highest ever in June 2018,21 with total VPM minutes for 2018-19 up 50% year-on-year.22

Television methodology As viewing patterns change, the lifespan of content is now being extended well beyond the initial television broadcast schedule. The way in which content is measured has also evolved. ‘Long Tail’ viewing measurement is now captured by 28-day time-shift TV ratings and Video Player Measurement (VPM) captures on-demand viewing. OzTAM VPM Data captures minute-by-minute viewing of online video across the five free-to-air broadcasters and Foxtel’s online video players. This methodology provides an ‘average audience’ figure for each program or episode, which can then be added to the TV broadcast figure, in order to reflect a more complete audience measure.

Total ABC TV Total TV reach was slightly down in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18, with free-to-air and subscription television viewing also showing declines in overall reach.23 The popularity of VOD services continued to contribute to the fragmentation of viewing, as emerging platforms and technologies alter consumer behaviour and offer alternatives to traditional scheduled viewing.

Metropolitan Total ABC metropolitan average weekly reach in 2018-19 was 8.1 million people or 47.0% of the five-city metropolitan population. This is down compared to 2017-18 (8.5 million, or 49.7%).24

Total ABC metropolitan Total TV share during daytime increased slightly in 2018-19. Across the four channels, ABC television achieved a metropolitan daytime Total TV share of 18.3%, up from 18.0% in 2017-18.25 Similarly, Total ABC Metropolitan share during prime time was also up: Total TV share for Total ABC across the five metropolitan cities was 13.8% in 2018-19, (13.6% in 2017-18).26

Regional In the combined aggregated regional markets including Tasmania, Total ABC average weekly reach in 2018-19 was 3.7 million people or 51.2% of the regional population. This is down compared to 2017-18 (3.9 million or 54.2%).27

In 2018-19, Total ABC regional Total TV share during daytime increased to 19.6%, up from 19.0% in 2017-18. Total ABC regional share during prime time was 14.8% in 2018-19 (14.4% in 2017-18).28

19 Telsyte Australian Digital Consumer Study 2019.

20 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

21 OzTAM VPM, June 2018.

22 OzTAM VPM, 2017-18, 2018-19.

23 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

24 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19 (Total ABC includes ABC, ABC COMEDY, ABC ME and ABC NEWS); 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

25 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

26 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

74 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

27 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (includes spill).

28 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19 (including spill).

Average weekly metropolitan reach Total ABC, 24-hour, five-minute consecutive viewing

Metropolitan prime-time share Total ABC, Total TV share of viewing %, 6pm-midnight

Source: OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 28 Data.

Source: OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 28 Data.

Source: OzTAM Metropolitan Consolidated 28 Data.

Regional daytime share Total ABC, Total TV share of viewing %, 6am-6pm

Source: OzTAM Regional Consolidated 28 Data.

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

2017-18 2018-19

Combined Agg. Mkts

Tasmania

Victoria

Southern NSW

Northern NSW

Queensland

Regional prime-time share Total ABC, Total TV share of viewing %, 6pm-midnight

Source: OzTAM Regional Consolidated 28 Data.

0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18%

2017-18 2018-19

Combined Agg. Mkts

Tasmania

Victoria

Southern NSW

Northern NSW

Queensland

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%

2017-18 2018-19

Five-city metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18%

2017-18 2018-19

Five-city metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%

2017-18 2018-19

Five-city metro

Perth

Adelaide

Brisbane

Melbourne

Sydney

Average weekly regional reach Total ABC, 24-hour, five-minute consecutive viewing

Source: OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data.

0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%

2017-18 2018-19

Combined Agg. Mkts

Tasmania

Queensland

Victoria

Northern NSW

Southern NSW

Metropolitan daytime share Total ABC, Total TV share of viewing %, 6am-6pm

ABC Audiences 75

In 2018, ABC TV’s coverage of the New Year’s Eve: Midnight Fireworks achieved a combined metropolitan and regional average audience of 1.8 million and was the top peak program based on TV broadcast data only. Across the evening, ABC TV’s coverage reached 3.8 million viewers across ABC, ABC ME and ABC NEWS, up slightly on 2017-18 (3.7 million).36

Top programs by peak audience: ABC main channel 17 of the top 20 ABC programs were Australian

# Program

Ave

Audience

1 NEW YEAR’S EVE 2018: MIDNIGHT FIREWORKS

1,841,000

2 SPICKS AND SPECKS REUNION SPECIAL

1,658,000

3 JACK IRISH 1,351,000

4 VERA 1,274,000

5 DEATH IN PARADISE 1,259,000

6 AUSTRALIA VOTES: ELECTION RESULTS LIVE

1,245,000

7 AUSTRALIAN STORY 1,205,000

8 FOUR CORNERS 1,199,000

9 ABC NEWS 1,196,000

10 BACK ROADS 1,196,000

11 RAKE 1,179,000

12 HARD QUIZ 1,169,000

13 ANH’S BRUSH WITH FAME 1,150,000

14 SHAUN MICALLEF’S MAD AS HELL 1,132,000

15 MEDIA WATCH 1,124,000

16 WAR ON WASTE 1,105,000

17 GRUEN 1,099,000

18 ENDEAVOUR 1,098,000

19 MYSTERY ROAD 1,070,000

20 THE WEEKLY WITH CHARLIE PICKERING

1,060,000

Source: OzTAM & Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19; duplicate episodes have been removed.

* Note: Highlighted programs are Australian content.

ABC main channel

Metropolitan ABC’s average weekly metropolitan reach in 2018-19 was 5.6 million people or 32.2% of the five-city metropolitan population. This represents a decrease from 5.8 million people or 33.6% of the five-city metropolitan population, in 2017-18.29

In 2018-19, ABC’s metropolitan daytime Total TV share was at 6.4%, which was an increase on 2017-18 (5.9%). ABC’s metropolitan share during prime time was up slightly at 9.8% in 2018-19 (9.7% in 2017-18).30

Regional ABC’s average weekly regional reach in 2018-19 was 2.6 million people or 35.7% of the regional population. This is a slight decrease compared to the 2017-18 average weekly regional reach of 2.7 million people or 37.3% of the regional population.31

In 2018-19 ABC’s regional daytime Total TV share was 7.3%, which increased on the 2017-18 result of 6.8%. ABC’s prime-time share in 2018-19 was 10.0% (9.9% in 2017-18).32

ABC main channel highlights The Spicks and Specks Reunion Special was the top program in 2018-19, with a combined metropolitan, regional and iview VPM average audience of 2.6 million.33 The new Australian drama The Cry had strong cross-platform engagement with a combined average audience of 1.7 million viewers.34

Series 4 of Hard Quiz ranked among the top programs in 2019, with a complete audience of 1.4 million across combined metropolitan, regional and iview.35

29 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

30 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

31 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (includes spill).

32 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19 (including spill).

33 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Ranked on series. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM. 34 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM. 35 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data; OzTAM VPM. Includes first run, encores and iview VPM. 36 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data. 31 December 2018 v 31 December 2017. Reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing. Ranked number

one based on peak episode, combined metropolitan and regional data (excluding VPM).

76 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC COMEDY In December 2017, ABC2 was changed to ABC COMEDY, with broadcast hours on the channel amended to commence at 7.30pm. As a result, reach and share figures below reflect the new timeslot and will not match figures published in the previous report.

Metropolitan In 2018-19, ABC COMEDY’s average weekly metropolitan reach was 1.7 million people, or 9.7% of the five-city metropolitan population. (1.9 million; 10.8% in 2017-18).37 ABC COMEDY’s 7.30pm-midnight metropolitan Total TV share remained steady at 1.7% in 2018-19.38

Regional In 2018-19, ABC COMEDY’s average weekly regional reach was 847,000, or 11.6% of the regional population. This is a decrease compared to the 2017-18 average weekly regional reach of 931,000 people, or 12.9% of the regional population.39 ABC COMEDY’s 7.30pm-midnight regional Total TV share was stable in 2018-19 at 2.1%.40

ABC COMEDY highlights ABC COMEDY continued to deliver a broad range of domestic and international comedic content to Australian audiences in 2018-19. Highlights on ABC COMEDY included the Melbourne Comedy Festival, the Spicks and Specks Reunion Special, Whovians and live comedy specials.

Top programs by peak audience: ABC COMEDY 8 of the top 15 ABC COMEDY programs were Australian

# Program

Ave

Audience

1 SPICKS AND SPECKS 237,000

2 WOULD I LIE TO YOU? 232,000

3 SPICKS AND SPECKS REUNION SPECIAL

219,000

4 WHOVIANS 193,000

5 LIVE AT THE APOLLO 180,000

6 HARD QUIZ 180,000

7 PENN AND TELLER: FOOL US 179,000

8 GRUEN XL 177,000

9 KITTY FLANAGAN: CHARMING AND ALARMING 172,000

10 THE IT CROWD 171,000

11 MICHAEL MCINTYRE’S COMEDY ROADSHOW

168,000

12 UPPER MIDDLE BOGAN 168,000

13 ADAM HILLS: THE LAST LEG 163,000

14 SHAUN MICALLEF’S MAD AS HELL 162,000

15 QI 162,000

Source: OzTAM & Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19.

* Note: Highlighted programs are Australian content.

37 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 7.30pm-midnight. Reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

38 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 7.30pm-midnight.

39 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 7.30pm-midnight. Reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (including spill).

40 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 7.30pm-midnight (including spill).

Hard Quiz with Tom Gleeson.

ABC Audiences 77

ABC KIDS In December 2017, ABC KIDS extended its broadcast hours to 7.30pm daily. Data published below reflects the new timeslot and will not match figures published in previous report.

Metropolitan In 2018-19, ABC KIDS was once again the destination of choice for Australian preschoolers and their parents, and was the highest ranked channel during the day among children aged 0-4. In 2018-19, ABC KIDS’ average weekly metropolitan reach among this group was 676,000 or 60.3% of children aged 0-4, a small decrease on the 2017-18 result of 692,000 (62.0%).41

In 2018-19, ABC KIDS 5am-7.30pm metropolitan Total TV share among 0-4s was 51.0%, up from 49.0% in 2017-18.42

Regional In 2018-19, ABC KIDS average weekly regional reach among children aged 0-4 was 266,000 or 60.5% of children in that age group (276,000 or 62.4% in 2017-18).43 ABC KIDS regional daytime Total TV share among children 0-4 was 52.6% in 2018-19, up from 46.9% in 2017-18.44

ABC KIDS highlights The Australian children’s animated series Bluey has been a cross-platform success in 2018-19, breaking records to become the No. 1 program in the history of iview measurement.45 Bluey was also the top ranked program on ABC KIDS in 2018-19 (for more on Bluey, see page 25). Stick Man, Zog and Peppa Pig were among other high-ranking programs on ABC KIDS.46

ABC ME

Metropolitan In 2018-19, ABC ME was the second-highest ranked channel during the day among children aged 5-12, behind ABC KIDS.47

ABC ME’s average weekly metropolitan reach among children aged 5-12 was 454,000 or 26.4%. This result is down on 2017-18 (522,000, or 31.0%).48 Among children 5-12, ABC ME achieved a 2018-19 metropolitan Total TV daytime share of 17.1% (17.4% in 2017-18). In the competitive evening prime-time landscape, ABC ME’s metropolitan 6pm-9pm share among this group increased to 7.8% in 2018-19, up from 6.9% in 2017-18.49

Regional In 2018-19, ABC ME’s average weekly regional reach among children aged 5-12 was 231,000 or 31.0%. This is down compared to 2017-18 (274,000 or 37.0%). 50 ABC ME’s regional daytime Total TV share among this age group was 20.8%, down on 2017-18 (21.9%). ABC ME’s share among children 5-12 during the 6pm-9pm timeslot was 11.1% in 2018-19, up on the 2017-18 result of 9.2%. 51

ABC ME highlights Doctor Who was the top program on ABC ME in 2018-19. Top ranked ABC ME programs also included the new Australian series The Little Things and Inbestigators. Other Australian highlights included the New Year’s Eve 2018: Family Fireworks and New Year’s Eve 2018: The Early Night Show Family Spectacular.52

41 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 5am-7.30pm daily. Reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

42 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 5am-7.30pm daily.

43 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 5am-7.30pm daily (including spill). Reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

44 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 5am-7.30pm daily (including spill). 45 OzTAM VPM.

46 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data, 2018-19.

47 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 6am-6pm.

48 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19. 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

49 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

50 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (including spill).

51 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19 (including spill).

52 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19.

78 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Online viewing

Change in online methodology In order to better capture audiences in the constantly changing digital landscape, Nielsen transitioned from its panel-based Digital Ratings Monthly (DRM, also known as Nielsen Digital Panel) to the new industry currency measure Digital Content Ratings (DCR) in mid-2018. Using a tagging-based methodology, DCR can provide a view of a brand’s audiences across its own websites and apps as well as off-platform via Facebook Instant Articles and Google Accelerated Mobile Pages. This provides a broader footprint of mobile audiences than was possible with panel-based DRM.

ABC iview There were 3.2 million Australians using iview each month in 2018-19,53 generating an average of 70 million monthly program plays - a 22% increase on the 2017-18 monthly average of 57 million.54

ABC ME app and on iview The ABC ME app was downloaded 312,000 times in 2018-19 55 and ABC ME programs had 6.1 million monthly plays across all platforms.56 This is a 32% decline in plays compared with 2017-18, although it should be noted that the Summer Best Fest drove a strong spike in plays for ABC ME in January 2018. Newly released series of popular programs The Next Step and Mustangs FC were available exclusively on iview during that time, while perennial favourite Little Lunch also performed strongly. ABC ME activity is also being impacted by increasing competition from subscription VOD providers and the growing popularity of YouTube among younger age groups.

ABC ME activity peaks during school holidays with plays in this reporting period peaking in January 2019 at 9.4 million. The top ABC ME program in 2018-19 was Miraculous: Tales of Ladybug and Cat Noir Series 2, which had a VPM average audience of 91,000. Several Australian productions were among the top ABC ME programs, including Little Lunch, Hardball and The Deep.57

ABC KIDS app and on iview ABC KIDS on iview continues to go from strength to strength, with program plays increasing by 30% year-on-year, from 40 million in 2017-18 to 52 million per month in 2018-19. KIDS iview was used on more than a million unique devices in June 2019 - its highest result on record. 58 The ABC KIDS iview app was downloaded 591,000 times in 2018-19.

Queensland-produced animated series Bluey debuted in October 2018 and rapidly became the most popular kids program on iview, ending the 2018-19 year with a VPM average audience of 1.5 million, recording more than 100 million plays. The previous year’s top program Peppa Pig remained popular, while PJ Masks: Songs was also among the top series on ABC KIDS iview.59

Non-kids iview Average monthly program plays of non-kids iview content increased 34% in 2018-19, to 11 million.60

Drama remains the top non-kids genre on iview with Australian productions featuring among the most popular. Four-part BBC co-production The Cry, available for binge viewing from February 2019, recorded a VPM average audience of 365,000 per episode. The Letdown Series 2 was among the top programs with an average audience of 156,000 for each of the six episodes61.

53 Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years. October 2018 - June 2019 (data prior to October 2018 did not include the iview main app). Excludes connected TVs (Smart TVs).

54 OzTAM VPM, April 2018 - June 2019; Webtrends, July 2017 - March 2018.

55 appfigures.

56 OzTAM VPM.

57 OzTAM VPM.

58 Google Analytics.

59 OzTAM VPM.

60 OzTAM VPM.

61 OzTAM VPM.

ABC Audiences 79

BBC America’s Killing Eve grew in popularity with the release of Series 2 in April 2019. Series 1 was the top non-kids program in 2018-19 with a VPM average audience of 402,000, while Series 2 had a VPM average audience of 337,000. This was well above the average of 161,000 for Series 1 in 2017-18.62

In 2018-19 there were 1.3 million monthly live streams of ABC channels in iview, up 85% on 2017-18. ABC NEWS accounted for 53% of live streams, achieving a record high during the 2019 federal election on 18 May, and experiencing strong live stream engagement during other major breaking news events such as the Christchurch mosque attack in March 2019.63

62 OzTAM VPM.

63 OZTAM VPM.

ABC iview: Top non-kids series Ranked on VPM

# Series

Plays

(Begin Event) VPM

1 KILLING EVE S1 4,794,000 402,000

2 THE CRY S1 2,418,000 365,000

3 KILLING EVE S2 4,030,000 337,000

4 MRS WILSON S1 942,000 209,000

5 EXPOSED: THE CASE OF KELI LANE S1 899,000 184,000

6 DOCTOR WHO S11 2,563,000 169,000

7 THE LETDOWN S2 1,359,000 156,000

8 JACK IRISH S2 1,438,000 147,000

9 YOU CAN’T ASK THAT S3

1,566,000 134,000

10 THE SPLIT S1 1,209,000 129,000

Source: OzTAM Begin Event Data; OzTAM VPM.

Highlighted programs are Australian content.

ABC iview: Top ABC KIDS series Ranked on VPM

# Series

Plays

(Begin Event) VPM

1 BLUEY S1 100,908,000 1,508,000

2 PJ MASKS: SONGS S1 6,279,000 591,000

3 ZOG 967,000 454,000

4 PEPPA PIG S6 13,453,000 408,000

5 ROOM ON THE BROOM 902,000 393,000

6 TEENY TINY STEVIES S1

4,179,000 389,000

7 PEPPA PIG S4 10,996,000 350,000

8 PEPPA PIG S7 23,271,000 344,000

9 STICK MAN 611,000 293,000

10 PEPPA PIG: AROUND THE WORLD WITH PEPPA

476,000 291,000

Source: OzTAM Begin Event Data; OzTAM VPM.

Highlighted programs are Australian content.

ABC iview: Top ABC ME series Ranked on VPM

# Series

Plays

(Begin Event) VPM

1 MIRACULOUS: TALES OF LADYBUG AND CAT NOIR S2

3,925,000 91,000

2 LITTLE LUNCH SPECIALS S1

284,000 81,000

3 LITTLE LUNCH S1 2,819,000 76,000

4 LITTLE LUNCH CAST INTERVIEWS S1 291,000 49,000

5 THE NEXT STEP S6 1,977,000 46,000

6 HARDBALL S1 921,000 44,000

7 100 THINGS TO DO BEFORE HIGH SCHOOL S1

1,687,000 39,000

8 THE DEEP S3 785,000 39,000

9 SCHOOL OF ROCK S2 857,000 39,000

10 SCHOOL OF ROCK S1 795,000 36,000

Source: OzTAM Begin Event Data; OzTAM VPM.

Highlighted programs are Australian content.

80 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

News and current affairs In 2018-19, ABC news and current affairs online reached an average 8.6 million Australian users each month, 35% of the active online Australian population.64 Due to a change in methodology used by digital market currency provider Nielsen (see page 79), comparison cannot be made with previous years, as the differences would reflect the change in methodology as well as behaviour change.

Six million Australians accessed ABC news and current affairs online in 2018-19 via their smartphone, making it by far the most popular access point for this content, while 2.8 million monthly users were on desktop and 1.1 million used a tablet.

News and current affairs on television

ABC news and current affairs programs In 2018-19, retaining television audiences in a shifting environment remained a challenge. However, several key ABC current affairs programs managed to grow their audience year on year.

News Breakfast and 7.30 both experienced a 3% increase in audience compared to 2017-18, Australian Story had a 2% audience increase and Insiders gained 13%. 7.30 achieved a combined average audience of 831,000 on ABC in 2018-1965 with its September 2018 episode detailing investigations into ‘fraud’ honey achieving a combined average audience of 1.1 million, the highest for the program over the period.66 Australian Story achieved a combined average audience of 999,000 in 2018-19. Its peak combined average audience was 1.2 million for the episode ‘A World of Their Own’ which profiled Australian music trailblazers, The Seekers.

Insiders achieved a combined average audience of 596,000 in 2018-19 across the ABC and ABC NEWS simulcast, an increase of 13% on 2017-18. The post-election special broadcast on Sunday 19 May 2019 achieved a combined average audience of 868,000, the highest average audience for the program in 2018-19.67

News Breakfast is simulcast each weekday on ABC and ABC NEWS. In 2018-19 the program achieved a combined average audience of 247,000 across ABC and ABC NEWS, an increase of 3% on 2017-18.68

The year also saw some audience declines. Combined metropolitan and regional average audience for the ABC’s 7pm News weeknight bulletin was 955,000 in 2018-19, down 2% compared to 2017-18, with the Saturday bulletin down 8% at 938,000 and the Sunday bulletin down 4% at 976,000. Foreign Correspondent, Four Corners, and Q&A also experienced audience declines of between 3% and 9% compared to 2017-18 figures.

Foreign Correspondent achieved a combined average audience of 649,000 on ABC in 2018-19, a decline of 9% year on year.69 The episode ‘To Burn or Not to Burn?’, addressing Australia’s waste crisis, achieved the highest combined average audience of the year for the program at 792,000.70 Four Corners achieved a combined average audience of 857,000 on ABC in 2018-19, a decrease of 7% on 2017-18.71 The episode ‘Guilty: The Conviction of Cardinal Pell’, achieved a combined average audience of 1.2 million, the highest average audience for the program in 2018-19.72

Q&A achieved a combined average audience of 581,000 on ABC in 2018-19, a decrease of 3% on 2017-18.73 The episode ‘Chaos, Crocs and Coal Mining’ attracted its highest combined average audience for the year, at 786,000.74

64 Nielsen DCR, Monthly Tagged, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years.

65 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

66 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19.

67 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19.

68 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

69 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

70 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19.

71 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

72 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19.

73 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

74 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2018-19; excludes Malcolm Turnbull episode that aired on Thursday 18 November 2018.

ABC Audiences 81

ABC NEWS channel In 2018-19, ABC NEWS maintained its position as Australia’s leading 24-hour news channel. The year saw strong audiences around the federal election, state elections and breaking news events.

ABC NEWS reached 2.1 million metropolitan and regional viewers over 24 hours on 18 May 2019 for the Federal Election and 1.8 million metropolitan and regional viewers the following day. The Wentworth by-election on 20 October 2018 (1.8 million combined metropolitan and regional), and the New South Wales Election on 23 March 2019 (1.8 million combined metropolitan and regional) were also highlights. The Christchurch Terror Attack on 15 March 2019 reached 1.7 million combined metropolitan and regional viewers.75

Metropolitan audiences In 2018-19, ABC NEWS channel achieved a metropolitan average weekly reach of 2.2 million, down 1% on 2017-18. This equates to a weekly reach of 12.5% of the 5-city metropolitan population.76 The channel achieved a metropolitan daytime Total TV share of 3.2% in 2018-19, up from 2.9% in 2017-18. Its metropolitan prime-time Total TV share was 1.2% in 2018-19, slightly up on 2017-18 (1.1%).77

Regional ABC NEWS channel achieved a regional average weekly reach of 1.1 million in 2018-19, down 2% on 2017-18. This equates to a weekly reach of 15.2% of the regional population.78 Prime-time regional Total TV share was 1.3% in 2018-19, up from 1.1% in 2017-18. Regional daytime Total TV share was 4% in 2018-19, up compared to 3.6% in 2017-18.79

Online streams ABC News is streamed live via the ABC NEWS website, ABC iview, the ABC NEWS app

and YouTube. ABC News live stream plays via ABC iview were up 59% to a monthly average of 710,000 in 2018-19.80 Plays of the ABC News live stream via the ABC NEWS website were at a monthly average of 179,000 and on the app at 58,000 over the reporting period.81 The ABC News live stream recorded 873,000 monthly live streams on YouTube in 2018-19, up 160% on 2017-18.82

Streams of ABC News via iview were at their highest ever on 18 May 2019 with a total of 300,000 plays, driven by the Federal Election. YouTube streams were at their second highest on this day with 441,000 streams.83

ABC Online

Methodology In order to better capture information related to online audiences, digital market currency provider Nielsen transitioned from its panel-based methodology to the current industry measure. For more on this, see ‘Change in online methodology’ on page 79. Due to this change, comparison cannot be made with previous years, as the differences would reflect the change in methodology as well as audience behaviour.

In 2018-19, the average monthly reach of ABC Online in Australia was 11.0 million or 45% of Australians aged 2+.84 Smartphone was the dominant device for accessing ABC Online in 2018-19 with 6.9 million Australians using their smartphones to access ABC Online each month, while 3.6 million monthly ABC users were on desktop and 2.4 million were on tablet.85 On average, there were 10.5 million domestic and international visitors each week to ABC websites and apps in 2018-19, up 10% from the 2017-18 average of 9.5 million. Visitors made an average of 26 million visits each week in 2018-19, up 10% on 2017-18.86

75 OzTAM and Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data, 2018-19.

76 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing.

77 OzTAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19.

78 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19; 24-hour reach based on five-minute consecutive viewing (includes spill).

79 Regional TAM Consolidated 28 Data 2017-18, 2018-19 (includes spill).

80 Webtrends 2017 - 31 March 2018, OzTAM 1 April 2018-19.

81 Google Analytics, October 2018 - June 2019.

82 YouTube Analytics.

83 OzTAM 2018-19, YouTube Analytics 2018-19.

84 Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years.

85 Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years.

82 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Social media ABC continued to achieve growth in audiences on social media. In the case of Instagram and YouTube, ABC growth was boosted by an increase in the number of users of these platforms in 2018-19.87

ABC News had the largest number of followers of any Australian news organisation on Instagram and Twitter, and second largest on Facebook and YouTube.88 Instagram followers were up 69% to 282,000, while Twitter followers increased by 3% to 1.5 million. ABC News had 3.9 million Facebook Page Likes (up 5% on 2017-18), while subscribers to the ABC News YouTube channel showed the strongest growth, up 152% between June 2018 and June 2019 to 653,000.89 Views of ABC News videos on YouTube were up 130%, from 60 million in 2017-18 to 138 million in 2018-19.90

Australia Plus Learn English has the largest number of Facebook Page Likes among ABC properties with 4.8 million, up 6% on 2017-18. YouTube subscribers to ABC Australia were up 12% to 115,000.91

triple j engages large social media audiences with a focus on younger-skewing platforms Instagram and YouTube in 2018-19. Subscribers to the triple j channel on YouTube increased by 40% to 942, 000,92 with video views up 31% to 129 million in 2018-19.93 triple j’s Facebook Page Likes were up 5% to 1.3 million. Followers of the triple j main account on Instagram were up 27% to 644,000 while triple j’s other Instagram accounts also showed strong growth: Unearthed followers increased by 35% to 124,000 and Hack followers were up 62% to 110,000. There was a 2% decline in triple j’s Twitter followers to 532,000 although this remained the second highest account for the ABC after ABC News.94

Top YouTube channels by video Views Channel 2018-19 2017-18 Change

ABC News 138,144,000 60,171,000 130%

triple j 129,368,000 98,946,000 31%

abcqanda 15,571,000 943,000 1551%

ABC TV & iview 14,169,000 17,996,000 -21%

The Weekly 10,940,000 4,116,000 166%

Source: Khoros; YouTube Analytics.

Top Facebook pages by page Likes Page June 2019 June 2018 Change

Learn English 4,789,000 4,500,000 6%

ABC News 3,903,000 3,722,000 5%

Bananas in Pyjamas 2,420,000 2,469,000 -2%

triple j 1,251,000 1,190,000 5%

ABC Science 976,000 921,000 6%

Source: Khoros.

Top Twitter accounts by Followers Account June 2019 June 2018 Change

ABC News 1,524,000 1,476,000 3%

triple j 532,000 542,000 -2%

Q&A 361,000 357,000 1%

ABC Radio Brisbane 282,000 286,000 -1%

ABC Radio Melbourne 195,000 198,000 -2%

Source: Khoros.

Top YouTube channels by Subscribers Channel June 2019 June 2018 Change

triple j 942,000 673,000 40%

ABC News 653,000 259,000 152%

ABC Australia 115,000 103,000 12%

ABC TV & iview 73,000

ABC Science 70,000

Source: Khoros; YouTube Analytics.

Top Instagram accounts by Followers Account June 2019 June 2018 Change

triple j 644,000 507,000 27%

ABC News 282,000 167,000 69%

triple j Unearthed 124,000 92,000 35%

triple j Hack 110,000 68,000 62%

ABC TV + iview 94,000 58,000 62%

Source: Khoros.

86 Google Analytics 2018-19, Webtrends 2017-18.

87 Nielsen Digital Panel.

88 Crowdtangle; YouTube.

89 Khoros.

90 YouTube Analytics.

91 Khoros.

92 Khoros.

93 YouTube Analytics.

94 Khoros.

ABC Audiences 83

ABC Online: monthly unique audience by device (000s)

ABC Online: weekly users and sessions

ABC Online: monthly unique audience (Reach)

Source: Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years.

Source: Google Analytics.

Source: Nielsen DCR, Text, Australia, People aged 2+ years.

0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

6,000

7,000

8,000

Smartphone Desktop Tablet

Aug 18

Oct 18

Dec 18

Apr 19

Feb 19

Jun 19

Jul 18

Sep 18

Nov 18

Mar 19

Jan 19

May 19

6,647

6,763

6,657

6,670

6,742

6,951

6,897

6,807

6,783

7,497

7,362

7,406

Aug 18

Oct 18

Dec 18

Apr 19

Feb 19

Jun 19

Jul 18

Sep 18

Nov 18

Mar 19

Jan 19

May 19

3,937

3,563

2,906

3,557

3,340

3,421

3,559

3,551

3,604

3,838

3,129

4,229

Aug 18

Oct 18

Dec 18

Apr 19

Feb 19

Jun 19

Jul 18

Sep 18

Nov 18

Mar 19

Jan 19

May 19

2,248

2,410

2,308

2,399

2,217

2,307

2,396

2,278

2,334

2,464

2,458

2,498

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

July 2018 June 2019

Users

Sessions (millions)

Users (millions)

Sessions

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

Jan 2019 Feb 2019 Mar 2019 Apr 2019 May 2019 Jun 2019 Jul 2018 Aug 2018 Sept 2018 Oct 2018 Nov 2018 Dec 2018

11.1 10.6 11.8 10.9 11.9 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.3

Unique Reach (Millions) Population Reach %

45.1 44.5 44.8 43.3

45.9 44.3 44.5 44.5 44.8 42.4

48.2 48.4

0

10

20

30

40

50

84 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

abc.net.au There was an average of 425,000 weekly visitors to the ABC homepage in 2018-19, down 14% on the average of 492,000 in 2017-18.95 This reflects an ongoing shift in online behaviour towards content discovery through social media and search with a decline in direct access of brand homepages.

Science and Health portals The ABC Science and ABC Health portals are legacy websites that aggregate content related to these subjects. Both portals are being migrated to CoreMedia, the digital content management system used to create and publish content for many of the ABC’s digital properties, including the ABC News website. For the majority of 2018-19, the two portals remained live at abc.net.au/science and abc.net.au/health while most new stories were published into topical sections of ABC News online at abc.net.au/news/science and abc.net.au/news/health. Some health stories were also published into the new ABC Life site at abc.net.au/life.

ABC Science averaged 265,000 weekly unique users in 2018-19 (this includes the legacy portal and the Science tab on ABC News online). This was up 7% on 2017-18. Stories as diverse as lunar eclipses, vegan diets and psychology were the most popular.96 ABC Science Facebook Page Likes were up 6% to 976,000, while Twitter followers were up 7% to 54,000. On YouTube, the ABC Science and ABC Catalyst channels merged in September 2018, ending the 2018-19 period with 70,000 subscribers.97

ABC Health reported 166,000 weekly unique users in 2018-19 (including the legacy portal and the Health tab on ABC News online). This was down 27% on 2017-18, which was in part due to some health stories being published in ABC Life. The most popular stories concerned processed foods, blood pressure and what happens if you don’t remove a splinter.98

ABC Life The ABC Life website launched in August 2018 as a destination for lifestyle content covering topics including wellbeing, food, money, travel, family and work (for more, see page 45). From launch to the end of June 2019, the website recorded an average of 236,000 weekly visitors and 282,000 weekly visits, with health content proving the most popular.99 On Facebook and Twitter, the ABC Health and Wellbeing accounts were rebranded as ABC Life, while on YouTube, the ABC Australia channel became ABC Life. ABC Life ended the 2018-19 period with 32,000 Facebook Page Likes (up 24% on Health & Wellbeing in June 2018), 26,000 Twitter followers (up 3% on Health & Wellbeing in June 2018), 10,400 YouTube subscribers (up 20% on ABC Australia in June 2018) and 7,900 Instagram followers.100

International audiences

Notes on terminology The term ‘international’ refers to the proportion of audience members who have accessed ABC services from anywhere in the world, outside Australia. The term ‘global’ refers to the total overall audience who have accessed ABC services from anywhere in the world, inclusive of Australia.

Radio streaming In 2018-19 there were 8.6 million online streams (plays) of ABC radio services by international audiences. This equates to 6% of global streams.101

Television In 2018, across nine markets in Asia, there were 422,000 affluent viewers each month of the ABC Australia television service.102 The service is available in 40 markets in the Indo-Pacific.

95 Google Analytics 2018-19, Webtrends 2017-18.

96 Google Analytics 2018-19, Webtrends 2017-18.

97 Khoros.

98 Google Analytics 2018-19, Webtrends 2017-18.

99 Google Analytics.

100 Khoros.

101 Webtrends; Google Analytics.

102 IPSOS Affluent Asia Survey Quarter 1 - Quarter 4, 2018.

ABC Audiences 85

The Sydney New Year’s Eve fireworks highlights were distributed to 32 international broadcasters and reached more than 200 million people in China through playback on national television and social media channels. Further, approximately 381,000 viewers in China watched the Australian Ballet on the Shanghai Media Group network and ABC content featured on Guangdong Television’s ‘Window Week on Australia’ special in late 2018.103

Websites In 2018-19, there were 152.6 million international sessions on ABC websites, equating to 17% of global sessions. Of this, 121.3 million sessions were on ABC NEWS websites.104 The geoblock on the ABC NEWS live stream was lifted in April 2018 and from January to June 2019 there were 192,000 stream starts of the ABC NEWS live stream on the ABC NEWS website from International audiences (17% of global streams).105

Apps Across ABC apps, there were 18.5 million international sessions on ABC apps in 2018-19, equating to 3% of global sessions.106 In 2018-19, there were 50,000 downloads of the ABC NEWS app by international audiences, with 12.5 million sessions on the app over the period,107 and 15,000 downloads of the triple j app.

In-language news The Chinese, Bahasa Indonesian and Tok Pisin news collections have been available on web and app since mid-2018. In 2018-19, there were 2.8 million page-views of all in-language news.108 The in-language news collection is also

syndicated on various Indonesian media partner websites, and in 2018-19 there were 23.5 million page-views of ABC syndicated content on these websites109.

Podcasts In 2018-19, there were 27.4 million podcast downloads by international audiences; 14% of the global total.110

Social media As of June 2019, there were 14.6 million international followers across ABC Facebook accounts (63% of global total), and 375,000 international followers across ABC Instagram accounts (23% of global total).111

Moreover, there were 245.3 million views of ABC YouTube channels from international audiences, equating to 72% of global views,112 with 108.7 million of those views on the ABC News channel (79% of global views). For the ABC News live stream on YouTube, there were 7.3 million views from International audiences (70% of global views).

In addition to posting on ABC branded social channels, the Audience and Content Experts team was active on expatriate social groups and Chinese platforms such as Weibo and WeChat. This enabled the ABC to communicate directly with key audience segments where they are most active. The ABC currently has 16,000 followers on WeChat and 166,000 on Weibo.113

103 Data supplied by Chinese media partner networks.

104 Webtrends; Google Analytics.

105 Google Analytics.

106 Webtrends; Google Analytics.

107 Appfigures; Webtrends; Google Analytics.

108 Webtrends; Google Analytics.

109 Data supplied by syndication partners. 110 ABC Podsights (powered by ABC Audience Data & Insights).

111 Khoros.

112 YouTube Analytics.

113 WeChat Analytics; Weibo Analytics.

86 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Annual Performance Statements 87

News Breakfast’s weather presenter Nate Byrne.

Annual Performance Statements

Reporting period 1 July 2018 - 30 June 2019

Introductory Statement We, the ABC Board, as the accountable authority of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), present the 2018-19 annual performance statements of the ABC, as required under paragraph 39(1) (a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act). In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Purpose The ABC’s purpose is to fulfil its functions as set out in the ABC Act, particularly the ABC Charter.

Pillar 1: Creating distinctive content that matters for all Australians Australian content

The delivery of distinctive Australian content is central to the ABC’s vision to be the source of Australian stories, conversations and culture. In achieving this, we contribute to the Australian identity and reflect our cultural diversity.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Australian content hours (produced) ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Analysis of production hours from Television Production Plan

931 hours 977.4 hours N/A - new

measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target met. The ABC will continue to be the source of Australian conversations, culture and stories through prioritising Australian content.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Australian children’s TV content ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Analysis of hours broadcast from Sydney transmitter

At least 30%

34.39% 34.14%

Analysis:

Target exceeded. The ABC allocates resources to maximise quality children’s output across multiple channels. This is achieved in part via a financing leverage ratio of 1:3 (from third party investment) making the 30% KPI the product of a highly efficient application of resources.

Annual Performance Statements (APS)

88 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Measure

Measure Source Data Source 2018-19 Target 2018-19 Result 2017-18 Result

Australian music on radio

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Analysis of hours based on scheduled programming

Local Radio 30% Local Radio 44.9% Local Radio 45.3%

Classic FM 35% Classic FM 53.1% Classic FM 51.0%

triple j 40% triple j 59.7% triple j 58.0%

Double J 35% Double J 34.2% Double J 35.5%

ABC Jazz 25% ABC Jazz 29.9% ABC Jazz 29.1%

ABC Country 30%

ABC Country 66%

ABC Country 65.8%

Unearthed 100% Unearthed 100% Unearthed 100%

RN 25% RN 54.7% RN 43.8%

Analysis:

Target met or exceeded for all stations excepting Double J, where station programming was impacted by tributes and anniversary events for several significant artists. The ABC will prioritise and continue to promote Australian music and has maintained targets for the 2019-20 financial year. High benchmarks ensure charter obligations are met, Australian music is heard and artists can develop viable careers to continue telling Australian stories and enrich Australian cultural life.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Digital first run Australian content on iview1

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Google Analytics 360

370,000 average monthly plays

230,000 average monthly plays

N/A - new measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target not met. The ABC has experienced a reduction in the pipeline of Australian digital-first programming, specifically commissioned during 2017-2019. High-performing content during 2018-19 has demonstrated an opportunity for original short-form digital content. As video-on-demand becomes increasingly important, exclusive digital first content will become an important trigger for engaging the online audience. Performance results will inform the ABC’s distribution strategy as it engages avenues for digital first Australian content.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Downloads of digital first run Australian content on podcast

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Podsights 1.6 million

average unique monthly downloads

2.6 million average unique monthly downloads

N/A - new measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target exceeded. The ABC expects continued growth for this content distribution stream as more emphasis is placed on producing unique podcast content.

1 Digital first Australian content is defined as content that was commissioned/acquired exclusively for iview and Australian content that had its ABC network premiere on iview (excluding titles acquired for iview binge campaigns that were also aired on linear television, and titles that were offered for binge on iview after first episode linear premiere).

Annual Performance Statements 89

Quality

Audience recognition of the high quality and distinctiveness of ABC programs indicates that the organisation is making content that matters to Australians.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Distinctiveness - Unique market position

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 ABC Quality & Distinctiveness

Surveys

2017-18: (July 2017, October 2017, March 2018)

2018-19: (July 2018, November 2018, March 2019)

80% 81% 79%

Analysis:

Target met. The ABC’s three major content teams achieved the target as follows - News, Analysis & Investigations (80%), Regional & Local (82%) and Entertainment & Specialist (82%).

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target 2018-19 Result

Editorial quality ABC Corporate

Plan 2018-19

Reviews commissioned or conducted by the ABC

Reviews undertaken and reports considered

The ABC’s commitment to high quality content that meets our Charter obligations and editorial standards is an essential part of our obligation to the Australian public.

The ABC has a detailed set of editorial policies, standards and guidelines. The ABC reviews its performance against the editorial framework through a range of mechanisms.

The ABC commissions reviews that are independent of content makers and carried out by a range of internal and external reviewers. Reviews involve an assessment of selected ABC content against a range of criteria, including different aspects of the editorial framework and measures of quality.

In 2018-19, the following editorial reviews were completed and published:

• Review of Analysis and Opinion online (July 2018)

• Review of Live Media Conferences on the ABC NEWS Channel (September 2018)

Two election reports were completed by the ABC Election Coverage Review Committee:

• Victorian Election (November 2018)

• New South Wales Election (March 2019)

The editorial reviews and ABC responses to those reviews are published on the ABC’s corporate website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/ what-guides-us/abc-editorial-standards/editorial-reviews/

Analysis:

Target met. Proper attention to editorial governance is an essential component of the ABC’s commitment to quality editorial content and adherence to the ABC’s Charter and editorial standards. Self-regulation within content teams, embedded editorial advisors, editorial training, and independent reviews are well-established. This multi-tiered approach creates a culture of continuous improvement.

90 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Complaints management

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 ABC Audience and Consumer

Affairs Data

100% within 60 days

99.5% within 60 days

98.5% within 60 days

The ABC’s complaints handling process changed during the year with the restructure of the former Audience and Consumer Affairs unit, which comprised two teams: Investigations and Audience Liaison. For more detail, refer to pages 124 and 147. Complaints management data is presented by team per below.

Audience and Consumer Affairs Results for 2018-19 include data from the former Audience and Consumer Affairs Investigations team for the period 1 July 2018 to 4 September 2018. 2017-18 results relate to data provided under the previous Audience and Consumer Affairs structure with its broader remit.

Written complaints finalised Number % Total Number %

Response required from A&CA Response made within 30 days2 1,994 86.4 2,308 40.7

Response made within 60 days

2,296 99.5

Referred to other areas for direct response 2,179 38.4

No response required 1,188 20.9

TOTAL WRITTEN COMPLAINTS FINALISED 5,675 100

Audience Planning (Non-Editorial Complaints) Results for 2018-19 include data from the former Audience and Consumer Affairs Audience Liaison team for the period 1 July 2018 to 4 September 2018.

Written complaints finalised Number % Total Number %

Response from Audience Planning Response made within 30 days 1,057 85.2 1,241 8.7

Response made within 60 days

1,216 98.0

Referred to other areas for direct response 6,188 43.6

No response required 6,776 47.7

TOTAL WRITTEN COMPLAINTS FINALISED 14,205 100

Analysis:

Target not met. The ABC seeks to achieve its corporate 60-day response target for complaints related to editorial content. The Broadcasting Services Act 1992 permits an audience member to lodge a complaint with the Australian Communications and Media Authority if the ABC has failed to respond to a complaint about a Code of Practice matter within 60 days, or if the audience member is dissatisfied with the ABC’s response. The ABC did not respond to all editorial complaints within the indicated timeline however has improved its response rate performance compared to the prior year.

2 Under the ABC’s Complaint Handling Procedures, A&CA endeavours to respond to complaints within 30 days of receipt.

Annual Performance Statements 91

Trust

The trust with which Australians regard the ABC indicates the standard of its content at a time of declining trust in institutions and in media organisations in particular.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Trusted source ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 ABC Corporate Tracking Program

81% 81% 82%

Analysis:

Target met. The ABC Corporate Tracking Program3 asks respondents to compare their level of trust in information provided by the ABC with other information sources. Trust is a key component of the ABC’s role as the national broadcaster and will continue to be an important performance measure.

Pillar 2: Providing an outstanding audience experience Experience & value

Audience perceptions of their experience engaging with the ABC and the value they place on the public broadcaster indicate how well the ABC is delivering its services and fulfilling its purpose.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

ABC experience ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 ABC Corporate Tracking Program

40% 49% N/A - new

performance measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target exceeded. ABC experience refers to the percentage of Australian adults accessing more than one ABC product or service over a week. There is a direct correlation between the number of touchpoints that a person has with the ABC and their perceptions of value of the ABC. The more touchpoints that the audience member has, the greater the value that they feel the ABC provides to the Australian community.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Overall value3 Program 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19, p75

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

ABC Corporate Tracking Program 84% 82% 82%

Analysis:

Target not met. Value in the ABC has been impacted by declining reach and share across traditional platforms, which have not been entirely offset by digital growth. Value remains a key performance driver for the ABC and will be prioritised as the organisation looks to new ways of reaching all Australians, including through digital platforms.

3 The ABC Corporate Tracking Program is an online survey conducted three times during the year requesting information from a nationally representative sample of people aged 18 to 75. As part of this survey, respondents are asked whether they value the ABC and its services to the community.

92 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Pillar 3: Delivering programs that reach and engage with more people Reach

Reach measures the percentage of Australians who have used ABC services in a given timeframe. This indicates the effectiveness and engagement with ABC programming.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Digital Engagement ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Nielsen Online - average number of

online sessions per month

100 million 121 million N/A - new measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target exceeded. The ABC will continue investing in digital platforms and distribution avenues to drive digital engagement in the environment of declining reach on traditional broadcast platforms.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Audience - Reaching all Australians - Net weekly reach4

Program 1.1, Portfolio Budget Statements 2018-19, p75

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

ABC Corporate Tracking Program 72% 68.3% 70.2%

Analysis:

Target not met. The ABC’s overall reach was impacted by declines in traditional broadcast television viewing. This was partially offset by increases in digital and third-party platform engagement and reach. Reaching and engaging more Australians more frequently is a strategic driver for the ABC and will be continued to be prioritised in future years.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Digital reach (weekly)5

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 ABC Corporate Tracking Program

28% 30% N/A - new

measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target met. Digital reach was driven by improvements in News Digital Services and iview. As Australia’s media consumption shifts from traditional broadcast platforms to digital, the ABC will work to maintain its reach through digital growth.

4 Net weekly reach measures the percentage of Australians who either watched, read or listened to ABC content across broadcast, owned digital and third-party platforms.

5 Digital reach is the percentage of Australians who watched, read or listened to ABC content weekly on ABC-owned digital platforms.

Annual Performance Statements 93

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Radio reach (weekly)6

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 GFK Radio Ratings 36.5% 35.6% 35.1%

Analysis:

Target not met. The ABC has experienced a decline in traditional platforms but notes an increase in weekly reach from 2017-18 driven by triple j and the six ABC DAB+ Stations. The ABC will continue to work towards addressing this audience gap through driving digital radio behaviours and investing in platforms to enable this, e.g. ABC Listen.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Television reach (weekly) ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

OzTAM 48% 47% 49.7%

Analysis:

Target not met. Declines in metro television reach were expected as weekly TV audiences generally shift to digital on-demand platforms. ABC Network television reach has decreased in both Metro and Regional areas. In 2018-19, Australian TV reach experienced a greater decline, down 3.5% in Metro areas.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

International monthly engagement

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Website Google Analytics 360

14,000,000 average monthly website sessions

14,031,048 average monthly sessions

N/A - new measure for 2018-19.

Analysis:

Target met. The ABC will continue enabling Australian citizens living or travelling outside Australia and international audiences to promote Australian culture, affairs and perspectives.

Access

Measuring access to ABC platforms provides a quantitative assessment of the ABC’s ability to transmit to Australian audiences - via linear or digital services - in keeping with its purpose to provide a comprehensive public broadcasting service.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Access to analogue radio Program 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements

2018-19, p76

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Broadcast Australia data

Australian Bureau of Statistics data

At least 99%

99.66% 99.66%

Analysis:

Target met. Terrestrial and satellite delivered TV and radio services are the main way Australian audiences can access ABC content. ABC analogue radio transmission services were unchanged in 2018-19.

6 The measurement of radio reach includes both broadcast and digital listening (streaming and apps).

94 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Access to digital radio7 Program 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements

2018-19, p76

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Broadcast Australia data

Australian Bureau of Statistics data

100%8 100%9 100%

Analysis:

Target met. ABC delivers digital radio to audiences using two technologies: Digital Audio Broadcasting Plus (DAB+) and the VAST satellite service. The ABC estimates that 63.16% of Australia’s population can receive ABC DAB+ services, with 23 transmission services located across the eight capital cities. The remainder of the population have access to digital radio via VAST.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Access to digital television10 Program 1.2, Portfolio Budget Statements

2018-19, p76

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Broadcast Australia data

Australian Bureau of Statistics data

100% 100% 100%

Analysis:

Target met. ABC delivers digital television to audiences using two technologies: Digital Terrestrial Transmission and the VAST satellite service. ABC estimates that 98.6% Australia’s population can receive ABC using Digital Terrestrial Transmission services, with 420 transmission services located across Australia. The remainder of the population have access via VAST.

7 With the extension of digital radio terrestrial services to Canberra, Darwin and Hobart, the 2017-18 result is based on the criterion of ‘Degree to which the eight state and territory capital cities have access to ABC digital radio transmissions.’ 8 VAST transmission can reach all homes in Australia, so digital coverage is 100%. The appropriate equipment (including a satellite dish) is required to access radio and television services via VAST.

9 See footnote 7 re: extension of digital radio terrestrial services.

10 See footnote 8 re: VAST transmission.

The ABC’s Mark Leonardi in action. Image: Chris Gillette

Annual Performance Statements 95

Measure

Measure Source

Data Source

2018-19 Target 2018-19 Result

Audience contacts - transmission issues

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19

Audience and Consumer Affairs data

Availability of reception advice line service

The Australian public can obtain troubleshooting information or report reception issues through various avenues, including the Reception Advice website and the ABC switchboard.

The Reception Advice team assists the public to improve their ABC television and radio reception, responds to broader ABC transmission enquiries, and works with the ABC’s transmission providers to identify and resolve transmission faults.

2018-19 2017-18

Total number of emails received 1,087 1,425

Total number of letters received 2 1

Total number of telephone enquiries received 3,021 5,760

Total enquiries 4,110 7,186

Total number of hits to the RAL website11 422,059 939,519

Analysis:

Target met. The continued reduction in hits to the Reception Advice website reflects a significant overhaul of the website during 2018-19. The new website provides a much-improved audience experience, employing more dynamic content display methods, thereby significantly reducing the required page views for a comparable user journey. Reductions in audience contact via other means (primarily telephone and email) follows similar trends in recent years.

11 The year-on-year reduction in hits to the Reception Advice website reflects a significant overhaul of the website during FY2019. The new website provides a much-improved audience experience, employing more dynamic content display methods, thereby significantly reducing the required page views for a comparable user journey.

Kira Puru performs at the ABC Pride strategy evening (see page 111). Image: Raj Muneshwar

96 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Availability

Transmission of the ABC’s radio and television content is provided by a third party and managed by the ABC via Transmission Service Agreements. The effective management of these agreements is fundamental to ensuring the ABC is able to achieve its purpose.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Transmission performance

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Broadcast Australia data

At least 99% for all services

99.78% 99.79%

Analysis:

The ABC relies on Broadcast Australia, Optus and Telstra to deliver its content to audiences across the country. This measure shows the aggregate weighted delivery of content to audiences across all radio and television services where the final transmission is via terrestrial transmission facilities including analogue and digital radio, and digital television. This measure quantifies where service was provided to the audience (no total loss of service, i.e. not off-air) but service quality is not assessed in this measure. The 2018-19 performance remained consistent with the previous year and met the target.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Operation of transmission facilities

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Broadcast Australia data

100% 100% 100%

Analysis:

Transmission facilities delivering ABC’s analogue and digital radio and television services are operated by Broadcast Australia under contract to the ABC. The ABC sets performance targets for these contracted services. Targets include measures assessing performance by: transmission type (radio or television); technology (analogue or digital); regions (aggregated states); and class of service (a measure of the site redundancy or complexity). In 2018-19 Broadcast Australia met its contracted service obligations under these agreements. In 2018-19 the overarching operational transmission target was met.

Annual Performance Statements 97

ABC Distribution and Transmission Network Aggregated 2018-19 Performance12 (as reported by Broadcast Australia)

ABC Service

No. of

Transmitters

(See Note 1)

Broadcast Australia Transmission Network

(See Note 2)

Total Network Availability

(See Note 3)

Total ‘On-Air’ Availability

(See Note 4)

Target

%

2018-19

%

2017-18

%

2018-19

%

2017-18

%

2018-19

%

2017-18

%

ABC Classic 68 99.83 99.95 99.95 93.23 95.32 99.88 99.89

triple j 58 99.82 99.96 99.95 89.52 91.89 99.88 99.87

ABC Radio 240 99.79 99.85 99.84 92.83 94.73 99.78 99.76

ABC NEWS on radio 84 99.89 99.95 99.93 92.60 92.16 99.87 99.87

RN 257 99.74 99.80 99.80 92.10 90.10 99.75 99.74

Television 420 99.77 99.93 99.91 98.40 97.45 99.77 99.79

Digital Radio 23

- Class A, B, and D 11 99.88 99.91 99.99 99.02 99.83 99.84 99.96

- Class E 12 N/A N/A N/A 92.34 — 99.42 —

State Analogue Radio

NSW/ACT 182 99.80 99.90 99.87 91.57 92.17 99.80 99.80

NT 37 99.71 99.74 99.82 95.57 95.59 99.67 99.76

Qld 204 99.76 99.85 99.83 94.25 89.37 99.81 99.76

SA 47 99.79 99.89 99.84 82.83 91.79 99.85 99.79

Tas 40 99.81 99.92 99.83 98.13 97.47 99.85 99.69

Vic 80 99.82 99.90 99.89 84.43 90.28 99.86 99.83

WA 117 99.75 99.81 99.87 95.22 96.94 99.75 99.81

State Television

NSW/ACT 95 99.78 99.96 99.87 98.76 97.70 99.86 99.78

NT 15 99.76 99.96 99.91 99.71 99.72 99.72 99.77

Qld 113 99.76 99.94 99.93 96.57 96.78 99.82 99.79

SA 32 99.77 99.96 99.92 99.86 97.17 99.88 99.89

Tas 41 99.76 99.88 99.88 99.77 97.51 99.81 99.63

Vic 53 99.77 99.91 99.88 98.19 96.70 99.83 99.78

WA 71 99.76 99.91 99.96 99.22 98.37 99.44 99.85

12 Further information on transmission:

1. No. of Transmitters: The number of transmitters includes Analogue Radio, Digital Television and Digital Radio operated by Broadcast Australia on behalf of the ABC. If a transmitter was operational during the period for one or more days, it is included in the report. Transmitter numbers for Digital Television do not include the six standby transmitters operated in Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Newcastle, Perth, and Sydney, which operate as a backup to the main transmitter in those areas. 2. Broadcast Australia Transmission Network (ABC Transmission Contractor): The transmission network performance data is reported by Broadcast

Australia in the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018. This is a contracted deliverable and is measured against the Service Level Agreement (SLA) for each service, network, or sub national network. The data is regularly reviewed and authenticated by ABC Transmission Network Services. There are 12 Class E digital radio services that are provided by Broadcast Australia for the ABC where contract performance is not measured as a target of overall uptime. These services are provided to equalise audience experience across both national and commercial and community broadcasters.

3. Total Network Availability shows the impact of all outages on the overall network: This reflects all faults across the transmission networks regardless of severity or cause or whether subject to a Service Level Agreement (SLA) or not. The vast majority of these faults are services not meeting full specification such as lower transmission power as agreed by the ABC on a case by case basis.

4. Total ‘On-Air’ Availability: The figures show ‘off-air’ occurrences where no service was provided due to faults and/or maintenance activity. It is important to note that the majority of maintenance activity is undertaken after midnight to reduce audience impact.

98 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Pillar 4: Building a great place to work Culture

The progress towards building a great place to work and ensuring a creative environment can be gauged by the engagement of the people working within the public broadcaster. As Australia’s largest creative employer, improvements in this measure indicate the ABC is becoming a more creative environment which in turn will enable even better content.

Measure Measure Source Data Source

2018-19 Target

2018-19 Result

2017-18 Result

Employee Engagement

ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 AON Hewitt benchmark or

similar

Above median for Australian employers

Refer below analysis

N/A - new measure for 2018-19

Analysis:

The 2018-19 engagement survey was deferred following the departure of the former Managing Director and former Chair in September 2018. A survey is planned for October 2019.

ABC Local Radio content maker Maree Yoelu.

Annual Performance Statements 99

100 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Alex Page and Tyler Hannigan present Opening Serve on ABC Broken Hill.

Working at the ABC

Contents Where ABC employees live and work 102

ABC People 103

Capability, development and training 105

Diversity 107

Work health and safety 112

Editorial quality 115

Infrastructure and Operations 118

Corporate services 123

Working at the ABC 101

In 2018-19, the ABC employed 4,649 people across every state and territory, the equivalent of 4,007 full-time employees. The majority of employees - 2,810 or 70.1% - were content makers.

ABC employees: distribution by region ABC employees: distribution by job group (full-time equivalent)

ABC employees: distribution by team

WA 5.1%

ACT 3.8%

VIC

16.6%

TAS 3.1%

SA

6.3%

QLD 10.2%

Overseas 0.4%

NSW 51.7%

NT 2.7%

0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

554, 13.8% of total

Administrative/ Professional

2,810, 70.1% of total

Content Maker

288, 7.2% of total

Executive

355, 8.9% of total

Technologist

ABC Commercial 1.5%

Content Ideas Lab 0.8% Corp Management & Public Affairs* 0.7%

Regional & Local 20.9%

People & Culture 2.1%

Editorial Policies 0.3%

Product & Content Technology 14.6%

Entertainment & Specialist 18.8%

News, Analysis & Investigations 32.3%

Finance 4.0%

Audiences 3.9%

Where ABC employees live and work

Data reported as at the end of the last reporting period in 2018-19 (23 June 2019)

Data reported as at the end of the last reporting period in 2018-19 (23 June 2019)

* includes Managing Director’s Office and Public Affairs Data reported as at the end of the last reporting period in 2018-19 (23 June 2019)

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ABC People & Culture Throughout 2018-19, the now People & Culture team went through a number of changes to its structure. The team’s Communications, Community Engagement and International Development (ABCID) units were moved to the Public Affairs team to facilitate a more cohesive communications and external stakeholder strategy. This allowed the People & Culture team to focus on the ABC’s workforce and internal culture.

ABC People & Culture seek to make the ABC a rewarding place to work, where:

• professional development and career opportunities are planned and encouraged

• strong performance and great ideas are recognised and celebrated

• managers know how to lead their teams supportively and talk honestly with them about both the good news and the bad

• craft skills are nurtured and kept up to date

• ABC values are evident in the way staff interact with each other

• bureaucracy is kept to a minimum

• everyone understands the ABC strategy and their role in its delivery.

ABC values and workplace behaviour The ABC Principles were launched in 2018 to help the ABC create and support a positive culture. Following the launch, ABC Principles Workshops were held across all capital cities for frontline managers to enhance their awareness and understanding of the initiative. ‘ABC Principles toolkits’ were made available to all managers to share with their teams and assist in adopting the principles throughout the Corporation.

The ABC Principles are:

• We are ABC

• Straight Talking

• People Focused

• Accountable

• Open and Transparent.

The Principles set clear expectations about working at the ABC as individuals, as leaders and together across teams. They set out the behaviours and attitudes employees commit to in delivering the Investing in Audiences strategy and are used to help build and manage teams as well as recognise and reward outstanding performance.

ABC People

ABC Classic’s Christopher Lawrence. Image: Toby Chadd

Working at the ABC 103

Employee engagement ABC People & Culture worked on many initiatives throughout the year to gauge, support and increase employee engagement.

The recruitment and new-starter process was simplified with the introduction of a new, more automated system and a reduction in the number of forms required on commencing employment with the ABC. The Change it Up program created opportunities for current staff to volunteer for Stargazing and other events, to find a mentor or become a mentor.

To drive employee engagement and motivate high performance, the inaugural ABC Peer-Based Recognition Program was launched in September 2018. The program further embedded the ABC Principles by calling for nominations of outstanding workplace behaviour measured against its values. Staff could recognise team members or employees in other areas of the ABC.

Enhancements were made to Leadership Development programs, with more comprehensive programs designed to equip ABC managers to lead their teams throughout the content team transformation and into the future. Evaluation of the technical/craft skills needed in content teams was also completed, and the rollout of tailored priority training to address those needs commenced.

In order to create a working environment with less bureaucracy and red tape, Bureaucracy Stop, launched in early 2018, resulted in more than 70 initiatives that streamlined work and removed duplication. More regular employee and leader communication and the sharing of information within and across teams was encouraged, and regular Leadership Team metropolitan and regional visits were undertaken to improve leadership visibility.

One year after the former platform teams were restructured along content lines, ABC People & Culture led a review into the operation of the new structure to better understand how employees were experiencing the changes. A cross-divisional working group was established to oversee the process. Part of the review included a voluntary all staff survey which had high response rate.

Employment agreements The ABC Enterprise Agreement 2016-19 came into operation in December 2016, and reached its nominal expiry date in June 2019.

In March 2017, the ABC Senior Employment Agreement 2016 reached its nominal expiry date.

Both agreements are continuing to operate until new agreements are made or the current agreements are terminated.

Short and Curly podcast producer Kyla Slaven with Moree Public School students.

104 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Effectively delivering the ABC’s strategy was the focus point for all learning and development opportunities provided to build and enhance the capabilities of employees in 2018-19.

This was a period of significant change for the ABC, with the bedding down of the restructure of content divisions and the development and introduction of new technologies. Learning and development activities focused on supporting both leaders and employees through these changes and ensuring they were able to continue building the skills required in the modern media environment.

To help meet demand for learning opportunities, employees were provided with training across a wide range of topics and skill areas, particularly those relating to technology and craft skills.

Training in more than 150 different topics across 56 skill areas was delivered during the period, using a range of learning platforms and methodologies. Increasingly, learning opportunities are being offered using a blended approach of short, focused sessions and masterclasses along with online learning and webinars, which provide more options for staff who are geographically dispersed.

Over 2018-19, around 14,075 staff attendances were recorded at 1,265 learning events delivered internally, externally, online and via webinar, amounting to 40,052 participant hours. These figures represent an increase in the total number of participants compared to the previous year, demonstrating a growing interest in professional development. The data does not capture the entirety of the ABC’s investment in learning and development as figures reflect only the information provided to the Learning & Development Team. Work continues to ensure that reporting of training is improved, to better reflect overall ABC investment.

Growth in participation was supported by an expanding range of quality learning and development opportunities made available through flexible learning approaches. This included ‘ just-in-time’ online learning, which was made available to increase access to training regardless of location. ‘Just-in-time’ courses and resources cover a

growing number of topics from understanding audience analytics and editorial policies to legal guidance, craft skills, and work health and safety. They have been designed to work on any platform including mobile phone, tablet or PC, and are easily accessible in or out of a work environment at any time. During 2018-19, the eLearning team continued to build an internal catalogue of content by partnering with ABC areas to make training tailored to their needs.

Investment in craft skills continued to be a priority. One example saw the design and roll-out of Production Skills Workshops for Regional & Local (R&L). These courses aimed to raise the technical and craft skills of radio producers, including casual producers, across all metropolitan and regional radio stations. The training provided a broader understanding of their roles and responsibilities and resulted in a more consistent approach to radio production across the entire R&L network. R&L’s 35 chiefs-of-staff are also given regular leadership training.

The ABC continued to access external expertise to deliver customised leadership programs. A two-day program developed for News, Analysis & Investigations (NA&I) in partnership with an external consultant used experiential learning principles to explore the skills and knowledge required by leaders in a modern, diverse, fast paced newsroom. The course was attended by 134 people across seven states - 75 from State Coverage (part of the NA&I team) and 59 from other teams including Regional & Local. The strategy of offering places to other teams assisted with the breaking down of silos and the improvement of communication across the organisation.

The ABC also uses its own skilled broadcasters and subject matter experts to develop other employees. Successful examples of this in 2018-19 were the Margaret Throsby masterclasses, with approximately 100 people in attendance and a similar number taking part via webinar. Participants heard Margaret and her guests discuss the keys to their success while providing professional insight and sharing their individual experiences.

Capability, development and training

Working at the ABC 105

Team-led training (Content Teams) In 2018, Regional & Local (R&L) undertook a comprehensive training needs analysis that identified priority areas for training in 2018-19. Training delivered to address these areas included: a Features Reporter course developed to enhance multiplatform output and attended by more than 100 reporters, audio recording training, video training delivered to more than 150 reporters with feedback sessions provided, and training to enable regional bureaux to broadcast live, breaking news on new equipment as it rolled out over the year. R&L’s Quality team worked with every regional bureau and capital city station in 2018-19. More than 200 airchecks were conducted to ensure the continued high quality of regional output.

In News, Analysis & Investigations (NA&I), the introduction of the Integrated Media System (IMS - see page 122) across operations required a major training program involving around 1,200 staff, to build skills in the new work practices afforded by the technology. Over 2018-19, more than 3,000 other training

sessions were delivered to the NA&I team in subjects ranging from Digital Forensics to Four Wheel Driving. Steps taken during the year to strengthen quality control processes and digital sub-editing regimes also improved the robustness of processes around news output (for more on editorial training, see page 115).

In Entertainment & Specialist (E&S), Music team managers participated in performance management workshops, ABC Audio Studios trained content makers in best practice podcast principles, and formal leadership training was provided to senior leaders in the Children’s team. Operations had training in technical production including regional audio production skills. E&S also continued its proud tradition of improving the skills of new and emerging Australian creatives through programs such as the Fresh Blood initiative in ABC Comedy and DisRupted in Children’s.

Training hours by gender and classification 2018-19 Job Female Male Not Specified Total

Administrative/Professional 2,396 951 - 3,347

Content Maker 16,615 13,403 - 30,017

Other* 264 251 3 518

Retail 46 3 - 49

Senior Exec 1,519 1,797 - 3,316

Technologist 433 2,372 - 2,806

Total 21,273 18,776 3 40,052

* Participants who did not have an employee number, e.g. external contractors.

Targeted leadership training 2018-19 Program Total Events Total Participants Total Participant Training Hours

ABC Principles 8 253 2168

Accelerate Your Leadership 2 21 336

Activate Your Leadership 11 168 3340

Effective Supervision Skills 1 1 8

Leading Transformation 7 143 715

Managing Performance 37 275 604

Navigating Change 3 41 218

Total 56 902 7389

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The ABC is required by its Charter to reflect the cultural diversity of Australia. It seeks to encompass the rich and varied nature of Australian society in both its workforce and its content, and increase awareness of the country’s broad range of communities and cultures.

The ABC takes these responsibilities seriously and considers diversity one of its key strategic priorities. The Corporation has a strong track record of engaging with, and telling the stories of, diverse communities.

The ABC is required by the Equal Employment Opportunity (Commonwealth Authorities) Act 1987 (the EEO Act) to develop a program designed to eliminate discrimination and promote equal opportunity for women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people from a non-English speaking background (NESB), and people with disabilities. As an employer, the ABC is committed to a diverse and inclusive workplace, to demonstrating values-based leadership, and to fostering attitudes and behaviours that contribute to a safe, creative and vibrant working environment.

Equity and Diversity Plan Central to the ABC’s workforce strategy is the ABC Equity and Diversity Plan 2016-18 (the Plan). This sets out clear approaches and targets to encourage a culture of diversity, engagement and flexibility, embrace diversity in the workplace, and represent, engage and connect with Australian communities.

As a guide, the following employment Corporate targets were identified in the Plan to guide the approach of ABC teams:

• 50% women executives

• 20% women technologists

• 15% non-English speaking background (NESB) executives

• Up to 12% NESB content makers

• 5% employees with disability.

Actions, goals and targets which specifically relate to the employment, experiences and coverage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People are included in the ABC’s Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18 (see page 109).

Overall, the measures that were launched under the 2016-18 Plan have been successful and while they remain important and ongoing, there is more work to do to achieve the Plan’s goals and targets, particularly in relation to the representation of cultural diversity in the ABC’s workforce. At the end of June 2019, the ABC had a gender-balanced workforce and leadership, had met its disability target, and had made considerable progress in increasing the representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in its workforce. However, the Corporation fell short of its targets for the representation of NESB employees.

In light of this outcome, the Equity & Diversity Plan 2016-18 has been extended to allow the ABC to reassess its approach. As part of this reassessment, and with a new Managing Director and Chair having been appointed, the Corporation is in the process of developing a new Diversity and Inclusion Plan for 2019-22. The plan will be launched in September 2019, and will provide a three-year strategic roadmap to guide the ABC in further developing its diverse, inclusive culture, with a workforce profile, content offering and services that reflect the diversity of the Australian community.

The ABC is required by section 9(2) of the EEO Act to report its performance annually for the period 1 September to 31 August. More information on outcomes and next steps against the plan will become available when the ABC Equity and Diversity Annual Report 2019 is published.

Current and historical Equity and Diversity Annual Reports are available on the ABC’s website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-theabc-is-run/reports-and-publications/

Diversity

Working at the ABC 107

Diversity & Inclusion Standing Committee (DISC) The Diversity & Inclusion Standing Committee (DISC) supports ABC diversity measures and makes recommendations on diversity and inclusion matters to the Executive Leadership Team. The DISC is co-chaired by two members of the Leadership team and is composed of senior representatives from ABC teams, the chairs of the Employee Network Groups and a representative from the Bonner Committee (see page 109). The composition of the committee demonstrates the importance of diversity and inclusion as a strategic priority for the ABC, and helps retain influence at the highest level of the Corporation. The DISC ensure a coordinated pan-ABC approach to improving diversity and inclusion outcomes.

In 2019, the DISC oversaw the development of the new Diversity & Inclusion Plan 2019-22. They also met every quarter to review progress against the commitments of the current Equity & Diversity Plan, share best practice, and identify solutions to current issues. Critical pieces of work identified and scoped by the DISC throughout the year included:

• the creation of new entry level programs for diverse content makers

• the development of new tools to measure and track levels of diversity on air and behind the scenes

• the improvement of recruitment processes and talent management in relation to Indigenous and culturally diverse on air employees

• ways of supporting employees from under-represented groups into leadership positions.

Media cadetships The 2018 ABC Media Cadetship program was launched to unearth and develop new talent with new approaches to content making. The program was specifically aimed at groups traditionally under-represented in the media industry and was designed to help them overcome traditional barriers to entering media

organisations. The approach had the reciprocal benefit of allowing the ABC to connect with under-represented audience groups and add energy, ideas and innovation to the workforce of the future.

The positive outcomes of the inaugural Media Cadet Program 2018-19 were realised almost immediately. Within four weeks of commencing with the ABC, the Media Cadet cohort had contributed to content making through a range of activities, including writing articles, recording interviews and assisting on television recordings. At the conclusion of the program, most of the cadets from the 2018-19 intake went on to secure further employment within the ABC.

Indigenous employment Leadership commitment, increased resources and targeted Indigenous employment and retention strategies begun in 2014 have meant considerable progress has been made towards the ABC’s 3% Indigenous employment target. At the end of the reporting period, Indigenous employees made up 2.7% of the ABC workforce.

Indigenous employees have access to career development opportunities, mentorships, scholarships and internships across the ABC. Additional leave is also offered to enable Indigenous employees to participate in NAIDOC Week activities. The ABC Indigenous Mentoring Program supports staff with skills development, career advice, practical assistance and help in understanding organisational culture.

A key measure taken up by the ABC to increase the representation of Indigenous employees was the advertising of vacancies only open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, under the affirmative measure provisions of the Australian Public Service Commissioner’s Directions 2016. Hiring managers at the ABC are encouraged to consider targeting advertising to Indigenous candidates and are provided with specialist recruitment support. During the reporting period, 11 roles were filled under the provisions.

108 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Indigenous ABC employees by Team Team Headcount FTE

ABC Commercial 3 3.0

Audiences 8 6.5

Content Ideas Lab - -

Corporate Management & Public Affairs* - -

Editorial Policies - -

Entertainment & Specialist 21 19.0

Finance 4 2.7

News, Analysis, Investigations 38 35.4

People & Culture 4 4.0

Product & Content Technology 11 10.7

Regional & Local 21 20.4

Grand Total 110 101.6

Notes:

1. Includes casuals and non-casual employees that were paid in the final pay period of the year ended 30 June 2019.

2. * Includes Managing Director’s Office and Public Affairs.

3. Number of overseas employees in the above table does not include locally-hired staff.

Indigenous ABC employees by Region Region Headcount FTE

NSW 60 53.7

Vic 8 8.0

Qld 10 9.6

SA 6 5.8

WA 3 3.0

Tas 3 2.2

ACT 5 4.7

NT 13 12.7

O/S 2 2.0

Grand Total 110 101.6

Reconciliation Action Plan The ABC’s Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18 is a Stretch RAP under Reconciliation Australia’s RISE (Reflect, Innovate, Stretch, Elevate) framework, and commits the ABC to meeting targets that build on its successes in its first (2009-12) and second (2013-15) RAPs. It focuses on four key areas:

• Relationships

• Respect

• Opportunities—Employment and Supplier Diversity

• Opportunities—Content.

All actions outlined in the Plan are monitored for progress by the ABC’s Bonner Committee. Named for the late Neville Bonner AO, who was an ABC Board Director from 1983 to 1991 and Australia’s first Indigenous Senator, the Bonner Committee is the ABC’s advisory and representative body on matters relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees, content, and communities.

Comprising a mix of Indigenous and non-Indigenous employees, the Committee of 12 members meets at least six times a year, and the Chair provides feedback and advice on discussions and decisions directly to the Managing Director.

Reports on progress against RAP targets are also provided to the Executive Leadership Team biannually, with external reports on progress published annually in the ABC’s Equity and Diversity Annual Report (see page 107). RAP impact measurement information is provided in response to Reconciliation Australia’s Impact questionnaire.

The Bonner Committee has developed a new Elevate RAP with input from across the ABC and with endorsement by Reconciliation Australia. The new RAP will be launched in 2019.

An Elevate RAP is for organisations with a proven track record of embedding effective RAP initiatives, and who are ready to take on a leadership position to advance national reconciliation. Elevate RAP organisations have a strong strategic relationship with Reconciliation Australia and actively champion initiatives to empower Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and create societal change.

There are unique requirements, expectations and processes to consider prior to commencement of an Elevate RAP. To ensure these requirements were appropriately considered and incorporated, the Stretch Reconciliation Action Plan 2016-18 was extended until 30 June 2019.

Working at the ABC 109

Composition of the ABC workforce (headcount) by gender Gender Headcount % of Total

Female 2,459 52.9%

Male 2,185 47.0%

Gender Diverse* 5 0.1%

Grand Total 4,649 100.0%

* The ABC uses the term ‘gender diverse’ to describe a wide range of gender identities. This may include, but is not limited to, people who are Transgender, those who identify as gender diverse, Bigender, Gender Queer, neither gender or both.

Composition of ABC management (Board, Executive Director and Executives) by gender Role Female % Male % Total % of Grand Total

Board Member* 6 66.7% 3 33.3% 9 2.9%

Advisory Council 7 58.3% 5 41.7% 12 3.8%

Executive Director 5 55.6% 4 44.4% 9 2.9%

Executive 139 48.8% 146 51.2% 285 90.5%

Grand Total 157 49.8% 158 50.2% 315 100.0%

* Includes Managing Director and the Staff-elected Director.

Gender profile The ABC has made significant efforts to achieve a gender-balanced workforce and has experienced considerable success:

• Women now make up six of the ABC’s nine Board members.

• The ABC reached gender parity in its executive leadership group in 2017.

• The overall number of women employees in the ABC workforce slightly exceeds the number of male employees, which is reflective of the gender profile of the Australian population where women slightly outnumber men.

• There is gender parity in the content makers group, significant as content making is the core business of the ABC.

On 8 March 2019, the ABC celebrated International Women’s Day across the country with internal events and specialised programming across all platforms. The ABC’s Sydney office hosted a panel discussion moderated by Ellen Fanning with guests Kumi

Taguchi, Manda Hatter, Nakkiah Lui and Judith Whelan, which was available for viewing live in ABC offices across all locations. Melbourne enjoyed a morning tea and featured a preview of their one-hour show, Long Story Short, which was the brainchild of ABC Radio Melbourne and featured four prominent Australians exploring the roles all people have in achieving gender equality. Darwin, Adelaide, Brisbane and Perth all hosted special guests and held morning teas or lunches to celebrate the event with employees.

The Back Roads extended crew take a break at Woolgoolga, NSW. Image: Maddie Whitford

110 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Diversity initiatives In 2018-19, various pipeline, attraction and recruitment measures were implemented to contribute to the ABC’s workforce better reflecting Australia’s diversity.

A range of new internships and cadetships programs were launched including:

• the ABC Regional Storyteller Scholarship, aimed at content makers with disability from regional Australia

• the Victorian Multicultural Commission-ABC Internship Program, which supports young journalists and storytellers from culturally diverse backgrounds

• the ABC and AFTRS Selwyn Speight Diversity Scholarship aimed at students from diverse cultural, ethnic or socio-economic backgrounds, or from otherwise underrepresented minority groups

• the Victorian Screen Development Internship which provides career pathways for creative talent from Indigenous and diverse backgrounds.

In 2019, the ABC embarked on a new partnership with the Asian Leadership Project, a group dedicated to advance Asian and culturally diverse talent into leadership positions. As part of its membership, ABC employees have access to professional development events designed and facilitated with Asian cultural sensitivities in mind.

Like many other workplaces in Australia, the ABC has an ageing workforce, many of whom are carers for an older relative. This year, the ABC partnered with Managing Work Life Balance to help employees manage both care and work responsibilities while practising self-care and wellbeing, and to provide them with information on financial assistance through the Eldercare Kits - an extensive resource directory of agencies and associations across Australia.

The Speak Up initiative continues to provide an opportunity for employees to talk to their peers about gender, sexism, racism and other cultural safety issues. Support was provided by colleagues trained in the legal framework and ABC policies on discrimination, bullying and harassment, responding to disclosures, dealing with trauma and providing guidance.

ABC Pride ABC Pride is an employee-led initiative committed to creating an inclusive work environment that supports and embraces difference, while respecting and valuing everyone’s contribution.

In June 2019, ABC Pride held its inaugural Gayla event. Comedian Zoe Coombs Marr welcomed over 200 ABC employees as ABC Pride launched its strategy to increase LGBTQI+ diversity on and off screen at the ABC. ABC Pride Chair Manda Hatter outlined the key initiatives to be undertaken, including:

• LGBTQI+ inclusion within the ABC’s 2019 Mentoring Program

• annual LGBTQI+ Awards

• the proposed inclusion of Gender Transition Leave within the ABC’s Enterprise Agreement.

For many employees, the Gayla was a moment to reflect on how far the ABC had come in supporting its LGBTQI+ employees.

ABC Pride Chair and Head Operations Manda Hatter with Chief People Officer and ABC Pride Executive Sponsor Rebekah Donaldson at the ABC Pride strategy launch. Image: Hayley Legg

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Management of WHS A range of initiatives were implemented to improve the ABC’s management of WHS in 2018-19.

WHS Team intranet pages were launched for each team, to facilitate easy access to team-specific WHS information, including risk assessments, WHS guidelines and WHS Committee information. WHS Risk Assessment workshops were delivered to a range of stakeholders to improve their assessment capability, and fact sheets were developed to provide safety information about managing a range of high-risk scenarios including driving, natural disasters, gender-based hazards (such as sexual violence) and civil unrest/riots.

A successful submission was made to the ABC’s Technology Project Office to fund the purchase of 25 lightweight cameras to reduce the incidence of body stressing injuries for camera operators, and People & Culture partnered with the Emergency Broadcast Team to raise the profile of WHS in EB guidance material, training and procedures. An external audit of ABC’s Rehabilitation Management System to benchmark compliance with Comcare standards achieved a score of 96%.

Health and safety committees Twelve WHS committees operate across the ABC, with a total of 183 members. 92% of the workforce has committee representation, and the remainder is represented by other agreed WHS consultative arrangements.

WHS across the ABC News, Analysis & Investigations (NA&I)’s WHS plan is built on three key values: Safe Places, Safe Systems and Safe People. Key performance indicators are specified for each value and requirements include mandatory workplace inspections across all operations, including International bureaux. In 2018-19 News had a 100% inspection completion rate.

Risk assessment training was also delivered to key program areas. To reduce the risk of manual handling of equipment by field camera operators, News began work with the Product & Content Technology (P&CT) team to introduce lightweight equipment across video production teams.

ABC Production & Content Technology (P&CT) initiated an electrical safety competency training and assessment program in 2018-19, to ensure technologists engaged in equipment repairs have undergone risk identification and hazard mitigation training. P&CT also implemented improvements in the management of WHS inspections and risk assessment processes including improved reporting of completion rates.

Entertainment & Specialist (E&S)’s Operations team began updating its risk assessments and standard operating procedures, particularly in relation to outside broadcasts. The Presentation Systems & Assets team established an employee wellbeing program that encourages flexible work/life balance arrangements, including work-from-home days and remote-enabled laptops to improve work flexibility. In 2018, all areas of the ABC Children’s team working on internal productions and with external producers, reviewed and implemented improvements to their Working with Children policies and practices in line with the new ABC Child Protection Policy Response.

Regional & Local (R&L) collaborated with the WHS team to produce specific pre-filled Risk Assessments, particularly relating to emergency broadcasting and shared broadcasting events such as election coverage. This ensured managers working in challenging situations had the correct advice to share with their teams. Driving guidance was created for R&L staff required to travel long distances for work purposes and R&L used the experience of its Emergency team to develop and undertake emergency coverage training in capital city newsrooms, to assist reporting teams working with NA&I.

Work health and safety

112 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Work-related WHS incidents In 2018-19, a total of 181 work-related incidents were reported (252 in 2017-18). Of those incidents, five were notified to Comcare by the ABC. An incident is notifiable to Comcare if it results in death, medical treatment as an inpatient in a hospital, immediate treatment for a serious injury, infection with a prescribed illness, or if it involves a dangerous occurrence. The ABC must ensure notification is made to Comcare, and the ABC Board, immediately after becoming aware that a notifiable incident has occurred.

Notices and investigations Comcare has the power to conduct an investigation into an ABC workplace at any time to ascertain whether the requirements of WHS legislation are being complied with, regarding a breach or suspected breach, or concerning an accident or dangerous occurrence.

During 2018-19, there were no investigations conducted by Comcare as a result of any Comcare-notified incidents.

Workers compensation claims Of the 179 work-related incidents reported in 2018-19, 15 resulted in workers compensation claims being accepted by Comcare (compared with eight in 2017-18). Analysis of the accepted claims in 2018-19 showed injuries were primarily due to falls, trips and slips in the workplace or in the course of work, followed by mental health illnesses and body stressing, which includes all musculoskeletal disorders such as occupational overuse and manual task injuries.

Workers compensation premiums The ABC Premium rate decreased from 0.66% in 2018-19 to 0.53% in the 2019-20 review. The reduction reflects the claims experience of the Comcare scheme as a whole, with reduced ABC claims numbers in 2017-18 and better than expected lifetime cost estimates in the 2015-16 year.

The overall premium rate for all Commonwealth agencies decreased from 1.06% in 2018-19 to 0.85% in 2019-20, consistent with previous years responses, where fewer overall claims are being accepted by the Comcare scheme per year. The ABC’s workers compensation premium for 2019-20 is $2,376,564 (ex GST), compared to $2,144,712 in 2018-19. Reporter Emma Davis produced an Antarctic Special for BtN, with travel companions including Dr Karl Kruszelnicki (centre). Image: Emma Davis

Working at the ABC 113

Work-related WHS incidents: severity of incident

Severity of Incident

1 July 2018 - 30 June 2019 1 July 2017 - 30 June 2018

Work Related Incidents % of total Work Related Incidents % of total

Near hit incident / no treatment required 50 28% 64 25%

First aid treatment only 32 18% 32 13%

Lost time injury/illness - off work for one full day/ shift or more 13 7% 15 6%

Medical treatment (from a medical doctor) - off work for less than 1 full day/shift 33 18% 48 19%

Precautionary treatment (from an allied health practitioner e.g. Physio) 30 16% 24 10%

Report Only - no treatment 23 13% 69 27%

Fatality 0 0% 0 0%

Total 179 100% 252 100%

Number of claims by mechanism of incident group

Mechanism of Incident Major Groups

Average cost to date/ claim ($) (2018-19)* 2018-19* 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15

Falls, trips and slips of a person $9,981 6 2 1 4 8

Hitting objects with a part of the body 0 1 0 0 3

Being hit by moving objects $17,382 2 1 1 3 1

Sound and pressure 0 0 0 0 1

Heat, electricity and other environmental factors 0 0 0 0 1

Stepping, kneeling or sitting on objects 0 0 0 0 3

Body stressing $15,169 3 4 9 18 23

Psychological /mental health $55,982 3 0 3 1 1

Being assaulted 0 0 1 0 0

Vehicle accidents 0 1 0 1 0

Unspecified $1,730 1 1 0 0 0

Neurological 0 0 1 0 0

TOTAL CLAIMS 15 15 10 16 27 41

Average cost-to-date/all claims $19,059 $19,059 $60,818 $41,193 $29,659 $36,300

* The data is immature and ultimate number and cost of accepted claims may differ from the data reported. New claims may be lodged in a later period. Data is accurate as at 30 June 2019. Claim costs are based on estimates at 31 March 2019.

ABC workers compensation premium rates ABC performance against all Australian government agencies combined

Premium rates 2019-20 2018-19 2017-18 2016-17 2015-16

ABC premium rates 0.53% 0.66% 0.76% 1.31% 1.39%

Premium rates - all Australian Government agencies combined 0.85% 1.06% 1.23% 1.72% 1.85%

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ABC Editorial Policies The ABC Editorial Policies and associated guidance outline the principles and set the standards that govern ABC content. They are a day-to-day reference point for content makers and are critical to the ABC’s ability to meet its statutory obligations and the expectations of audiences. They provide the basis for the ABC Code of Practice, which the ABC provides to the industry regulator, the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

In addition, the Editorial Policies give practical shape to statutory obligations in the ABC Act, in particular the obligations to provide services of a high standard; maintain independence and integrity; and ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is accurate and impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism.

Editorial management and guidance In 2018-19, the Editorial Policies team expanded to add a full-time Language Research Specialist, to strengthen language and pronunciation support across ABC output.

An internal restructure in September 2018 saw the remit of the Audience and Consumer Affairs team change to focus only on editorial complaints. Previously, the unit comprised two teams, with one team handling editorial complaints and the other feedback such as requests, suggestions and appreciations, as well as complaints about matters of personal preference which did not raise issues of compliance with the ABC’s editorial standards. Contacts and complaints in this latter group are now handled by Audience Planning and are reported on separately (see page 105). Editorial complaints management, handled by Audience and Consumer Affairs, is reported in the Accountability chapter (see page 141).

In January 2019, the Editorial Policies and Code of Practice were updated with the addition of a new Preamble setting out the aims and principles behind the Editorial Policies. The Scope section of the Code was revised to set out more clearly the factors considered by the ABC in determining whether or not a complaint falls within the Code. Other changes removed any suggestion that ACMA is itself bound by the ABC’s deliberations in relation to scope.

New wording was added to Standard 5.8 of the Code which deals with ‘Secret Recording and Other Types of Deception’, to reinforce the need to consider the potential for harm when undertaking secret recording, even where consent or the obscuring of identities are involved.

The Editorial Director notified all staff of the changes to the Editorial Policies and Code of Practice, and all related Editorial training materials were updated and amended to reflect.

In February 2019, the Editorial Policy Group, chaired by the Editorial Director, issued new guidance on Advertising and Sponsorship ABC Magazines, to assist publishing staff in upholding the editorial standards.

Editorial training There was a high level of engagement with editorial standards training during 2018-19, with more face-to-face training leading to increased participation rates when compared to the last reporting period. Almost 2000 participants undertook the Online Editorial Course and the Editorial Policies training resource continued to assist staff to make quick, accurate editorial decisions. The training resource is a good example of a ‘ just-in-time’ learning platform (see page 105), being accessible anywhere, anytime.

Editorial quality

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Editorial Training Program

Total events

Total

participants

Total

participant training hours

Face to Face and Zoom Sessions 86 712 931.5

Online Editorial Course 1934 1450.5

Total 86 2646 2381.5

In addition, there was a strong focus in the News, Analysis & Investigations Team on editorial responsibilities surrounding impartiality and fairness, and best practice in dealing with and protecting sources.

Sources training, developed in conjunction with ABC Legal, covered issues such as the obligation to protect confidentiality, when to offer confidentiality, the legal risks associated with recent legislative changes, procedures for upward referral, duty of care for vulnerable sources, and practical measures to ensure confidentiality and to mitigate potential harm to sources.

Impartiality and fairness training covered both the requirements for fairness and impartiality when producing investigative journalism and other stories involving allegations of wrongdoing, and how to ensure impartiality in political and other issues-driven journalism.

Editorial reviews The ABC consistently reviews its own performance against the editorial standards. Content makers and program teams regularly review their own work, and the ABC also commissions reviews that are independent of content makers and carried out by a range of internal and external reviewers. An overview of Editorial Reviews in 2018-19 can be found in the Annual Performance Statements on page 87.

The Editorial Reviews and ABC responses to those reviews are published on the ABC’s corporate website: http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/abc-editorial-standards/editorial-reviews/.

Corrections and clarifications The ABC publishes a Corrections and Clarifications page on its corporate website which brings together in one place the corrections and clarifications made to ABC content across radio, television and digital platforms, whether as a result of complaints or for any other reason. Where possible, links to the original content are provided.

In 2018-19, 46 corrections or clarifications were published on the Corrections and Clarifications page on the ABC’s website. Where online transcripts existed, editor’s notes and corrections to copy were also published.

Duncan Bellows and Alison Bell in The Letdown. Image: Tony Mott

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Election Coverage Review The Election Coverage Review Committee (ECRC) is convened during each federal, state or territory election campaign to monitor ABC coverage and ensure ABC editorial standards are met. The Committee is chaired by the Editorial Director or a senior editorial policy advisor and comprises representatives from all relevant ABC divisions. It is principally a committee of review and does not supplant the usual lines of editorial authority in each division during an election campaign.

For federal elections, the ECRC reviews externally commissioned share of voice data to ensure appropriate editorial balance is maintained and no single political party is disproportionately represented. This is done while recognising that there are a range of factors which can and will affect the amount of time or share of voice of each party. For state and territory elections, the ECRC monitors content, internal records and feedback to ensure editorial balance. Audience complaints related to election coverage are also reviewed by the Committee. The Chair of the ECRC is also responsible for administering the free broadcast time allocated to eligible political parties. Broadcast slots are provided on television and radio for policy announcements by political parties who meet the eligibility criteria.

During 2018-19, the ECRC convened on three occasions, to cover the state elections in Victoria and New South Wales, and the Federal Election.

Federal Election 2019 - ECRC review The Election Coverage Review Committee for the federal election was chaired by the Editorial Director. In addition to the major parties, the Greens, One Nation, Australian Conservatives, Liberal Democrats, United Australia Party and Fraser Anning’s Conservative National Party all met the eligibility criteria for free broadcast time. One Nation did not use its allocation.

Editorial balance was broadly achieved, with external share of voice data showing time apportioned in percentage terms at 41.0% Coalition and 35.7% Labor across ABC outlets. The Greens share of voice was 7.5% with the remaining 15.8% shared by minor parties and independents. The data also showed a 13.7% share of voice for the Prime Minister and 11.1% for the Opposition Leader.

ABC Audience and Consumer Affairs received 322 complaints alleging a breach of the ABC’s Editorial Policies or Code of Practice in relation to the ABC’s 2019 federal election coverage. Of these, 61% alleged bias in favour of the Opposition, 28% alleged bias in favour of the Government and 11% alleged other bias. At the time of writing, no complaints about election coverage had been upheld by Audience and Consumer Affairs.

For more on the ABC’s federal election coverage, see page 22.

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Product & Content Technology In early 2018-19, ABC Technology was restructured to strengthen the division’s ability to effectively deliver on the Investing in Audiences strategy and reshape the way the ABC invests in audience-facing digital products, content production and management, and technology infrastructure. The newly-named Product & Content Technology (P&CT) Team brought together employees from across the ABC with expertise in digital products and design, and delivered efficiencies through flatter management structures, vendor contract negotiations, and the opportunities presented by evolving technology solutions.

The P&CT Team is focussed on delivering against five strategic priorities:

1 Meeting audiences on their terms Through investment in core digital products such as iview and the ABC NEWS app, the team aims to deliver digital growth and engagement while maintaining broadcast transmission to service loyal audiences. This reflects the ABC’s challenge of operating on a ‘dual track’ basis.

2 Tools and resources for content makers Providing the tools to enable content teams to improve creative output, quality and audience engagement is crucial. P&CT delivers processes and infrastructure that support end-to-end content management solutions across digital and broadcast production and distribution.

3 Managing technology risk P&CT works to manage risk through a prioritised replacement/retirement plan for the ABC’s technology assets, to ensure the uninterrupted operation of ABC wide systems, broadcast and digital services.

4 Protecting and managing ABC data and content This priority has the aim of safeguarding the ABC’s content and information through policies and investment which protect audience data and can support personalised audience experiences. It will provide data to drive insights and inform quality decision making, and be utilised to automate processes.

5 Technology efficiency and effectiveness P&CT supports simplicity, sustainability and savings through innovative technology and solutions.

The strategic priorities are underpinned by the product & technology investment plan which aims to address critical technology replacement or upgrade across the content value chain and IT infrastructure and digital product suite.

The ABC has a complex and ageing technology asset base which presents risks to our broadcast capability and audience service delivery. It covers a broad range of assets including traditional production equipment, such as cameras and studio lighting, and information technology, business systems and infrastructure. The ABC has maximised the return on investment by extending the lives of these assets wherever possible, which increases the risk profile over time in a constrained capital funding environment.

Delivering on P&CT’s strategic priorities and investment plan will enable the ABC to be better positioned in a globally competitive media market, and strengthen the ABC’s commitment to delivering outstanding content and media experiences while continuing to meet audiences on their terms - guaranteeing that the ABC remains relevant today and into the future.

Infrastructure and Operations

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Product highlights 2018-19 In 2018-19, P&CT delivered a range of initiatives that will transform the way the ABC uses technology to deliver outstanding audience experiences, produce and manage content, and underpin broadcast/IT infrastructure.

The Content Digital Archive (CoDA) was established in 2018-19 and is a central content repository that provides faster access to, and the preservation of, ABC archive footage in a single self-service interface for content makers. CoDA is the new home for the ABC’s digital archival content and is constantly growing with digital content being added daily.

Investment initiatives included starting migration to High Definition production in studios, investment in core infrastructure and workflows between state and regional offices, and network enhancements to support faster movement of content.

Throughout the period the ABC continued to develop its digital products to improve and deliver audience experiences online and mobile. The ABC invested in a redesigned iview user interface for specific devices and to make content more discoverable. This update also involved improved streaming quality. The development of new web framework technology enabled the delivery of ABC Life (see page 45) and other web experiences.

Also in 2018-19, the triple j app was launched to incorporate Double J and Unearthed and deliver a modern digital experience with interactive audience participation. The ABC News app provided a tailored experience that showcased ABC News video content and the ABC listen app delivered enhanced curation and discovery capability and ABC local radio live streams.

Information and cyber security management Effective risk management and cyber security practices are critical to the ABC’s delivery of services to audiences and our business operations.

During 2018-19, the Corporation continued to implement the cyber security roadmap, which incorporates operational activities and significant investment to strengthen our cyber resilience in an environment of ever-changing cyber security threats. The investment program aligns with industry best practice and government standards and has included measures to enhance firewalls, malware filtering and access controls.

Further investment was made in 2018-19 to ensure all ABC websites were brought up to the latest security capability, providing audiences with secure and trustworthy access to information on ABC websites.

Transmission and distribution of ABC services Transmission and distribution performance was within contracted service level agreements for all radio and television networks for 2018-19.

During the year:

• overall transmission performance in regional areas was impacted by the continued NBN and 4G rollout, with tower works for these telecommunications services causing some disruption to radio and television operation

• Broadcast Australia completed its television transmitter replacement program, upgrading eight television transmitters across the country

• Broadcast Australia commenced a program to replace high-power FM transmitters throughout the network. In 2018-19, 45 FM transmitters were replaced at 15 sites.

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AM radio During 2018-19, the ABC’s supplier of transmission services, Broadcast Australia, installed two replacement AM transmitters at its Liverpool site - for ABC Radio and RN - which improved the power efficiency and reliability of these services. During the transmitter upgrades, Broadcast Australia also upgraded the program input equipment, providing the ABC with improved program delivery redundancy options as well as enhanced monitoring of content delivery to the transmission site to minimise fault durations.

FM radio Over the period, P&CT worked with Broadcast Australia on the upgrade of 15 high-power FM transmission sites to replace 45 old valve transmitters with new solid-state transmitters. These units are more energy efficient and will also ensure the network continues to operate effectively and reliably over the long term. Broadcast Australia has also installed additional or enhanced existing transmitter redundancy at each of these sites, to provide an additional transmitter at each site that can be remotely brought online should one of the existing in-service units fail. This ‘n+1’ redundancy will deliver increased uptime for ABC FM radio services at these 15 sites.

Digital radio Working with Broadcast Australia, the P&CT Transmission team launched a digital radio service in Darwin City, to improve the coverage of the existing Darwin digital radio service. The ABC also assumed responsibility for 12 new capital city digital radio services. These services will match the coverage provided by commercial radio services in these areas.

Over the year, services were established to improve digital radio reception in Caboolture, Campbelltown, Collaroy Plateau, Melbourne City, Penrith, Perth City, Perth Northern Beaches, Port Melbourne, Sydney City, Sydney Inner South, Sydney Northern Beaches and Werribee. The ABC digital radio footprint now reaches 63.16% of the Australian population.

Digital television Broadcast Australia completed its high-power digital television transmitter replacement program with the installation of new transmitters at eight sites during 2018-19. This has seen the completion of the multi-year replacement program for 54 high power television transmitters across Australia, which will deliver enhanced remote-control capabilities to improve restoration times for services experiencing faults.

VAST (Viewer Access Satellite Television) The ABC added the ABC Radio Geraldton service to the roster of radio services available on the VAST satellite platform, bringing the total to 20 different regional and capital city ABC Radio services available via VAST. This enabled the ABC to provide more locally appropriate content to listeners on the ABC Radio transmitters for Cue, Kalbarri, Meekatharra, Mt Magnet and Yalgoo, which now receive the ABC Radio Geraldton service from VAST as their program source for transmission.

4G / NBN Working with the ABC’s service provider, Telstra, P&CT oversaw installation of 4G backup services at 19 transmitter sites. These 4G services provide additional program input resilience to augment existing copper line program feeds. The team also oversaw the transition of program input to NBN at 10 transmission sites, as part of the NBN nationwide rollout.

International A refurbishment of the transmission facility in Tonga was completed during the year, including repairs to the satellite downlink dish and installation of a new transmitter. P&CT completed final on-site commissioning of the five FM services in Papua New Guinea, under a new agreement with the ABC’s PNG transmission service provider.

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Audience reception The audience coverage and reception website was redesigned during the year: www.abc.net.au/reception. Audience members can now access dynamic information based on their location, which delivers advice on the available ABC radio and television services in their area, links to available streaming services, as well as information on planned maintenance activities on ABC radio and television services. The site includes information pages on answering common questions, including advice on antenna installations, satellite radio and television services and digital radio.

Transmission Testing The ABC has been working closely with Broadcast Australia to change the way transmission service performance tests are conducted. These tests were traditionally performed annually on each service, and required the service to be switched off overnight.

New testing methodology was introduced for television services in February 2018, and from September 2018 most FM service tests are now also undertaken while the transmission services are on. The amount of time services are off for annual proof-of-performance tests in 2018-19 financial year was 41% lower than in 2017-18. This is primarily due to an 80% reduction in time off for TV tests and a 35% reduction in time off for FM tests. The new system delivers rigorous testing methodology together with improved service availability for ABC audiences.

Proportion of the population able to receive transmissions from ABC broadcasting services (as at 30 June 2019)

Aust

ACT/ NSW Vic Qld WA SA Tas NT

Analog Radio

ABC Radio 99.61% 99.84% 99.95% 99.72% 99.25% 99.77% 99.64% 85.14%

triple j 96.39% 97.89% 98.51% 95.05% 91.87% 95.64% 96.72% 72.63%

RN 99.10% 99.52% 99.75% 98.92% 97.50% 99.71% 99.33% 85.13%

Classic FM 96.83% 98.29% 98.57% 96.03% 92.64% 95.82% 96.72% 72.63%

ABC NEWS on radio 96.80% 98.29% 98.00% 94.54% 94.79% 98.09% 95.86% 76.88%

Digital Radio (incl Double J)

via DAB+1 63.16% 61.29% 72.30% 44.88% 78.14% 74.55% 46.22% 60.00%

via Digital Television (includes Double J and ABC Jazz only)2 98.60% 98.92% 99.55% 97.81% 97.85% 99.29% 98.58% 84.19%

via VAST 3 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Digital Television 98.60% 98.92% 99.55% 97.81% 97.85% 99.29% 98.58% 84.19%

Note: Population derived from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2016 Census data.

1 DAB+ services are provided in all state and territory capital cities. There are eleven digital radio services provided on this platform: ABC Radio, RN, triple j, ABC NEWS on radio, ABC Classic, Double J, ABC Jazz, triple j Unearthed, ABC Grandstand, ABC Country and ABC KIDS. NB: These figures are related to the ones provided in last year’s Annual Report, but with two additional two rows for clarity - as there are multiple ways to receive digital radio.

2 ABC provides two digital radio services on the digital television platform. During 2018-19, these were Double J and ABC Jazz.

3 ABC provides 47 digital radio services on the VAST platform. This includes 20 different regional and capital city versions of ABC Radio, as well as RN, triple j, ABC NEWS on radio, ABC Classic, ABC Classic 2, Double J, ABC Jazz, triple j Unearthed, ABC Grandstand, ABC Country and ABC KIDS. As the VAST platform is delivered via satellite, it is available to all Australians. The appropriate equipment (including a satellite dish) is required to access radio and television services via VAST.

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Capital works

Cladding In 2017-18, the ABC underwent an essential assessment of its building cladding at all ABC sites. The outcome revealed the ABC’s Ultimo building no longer complied with the current Building Code of Australia fire safety standards. As a result of recommendations following that assessment, the ABC undertook to remove and replace the combustible cladding.

Over the year, the atrium scaffolding, hoarding and tower crane installation necessary to facilitate the cladding replacement works were established, with 90% of internal scaffolding in place at the end of the period. External bounding construction work was commenced and work to service the façade replacement was well advanced, as was the replacement of internal safety systems such as smoke detectors, fire hydrants and emergency signage and the installation of new fire control panels.

The project team continues to identify, and implement actions to mitigate, various project related risks. Protecting the safety of ABC staff has been paramount throughout the process. Construction, fire safety, and remediation works will continue throughout 2019-20.

Ultimo Foyer The foyer upgrade project was completed in 2018-19 with the completion of the upgrade to the carpark entrance and appropriate security works. Minor upgrades were also completed to the foyer area including additional furniture and the installation of the Countdown signage.

Integrated Media System (IMS) The IMS project was completed in 2018-19, with its final site successfully implemented in Darwin in February 2019. Over its life, the project saw the implementation of the IMS into eight capital cities and 47 regional sites, with more than 3,100 users from across Radio, Regional, News, Content Services and Technology teams trained in its use.

Establishment of the IMS has enabled ease of content sharing not only between radio and news areas, but also between every ABC site around Australia. The project had set aside funding to assist with version upgrades in the capital cities, which are now underway and being managed by the Technology team.

News Studio Automation During 2018-19, the News Studio Automation project continued technical implementation of replacement hardware and software in ABC studios, and rolled out related operational training. The project was completed successfully in April 2019, with the last studio online in Sydney, coinciding with the upgrade of that location’s 7pm News set to create a high functioning facility. Currently all studio automation upgrades are in operation and running well.

Melbourne Accommodation Project (MAP) The Melbourne Accommodation Project was completed in the 2017-18 financial year with all facilities operational. Several minor post-completion works were commenced in 2018-19, including completion of a Terrace refurbishment which has provided the ABC Melbourne building with a usable, WHS-compliant outdoor facility for staff and broadcasts. Other works included replacement of essential waterproofing, TV Edit Suite conversion and studio lighting upgrades.

Renewing Adelaide Project The Renewing Adelaide Project reached practical completion on 3 April 2018. The SA Property team managed the Defects Liability Period of 12 months and it has been effectively extended after consultation with the builders. Outstanding defects comprising those relating to minor electrical services, architectural and acoustic aspects, and glazing are 98% complete. It is estimated that all works will be completed by September 2019.

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Government submissions In 2018-19, the ABC made 11 submissions to Government departments, Parliamentary committees and industry review bodies. These included submissions to the Australian Government Soft Power review, a response to the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission Digital Platforms Inquiry preliminary report, and a submission to the House Standing Committee on Communications and the Arts Inquiry into the Australian music industry.

The ABC’s reports, submissions and publications can be found at http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/.

Strategy The Strategy team leads the development, and supports the implementation, of the strategic priorities of the Corporation.

In 2018-19, this work included the development and delivery of a comprehensive five-year outlook on the ABC’s operating environment, drafting the ABC’s Corporate Plan, and supporting the articulation of divisional strategies. The team played a leading role in shaping ABC responses to public policy inquiries such as the ACMA review of the future delivery of radio services in Australia, the Government’s Competitive Neutrality Inquiry and the ACCC’s Digital Platforms Inquiry. The Strategy team also supported the ABC’s engagement with the Government’s Efficiency Review.

During the year, the team actively engaged with other Public Service Media and bodies such as the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and the Public Media Alliance (PMA), to identify, research and champion common themes such as opportunities for content collaboration and approaches to market challenges, and to support and strengthen policy development.

In November 2018, the Strategy team began reporting directly to the Managing Director. Together with the ABC’s content and support divisions, the Strategy team has worked to

deliver a sustainable ABC and invest in the ABC of the Future, and will continue to do so throughout 2019-20.

Audiences The ABC Audiences team manages the audience experience in a holistic way, which ensures that audiences are at the heart of everything the ABC does. The team is responsible for leading the ABC’s brand, data and audience strategies, and works collaboratively with content teams to lead an integrated approach across audience insights, branding, design, acquisition and retention, marketing and partnerships.

In 2018-19, the Audiences team sought to provide engagement opportunities both to audiences who infrequently use the ABC, by leveraging important national conversations and major initiatives, and to assist loyal audiences with ABC content that matched their interests. To do this, the team increased its focus on understanding audience needs through research and analytics. Audience strategy prioritised programs and initiatives that drove impact within communities, exemplified through initiatives such as the War on Waste and Invictus Games campaigns.

Australians care deeply about local matters, and data insights at the ABC confirms this. The Audiences team worked across radio and the 7pm News throughout 2018-19 to enhance awareness of the ABC’s local content and presenters. Core to the team’s strategy was building the ABC’s community profile.

In late 2018, a consolidated, multiskilled Audience Support function was created within the Audiences team. This was a response to the changing support needs of audiences, where there has been a decline in written and telephone contacts, and an increase in digital support needs. The core functions of the team are to provide multi-channel support, capture critical audience feedback and suggestions, and help inform business decisions.

Corporate services

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The Social Strategy team worked to improve discovery of ABC content by audiences. The team’s emphasis was on improving the effectiveness of ABC social properties through their consolidation, which resulted in a 50% decrease in the number of ABC social accounts and an improvement in overall audience engagement. Training in the more efficient publishing of content and improved governance was provided to social content creators.

Improvements were also made to the structure of Audience Data & Insights. As the ABC’s data and analytics needs have grown, so too have the skills in this area. This along with the team’s strong digital marketing skills have meant greater customer relationship management capability for the ABC.

ABC’s in-house creative team is called ABC MADE. They provide strategic, audience-centric creative solutions for all ABC brands, content, products and services. The multi-disciplinary team is comprised of television and radio promo producers, digital, print and motion designers, and production staff. In 2018, ABC MADE produced the large campaign around ABC Yours. In addition to larger brand projects, ABC MADE output more than 100 television promos and 400 radio promos per week in 2018-19. The team has been recognised locally and internationally for creative excellence.

Brand The Audiences team is responsible for managing the ABC brand. In August 2018, the ABC launched a new brand position, ABC Yours, to reflect the ABC’s role for all Australians. This work celebrated Australia’s rich and diverse culture and featured many community groups and individuals, who came together in a celebration of country and spirit. The iconic Seekers anthem I am Australian, reinterpreted by triple j Unearthed artist Emily Wurramara, was the soundtrack. High profile talent such as Tim Minchin and Jimmy Barnes gave their time, free of charge, to tell warm, passionate and heartfelt ABC stories. The brand campaign rolled out throughout the year and was highly regarded by audiences.

The ABC has gradually been evolving all brand logos away from the chrome logo (the lissajous or ABC ‘worm’), to a block logo, in line with digital accessibility requirements and the increasing amount of online content. In 2018-19 this included the rebranding of regional radio stations, creating new aural and visual identities. The Audiences team also simplified ABC Classic FM to ABC Classic, to focus on its vision to be the home of classical music for all Australians on radio, online, via the ABC listen app or through album releases.

Audience support

Managing audience feedback The Audience Support function was centralised within the Audiences team in September 2018. The team collates audience feedback from a range of audience touchpoints including:

• the ABC’s national switchboard

• reception/transmission assistance

• iview

• ABC KIDS and ABC ME apps

• ABC listen app

• ABC NEWS app

• triple j app

• the ‘Contact the ABC’ webform

• letters.

The table below sets out the volume of audience feedback received by contact channel between 30 September 2018 and 30 June 2019:

Contact channel Volume % of Total

Phone calls* 87,300 62.5

Webform/letters 35,607 25.5

App contacts 16,833 12.0

Total 139,740 100.0

* includes business transfers.

Of the audience feedback received, written complaints alleging a breach of the ABC Code of Practice or ABC Editorial Policies were referred to Audience and Consumer Affairs, a separate unit within the ABC (see pages 147).

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Key feedback matters In 2018-19, contact from the ABC’s listeners, viewers and online audiences involved mixed responses to a wide range of matters, with the following being key contact drivers:

• coverage of the visit to Australia by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex for the opening of the Invictus Games

• coverage of the Invictus Games

• New Year’s Eve coverage

• Australia Day programming including the Australian of the Year Awards ceremony through to the Australia Day live concert

• current affairs panel program The Drum

• the Al-Jazeera documentary How To Sell A Massacre

• the Q&A: Budget Special, along with coverage of the federal election campaign and a range of election specials on The Drum, and Australia Votes: Election Night Live

• news coverage around Cardinal George Pell, the mosque attack in Christchurch, and the broadcast of the Christchurch Memorial Service

• the raid of the ABC offices by the Australian Federal Police in June 2019 in relation to The Afghan Files

• Bob Hawke’s State Memorial Service.

During the period there were several technical issues that fuelled audience feedback:

• a technical fault in the Melbourne studio in October 2018, during what was to be long-time newsreader Ian Henderson’s final  7pm News bulletin.

• iview users experiencing issues connecting to iview via their Telstra TV early in January 2019.

• the Latest News Bulletin feature disappearing briefly from the ABC listen app in late April.

• an outage in May requiring the reinstallation of the iview app on Samsung, Sony and LG TVs.

• an inadvertent publishing delay of the Insiders program on iview the morning after the federal election.

• an unplanned outage affecting ABC TV transmission in the Nowra North area in late May 2019.

New and returning programs receiving positive feedback this year across the Children’s, Drama and Factual genres included Bluey, Don’t Stop the Music, Employable Me, Killing Eve, Rosehaven, Spicks and Specks Reunion Special, The Heights, The Recording Studio, The Set, and perennial favourite You Can’t Ask That.

Legal Services In 2018-19, ABC Legal focused on four objectives:

• providing quality legal services

• supporting and developing its people through mentoring and training

• encouraging innovation

• sharing knowledge within the team.

Working closely with the General Counsel, a Head of Legal Operations role was created to drive these objectives, and the team looked at ways to build capacity, improve consistency and quality assurance, better manage risk, and enhance its ability to analyse and report on the work executed by the team. A dedicated Pre-Publication team was created, to enhance the provision of high quality 24/7 media law advice, and the Rights Management team was returned to the ABC Legal umbrella. The entire team moved to open plan workspaces to promote knowledge sharing and teamwork, and the implementation of automated document-signing and contract creation processes aided efficiency. The team is currently working on digital advice applications that will assist content makers in assessing their own content against legal risk.

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ABC Legal launched three online media law training modules during the period, as well as a comprehensive training schedule for content makers around Australia in areas including defamation, contempt of court and investigative journalism risks. The team refreshed its rights training for content makers, which it plans to deliver across the Corporation in 2019-20, and ran a series of tailored in-house training sessions for its people.

Legal was involved in a number of major projects across the ABC in 2018-19, including:

• managing the search warrant served by the Australian Federal Police in relation to ABC reporting on Australian military in Afghanistan

• defending the ABC in the McLachlan and Chau Chak defamation matters

• advising the ABC on reporting the Pell proceedings

• advising on preparation of the supplementary submission to the Competitive Neutrality Inquiry and assisting the Right to Know coalition with submissions concerning reform of the Defamation Act 2005 (the NSW Act)

• playing an integral role in the pan-ABC Rights Project to develop a new rights strategy and acquire a new digital rights system for the ABC

• advising on various international strategies.

ABC Legal provided advice to the Corporation following the termination of the former Managing Director’s appointment, the resignation of the former ABC Chair, and throughout the Departmental and subsequent Senate inquiries into allegations of political interference in the ABC.

The team’s business-as-usual work included:

• in addition to daily rolling news coverage and current affairs, providing pre-publication advice to content-makers across the ABC on more than 500 programs, podcasts and investigations

• successfully resolving or defending more than 120 complaints across a broad range of areas including defamation, copyright and contempt

• responding to more than 40 external requests for program material, and handling over 15 challenges to suppression orders and applications for court material

• corporate governance and privacy work

• settling finance, production and rights agreements for over 100 audio and audio-visual productions including the Invictus Games, Mystery Road Series 2, Les Norton, Stateless, Australia Day, Stargazing - the Moon and Beyond and Bluey Series 2

• drafting and negotiating a range of technology related contracts including for cloud services and the acquisition of hardware and software and support services

• working on significant property matters including the replacement of cladding on the ABC Ultimo building and the potential sale of the ABC’s Gordon Street property in Melbourne, and assisting with contracts relating to construction and property management and maintenance

• assisting ABC Commercial with activities such as content licensing, book and magazine publishing, and music recording, licensing and publishing

• undertaking copyright clearances, rights assessments for re-use and supply, and the coordination of repeat fees and residuals for myriad programs and services.

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Responsibility 127

Baker Boy performs at New Year’s Eve 2018 - the Night is Yours. Image: Jared Leibowitz

Responsibility

Contents Corporate responsibility 128

Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context 129

Environmental responsibility 132

Social responsibility 136

Management of corporate responsibility The ABC contributes significant social value to the Australian community and is committed to conducting its day-to-day activities with integrity, diligence, and transparency, and to maintaining public trust. Responsibility for implementing and demonstrating corporate social responsibility rests with every ABC employee. The ABC’s Corporate Responsibility Policy reinforces the ABC’s commitment to acting ethically and responsibly in all areas of its operations. The Policy outlines the ABC’s commitment to key principles of corporate social responsibility, which include adhering to relevant laws and regulations, respecting human rights, being accountable and transparent, and engaging in a collegiate manner with both internal and external stakeholder groups.

Reporting performance The ABC reports its corporate responsibility and sustainability performance each financial year in the Annual Report, with additional information available throughout the year on the Corporate Responsibility webpage at http://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/ whatguides-us/corporate-responsibility/. Other than references to the ABC’s international activities, the Annual Report is limited to domestic operations within the direct control of the ABC. Sustainability information about the ABC’s investments in MediaHub Australia Pty Limited, Freeview Australia Limited and National DAB Licence Company Limited is not included in the report. Any additional limitations to the scope or completeness of particular data are identified within the reported data.

The ABC is guided by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Reporting Guidelines and the associated Media Sector Supplement document to report its performance.1 The GRI framework provides a common language for organisations to measure and report their sustainability performance so that stakeholders can view a more complete picture of the organisation’s financial and non-financial activities and performance.

Stakeholder inclusiveness The ABC provides myriad opportunities for its audiences and other stakeholders to provide input into the content and activities of the Corporation. In 2018-19, mechanisms for engaging with external stakeholders included:

• the ABC Corporate Tracking Program

• the ABC Quality & Distinctiveness Study (via YourABC)

• formal audience contacts and complaints processes (see pages 124 and 147)

• ABC Advisory Council processes (see page 52)

• online feedback mechanisms specific to ABC content areas

• the ABC’s social media properties.

Contact The ABC welcomes feedback on the 2018 Corporate Responsibility Report. Comments, questions or other feedback can be addressed to:

The Annual Report Coordinator Australian Broadcasting Corporation 700 Harris Street

Ultimo NSW 2007 Ph +61 2 8333 1500 http://www.abc.net.au/contact/contactabc.htm

Corporate responsibility

1 Version G3.1.

128 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Protecting freedom of expression Article 19 of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights recognises freedom of expression as a fundamental human right. Freedom of expression is enshrined in the ABC Editorial Policies. The ABC’s commitment to impartiality and diversity of perspectives reflects the importance of diverse sources of reliable information and a plurality of views within a healthy democracy. In pursuing impartiality, the ABC is guided by the following:

• a balance that follows the weight of evidence

• fair treatment

• open-mindedness

• opportunities over time for principal relevant perspectives on matters of contention to be expressed.

The ABC seeks to balance the public interest in disclosure of information and freedom of expression with respect for privacy.

Accessibility of content and services In 2018-19 the ABC continued to improve the accessibility of its content and services.

Improving access for people with a hearing impediment Captioning is the process by which speech or scenes are described in text for viewing on-screen. Closed captioning indicates the availability of text that can be activated by users if required. The ABC provides a closed captioning service for its television services ABC main channel, ABC COMEDY, ABC KIDS, ABC ME and ABC NEWS.

In 2018-19, captions were available on 99.9% of programs broadcast on ABC main channel between 6am and midnight and 72% of those broadcast on ABC COMEDY between 7.30pm and midnight. 73% of the content on ABC ME and 78% of the content on ABC KIDS was captioned.

More than 55% of content broadcast on ABC NEWS was also captioned and where available included signing for the hearing impaired. Closed captions were also available with much of the programming on iview including iview exclusive content.

The ABC provides greater access to key events by providing captions for broadcasts such as Anzac Day marches and memorial services, and Australia Day events. Other notable events were captioned during 2018-19. As part of the ABC’s coverage of New Year’s Eve, the ABC featured an audio description of the Sydney fireworks and celebrations, availably nationally on ABC Local Radio, digital radio and through the ABC listen app.

Improving access for people with a visual impairment In 2018-19, 23 titles published by ABC Books were made available through ReadHowYouWant, an Australian service that offers print-on-demand reformat publishing for people unable to read standard formatted books. Text is enlarged and customised to suit the capabilities of the reader. ABC Audio provided an extensive range of genre and age-diverse audio books accessible to the vision impaired and people with a print disability. In 2018-19, ABC Audio released 90 titles in both physical and digital formats, through licence agreement with audio book publisher Bolinda. Of those, 11 included ABC-devised content, 51 were adult titles and 39 were children’s titles.

Work was undertaken throughout 2018-19 to improve the accessibility of graphics used on social media platforms. A style guide was created for social media producers outlining appropriate colour options, contrast and text size. Several program websites were updated with assistive technologies such as screen readers and navigation switches for people with impaired vision, and optimised for easy reading on more devices, including smartphones and tablets.

Corporate responsibility in a broadcasting context

Responsibility 129

Digital accessibility The ABC strives for equal access to its digital websites, mobile applications and documents by people with limited vision, hearing, speech, mobility or cognition, in accordance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0).

In 2018-19, the ABC made many events and programs broadly available, including the Hottest 100 and Classic 100 polls and countdowns, the Invictus Games, Heywire 2019, NAIDOC Week and the inaugural DisRupted initiative.

Australians turn to the ABC for information about elections, candidates and event coverage. In 2019, the complex details and data for election coverage were provided for everyone in accessible, digestible formats through the ABC NEWS website, helping Australians make informed decisions. Further initiatives to improve access included new ways to search ABC content, a reimagined iview Connected TV application, consumer support for services like ABC iview and the evolution of the ABC’s Digital Language System (a library of reusable, accessible components that steers product development). Apps such as triple j, ABC listen and ABC NEWS enjoyed ongoing improvements for use by everyone.

Reports, publications and other resources were made readable and usable for all. These included the ABC Annual Report 2018 and the ABC Equity & Diversity Report 2018 and a range of educational aids and games.

Protecting young or vulnerable audiences The ABC’s Editorial Policy framework sets out guidelines to protect vulnerable audiences such as children. Advice and training in the ABC Editorial Policies is delivered on an ongoing basis. Upward referral - a key concept within the policies - ensures complex decisions are not made in isolation.

All television programs other than news, current affairs and sporting events, are classified and scheduled for broadcast in accordance with the ABC’s Associated Standard on Television Program Classification. The ABC ensures that graphic or distressing news content is preceded by a warning, to give readers, listeners or viewers the opportunity to avoid the content if they choose. Content created especially for children and available on iview or apps is accompanied by classification advice and warnings where appropriate. As with broadcast, children’s content on digital properties is restricted to G and PG. Both the ABC KIDS iview and ABC ME apps, along with the main iview service, include a parental filter so parents can control their children’s viewing boundaries.

The ABC’s websites and apps for children follow strict protocols to minimise risk to children and protect their privacy. With the creation of content and experiences for children across all platforms, consideration of sensitivities and risk is paramount. The online protection of children is a shared responsibility between the ABC, the parent/ guardian, and the child. The ABC aims to ensure that children and young people who engage with the ABC’s online spaces understand the possible risks they face and how to minimise them. Providing information about online safety is encouraged on ABC platforms designed for children.

ABC Regional & Local’s user-generated content projects, ABC Open1 and Heywire, have clear moderation guidelines that address how they handle sensitive content and ‘at risk’ contributors or audiences. Measures can be implemented to protect contributors and audience members. In addition to being guided by the editorial policies, Heywire consulted with a range of youth mental health organisations such as Headspace to create a Code of Conduct for all adults attending Heywire events, which provides advice on how participants can be supported and any possible harms reduced.

1 ABC Open was decommissioned on 30 June 2019. All contributions have been retained and are available. The ABC’s new audience-image portal, ABC My Photo, will be launched in 2019-20.

130 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Where required, steps are taken to protect the anonymity of young contributors who are writing about sensitive issues, such as domestic violence or mental illness. Contributors are invited to use an alias and generic file images when writing about sensitive topics. On occasion, details may be edited or removed from a contribution or user profile to protect the identity of the author. Contributors are also encouraged to avoid sharing this kind of content on their personal social media accounts if there is a chance they could be identified as the author.

triple j has strategies in place to ensure its younger audiences are protected from harm and offence. Editorial content which is likely to cause harm or offence to younger sections of the audience is scheduled in appropriate time periods such as later in the evening. The Hook Up, for example, which discusses sex and relationships, is programmed for after 9pm on Sundays. Warnings are given before playing music containing language or content that is assessed as likely to offend the triple j audience and prior to other types of content which risk causing harm to vulnerable audiences.

All ABC DVD product is subject to formal classification by the Classification Board, and appropriate warnings/guides are attached to each product. ABC CDs display appropriate warnings regarding language and content. ABC Commercial’s Events business contracts event management to third party promoters. Under these event management contracts, promoters are required to warrant that all venues will be safe and fit for purpose. The contracts also stipulate promoters must conduct themselves in accordance with all international, national, federal, state, and local laws, and treaties. ABC Commercial’s promoter agreements explicitly ensure current compliance with state and territory-based legislation regarding working with children.

Improving digital literacy Enhancing digital literacy promotes better understanding the digital environment in which so many Australians now engage. ABC teams

regularly review their content and projects in response to audience needs, behaviours and expectations in an increasingly digital world.

In 2018, a new role was created in the Regional & Local team to lead work on increasing and supporting digital literacy, and in September 2018, the ABC held its inaugural Media Literacy Week to help audiences navigate the modern media landscape. More than 50 pieces of original content were created for a range of platforms and programs across the week, including interactives, community competitions and teacher guides.

A Media Literacy Week site was created, and online resources produced by ABC Education assisted school students to better distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate (‘real’ and ‘fake’) news sources. The team also broadcast the series Citizen Code to teach young people to protect themselves in the face of cryptology, big data, tracking and cookies, and to provide education about social media and other virtual realities. As part of the week, and in collaboration with the University of Tasmania, the ABC convened Navigating the News, the first Australian conference to bring media organisations, academics and educators together to discuss how to build trust in public-interest journalism and advance community media literacy.

In 2018-19, Play School themed a week of episodes ‘Gadgets and Gizmos’, showing preschoolers how to code a robot and create simple tablet animations to tell stories. BtN provided practical digital literacy content for primary school-aged audiences. For older children, Good Game Spawn Point covered the need for balanced and healthy online habits in its ‘Gamer Life’ series, and developed the ‘How to Build a Computer’ series for computer newbies. triple j’s Hack and ABC News continued to educate via regular content focused on media literacy, with coverage of matters such as online scams, catfishing, trolling, cryptocurrencies, online dating, and the impact of data breaches.

Responsibility 131

Energy In 2018-19, overall ABC energy consumption decreased slightly, with a 1% change from 2017-18.

The nature of ABC business, and in particular its reliance on technology, necessarily involves high levels of energy consumption. This is reflected in energy use figures for New South Wales where there is a significant concentration of the ABC’s workforce and production. Energy reduction initiatives in 2017-18 included:

• LED was nominated for all light replacements

• inverter AC replacement units were installed

• staff were encouraged and reminded to contribute to energy saving by switching off HVAC and lighting when not required in their workplace.

Solar hot water systems are installed in 10 ABC sites: Port Macquarie and Newcastle (NSW), Canberra (ACT), Brisbane and Gold Coast (Qld), Port Pirie (SA), Launceston (Tas), Albany and Broome (WA), and Alice Springs (NT). The impact of solar hot water usage on ABC energy consumption is not currently measured.

Energy consumption 2018-19

State/ Territory 2018-19 2017-18

% change (from actual)

Total GJ Total GJ

NSW 70,509 71,047 -1%

ACT 4,906 4,982 -1%

Vic 25,900 31,984 -5%

Qld 13,326 13,680 -1%

SA 16,410 16,321 0.1%

WA 10,431 9,504 1%

Tas 7,285 7,348 1%

NT 4,920 4,810 1.6%

Total ABC 153,687 159,676 -1%

Emissions The ABC uses the National Green Accounts (NGA) factors published by the Department of the Environment and Energy to identify and quantify greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2018-19, the ABC captured electricity data via the BidEnergy platform for electricity, while data for diesel generators and gas consumption was manually extracted.

There was a 8.8% decrease in emissions overall in 2018-19, when compared with 2017-18 levels.

Environmental responsibility

Emissions 2018-19 Categories / Measure Raw Figures 2018-19 2017-18

%

Change Energy 2018-19 2017-18

Scope 1 Scope 2

Scope 3

GHG t CO2-e Scope 1

Scope 2

Scope 3

GHG t CO2-e

Electricity /kWH 37,684,184 38,314,895 29,484 4,534 34,018 0 32,760 4,590 37,350 -1.10%

Natural gas /MJ 18,074,000 19,238,483 981 0 368 1,349 1,327 0 265 1,592 -1.20%

Generation Energy % Change -2.30%

Diesel Oil/L 19,117 8,200 46 46 20 0 0 20 43.00%

Diesel Oil % Change 43.00%

Transport E10/L 91,384 60,406 190 31 221 126 0 20 146 40.00%

Auto Gasoline (petrol)/L 104,115 180,252 241 13 254 417 0 22 439 -40.00%

Auto Diesel (transport)/L 223,985 178,519 610 31 641 486 0 25 511 20.00%

Transport Fuel % Change 20.00%

All categories 419,484 419,177 2,068 29,484 4,977 36,529 2,376 32,760 4,922 40,058

Overall GHG % Change -8.80%

132 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Waste and recycling The ABC’s national waste contractor maps the waste profile of each ABC site and makes the information available to the Corporation through an online portal.

Recycled and landfill waste 2018-19 State/Territory 2018-19 2017-18 % change

Recycled m3

Landfill m3

Recycled m3

Landfill m3

Recycled m3

Landfill m3

NSW 1936 2338 1,635 1,305 18% 79%

ACT 97 194 97 181 0% 7%

Vic 144 692 203 699 -29% -1%

Qld 454 1082 267 320 70% 238%

SA** 319 14 987 0

WA 142 355 121 382 17% -7%

Tas 93 330 124 240 -25% 38%

NT 84 84 31.9 208 163% -60%

Total ABC 3,269 5,089 2,480 3,637 32% 40%

** The waste disposal data that informs this report is sourced from billing information of the ABC’s national waste contractors for the capital cities and regional centres that are not serviced by the local council. Council data is not available.

Increase in waste volumes in Queensland over 2018-19 can be attributed to two factors: firstly, streamlining of loading dock operations has all tenancy waste picked up by the ABC’s national contractor, with the ABC subsequently invoicing the properties’ other tenants; secondly, data is now recorded in regional sites where previously waste was not collected via the national contractor.

Targeted initiatives to reduce waste across the ABC sites in 2018-19 included:

• the Southbank (Vic) Simply Cups initiative, which resulted in 17,856 coffee cups diverted from landfill

• a water fountain installation in Southbank (Vic) to reduce plastic bottles going to landfill - in excess of 500 bottles were diverted from landfill in the first month

• the recycling of toners via Planet Ark’s collection program Close the Loop

• the recycling of old mobile phones via Mobile Muster

• the collection of e-waste and batteries by SUEZ

• zip water dispensers for hot and cold filtered water were installed in the Perth site

• the continued removal of under desk bins at several locations, to increase recycling and reduce general waste - in the Adelaide site, all desk bins have been removed in both the ABC’s office and all tenancies in the building and have been replaced by bin stations.

Gardening Australia’s Costa Georgiadis. Image: Malcolm Sutton

Responsibility 133

Environmental sustainability in the supply chain

Travel and transport Although the nature of the ABC’s operations, in particular its news and current affairs activities, necessitates frequent domestic and international travel, the ABC encourages employees to reduce domestic travel. Whenever possible, employees are encouraged to consider the use of video conferencing and other alternatives to travel. Facilities for employees who walk or cycle to work are provided at most capital city and some regional sites, and include secure bike parking, showers and lockers.

Travel by air There was a 3.1% decrease in kilometres flown by ABC employees in 2018-19, compared to the previous year.

2018-19 2017-18 Difference

Domestic kms flown 19,004,347 20,241,229 -6.1%

International kms flown 8,845,585 8,484,853 4.3%

Total 27,849,932 28,726,082 -3.1%

Domestic fleet travel In 2018-19, there was an increase in domestic fleet vehicle travel, with kilometres travelled up 6% on the 2017-18 figure. Of the 311 vehicles in the ABC Fleet, increased from 307 in 2017-18, 37 were owned and 274 were leased by the ABC. Fourteen were hybrid vehicles, which equates to 4.5% of the fleet.

2018-19 2017-18 Difference

Domestic kms travelled 3,577,790 3,384,659 195,350

No of vehicles 311 307 4

Heritage Strategy The ABC has prepared a Heritage Strategy in accordance with section 341ZA of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (the EPBC Act). The EPBC Act sets out the ABC’s responsibilities to protect and conserve the Commonwealth Heritage values of places that it owns or controls. The Strategy is intended to inform the Minister and the Australian Heritage Council of the identification, assessment and monitoring of those places.

The ABC’s 2018-2021 Strategy was approved by the Department of Environment and Energy, which administers the EPBA Act, in September 2018 and is available online.

ABC Rural reporter Charlie McKillop.

134 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Water In 2018-19, the ABC’s water consumption was reduced overall by 7.85% on the previous period.

Water consumption State/Territory 2018-19 2017-18

kL kL % change

NSW 33,340 41,911 -20%

ACT 763 664 15%

Vic 6,223 6,651 -6%

Qld 4,004 3,008 33%

SA 8,551 8,295 3%

WA 6,743 6,336 6%

Tas 3,188 2,276 40%

NT 1,820 973 87%

Total ABC 64,632 70,144 -7.85%

* Total ABC consumption includes 8 out of 8 capital city sites and 28 out of 52 regional sites.

The ABC collected rainwater at 14 separate ABC sites across the country, with most of the water collected used in toilet cisterns or for watering gardens. More than 360kL of rainwater was collected, a significant increase on the 2017-18 figure of 271kL.

Rainwater collection State/ Territory Location Capacity Quantity

Total Capacity (kL)

NSW Orange

Port Macquarie

Wollongong Victoria St

Wagga Wagga

2,100

500

750

2,200

1

6

3

1

2.1

3.0

2.3

2.2

WA East Perth

Broome - Hamersley St

11,365

5,819

10,000

2

2

1

22.7

11.6

10.0

SA Port Pirie 10,000 1 10.0

Vic Sale *

Bendigo *

Southbank

13,000

24,500

90,000

1

1

1

13.0

24.5

90

NT Alice Springs 4,500 1 4.5

Qld Brisbane - Southbank

Gold Coast

Longreach

25,000

5,000

10,000

6

1

1

150.0

5.0

10.0

TOTAL 360.9

Responsibility 135

Times of emergency There was a sharp increase in the number and severity of natural disasters in Australia over 2018-19, with Emergency Broadcasting provided during 371 separate events - compared to 256 in 2017-18. Changes were made to the structure of the emergency broadcasting team to respond to this increase and provide additional support to affected communities.

Details regarding ABC emergency broadcasting can be found in the chapter Yours in the Community (pages 51-64).

Content impact The ABC’s Content Teams aim to make a difference for their audiences, through the impact of the content they create, and in the communities they engage with, work with and portray. Delivering effective environmental, cultural and social change is part of what drives ABC content makers.

Coverage of the Invictus Games (see page 41) raised awareness of adaptive sport and mental health issues. For the daily television update show Invictus Games Today, the production team sent scripts to captioners to obtain superior captions for a live program. Producers were briefed about the importance of protecting vulnerable audiences and the appropriate

approach and language to use when interviewing people with physical and mental illnesses. The show was co-hosted by disability advocate and wheelchair tennis champion Dylan Alcott. Dylan also co-hosted the ABC’s new live music show The Set throughout the year.

ABC serial drama The Heights and children’s series Hardball also featured people living with disabilities in leading roles and in 2018, the ABC Children’s team partnered with Screen Australia on DisRupted, an initiative supporting and showcasing the best of Australia’s next generation of content makers living with disability.

Employable Me promoted opportunities for jobseekers with disability while providing a window for viewers into their lives, and

You Can’t Ask That continued to enlighten Australians about the challenges and realities of misunderstood groups. The 2018 ABC telemovie Riot, which explored Australia’s 1970s gay liberation movement, became an official part of NSW Police officer training in 2018-19. For the Hottest 100 in January 2019, triple j teamed up with Lifeline to raise more than $700,000, ensuring the suicide prevention charity’s volunteers can attend to around 4,000 additional calls each year.

To address gender imbalance in daily news reporting, ABC News initiated a pilot program called the 50:50 Project to increase female contribution and representation in broadcast and digital services. Discussion program The Drum continued to broaden the diversity of its panels in 2019, with its new longer format allowing more time for discussion and more people on the desk. The panels skew female and actively seek to bring expertise from diverse participants across culture, religion, politics, socioeconomics and physical abilities.

The Asia Pacific Newsroom in Melbourne significantly directed its attention to digital reporting for language groups. Original reporting in languages other than English saw growth in page views and engagement times.

Social responsibility

Don’t Stop the Music Don’t Stop the Music saw more than 8,000 musical instruments donated and $90,000 raised to support music programs in schools. The program followed

a school principal as she joined forces with musical experts and singing superstar Guy Sebastian on a mission to transform the lives of disadvantaged kids

through the power of music.

136 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

1 University of Technology, Sydney Institute of Sustainable Futures ‘War on Waste Impact Report’ (co-developed with ABC).

War on Waste There can be little doubt of the impact of the ABC’s War on Waste program and associated initiatives. One in two (56%) Australians were aware of War on Waste and the campaign contributed to major social and environmental change across Australia. A report by the University of Technology Sydney and the ABC identified 452 high-impact waste reduction initiatives by schools, hospitals, businesses, governments and community groups that were inspired by the series.1 Among these were:

• Woolworths’ decision to remove plastic straws from its stores in Australia and New Zealand

• the Western Australian Government’s banning of single-use plastic bags

• a surge in cafes offering discounts to customers with reusable cups, preventing almost 61 million single-use cups from ending up in landfill

• schools introducing co-mingled recycling and e-waste collections

• hospitality businesses banning single-use plastic straws

• hospitals and clinics introducing recycling systems and replacing single-use plastics and polystyrene with reusable products

Educational resources and a Community Action Toolkit created with online environmental action facilitator Good For The Hood were provided to empower community groups and individuals to improve their waste reduction. The Toolkit has been downloaded more than 5,000 times as communities continue to benefit from the War on Waste.

War on Waste presenter Craig Reucassel.

Responsibility 137

Social responsibility in the community

Community service announcements Local Radio stations provide information about issues relevant to local listeners, including announcements for appeals that support communities. Stations also undertake emergency service announcements as part of the ABC’s emergency broadcasting work.

Humanitarian appeals The ABC works with Australian and international aid agencies during crises and humanitarian aid appeals when it is appropriate and possible to do so, highlighting the work of these agencies as they attempt to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare and other forms of relief. The ABC Appeals website at http://www.abc.net.au/ appeals/ provides information about current crises and suggests appropriate agencies to which audiences can donate.

In 2018 the ABC supported the Red Cross Australian drought appeal, and in February 2019 the ABC supported the Australian Red Cross Society, GIVIT, the Salvation Army, St Vincent de Paul Society Queensland and Uniting Care in raising funds to assist those affected by the floods in Far North Queensland.

Connecting with communities The ABC continued to focus on connecting with all Australian communities throughout 2018-19, both directly and through its broadcasting services. Additionally, ABC International Development (ABCID) enables partner organisations in the Indo-Pacific region to pursue quality journalism, engaging storytelling and building strong local connections. These many and varied relationships are detailed in the Yours in the Community chapter (pages 51-64).

ABC presenter Ali Clarke, Pippa Wanganeen and Foodbank CEO Greg Pattinson accept donations at the ABC Radio Adelaide Christmas Foodbank Food Drive

138 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Social responsibility in the supply chain Modern slavery practices are major violations of human rights and serious crimes, including trafficking in persons, slavery, slavery-like practices including forced labour and the worst forms of child labour. The Commonwealth Modern Slavery Act 2018 came into effect on 1 January 2019 and the ABC is now considering the application of the Act across its supply chain including implementation activities in relation to the four key mandatory reporting criteria, being:

1. the ABC’s structure, operations and supply chains

2. possible modern slavery risks

3. actions to assess and address modern slavery risks, including due diligence and remediation processes

4. how the ABC assesses the effectiveness of its actions.

The ABC is currently developing a program to address these key criteria with the aim to provide the first ABC Board approved statement on its progress by the initial reporting date of December 2020.

Social responsibility in the workplace Information about the ABC’s values at work, workplace health and safety, and diversity in the workplace, can be found in pages 103-114. The ABC’s employees are also committed to creating a wealth of content that reflects the diversity of its audiences. Information about the ABC’s social investment via its content can be found in ‘Content impact’ on page 136, and throughout the Annual Report.

Mental health in the workplace The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) was available to all ABC employees and their immediate family members during 2018-19. The EAP service is provided by Converge International and comprises confidential short-term counselling service for a broad range of personal and work-related issues, in addition to specific advice through CareerAssist, ManagerAssist, MoneyAssist, FamilyAssist and LegalAssist. All EAP services are available 24/7 both locally and internationally.

During 2018-19, ABC Staff were provided with access to additional dedicated telephone helplines offering specialised support for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander peoples, LGBTQI, Domestic & Family Violence, Eldercare, and Disability and Carers.

The ABC Trauma and Resilience Program provides employees access to specialist clinicians on a confidential referral basis. Employees affected by potentially traumatic events in the course of their work are able to access up to 6 sessions. Employees appointed to international bureaux are provided with a dedicated clinician for the duration of their appointment. Employees are also able to access peer-to-peer psychological first aid through the Trauma Peer Support program. At the end of 2018-19, there were 77 peer support leaders across the organisation.

In 2018-19, the ABC continued to offer professional assistance and counselling through redundancy and career transition specialists Trevor-Roberts, who were primarily utilised in cases of redundancy. The service assisted participants in dealing with the impact of being made redundant as well as guidance with analysing career options, resume preparation and developing job search and interview skills. The services are available to those made redundant for six months after leaving the ABC.

Responsibility 139

Product responsibility

Product information and labelling The ABC ensures all products are appropriately labelled. No changes to the ABC’s policy or practices regulating product information or labelling were made during 2018-19. If applicable, packaging displays information about appropriate disposal of the packaging. ABC licensed merchandise packaging is clearly marked if it is a potential hazard.

Quality assurance All licensees of ABC branded merchandise have contractual obligations to manufacture high quality products that meet Australian Standards applicable to the product. Children’s products are safety tested to the Standards AS/NZS ISO 8124 parts 1, 2 and 3 if applicable. Products aimed at adults also may be required to be tested to relevant standards. Licensees are required to provide certificates to prove the test results. If there are no applicable Australian Standards or testing procedures for a product aimed at children, the ABC requires that licensees or manufacturers perform tests that conform to

American or European testing, to safeguard product safety and quality. Licensees test for colourfastness, shrinkage and flammability of apparel products. These products are required to meet retailers’ individual standards.

Product complaints and recalls In 2018-19, there were no product recalls or instances of non-compliance with safety standards associated with products produced, distributed, licensed or sold by the ABC. In light of the legislated requirement to report death within 48 hours to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) any products that have caused, or may cause, serious injury, the ABC developed a comprehensive Product Recall Procedure. The procedure covers all products that ABC Commercial produces, distributes, licenses, and sells. The procedure stipulates that once a product recall has been initiated, the ACCC guidelines are followed. Customer safety and satisfaction is of paramount concern to the ABC when it comes to the creation and distribution of quality products and services.

Protecting privacy Information about the ABC’s compliance with privacy obligations can be found on page 146.

Tiana, Ryan, Eric, Krystyna, Kiah and Paul in Employable Me Series 2.

140 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Accountability 141

Double J Mornings presenter and ABC Music Correspondent Zan Rowe. Image: Jared Leibowitz

Accountability

Contents Corporate governance 142

Risk 143

Audit 144

Corporate reporting 145

Privacy 146

Editorial complaints management 147

Enabling legislation ABC corporate objectives, strategies, policies and activities derive from the requirements of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 (the ABC Act). In particular, section 6 of the Act, the ABC Charter, outlines the functions of the Corporation and section 8 lays out the duties of the Board (see Appendix 1, page 210). The ABC Act expressly provides for both the editorial and administrative independence of the Corporation, thereby investing the Board with considerable discretion. In acknowledgement of that independence, the ABC accepts the obligation to meet the highest standards of public accountability.

Responsible Minister The ABC is an agency within the portfolio of the Australian Department of Communications and the Arts.

From 1 July 2018 to 29 May 2019, the responsible minister was Senator the Honourable Mitch Fifield, Minister for Communications and the Arts.

From 29 May 2019 to the end of the reporting period, the responsible minister was the Honourable Paul Fletcher MP, Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts.

Governance and management processes

Board governance The roles and responsibilities of the Board are described in Appendix 1 (see page 210).

The ABC Board held six scheduled meetings during 2018-19. In addition, the non-executive Directors of the Board met on 13 additional occasions. The Risk & Audit Committee met on six occasions, the People & Remuneration Committee met on four occasions, and the Editorial Committee met on two occasions. Further information about the ABC Board and its Committees is provided in Appendix 2 (see pages 211-14).

Management processes Throughout 2018-19, the Managing Director or Acting Managing Director chaired weekly meetings of the ABC Executive Leadership Team, comprising Team Directors and the Heads of specialist support units reporting to them, to ensure oversight of business-as-usual processes as well as address any topical matters. The Leadership team also attended longer monthly meetings to discuss and make decisions regarding strategic, operational, compliance and other issues.

Corporate governance

142 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The ABC’s governance framework includes a number of executive, advisory and working groups that provide guidance and leadership around areas such as digital strategy, risk management, information technology, work health and safety, content planning and collaboration, and policy development.

Corporate Plan The ABC’s strategy is informed by the broader corporate objectives and outcomes in the ABC Corporate Plan.

The requirement to prepare a corporate plan in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (the PGPA Act) came into effect on 1 July 2015. Under section 35 of the PGPA Act, the accountable authority of the ABC is required to prepare a corporate plan at least once each reporting period. The corporate plan must be prepared in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (the PGPA Rule). The ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 was prepared in accordance with the requirements of the PGPA Act and PGPA Rule and is published on the ABC’s corporate website at http://about.abc.net.au/reports-publications/.

The ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 also meets the requirements of section 31B(1) of the ABC Act by outlining the overall strategies and policies that the Corporation will follow to ensure that the Board fulfils its duties under section 8 of the ABC Act, and includes a forecast of the revenue and expenditure of the Corporation and its subsidiaries, including a forecast of capital expenditure and borrowings.

In 2018-19, the Strategy team continued to lead the development and implementation of ABC strategy and planning. For more on their activities see page 123.

The ABC Risk team is responsible for the continued refinement of the ABC risk management framework. This includes providing counsel to the Board and management on how to identify, assess and manage risk.

In 2018-19, the Risk team continued to refine the way in which risk incidents were recorded and analysed, so as to provide close to real-time insights to the Board and management on the effectiveness of the risk management framework. The team also continued to develop a comprehensive all employee program of risk related learning and development, that will support the enhancement of a positive risk culture and help maintain risk management capability across the Corporation.

A core part of the Risk function is Business Continuity. The ABC’s business continuity program manages the development, testing and maintenance of the Corporation’s business resilience, crisis management and disaster recovery programs. The program continues to focus on effectively managing foreseeable business disruptions.

The ABC’s Board of Directors and management oversee and continue to be committed to developing and refining a fit-for-purpose risk management framework that will both protect and enhance value through the timely and accurate identification, assessment and management of all risks.

Risk

Accountability 143

Internal audit Group Audit supports governance at the ABC through objective assessment of strategic priorities, including those set out in the Investing in Audiences strategy. Audits are conducted in accordance with international auditing standards.

Group Audit prepares and delivers the ABC’s Audit Plan, which is approved by the Risk & Audit Committee. Further information on Group Audit’s interactions with Board committees is provided in Appendix 2 (see page 212).

Group Audit is responsible to the Risk & Audit Committee for contributing to the achievement of the Corporation’s goals and objectives by:

• evaluating processes that manage the ABC’s key operational, financial and compliance risks

• providing recommendations to management

• playing a role in developing and maintaining a culture of accountability and integrity, including undertaking investigations in relation to fraud or public interest disclosure allegations

• being responsive to the Corporation’s changing needs and striving for continuous improvement in the performance of its activities

• facilitating and supporting the integration of risk management into day-to-day business activities and processes

• utilising technologies and data to efficiently assess control performance.

In 2018-19, Group Audit completed 25 assignments, including coverage of editorial, finance, information technology, health and safety and project management processes. The team continued to operate with a combination of in-house employees and external providers of internal audit services.

Coordination with external auditors Group Audit liaises with the ABC’s external auditors the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO), and its nominated representative, KPMG. In 2018-19, work with external auditors included seeking advice on proposed areas of focus, identifying areas of potential external audit reliance on audits undertaken by Group Audit, and ensuring that there was minimal duplication of audit coverage.

Audit

Emily Crockford with her mural art, in iview Arts profile series Art Bites: Studio A.

144 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Compliance reporting Any significant non-compliance with the finance law must be reported to the responsible Minister under section 19(1)(e) of the PGPA Act and must also be disclosed in the Annual Report together with an outline of the action taken to remedy the non-compliance.

To meet these requirements, the ABC maintains an internal compliance reporting framework, comprising internal controls and governance procedures together with other sources of assurance and information to ensure that relevant PGPA Act reporting requirements are achieved.

There was no significant non-compliance with the finance law - which includes the PGPA Act and Rule and any other instrument made under the PGPA Act, for example the PGPA Financial Reporting Rule 2015 - required to be notified to the responsible Minister under section 19(1) (e) of the PGPA Act during the 2018-19 reporting period.

Annual Report The ABC is required by section 46 of the PGPA Act to prepare an annual report. The report must be submitted to the responsible minister for presentation to the Parliament. The ABC Annual Report 2018 was submitted to the Minister for Communications and was tabled in Parliament on 31 October 2018.

Report against the ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19 Reports against the key performance indicators and forward estimates presented in the ABC Corporate Plan 2018 are set out in the Annual Performance Statements on pages 87-99, and the Financial Statements on pages 150-207.

Freedom of Information The Freedom of Information Act 1982 (the FOI Act) gives the public the right to access documents held by the ABC.

During 2018-19, the ABC received 70 requests for access to documents under the FOI Act. Six requests were granted in full, 17 were granted in part, 25 were refused in full and 12 were withdrawn or deemed to be withdrawn, with two of those requests dealt with outside of the formal FOI process. Ten requests were still being processed at the end of the financial year.

Of the 42 requests that were refused or part-refused, 30 were (or involved some documents that were) outside the scope of the FOI Act. Section 7 and Part II of Schedule 2 of the FOI Act specifically exempts documents relating to the ABC’s program material from the operation of the FOI Act.

One matter was the subject of Internal Review and the decision in that matter was affirmed.

Nine decisions were the subject of review by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC). Three of those applications were withdrawn, one was resolved and closed under section 55F of the FOI Act when the applicant and the ABC reached a satisfactory agreement, and five matters were still being processed as at 30 June 2019.

In accordance with section 8(1) of the FOI Act, the ABC maintains an Agency Plan which describes how the ABC will comply with the Information Publication Scheme (IPS) requirements set out in Part II of the FOI Act. This Plan remains under review and an updated Plan will be finalised in 2019-20.

The ABC’s IPS Agency Plan and FOI Disclosure Log are published on the ABC’s corporate website at https://about.abc.net.au/how-the-abc-is-run/what-guides-us/freedom-of-information/.

Corporate reporting

Accountability 145

The ABC is required to comply with the Australian Privacy Principles (APPs) in the Privacy Act 1988. The ABC Privacy Policy is published on the Privacy page of the ABC corporate website. The Policy sets out the kind of information the ABC will collect, the circumstances in which the ABC may use and disclose such information, how individuals may access their personal information, and how and to whom individuals may complain about a breach of privacy.

On 1 July 2018 the Australian Government Agencies Privacy Code (the Code) commenced. The Code introduced a best practice approach to privacy governance.

The ABC has implemented a pan-ABC privacy framework which has improved and enhanced the information on privacy that is available for its audience and created a strong culture of privacy within the ABC. The Privacy page on the ABC corporate website has been updated to include the ABC Privacy Assurance, a summary of the Privacy Policy, a detailed Privacy Collection Statement and the register of Privacy Impact Assessments. The ABC’s General Counsel acts as the Privacy Champion.

The ABC Privacy Assurance is the ABC’s commitment to privacy to its audience and guides and informs privacy-related decisions and behaviour across the ABC. The ABC makes its Privacy Assurance directly to its audience and is published on the ABC website in this form:

Transparency We have transparent practices and explanations of what personal information we collect and why, and how we may use your personal information

Control We use your personal information to give you more and better choices from our services. We tell you how you can control the use of your personal information and interact with the ABC

Trust We value your trust, will keep your personal information secure and never sell or share your personal information to anyone for commercial purposes.

The Privacy page also includes a plain English summary of the Privacy Policy that is designed to be easier to read and more accessible than the full Privacy Policy.

The Privacy Collection Statement provides a detailed explanation of the types of personal information that the ABC collects, holds, uses and discloses as part of the ABC’s interaction with the public and its audience.

Privacy considerations are now embedded in ABC business processes. When ABC personnel are involved in a project that collects personal information they are required to complete a privacy questionnaire. The Privacy Officer reviews that information to determine whether the project may be considered a ‘high privacy risk’ project. A project may be high privacy risk if it involves any new or changed ways of handling personal information that are likely to have a significant impact on the privacy of individuals.

The ABC is required to conduct a Privacy Impact Assessment for all high privacy risk projects. A Privacy Impact Assessment is a systematic assessment of a project that identifies the impact the project might have on the privacy of individuals and sets out recommendations for managing, minimising or eliminating that impact. The ABC maintains a public register of the Privacy Impact Assessments it conducts for all high privacy risk projects.

Data breach notification Data breach notification laws have been in effect since February 2018 and make it mandatory for the ABC to report a data breach that is likely to result in serious harm to any affected individuals. Notification must be made to the affected individuals and the regulator.

In 2018-19, the ABC did not experience any data breaches that required notification to the Privacy Commissioner.

Privacy

146 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Audience and Consumer Affairs Written complaints that are potentially editorial - about issues such as factual inaccuracy, bias or inappropriate content - are referred to Audience and Consumer Affairs (A&CA), a unit which is independent of ABC program areas.

An internal restructure of the Editorial Policies team in September 2018 (see page 115) saw the remit of the A&CA change to focus specifically on these editorial complaints. Previously, the team also handled audience contact with the ABC containing requests for information, suggestions and appreciations, as well as complaints about matters of personal preference which did not raise issues of compliance with the ABC’s editorial standards. These contacts are now handled by Audience Support (for reporting, see page 124).

Once in receipt of a written complaint, A&CA conduct an initial assessment to identify if the matter raises editorial issues. Where such a complaint suggests that the ABC may have breached its Editorial Policies or Code of Practice, A&CA conducts a further assessment to determine appropriate handling in accordance with the ABC Complaint Handling Procedures. A&CA may themselves investigate the complaint and determine whether ABC editorial standards have been met. Where the matters raised are less serious, A&CA may refer the complaint for direct handling to the content area responsible.

In cases where a complaint is investigated and the ABC’s editorial standards have not been met, the complaint will be upheld (either fully or in part). Complaints also can be resolved by prompt action being taken to remedy a matter.

Overall complaint handling During 2018-19, A&CA assessed and finalised 5,675 written complaints. The unit provided a personal response to 2,308 of these complaints and 2,179 complaints were referred to other areas of the Corporation for direct response. No substantive response was required for 1,188 complaints.

Editorial complaint handling Of the 5,675 complaints assessed by A&CA, 3,021 were determined to be editorial (raising 3,104 issues). The unit investigated 1,420 editorial complaints (raising 1,503 issues), provided responses to 48 editorial complaints that did not require investigation, referred 1,548 editorial complaints to content areas for direct response, and closed 5 editorial complaints without response.

Nature of editorial complaint issues Subject Issues % total

Factual inaccuracy 782 25.2%

Party political bias 616 19.8%

Bias (other than party political)* 613 19.7%

Inappropriate content 418 13.5%

Lack of balance 264 8.5%

Unfair treatment 254 8.2%

Other 157 5.1%

Total 3,104 100.0%

* Includes claims of bias in relation to issues such as international coverage, sport and religion.

Editorial complaints management

Accountability 147

Outcome of investigated complaints During 2018-19, 50 editorial complaint issues (3.3% of all investigated issues) were upheld. A matter is upheld in cases where A&CA determine that ABC editorial standards have not been met. A further 115 issues (7.7% of all investigated issues) were resolved, after the relevant content area took prompt and appropriate action to remedy the cause of the complaint.

All findings in relation to upheld and resolved complaints are brought to the attention of the senior editorial staff responsible. In 2018-19, actions taken in response to upheld and resolved complaints included written apologies to complainants, on-air corrections, counselling or other action with staff, removal of inappropriate content or correction of material on ABC Online, and reviews of - and improvements to - procedures.

Summaries of upheld and resolved complaints are published on abc.net.au as individual complaints are finalised, providing timely access to complaint decisions. The ABC also publishes a quarterly statistical overview of audience contacts on its corporate website.

Timeliness A&CA seeks to respond to all complaints as quickly as possible and aims to respond within 30 days of receipt, in accordance with the timeliness standard for complaint handling that is specified in the ABC’s Complaint Handling Procedures.

Of the 2,308 complaints that A&CA responded to directly between 1 July 2018 and 30 June 2019, 1,994 (86.4%) received responses within 30 days.

Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) Members of the public who complain to the ABC about matters covered by the ABC Code of Practice and who are dissatisfied with the ABC’s response, or who do not receive a response to their complaint within 60 days, may seek review from the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

During 2018-19, the ACMA advised the ABC that it had finalised investigations into seven such matters (compared to 14 in 2017-18). In one case in 2018-19 the ACMA found a breach of the ABC Code of Practice.

Catalyst, 14 August 2018 The ACMA found a breach of due impartiality in the Catalyst episode ‘Feeding Australia: Foods of Tomorrow’ (part 1). ACMA concluded that the program did not present beef with the same open-mindedness and fair treatment as it did other foods. The ABC noted the findings but respectfully disagreed with the ACMA’s view that the program lacked impartiality.

Commonwealth Ombudsman The Ombudsman’s office did not notify the ABC of any investigations into the ABC’s handling of complaints commenced or finalised during the 2018-19 reporting period.

148 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Aaron Pedersen (Jay) in Mystery Road. Image: John Platt

Accountability 149

150 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Financial Statements

James Morrison performs with primary school children for Don’t Stop the Music (see pages 28 and 136).

Contents Financial Summary 152

Independent Auditor’s Report 156

Financial Statements 158

Financial Statements 151

Completion of Annual Financial Statements

On 22 August 2019, following endorsement by the Audit and Risk Committee, the Board approved the signing of the ABC’s 2018-19 Financial Statements and the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) issued an unmodified audit opinion on the ABC’s 2018-19 Financial Statements.

Financial Outcome 2018-19

The ABC operated within its total sources of funds and revenue from Government for the 2018-19 financial year, recording total comprehensive income of $38.3 million.

Sources of Funds 2018-19

The ABC was allocated $1,045.9 million in the May 2018 Federal Budget, reflecting a further decrease in base funding of $12.5 million related to the previously announced ABC/SBS Additional Efficiency Savings Measure, offset by indexation on base funding and one-off funding received in relation to the previously announced Enhanced News Services initiative.

The ABC also received $62.5 million from other sources, including ABC Commercial during the year.

The chart ‘ABC source of funds’ depicts the ABC’s budgeted funds for the various categories against actual sources for 2018-19 and its budgeted sources for 2019-20.

Financial Summary

865 865 879

181 181 184

43

29 26

29 34 32

General Appropriation

Transmission and Distribution Services

Loan

ABC Commercial Revenue

Other Revenue

$ Millions

Government Funding

Independent

0 200 400 600 800 1,000

2018-19 Budget 2018-19 Actual 2019-20 Budget

ABC source of funds

152 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Application of Funds

The chart ‘ABC split of actual expenditure 2018-19’ broadly represents how the ABC allocates its funds by cost category.

The Year Ahead

Revenue from Government In the 2019-20 Budget the Government announced additional funding of $43.7 million over three years for continuation of the Enhanced News Services initiative under the ‘Guaranteeing National Broadcaster ABC and SBS’ measure. This includes $14.3 million provided in 2019-20, with the renewed funding being for three years only, terminating on 30 June 2022.

2019-20 is also the first year impacted by the three year pause to indexation of ABC General Operational Activities base funding, announced by Government in the May 2018 Budget as part of the ‘Funding for Australian Film and Television Content and the National Broadcasters’ measure. This results in a reduction of $14.6 million in 2019-20 and a total reduction of $83.7m over the three years 2019-20 to 2021-22, with an ongoing reduction to the funding base of $41.3m per annum in future years beyond 2021-22. This is offset by a year on year reduction in 2019-20 of the amount for the previously announced ABC/SBS Additional Efficiency Savings Measure.

ABC Transmission and Distribution Services 17.3%

ABC General Operational Activities 82.7%

Other 0.2% Program amortisation 14.0% Employee benefits 46.2%

Suppliers 32.0% Depreciation and amortisation 7.6%

ABC revenue from Government by programme 2019-20

ABC split of actual expenditure 2018-19

Financial Statements 153

The ABC’s funding for the 2019-20 financial year is:

$m

Total revenue from Government per Outcome 1 1,062.3 Less Transmission and Distribution Services

183.7

Total Revenue from Government available for ABC General Activities 878.6

The chart ‘ABC revenue from Government by programme 2019-20’ (see page 153) broadly represents the ABC’s budgeted appropriation of funds by programme for the 2019-20 financial year.

Budget Strategy

The Budget for 2019-20 faces an environment of constant change in the media landscape, with the growth of digital formats and emergence of global players driving sophisticated and targeted multiplatform content delivery. There has never been a more challenging time for the ABC to deliver on its Charter, while at the same time reshaping the business to remain competitive and relevant in a digital era.

2019-20 represents the first year of the new triennial funding period, including renewed three-year funding for Enhanced News Services. It is also the first year impacted by the operational funding indexation pause announced in the May 2018 Budget, as outlined above. This funding reduction comes on top of the ABC/SBS Efficiency Savings measure previously announced in 2014-15 Budget, and places additional pressure on the ABC’s budget strategy over the next three years.

The ABC is in the process of reviewing a program of initiatives to achieve the savings required to operate within the reduced levels of funding for the next three years and beyond. Given that the ABC has already achieved significant productivity gains in response to past budget cuts, the impact of the funding reduction cannot be absorbed by efficiency measures alone, with some initiatives likely to impact on content.

The ABC remains committed to prioritising available resources to enable it to most effectively deliver on its Charter obligations and remain relevant to audiences in Australia’s cultural and media landscape into the future.

$1,201

$879

$ Millions

Years

600

650

700

750

800

850

900

950

1,000

1,050

1,100

1,150

1,200

1,250

85/86

86/87

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88/89

89/90

90/91

91/92

92/93

93/94

94/95

95/96

96/97

97/98

98/99

99/00

00/01

01/02

02/03

03/04

04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

09/10

10/11

11/12

12/13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

ABC operational revenue from Government

including capital indexed at 2018-19 levels - December 2018, six months CPI Index 29.5% reduction from 1985-86 to 2019-20

154 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Comparative Revenue from Government

The 2019-20 operational revenue from Government of $879 million represents a decrease in real funding of $367 million or 29.5% since 1985-86 as depicted in the chart ‘ABC operational revenue from Government’.

Five-year analysis

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

2017 $’000

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Financial Performance Total expenses 1,149,162 1,188,221 1,138,693 1,168,748 1,264,641

Total income 105,952 65,487 102,846 118,174 163,011

Net Cost of Services (a) 1,043,210 1,122,734 1,036,117 1,050,574 1,101,630

Share of (deficit)/surplus from jointly controlled entities (b) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

Revenue from Government 1,045,911 1,043,680 1,036,090 1,064,413 1,063,215

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

2017 $’000

2016 $’000

2015 $’000

Financial Position Current Assets 367,047 323,575 383,246 397,312 386,371

Non-Current Assets 1,034,710 1,041,900 1,058,155 1,011,754 998,671

Total Assets 1,401,757 1,365,475 1,441,401 1,409,066 1,385,042

Current Liabilities 287,350 272,473 257,589 257,192 264,881

Non-Current Liabilities 42,751 59,650 79,243 98,691 99,146

Total Liabilities 330,101 332,123 336,832 355,883 363,900

Total Equity 1,071,656 1,033,352 1,104,569 1,053,183 1,021,142

Ratios Current Ratio (b) 1.28 1.19 1.49 1.54 1.46

Equity (c) 76% 76% 77% 75% 74%

(a) Net cost of services is total expenses less total income (b) Current assets divided by current liabilities (c) Equity as a percentage of total assets

Financial Statements 155

Independent Auditor’s Report

156 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Financial Statements 157

Primary Financial Statements

Statement by the Directors and Acting Chief Financial Officer 159 Statement of Comprehensive Income 160

Statement of Financial Position 162

Statement of Changes in Equity 164

Cash Flow Statement 165

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements 166 1. Cash Flow Reconciliation 166

2. Explanation of Major Variances between Actual Results and Original Budget 167 3. Overview 169

Financial Performance - Expenses 174

4. Expenses 174

Financial Performance - Revenue and Income 178

5. Own-Source Income 178

Financial Position 180

6. Financial Assets 181

7. Non-Financial Assets 184

8. Payables 188

9. Interest Bearing Liabilities 189

10. Other Provisions 190

People and Relationships 191

11. Employee Provisions 191

12. Key Management Personnel Remuneration 192

13. Related Party Disclosures 195

Financial Risks and Disclosure 198

14. Financial Instruments 198

Contingent Items 206

15. Contingent Assets and Liabilities 206

Financial Statements 2018-19Year ended 30 June 2019 Table of Contents

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Statement by the Directors and Acting Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2019 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Broadcasting Corporation will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This statement is made in accordance with a resolution of the directors.

Financial Statements 159

Statement of Comprehensive Income for the year ended 30 June 2019

2019 to

Original Budget Explanation (Note 2) Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

2019

Original Budget(a) $’000

EXPENSES Employee benefits A,B 4A 531,008 524,940 485,740

Suppliers 4B 367,999 390,329 354,289

Depreciation and amortisation 4C 87,144 88,264 98,292

Program amortisation 4D 160,766 175,550 162,500

Finance costs 4E 951 1,265 1,961

Impairment loss on financial instruments

4F 128 30 -

Write-down and impairment of other assets

4G 1,122 5,688 -

Net loss from disposal of assets 4H 44 2,155 -

Total expenses 1,149,162 1,188,221 1,102,782

OWN-SOURCE INCOME Own-source revenue Sale of goods and rendering of services

C 5A 43,144 46,023 57,279

Interest 5B 5,416 5,890 6,553

Other revenue 5C 13,901 13,203 8,006

Total own-source revenue 62,461 65,116 71,838

Gains Net foreign exchange gain 5D 219 371 -

Insurance recoveries D 43,272 - -

Net gains 43,491 371 -

Total own-source income 105,952 65,487 71,838

Net (cost of)/contribution by services (1,043,210) (1,122,734) (1,030,944)

Revenue from Government 1,045,911 1,043,680 1,045,911

Surplus/(deficit) 2,701 (79,054) 14,967

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Changes in asset revaluation reserve E 7A 35,603 7,837 -

Total other comprehensive income 35,603 7,837 -

Total comprehensive income/(loss) 38,304 (71,217) 14,967

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

(a) Original Budget as reflected in the May 2018 Portfolio Budget Statements for the ABC.

160 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Recognition and measurement - Revenue from Government

Operational funding for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (the “Corporation” or “ABC”) is appropriated under the General Operational Activities Programme under Outcome 1. ABC transmission and distribution funds are appropriated under the ABC Transmission and Distribution Services Programme under Outcome 1.

Financial Statements 161

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2019

2019 to

Original Budget Explanation (Note 2) Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

2019

Original Budget(a) $’000

ASSETS Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 6A 5,269 6,844 5,024

Receivables D,F 6B 56,673 13,872 9,431

Other investments A,G 6C 175,000 167,400 226,406

Accrued revenue 6D 5,606 7,366 8,513

Total financial assets 242,548 195,482 249,374

Non-financial assets Land E,H 7A 269,080 241,408 228,455

Buildings (including improvements) 7A 505,481 528,577 511,342

Plant and equipment A,I 7A 199,691 228,612 254,122

Intangibles A,I,J 7A 47,981 28,892 24,509

Assets classified as held for sale 7B 335 - -

Inventories 7C 113,617 117,033 107,923

Prepayments 7D 18,463 20,883 31,669

Other non-financial assets 7E 4,561 4,588 -

Total non-financial assets 1,159,209 1,169,993 1,158,020

Total assets 1,401,757 1,365,475 1,407,394

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 8A 62,195 57,098 70,183

Other payables 8B 39,741 54,686 38,286

Total payables 101,936 111,784 108,469

Interest bearing liabilities Loans 9A 32,721 51,647 30,995

Total interest bearing liabilities 32,721 51,647 30,995

Provisions Other provisions K 10A 35,649 34,022 2,487

Employee provisions B,L 11A 159,795 134,670 139,743

Total provisions 195,444 168,692 142,230

Total liabilities 330,101 332,123 281,694

NET ASSETS 1,071,656 1,033,352 1,125,700

EQUITY Contributed equity 93,640 93,640 93,640

Reserves E 793,615 758,012 750,175

Retained surplus A,B,C,D 184,401 181,700 281,885

Total equity 1,071,656 1,033,352 1,125,700

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

(a) Original Budget as reflected in the May 2018 Portfolio Budget Statements for the ABC.

162 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Current / non-current splits as at 30 June 2019

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

Assets expected to be recovered in; no more than 12 months 367 047 323,575

more than 12 months 1,034,710 1,041,900

Total 1,401,757 1,365,475

Liabilities expected to be settled in; no more than 12 months 287,350 272,473

more than 12 months 42,751 59,650

Total 330,101 332,123

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

(a) Original Budget as reflected in the May 2017 Portfolio Budget Statements for the ABC.

Financial Statements 163

Statement of Changes in Equity for the year ended 30 June 2019

2019 to

Original Budget Explanation (Note 2)

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

2019

Original Budget(a) $’000

Contributed equity Opening balance as at 1 July 93,640 93,640 93,640

Closing balance as at 30 June 93,640 93,640 93,640

Asset revaluation reserve Opening balance as at 1 July 758,012 750,175 750,175

Net revaluation of land and buildings E 35,603 7,837 -

Closing balance as at 30 June 793,615 758,012 750,175

Retained Surplus Opening balance as at 1 July 181,700 260,754 266,918

Surplus/(deficit) 2,701 (79,054) 14,967

Closing balance as at 30 June 184,401 181,700 281,885

Total equity as at 30 June 1,071,656 1,033,352 1,125,700

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

(a) Original Budget as reflected in the May 2018 Portfolio Budget Statements for the ABC.

Recognition and measurement - Transactions with Government as Owner

The Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR) requires that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend. No distributions were made to Government during the year ended 30 June 2019 (2018 nil).

164 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 30 June 2019

2019 to

Original Budget Explanation (Note 2) Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

2019

Original Budget(a) $’000

Inflows (Outflows)

Inflows (Outflows)

Inflows (Outflows)

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash received Revenue from Government 1,045,911 1,043,680 1,045,911

Sales of goods and rendering of services

46,575 42,858 57,279

Interest 5,399 5,742 6,553

Net GST received 42,848 42,046 57,185

Other 14,616 11,951 8,006

Total cash received 1,155,349 1,146,277 1,174,934

Cash used Employees (518,625) (531,299) (501,740)

Suppliers (561,986) (583,974) (573,974)

Finance costs (1,034) (1,345) (1,961)

Total cash used (1,081,645) (1,116,618) (1,077,675)

Net cash from operating activities A,G,M 1 73,704 29,659 97,259

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sale of land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles

79 276 -

Proceeds from investments A,G,M 55,100 115,900 -

Total cash received 55,179 116,176 -

Cash used Purchase of land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles

(48,832) (70,863) (65,976)

Purchase of investments A,G,M (62,700) (53,000) (10,881)

Total cash used (111,532) (123,863) (76,857)

Net cash used in investing activities (56,353) (7,687) (76,857)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from long-term loans 1,900 250 -

Total cash received 1,900 250 -

Cash used Repayment of loans (20,826) (20,402) (20,402)

Total cash used (20,826) (20,402) (20,402)

Net cash used in financing activities (18,926) (20,152) (20,402)

Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents

(1,575) 1,820 -

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

6,844 5,024 5,024

Cash and cash equivalents as at 30 June

1, 6A 5,269 6,844 5,024

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

(a) Original Budget as reflected in the May 2018 Portfolio Budget Statements for the ABC.

Financial Statements 165

1. Cash Flow Reconciliation

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

Cash and cash equivalents per:

Cash Flow Statement 5,269 6,844

Statement of Financial Position 5,269 6,844

Difference - -

Reconciliation of net cost of services to net cash from operating activities

Net (cost of)/contribution by services (1,043,210) (1,122,734)

Revenue from Government 1,045,911 1,043,680

Adjustment for non-cash items Depreciation of land, buildings, plant and equipment 80,679 82,093

Amortisation of intangibles 6,465 6,171

Write-down and impairment of:

- financial instruments 128 30

- commercial advances 995 3,853

- land and buildings 9 -

- plant and equipment 38 5

- intangibles 7 196

- inventory held for sale 73 1,634

Loss from disposal of assets 44 2,155

Unrealised foreign exchange gain (219) (371)

Total adjustment for non-cash items 88,219 95,766

Changes in assets and liabilities (Increase)/decrease in assets Receivables (42,929) (8,291)

Accrued revenue 1,760 1,147

Prepayments 1,425 6,198

Inventories 3,343 (10,744)

Other non-financial assets 27 -

Increase/(decrease) in liabilities Suppliers 7,349 (2,553)

Other payables (14,943) 5,011

Employee provisions 25,125 (9,356)

Other provisions 1,627 31,535

Total changes in assets and liabilities (17,216) 12,947

Net cash from operating activities 73,704 29,659

Recognition and measurement within cash flows

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and on hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less, that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value.

Cash flows are included in the Cash Flow Statement, inclusive of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST). The GST components arising from investing and financing activities which are recoverable from or payable to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) are classified as operating cash flows.

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

166 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

2. Explanation of Major Variances between Actual Results and Original Budget

Explanations are provided for significant variances between actual results and the original budget, as reflected in the May 2018 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) of the ABC. Significant variances are typically greater than $20,000,000 though they include variances which are relevant to the performance of the ABC, not merely numerically significant variances between the original budget and the actual amounts. The budget is not audited.

The ABC’s total comprehensive income for the financial year to June 2019 was $38,304,000. This result was $23,337,000 higher than the budgeted total comprehensive income of $14,967,000.

The primary factors which contributed to this total variance were the upward revaluation of the Corporation’s Ultimo, New South Wales premises, as detailed in Note 2E, together with the factors outlined in Note 2B and 2D. The original budget did not incorporate these factors due to their unpredictable, uncontrollable and/or unplanned nature.

A. Timing of original budget

The original budget was prepared prior to the completion and approval of the ABC’s internal budget by the ABC Board. Differences between the original budget and the ABC’s internal budget allocations may result in amounts being reflected in different line items between the original budget and the actual results at 30 June 2019.

B. Employee benefits

Employee benefits expenses are higher than the original budget primarily due to the recognition of estimated historical entitlements owed to casual employees. Refer to Note 11A Employee provisions for further commentary.

A further component of the variance is due to additional employee benefits expenditure relating to content creation which was originally budgeted to be expended against suppliers. Consequently, supplier costs were lower than the original budget, however this variance is not observable due to the additional supplier costs of $19,508,687 incurred as a result of the ABC’s Ultimo remediation project.

C. Sale of goods and rendering of services

Own-source revenue from sale of goods and rendering of services is lower than the original budget mainly due to the closure of ABC Retail in 2018-19. The closure of ABC Retail also resulted in reduced Employee benefits and Supplier expenditure. The cessation of the ABC’s retail business was not factored into the budget as it was not planned at the time that the budget was set.

D. Insurance recoveries

A gain has been recognised for an insurance recovery that the Corporation expects to receive for the cost of certain remedial works on the ABC’s Ultimo building. This recovery was not factored into the original budget as the recovery was not virtually certain at the time of preparing the budget. A receivable has been recognised for the insurance recovery at 30 June 2019 and is expected to be recovered in the 2019-20 financial year.

Financial Statements 167

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

2. Explanation of Major Variances between Actual Results and Original Budget (continued)

E. Changes in asset revaluation reserve

Independent property valuers, MMJ Advisory, undertook a desktop valuation of the ABC’s Ultimo premises as at 30 April 2019. Consequently, revaluation increments of $28,000,000 for land and $7,465,134 for buildings on freehold land were credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in Changes in asset revaluation reserve within Other Comprehensive Income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income, Reserves within the Statement of Financial Position and Net revaluation of land and buildings in the Statement of Changes in Equity. In addition, a small revaluation increment has been recognised due to the anticipated sale of a freehold property in Karratha, Western Australia.

F. Receivables

Refer to the commentary in Note 2D.

G. Other investments

The Other investments balance is lower than the original budget mainly due to the actual opening balance at 1 July 2018 being lower than the budgeted opening balance. This was due to a draw down on other investments in 2017-18 to fund additional expenditure on content and remediation of the ABC’s Ultimo building, which was not factored into the budget. As a result of these factors Net cash from operating activities was also lower than the original budget.

H. Land

Refer to the commentary in Note 2E.

I. Plant and equipment

The original budget was finalised prior to the preparation of the Corporation’s internal capital investment budget. The capital plan resulted in reduced investment in plant and equipment and increased investment in intangibles (specifically software) in 2018-19. This investment mix is reflective of the ABC’s Product and Technology investment program which centres on the digital modernisation of the Corporation.

J. Intangibles

Refer to the commentary in Note 2I.

K. Other provisions

The Other provisions balance is higher than the original budget due primarily to the recognition of estimated expenses associated with the remedial building work referenced in Note 2D.

L. Employee provisions

Refer to the commentary in Note 2B.

M. Cash Flow Statement

Movements in the Cash Flow Statement including lower than budgeted Net cash from operating activities are largely reflective of the explanation provided in Note 2G. In addition, the Cash Flow Statement shows the gross amounts related to the purchase and proceeds of investments separately under investment activities whilst the original budget shows a net figure against Purchase of investments.

168 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

3. Overview

The Corporation is a Corporate Commonwealth, not-for-profit entity.

Its functions are set out in section 6 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. Those functions are reflected in the statement of purpose in the ABC Corporate Plan 2018-19, which was prepared in accordance with section 35 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act).

The Corporation sets out to achieve one outcome: inform, educate and entertain audiences throughout Australia and overseas through innovative and comprehensive media and related services.

The continued existence of the Corporation in its present form and with its present programs is dependent on Government policy and on continued funding by Parliament.

Accounting Framework

The principal accounting policies adopted in preparing the financial statements of the Corporation are stated to assist in a general understanding of these financial statements.

Basis of Preparation of Financial Statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements as required by section 42 of the PGPA Act.

The financial statements and notes have been prepared in accordance with;

• PGPA (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

• Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The Corporation’s financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities which are at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars unless otherwise specified.

Significant Accounting Judgements

In the process of applying the accounting policies listed throughout the financial statements and accompanying notes, the Corporation has taken the fair value of freehold land to be the market value of similar locations and the fair value of freehold buildings to be the depreciated replacement cost, as determined by an independent valuer.

In addition, the Corporation has taken the fair value of plant, equipment and intangibles to be the depreciated cost which is representative of depreciated replacement cost.

Significant Accounting Estimates and Assumptions

The Corporation has applied estimates and assumptions to the following:

• Depreciation, as detailed in Note 4C Depreciation and amortisation, and Note 7A Land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles;

• Program amortisation, as detailed in Note 4D Program amortisation, and Note 7C Inventories;

• Impairment of financial instruments, as detailed in Note 4F Impairment loss on financial instruments ;

• Impairment of non-financial assets, as detailed in Note 4G Write-down and impairment of other assets;

• Valuation of properties, plant and equipment, as detailed in Note 7A Land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles;

• Provision for make good and Provision for building maintenance (cladding), as detailed in Note 10 Other Provisions; and

• Employee provisions detailed in Note 11 Employee Provisions.

Financial Statements 169

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

3. Overview (continued)

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to carrying amounts of assets and liabilities.

New Accounting Standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

AASB 9 Financial Instruments (AASB 9)

This Standard replaces AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement. It amends the classification and measurement requirements for financial assets and liabilities and the recognition and de-recognition requirements for financial instruments. Changes to hedge accounting align the accounting with risk management objectives. AASB 9 applies allowances for impairment based on expected credit losses, rather than as and when an impairment event occurs. This takes effect for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2018.

AASB 9, adopted by the Corporation from 1 July 2018, introduces a single classification and measurement model for financial assets, dependent on both:

• An entity’s business objective for managing financial assets; and

• The contractual cash-flow characteristics of those financial assets.

The initial recognition and subsequent measurement of the Corporation’s financial assets under AASB 9 has had minimal impact on its financial position as most of the Corporation’s financial assets comprise held-to-maturity investments or cash and cash equivalents.

With the exception of derivative financial instruments which are measured at fair value through surplus/(deficit), the Corporation will continue to measure its financial assets at amortised cost, based on the following conditions being met:

• Financial assets are held to collect contractual cash flows; and

• Payments comprise solely of principal and interest and occur on the principal outstanding.

Impairment of financial assets and transition to AASB 9 Financial Instruments

Under AASB 9, impairment of financial assets is provided for based on future expected credit losses (ECLs) rather than as and when existing debts are deemed to be impaired.

This principle also allows for the expectation of credit losses to be adjusted in response to certain factors, for example prevailing or anticipated market conditions. The new impairment model applies to financial assets measured at amortised cost (as is the case with the ABC) or fair value through other comprehensive income. The impact to the ABC’s financial statements is not material and no adjustment was required to be recognised in retained earnings upon adoption at 1 July 2018.

Future Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

The following new standards and amendments to standards were issued by the AASB but are effective for future reporting periods. The expected impact of adopting these pronouncements on the Corporation’s financial statements is outlined below. This will be assessed periodically up to the date the standards are formally adopted.

170 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (AASB 15)

AASB 15 provides a single principle-based five-step model to be applied to all sales contracts, based on the transfer of control of goods and services to customers. It replaces the separate models for goods, services and construction contracts currently included in AASB 11 Construction Contracts and AASB 118 Revenue.

AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities permits not-for-profit entities to apply this Standard for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2019.

Transition to AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers

This Standard applies predominantly to transactions made by ABC Commercial. The ABC has reviewed ABC Commercial contracts to determine the impact of AASB 15 on revenue recognition.

The ABC expects the changes attributable to the adoption of AASB 15 to have little impact as ABC Commercial already recognises revenue when performance obligations are met.

In addition, changes to the disclosure requirements are not expected to be material to the ABC.

AASB 1058 Income of Not-for-Profit Entities (AASB 1058)

AASB 1058 clarifies and simplifies the income recognition requirements that apply to not-for-profit (NFP) entities, in conjunction with AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers.

The requirements of this Standard more closely reflect the economic reality of NFP entity transactions that are not contracts with customers. The timing of income recognition depends on whether such a transaction gives rise to a liability or other performance obligation (a promise to transfer a good or service), or a contribution by owners, related to an asset (such as cash or another asset) received by an entity.

Under AASB 1058, the ABC is required to apply the recognition criteria set out in AASB 1004 Contributions, to Revenue from Government.

Under AASB 1004, income arising from the contribution of an asset (in this case cash) to the entity shall be recognised when and only when, all of the following conditions have been met:

• The entity obtains control of the contribution or the right to receive the contribution;

• It is probable that the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the entity; and

• The amount of the contribution can be measured reliably.

The ABC currently applies the above criteria to Revenue from Government and therefore the adoption of AASB 1058 is expected to have no impact.

AASB 16 Leases (AASB 16)

AASB 16 sets out the principles for recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases and will replace existing accounting requirements for leases in reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2019.

Under current requirements leases are classified by lessees either as finance leases which are recognised on the Statement of Financial Position or operating leases which are not recognised on the Statement of Financial Position.

The application of AASB 16 will result in the recognition of all leases on the Statement of Financial Position in the form of a right-of-use asset and a corresponding lease liability based on the discounted value of committed lease payments. Over the life of the lease, the liability incurs interest and is reduced as lease payments are made, and the asset is amortised over its useful life.

Financial Statements 171

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

3. Overview (continued)

Lessor accounting under AASB 16 is substantially unchanged from current accounting requirements under AASB 117 Leases and has no material impact to the ABC.

Based on an assessment undertaken by ABC management, certain broadcast distribution and transmission arrangements, which are currently classified by the ABC as service agreements, will be captured as leases under the new Standard. The assessment also concluded that a number of the ABC’s broadcast distribution and transmission arrangements fall outside the scope of the Standard. These arrangements will continue to be recognised as services.

The new Standard is also expected to impact leases which are currently classified by the ABC as operating leases, being mainly leases over premises and motor vehicles.

The ABC will apply the Standard retrospectively, using the modified retrospective method, recognising the cumulative effect of initially applying the standard in retained earnings and reserves as at 1 July 2019.

Based on the ABC’s assessment, the Standard’s likely impact on first-time adoption is as follows:

• There will be a material increase in lease assets and financial liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position; amounts are approximated at:

- recognition of Finance Lease Liabilities of $650 million to $700 million; and

- recognition of Right of Use (RoU) Assets of $650 million to $700 million.

• Approximately $1 million to $3 million is expected to be recognised against the value of the RoU Assets relating to property lease make-good costs expensed in prior periods. This will be adjusted against opening retained earnings resulting in a reduction in equity.

• Finance costs and depreciation expenses in the statement of comprehensive income will be higher as the implicit interest in lease payments will be presented as part of finance costs and the depreciation of the right of use asset will be presented as depreciation rather than being included as supplier costs. A net additional expense of between $5 million to $10 million is expected to be incurred in the 2019-20 financial year as a result of the application of AASB 16.

• Operating cash outflows will be lower and financing cash outflows will be higher in the cash flow statement as principal repayments on all lease liabilities will be included in financing activities rather than operating activities.

Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Revenues, gains, expenses and losses are recognised net of the amount of GST except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). In these circumstances, the GST is recognised as part of the revenue or expense.

Receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included. The net amount of GST receivable from the ATO is included as a financial asset in the Statement of Financial Position while any net amount of GST payable to the ATO is included as a liability in the Statement of Financial Position in Other payables.

172 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Income Tax

The Corporation is not subject to income tax pursuant to section 71 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

Two of the Corporation’s controlled entities, Music Choice Australia Pty Ltd and The News Channel Pty Limited, while subject to income tax, have been inactive up to and including 30 June 2019.

The Corporation’s interests in MediaHub Australia Pty Limited, Freeview Australia Limited and National DAB Licence Company Limited are subject to income tax.

ABC AustraliaPlus (Shanghai) Cultural Development Co. Ltd, incorporated in the People’s Republic of China, is not subject to Australian income tax.

Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT)

The Corporation is subject to Australian FBT.

Events after Reporting Period

There were no material events after the reporting period that would have a material impact on the operations of or finances of the Corporation.

Financial Statements 173

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

Financial Performance - Expenses

4. Expenses

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

4A Employee benefits Salaries and wages 397,926 374,438

Superannuation - defined contribution plans 42,959 38,543

- defined benefit plans 30,497 31,124

Leave and other entitlements 46,348 49,044

Separation and redundancies 5,559 23,861

Other employee benefits 7,719 7,930

Total employee benefits 531,008 524,940

4B Suppliers Transmission and distribution contracts 168,774 166,736

Repairs, maintenance and hire 44,517 48,201

Consultants and contractors 34,342 38,310

Production costs 32,891 13,383

Communications and technology 23,351 31,328

Rights and royalties 20,040 20,397

Travel 17,539 16,822

Materials 4,982 8,574

Promotion costs 3,660 6,621

Other goods and services 9,322 30,634

Operating lease rentals 6,094 5,563

Workers’ compensation premiums 2,268 3,528

Remuneration to the Auditor General for audit of financial statements for the period(a) 219 232

Total suppliers 367,999 390,329

4C Depreciation and amortisation Depreciation Land 7A 243 243

Buildings (including improvements) 7A 36,122 36,087

Plant and equipment 7A 44,314 45,763

Total depreciation 80,679 82,093

Amortisation Intangibles 7A 6,465 6,171

Total amortisation 6,465 6,171

Total depreciation and amortisation 87,144 88,264

4D Program amortisation Purchased 37,647 36,683

Produced 123,119 138,867

Total program amortisation 160,766 175,550

(a) The Australian National Audit Office have contracted KPMG to provide audit services to the Corporation on their behalf. In 2019, KPMG earned additional fees of $5,500 (2018 $1,650) for services that were separately contracted by the Corporation.

174 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Recognition and measurement

Employee benefits

Refer to Note 11 Employee Provisions.

Repairs and maintenance

Maintenance, repairs and minor renewals which do not constitute an upgrade or enhancement of equipment are expensed as incurred.

Operating leases

Operating lease payments are expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Depreciation

Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are depreciated to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method. Leasehold improvements are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements or the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation rates are initially based on their useful lives, reviewed each year and adjusted as appropriate. Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are referenced in Note 7A Land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles.

Amortisation of intangibles

Intangibles comprise software for internal use. These assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is initially recognised at cost and amortised on a straight-line basis over anticipated useful lives between 3-8 years (2018 3-8 years). The amortised cost is considered to approximate fair value. These assets are assessed annually for potential impairment. Refer to Note 4G Write down and impairment of other assets.

Amortisation of produced programs

The cost of produced television program inventory is amortised as follows:

• News, Current Affairs, Live Programs, Factual and Entertainment programs based on current topics - 100% on first screening;

• Childrens, Education and Movies - straight line over three years from completion of production;

• iview-only programs - 100% on first release; and

• Programs not covered above - 100% on first screening.

The costs of programs produced for Radio and ABC International are expensed as incurred. Such programs are normally broadcast soon after production, stock on hand at any time being minimal.

Amortisation of purchased programs

Purchased program inventory is amortised in accordance with the policy noted. Subsequent sales of residual rights are recognised in the period in which they occur.

Refer to Note 7C Inventories regarding inventory valuation.

Financial Statements 175

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

4. Expenses (continued)

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

4E Finance costs Loans from Department of Finance 859 1,210

Other finance costs 92 55

Total finance costs 14.2B 951 1,265

4F Impairment loss on financial instruments Impairment of:

Trade and other receivables 128 30

Total impairment loss on financial instruments 128 30

4G Write-down and impairment of other assets Commercial advances 995 3,853

Land and buildings 9 -

Plant and equipment 38 5

Intangibles 7 196

Inventory held for sale 73 1,634

Total write-down and impairment of other assets 1,122 5,688

4H Net loss from disposal of assets Land and buildings Carrying value of assets disposed 7 101

Cost of disposal - (31)

Net loss from disposal of land and buildings 7 70

Plant and equipment Total proceeds from disposal (79) (276)

Carrying value of assets disposed 100 2,241

Cost of disposal 16 51

Net loss from disposal of plant and equipment 37 2,016

Intangibles Carrying value of assets disposed - 69

Net loss from disposal of intangibles - 69

Total Net loss from disposal of assets Total proceeds from disposal (79) (276)

Carrying value of assets disposed 107 2,411

Total costs of disposal 16 20

Total net loss from disposal of assets 44 2,155

176 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Recognition and measurement

Finance costs

All borrowing costs are expensed as incurred.

Impairment loss on financial instruments

Under AASB 9 Financial Instruments, impairment of financial assets is provided for on the basis of future expected credit losses (ECLs) rather than as and when existing debts are deemed to be impaired.

It also allows for the expectation of credit losses to be adjusted in response to certain factors, for example prevailing or anticipated market conditions.

Write-down and impairment of other assets

Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment is made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the greater of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Corporation were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

At 30 June 2019, the Corporation had performed assessments to determine the extent of any indications that assets may be impaired and the resultant financial impact has been incorporated in the financial statements.

Gains or losses on disposal of assets

Gains or losses from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Lease expense commitments

Commitments are GST inclusive where relevant. GST recoverable is disclosed separately. Net commitments for minimum lease payments in relation to non-cancellable operating leases are payable as follows:

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

One year or less 3,410 5,115

From one to five years 3,988 6,117

Over five years - 1,947

Total operating lease expense commitments 7,398 13,179

GST receivable on operating lease expense commitments One year or less (319) (293)

From one to five years (391) (302)

Total GST receivable on operating lease expense commitments

(710) (595)

Nature of operating lease General description of leasing arrangement

Motor vehicles - business and senior executive

Fully maintained operating lease over 24/36 months and/ or 40,000/60,000 kilometres; no contingent rentals; no renewal or purchase options available.

Property leases - office and business premises

Lease payments subject to increase in accordance with CPI or other agreed increment; initial period of lease ranges from 1 year to 6 years; options to extend in accordance with lease.

AASB 16 Leases

A component of the commitments in the above table will be recognised as leased right of use assets and lease liabilities under AASB 16 from 1 July 2019. Those leases which are exempt from AASB 16 will continue to be expensed on a straight-line basis which is representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.

Financial Statements 177

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

Financial Performance - Revenue and Income

5. Own-Source Income

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

5A Sale of goods and rendering of services Goods 22,662 28,203

Services 20,482 17,820

Total sale of goods and rendering of services 43,144 46,023

5B Interest Financial instruments 5,416 5,890

Total interest 14.2B 5,416 5,890

5C Other revenue Subsidies and grants 963 1,012

Contract revenue 403 1,063

Share of revenue attributable to joint operations 11,037 8,864

Other 1,498 2,264

Total other revenue 13,901 13,203

5D Net foreign exchange gain Non-speculative 219 371

Total net foreign exchange gain 14.2B 219 371

Recognition and measurement

Sale of goods

Revenue is recognised at fair value of the amount received on delivery of goods, net of GST upon delivery of the goods to customers, when:

• the risks and rewards of ownership have been transferred to the buyer;

• the Corporation retains no managerial involvement or effective control over the goods;

• the revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Corporation.

Rendering of services

Revenue is recognised by reference to the stage of completion and the meeting of performance obligations of contracts at the reporting date, when;

• the amount of revenue and transaction costs incurred can be reliably measured; and

• the probable economic benefits of the transaction will flow to the Corporation.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction.

Credit sales are on normal commercial terms. Receivables, which have 30-day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due, less any impairment allowance for bad and doubtful debts. The collectability of debts is reviewed periodically. Allowances are made for expected credit losses.

178 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Interest Revenue

Interest income is recognised as it accrues using the effective interest method and if not received at balance date, is reflected in the Statement of Financial Position as a receivable.

Subsidies and grants

The Corporation receives grant monies from time to time. Most grant agreements require the Corporation to perform services or provide facilities, or to meet eligibility criteria. Subsidies, grants, sponsorships and donations are recognised on receipt unless paid to the Corporation for a specific purpose where recognition of revenue will be recognised in accordance with the agreement.

Share of revenue attributable to joint operations

Share of revenue attributable to joint operations represents the ABC’s 50% share of MediaHub’s Revenue from continuing operations.

Foreign currency transactions

The Corporation enters into foreign currency hedging arrangements to protect its purchasing power in relation to foreign currency exposures. Revenues and expenditures denominated in foreign currencies are converted to Australian dollars at the exchange rates prevailing at the date of the transaction or at the hedged rate.

All gains and losses are taken to surplus/ (deficit) except for forward exchange contracts that are classified as cash flow hedges used to hedge highly probable transactions. Gains on cash flow hedges held at balance date are taken to equity.

Operating leases revenue commitments

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

One year or less 1,611 2,447

From one to five years 3,857 2,233

Over five years 1,921 2,082

Total operating lease revenue commitments 7,389 6,762

GST payable on operating lease revenue commitments One year or less (133) (209)

From one to five years (330) (168)

Over five years (175) (189)

Total GST payable on operating lease revenue commitments

(638) (566)

These commitments, largely relating to rental income for letting out office space, are GST inclusive where relevant. GST payable to the ATO is disclosed separately.

Lease terms are typically between 1 to 5 years in duration and income is subject to increases in accordance with CPI or other agreed increment.

Financial Statements 179

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

Financial Position

Recognition and measurement

Acquisition of assets

Assets are recorded at cost at the time of acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities

The Corporation has adopted the following general policies relating to the determination of fair value of assets and liabilities.

The fair value of land is determined by reference to the market value of the land component of ABC property because it is possible to base the fair value on recent sales of comparable sites. The Corporation’s independent valuers detail these reference sites in valuation reports for respective properties.

The fair value of buildings, plant, equipment and intangibles is determined by reference to depreciated replacement cost as they are typically specialist in nature, with broadcasting in mind.

Generally, the fair value of the Corporation’s other financial assets and liabilities is deemed to be their carrying value as it approximates fair value. The fair value of long-term loans is the net present value of future discounted cash flows arising.

AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement requires disclosure of fair value measurements by level in accordance with the following fair value measurement hierarchy:

• Level 1 - quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;

• Level 2 - inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and

• Level 3 - unobservable inputs for an asset or liability.

The Corporation holds a freehold property classified as held for sale, which was tendered for sale in an open market as disclosed in Note 7B Assets classified as held for sale . The sales process has been administered at arm’s length by an independent agent.

Apart from the above asset, the Corporation does not hold any assets or liabilities measured at fair value that are classified as Level 1 inputs (i.e. with reference to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities).

Assets and liabilities measured at fair value and classified as Levels 2 and 3 are detailed in Note 7A Land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles.

The carrying value of cash and cash equivalents, financial assets and non-interest-bearing financial liabilities (except for derivatives used for hedging) of the Corporation, are measured at amortised cost that approximates their fair value. There have been no recurring fair value measurements transferred between the respective levels for assets and liabilities to 30 June 2019.

Foreign currency transactions

The Corporation enters into foreign currency hedging arrangements to protect its purchasing power in relation to foreign currency exposures. Revenues and expenditures denominated in foreign currencies are converted to Australian dollars at the exchange rates prevailing at the date of the transaction or at the hedged rate.

All monetary foreign currency balances are converted to Australian dollars at the exchange rates prevailing at balance date. Monetary assets and liabilities of overseas branches and amounts payable to or by the Corporation in foreign currencies are translated into Australian dollars at the applicable exchange rate at balance date.

180 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

6. Financial Assets

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

6A Cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 4,821 6,393

Salary sacrifice funds 448 451

Total cash and cash equivalents 14.2A 5,269 6,844

6B Receivables Goods and services Goods and services 17,144 4,279

Total goods and services 14.2A 17,144 4,279

Other receivables Net GST receivable from the Australian Taxation Office 4,615 4,623

Forward exchange contracts 14.2A 62 103

Other, including receivables attributable to joint operations 14.2A 34,994 4,943

Total other receivables 39,671 9,669

Total receivables (gross) 56,815 13,948

Less expected credit loss provision Goods and services (142) (76)

Total impairment allowance (142) (76)

Total receivables (net) 56,673 13,872

Receivables are expected to be recovered in:

no more than 12 months 56,348 13,432

more than 12 months 325 440

Total receivables (net) 56,673 13,872

Reconciliation of expected credit loss provision Opening balance (76) (18)

Creation and maintenance of expected credit loss provision (142) -

Amounts written off 64 -

Amounts recovered or reversed 12 18

Net increase recognised in surplus/(deficit) - (76)

Closing balance (142) (76)

Financial Statements 181

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

6. Financial Assets (continued)

Recognition and measurement

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are recognised at their nominal amounts and include:

• cash on hand; and

• cash at bank and short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

Receivables

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

These are included in current assets, unless they mature more than 12 months after the Statement of Financial Position date, in which case they are classified as non-current assets.

Other receivables

Other receivables include forward exchange contracts at fair value through surplus/(deficit) of $62,159 (2018 $102,616).

Under the fair value measurement hierarchy, these are Level 2 financial instruments as defined earlier under Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities.

The balance represents estimated future cash flows, based on market forward exchange rates at 30 June 2019 and the forward contract rate, discounted by the observable yield curves of the respective currencies. The above amount reflects a 2.2% average depreciation (2018 5.5%) of the Australian dollar against those currencies for which forward exchange contracts have been taken out, where the market forward rate at 30 June 2019 is lower than the contracted rate.

Insurance recoveries

At 30 June 2019, Receivables (Goods and services) included $13,727,176 (2018 nil) for amounts invoiced to Comcover for insurance recoveries relating to expenditure incurred on the remediation of the ABC’s Ultimo building.

At 30 June 2019, Other receivables - Other, including receivables attributable to joint operations included $29,544,550 (2018 nil) for insurance recovery amounts yet to be invoiced.

The total Receivables amount recognised in respect of the insurance recovery for the ABC Ultimo remediation works is $43,271,726. This represents the amount that the ABC is virtually certain of recovering.

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

6C Other investments Term deposits with an original maturity date greater than 90 days 175,000 167,400

Total other investments 14.2A 175,000 167,400

Other investments are all due to be recovered within 12 months.

6D Accrued revenue Goods and services 5,144 6,921

Interest receivable 462 445

Total accrued revenue 14.2A 5,606 7,366

Accrued revenue expected to be recovered in:

no more than 12 months 5,406 6,536

more than 12 months 200 830

Total accrued revenue 5,606 7,366

182 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment throughout each reporting period as outlined below;

• Financial assets held at amortised cost If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred for loans and receivables or held-to-maturity investments held at amortised cost, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows discounted at the asset’s original effective interest rate. The carrying amount is reduced by way of an impairment allowance account. The loss is taken to the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

• Bad and doubtful debts The Corporation assesses the likelihood of recovery of those debts, factoring in past bad debts experience. Bad debts are written off when identified.

• Impairment and transition to adoption of AASB 9 Financial Instruments The ABC calculates an expected credit loss (ECL) provision, based on historical rates of credit impairment, adjusted for any external factors likely to impact the rate of impairment. The carrying value of the ECL provision is monitored against the value of debts likely to be considered at risk of being non-recoverable.

At 30 June 2019, the balance of the ECL provision is $141,844 (2018 $75,594). For the year ended 30 June 2019, the Corporation has identified $132,284 of outstanding debt attributable to customers at risk of non-recoverability. This is fully covered by the ECL provision. Of prior years’ balances, $62,877 was recognised as bad debts and $12,717 was recovered.

Other investments (held to maturity financial assets)

Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity dates that the Corporation has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity investments. Under AASB 9 Financial Instruments, held-to-maturity investments are recorded at amortised cost using the effective interest method less impairment, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis.

Surplus cash is invested into short term investments with maturities at acquisition date of greater than three months. These investments are due to be recovered within twelve months.

Financial Statements 183

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

7. Non-Financial Assets

7A Land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles

Reconciliation of opening and closing balances of land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles at 30 June 2019 is as follows:

Land

(Level 2)

Buildings (including improvements)

(Level 3)

Plant and equipment

(Level 3)

Intangibles

(Level 3) Total

$’000 $’000 $’000 $’000 $’000

Carrying amount as at 30 June 2018 represented by Gross book value 241,743 557,157 600,177 99,373 1,498,450

Assets under construction - 578 32,237 7,186 40,001

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (335) (29,158) (403,802) (77,667) (510,962)

Closing net book value as at 30 June 2018 241,408 528,577 228,612 28,892 1,027,489

Assets controlled by ABC Additions - 6,240 40,021 26,145 72,406

Revaluations and impairments recognised in other comprehensive income 28,059 7,544 - - 35,603

Depreciation and amortisation (243) (35,814) (41,849) (6,465) (84,371)

Write-down and impairment - - (38) (7) (45)

Disposals - (7) (100) - (107)

Transfers/reclassifications (144) (505) 314 - (335)

Net additions to assets under construction - 283 3,568 6,156 10,007

Net transfers from assets under construction - (530) (30,427) (6,740) (37,697)

Assets attributable to joint operations Additions - 1 1,851 - 1,852

Depreciation - (308) (2,465) - (2,773)

Net additions to assets under construction - - 838 - 838

Net transfers from assets under construction - - (634) - (634)

Net book value as at 30 June 2019 269,080 505,481 199,691 47,981 1,022,233

Carrying amount as at 30 June 2019 represented by Gross book value 269,658 558,630 601,897 125,145 1,555,330

Assets under construction - 330 5,584 6,602 12,516

Accumulated depreciation and amortisation (578) (53,479) (407,790) (83,766) (545,613) Closing net book value as at 30 June 2019 269,080 505,481 199,691 47,981 1,022,233

Useful lives of asset classes

Asset Class Fair Value Measured at Useful Life

Freehold land Market value n/a

Freehold buildings* Depreciated replacement cost 50 years

Freehold building improvements Depreciated replacement cost 15 to 50 years Leasehold land - long term Market value 99 to 120 years

Leasehold buildings Depreciated replacement cost Life of lease (up to 50 years)

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost Life of lease (up to 50 years) Plant and equipment Depreciated replacement cost 3 to 15 years

Intangibles (software for internal use) Depreciated replacement cost 3 to 8 years

* Freehold buildings are initially recognised based on a useful life of 50 years, however the useful lives of individual buildings are occasionally adjusted in accordance with advice from independent valuers.

184 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Recognition and measurement

Land, buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles

Land is a Level 2 non-financial asset. The fair value of land is determined based on market comparability, using recent sales history for comparable sites as referenced by independent valuers. The exception to this is the Karratha, Western Australia referred to below, which is a Level 1 non-financial asset, which was revalued to reflect a quoted price.

Independent property valuers, MMJ Advisory undertook a desktop valuation of the Harris Street, Ultimo site as at 30 April 2019. Consequently, a revaluation increment of $28,000,000 (2018 $4,300,000) for land and an increment of $7,465,134 (2018 $3,537,121) for buildings on freehold land was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in Changes in asset revaluation reserve within Other Comprehensive Income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income, Reserves within the Statement of Financial Position and Net revaluation of land and buildings in the Statement of Changes in Equity.

As outlined above, due to the anticipated sale of a freehold property, Karratha, Western Australia, a revaluation increment of $59,251 for land and an increment of $78,352 for buildings on freehold land was credited to the asset revaluation reserve and included in Changes in asset revaluation reserve within Other Comprehensive Income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income, Reserves within the Statement of Financial Position and Net revaluation of land and buildings in the Statement of Changes in Equity. This property is reflected in Note 7B Assets classified as held for sale.

Level 3 non-financial assets comprise buildings, plant and equipment and intangibles, with no observable market data for the assets.

Given the specialised nature of the Corporation’s buildings, valuation is determined with reference to depreciated replacement cost, which is considered to be a reasonable approximation of fair value.

The carrying value of the Corporation’s plant and equipment represents its depreciated replacement cost, which is considered to be a reasonable approximation of its fair value.

The carrying value of the Corporation’s software for internal use represents its amortised replacement cost, which is considered to be a reasonable approximation of its fair value.

Asset recognition threshold

Purchases of land, buildings, plant, equipment and intangibles are recognised initially at cost in the Statement of Financial Position.

Purchases costing less than $2,000 are expensed in the year of acquisition except where they form part of a project or group of similar items, which are significant in total.

Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, the fair value of property, plant, equipment and intangibles is measured based on depreciated replacement cost.

Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets do not materially vary from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depends upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reverses a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class, previously recognised through surplus/(deficit). Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly through surplus/(deficit) except to the extent that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the re-valued amount.

Financial Statements 185

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

7. Non-Financial Assets (continued)

Impairment of non-current assets

The aforementioned classes of assets were subject to an assessment as to indicators of impairment under AASB 136 Impairment of Assets as at 30 June 2019.

Disposals

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected.

Capital purchases commitments

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

Buildings - 238

Plant and equipment (a) 3,257 5,163

Intangibles (b) 353 849

Total capital purchases commitments

3,610 6,250

One year or less 3,610 6,250

Total capital purchases commitments

3,610 6,250

Net GST receivable on capital purchases commitments One year or less (327) (569)

Total net GST receivable on capital purchases commitments

(327) (569)

Commitments are grossed up for any GST included in the expected outlay. The GST itself, which is expected to be claimed back from the ATO, is disclosed as a receivable.

a) Outstanding contractual commitments associated with the purchase of plant and equipment, including communications upgrades and technical equipment fit out.

b) Outstanding contractual commitments associated with the purchase or development of software.

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

7B Assets classified as held for sale Land and buildings at carrying value

335 -

Total assets classified as held for sale

335 -

7C Inventories Retail inventory held for sale

121 849

Purchased television programs

17,651 19,064

Produced television programs

55,263 51,610

In progress television programs

40,582 45,510

Total inventories 113,617 117,033

Inventories are due to be recovered within 12 months.

7D Prepayments Technology 6,837 9,380

Royalties 7,409 7,708

Content 1,647 2,554

Rentals 75 90

Other 2,495 1,151

Total prepayments 18,463 20,883

Prepayments are expected to be recovered in: no more than 12 months 11,072 12,330

more than 12 months 7,391 8,553

Total prepayments 18,463 20,883

7E Other non-financial assets Share of deferred tax asset in joint operations 4,561 4,588

Total other non-financial assets 4,561 4,588

Other non-financial assets are due to be recovered beyond 12 months.

186 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Recognition and measurement

Assets classified as held for sale

Assets classified as held for sale are stated in the Statement of Financial Position at the lower of carrying value and fair value less costs to sell. Any such costs are provided for in the Statement of Comprehensive Income and the Statement of Financial Position.

The Corporation entered into a contract, subject to finance, for the sale of its Karratha, Western Australia property. The contract was signed on 30 May 2019 for a sale price of $335,000.

Inventories (general)

Inventories held for resale are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Inventories not held for resale are valued at the lower of cost, adjusted for any loss in service potential, based on the existence of a current replacement cost that is lower than the original acquisition cost or other subsequent carrying amount.

Produced programs

Television programs are produced for domestic transmission and include co-production fees, direct salaries and expenses and production overheads allocated on a usage basis to the program. Production overheads not allocated to programs are expensed in the period in which they are incurred. External contributions received in respect of co-production of television programs are offset against production costs which are recorded as Inventories in the Statement of Financial Position.

Write-down of inventory held for distribution

When inventories held for distribution are distributed, the carrying amount of those inventories is recognised as an expense. The amount of any write-down of inventories for loss of service potential, and all losses of inventories are recognised as an expense in the period the write-down or loss occurs. The amount of any reversal of any write-down of inventories arising from a reversal of the circumstances that gave rise to the loss of service potential will be recognised as a reduction in the value of inventories recognised as an expense in the period in which the reversal occurs.

Write-down of retail inventory

The amount of any write-down of inventories to net realisable value and all losses of inventory are recognised as an expense in the period the write-down or loss occurs. The amount of any reversal of any write-down of inventories arising from an increase in the net realisable value will be recognised as an inventory expense reduction in expense in the period in which the reversal occurs.

Financial Statements 187

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

8. Payables

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

8A Suppliers Trade creditors 14.2A 62,195 57,098

Total suppliers 62,195 57,098

Supplier payables expected to be settled in:

no more than 12 months 62,155 56,560

more than 12 months 40 538

Total supplier payables 62,195 57,098

8B Other payables Interest payable 14.2A 134 217

Salaries and wages (including separation and redundancies) 14.2A 17,289 30,012

Superannuation 14.2A 487 504

Unearned revenue 18,691 20,144

Other payables 14.2A 3,140 3,793

Forward exchange contracts 14.2A - 16

Total other payables 39,741 54,686

Other payables expected to be settled in:

no more than 12 months 27,299 42,960

more than 12 months 12,442 11,726

Total other payables 39,741 54,686

Recognition and measurement

Suppliers and other payables

The fair value of suppliers and other payables is deemed to be their carrying value as it approximates fair value.

Note 8B Other payables contains nil forward exchange contracts at fair value through surplus/(deficit) (2018 $7,734) nor cash flow hedges (2018 $8,380). Under the fair value measurement hierarchy, these are Level 2 financial liabilities.

188 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

9. Interest Bearing Liabilities

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

9A Loans Loans from Department of Finance 30,000 50,000

Share of loans in joint operations 2,721 1,647

Total loans 14.2A 32,721 51,647

Loans expected to be settled in:

no more than 12 months 20,891 20,512

more than 12 months 11,830 31,135

Total loans 32,721 51,647

Recognition and measurement

Loans

Loans are classified as current liabilities unless the Corporation has the unconditional right to defer settlement for at least twelve months after the Statement of Financial Position date. The loan facility entered into with the Department of Finance was to cash-flow the construction of a purpose-built facility in Southbank, Victoria.

The total loan facility is $30,000,000 (2018 $50,000,000) and is provided on a long-term fixed interest rate basis at a weighted average interest rate of 1.95% (2018 1.88%). Interest is payable annually in arrears at the loans’ anniversary dates.

The fair value of Loans from the Department of Finance at 30 June 2019 is $30,476,369 (2018 $50,231,245), which approximates the carrying value of $30,000,000 (2018 $50,000,000). Under the fair value measurement hierarchy, this is a Level 2 financial instrument. This has been derived on future cash flows based on timing of contractual borrowing costs and the principal repayment, discounted by the Australian Government bond rate for a bond of equivalent duration.

Two of the remaining repayment tranches of $10,000,000 are payable in April 2020 while the third is payable in April 2021.

The discount rate applied to the cash flow forecasts and the principal value of the remaining drawdown maturing beyond 12 months was the Australian Government 2-year bond rate, 0.98% (2018 2.00%). No loan payments span beyond 3 years, so the 3-year bond rate was nil (2018 2.07%).

Share of loans in joint operations represents the ABC’s 50% share of MediaHub’s loan balances with the ANZ Banking Corporation.

At 30 June 2019, MediaHub had drawn loans under six facilities with ANZ Banking Corporation, with an aggregate balance of $5,441,667 (2018 $3,294,000). The ABC’s share, as reflected in its Statement of Financial Position, is $2,720,834 (2018 $1,647,000). These facilities are generally repayable over 5 years.

At 30 June 2019, a further facility of $1,000,000 had not been drawn upon.

The facility is provided on an average variable interest rate to 30 June 2019 of 3% (2018 3.35% to 3.5%).

Financial Statements 189

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

10. Other Provisions

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

10A Other provisions Make good 3,036 3,317

Building maintenance 32,613 30,705

Total other provisions 35,649 34,022

Other provisions are expected to be settled in:

no more than 12 months 32,443 31,817

more than 12 months 3,206 2,205

Total other provisions 35,649 34,022

Reconciliation of the make good provision Opening balance 3,317 2,487

Amounts reversed (307) -

New/additional amounts provided 26 830

Closing balance 3,036 3,317

Reconciliation of the Building maintenance provision Opening balance 30,705 -

New amounts provided 19,509 30,705

Amounts used (17,601) -

Closing balance 32,613 30,705

Recognition and measurement

Other provisions

Provisions are recognised when the Corporation has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event, where it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

The provision for make good represents the estimated cost to make good 27 (2018 27) leased properties at the end of the lease term. The estimated cost is based on management’s best estimate of the cost to make good each site, plus an allowance for inflation. The movement in the provision for make good was impacted by a downward revision in certain make good estimates.

During the year, the ABC provided a further $19,508,687 (2018 $30,704,936) for remediation works to replace the external cladding on the Ultimo, NSW building, to ensure compliance with the current BCA Fire Safety Standards. This resulted in a total provision of $50,213,623. For the year ended 30 June 2019, expenditure incurred on this project was $17,601,011 (2018 nil), resulting in a balance in the provision of $32,612,612 (2018 $30,704,936).

190 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

People and Relationships

11. Employee Provisions

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

11A Employee provisions Annual leave 44,008 43,943

Long service leave(a) 88,626 89,705

Salaries and wages(b) 22,984 -

Superannuation(b) 3,806 -

Redundancy 371 1,022

Total employee provisions 159,795 134,670

Employee provisions are expected to be settled in:

no more than 12 months 144,562 120,624

more than 12 months 15,233 14,046

Total employee provisions 159,795 134,670

(a) The settlement of employee provisions is based on the individual employee’s entitlement to leave. Where an employee has a current entitlement to leave (i.e. is presently entitled to take the leave), the value of that entitlement is included in the employee provisions expected to settle in no more than 12 months. Where the Corporation expects that an employee will be entitled to leave in the future but is not yet entitled to that leave, the value of the leave is included in the employee provision expected to settle in more than 12 months.

(b) A provision is made for estimated historical salary and wages and superannuation entitlements owed to certain casual employees. This estimate is based on an extrapolation of entitlements calculated for a portion of potentially affected employees and factors-in risks and uncertainties associated with the settlement of the liability. The provision for superannuation also includes an amount in respect of an outstanding employer contribution to a defined benefit superannuation scheme.

Recognition and measurement

Liabilities for short-term employee benefits and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts. Other long-term employee benefits are measured as the net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

Leave liabilities are calculated based on employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will apply at the time the leave is taken, including the employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination. The calculation is based on the anticipated length of time taken for an employee to fully settle his/her leave entitlement.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by reference to the work of an actuary, PricewaterhouseCoopers Securities Ltd. The liability for long service leave is the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made by the Corporation resulting from employees’ services provided up to 30 June 2019. The estimate of the present value of the liability considers attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation. A discount rate of 1.2% per annum was applied to calculate the present value of the liability (2018 2.6%).

This discount rate is based on the Commonwealth Government bond yield for a bond with a similar term to the liability.

Redundancy

A provision is made for separation and redundancy benefit payments. The ABC recognises a provision for termination when it has developed a detailed formal plan for the terminations and has informed those employees affected that it will carry out the terminations.

Financial Statements 191

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

11. Employee Provisions (continued)

Superannuation

ABC employees are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Accumulation Plan Scheme (PSSap) or another non-Commonwealth Superannuation fund.

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap and other non-Commonwealth funds are defined contribution schemes.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance’s administered schedules and notes.

The Corporation makes employer contributions to the employee defined benefit superannuation schemes at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government of the superannuation entitlements of the Corporation’s employees. The Corporation accounts for the contributions in the same manner as contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June 2019 represents outstanding contributions at the end of the period.

Expenses

Expenses attributable to the aforementioned employee benefits and provisions are reported in Note 4A Employee benefits .

12. Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the Corporation.

The Corporation determined key management personnel as the members of the Board, the Managing Director, Content Team Directors and the Chief Financial Officer. Remuneration of key management personnel is reported below with prior year remuneration of those individuals no longer considered key management personnel included in “Other”.

192 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Details of the remuneration of key management personnel for the year ended 30 June 2019

2019 $

2018 $

Short term employee benefits

Post employment benefits: superannuation

Other long term employee benefits: long service leave

Termination benefits

Total

Short term employee benefits

Post employment benefits: superannuation

Other long term employee benefits: long service leave

Termination benefits

Total

Executive management David Anderson (Managing Director)

799,136 73,310 265,933 - 1,138,380 428,287 71,274 9,330 - 508,891

Michael Carrington 297,179 15,399 9,679 - 322,257 - - - - -

Michelle Guthrie (former Managing Director)

211,983 4,920 - 1,347,814 1,564,717 943,942 20,049 - - 963,991

Louise Higgins

348,967 38,110 - - 387,076 466,177 60,052 - - 526,229

Melanie Kleyn

202,256 10,318 2,623 - 215,197 - - - - -

Michael Mason

225,335 28,606 4,128 642,854 900,922 408,713 70,052 16,366 - 495,131

Gaven Morris

504,462 64,473 31,211 - 600,146 441,055 60,721 - - 501,776

Judith Whelan

284,214 13,511 10,779 - 308,504 - - - - -

Board Ita Buttrose (Chair) 53,863 8,295 - - 62,158 - - - - -

Jane Connors

57,510 10,007 - - 67,517 9,397 1,635 - - 11,032

Kirstin Ferguson

115,916 11,012 - - 126,928 56,380 5,356 - - 61,736

Joseph Gersh

57,510 5,463 - - 62,973 9,397 893 - - 10,290

Vanessa Guthrie

57,563 5,469 - - 63,032 56,380 5,356 - - 61,736

Peter Lewis 57,510 8,857 - - 66,367 56,380 8,682 - - 65,062

Justin Milne (former Chair)

43,673 4,149 - - 47,821 171,260 15,953 - - 187,213

Georgina Somerset

58,972 5,602 - - 64,574 56,380 5,533 - - 61,913

Donny Walford

57,510 5,463 - - 62,973 56,380 5,356 - - 61,736

Other - - - - - 51,681 7,508 - - 59,189

Total 3,433,557 312,963 324,353 1,990,668 6,061,541 3,211,809 338,420 25,696 - 3,575,925

Total number included above

17 15

Financial Statements 193

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

12. Key Management Personnel Remuneration (continued)

Notes on remuneration

a. The number and remuneration totals (on a pro rata basis) for key management personnel includes those who ceased in their roles as well as their replacements.

The following Executive Managers served for part of the financial year:

- Michael Carrington - 24 September 2018 to 30 June 2019 (in an acting capacity);

- Michelle Guthrie - 1 July 2018 to 24 September 2018;

- Louise Higgins - 1 July 2018 to 22 February 2019;

- Melanie Kleyn - 17 December 2018 to 30 June 2019 (in an acting capacity);

- Michael Mason - 1 July 2018 to 11 December 2018, and

- Judith Whelan - 17 October 2018 to 30 June 2019 (in an acting capacity).

David Anderson performed the following Executive Management roles during the financial year:

- Director Entertainment and Specialist - 1 July 2018 to 23 September 2018;

- Acting Managing Director - 24 September 2018 to 3 May 2019; and

- Managing Director - 6 May 2019 to 30 June 2019.

The following Board members served for part of the financial year:

- Ita Buttrose - 7 March 2019 to 30 June 2019; and

- Justin Milne - 1 July 2018 to 27 September 2018.

Kirstin Ferguson performed the following roles on the ABC Board during the financial year:

- Director - 1 July 2018 to 27 September 2018;

- Acting Chair - 28 September 2018 to 6 March 2019; and

- Deputy Chair - 7 March 2019 to 30 June 2019.

b. The above table is prepared on an accrual basis, including remuneration at risk. Remuneration at risk is recognised in the period in which the entitlement is confirmed. For those key management personnel who served for part of the year, remuneration at risk is reported on a pro-rata basis in respect of the period that they were key management personnel.

Other long-term employee benefits: long service leave reflects the estimated entitlement to long service leave that was accrued during the period, calculated in accordance with the methodology explained in Note 11 Employee Provisions. This includes changes to the value of an employee’s accrued leave entitlement that resulted from a change in their salary during the period.

c. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister’s remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Corporation.

d. Remuneration of the Chair and Directors of the Board is determined by the Remuneration Tribunal. In addition to the remuneration of the Chair and Directors of the Board disclosed above, the Board incurred travel and other expenses of $324,678 (2018 $294,678).

The aggregate remuneration of other Senior Executives and Other Highly Paid Employees is published in the ABC’s Annual Report.

e. “Other” includes prior year remuneration of those individuals who departed the Corporation in 2018.

194 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

13. Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships

The Corporation is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the Corporation include Key Management Personnel, the Portfolio Minister and other Australian Government entities as well as those entities controlled, or jointly operated, by the Corporation.

Directors of the Corporation

The Directors of the Corporation during the year were:

• Ita Buttrose (AO OBE) (Chair) (appointed 7 March 2019);

• Justin Milne (Chair) (resigned 27 September 2018);

• Dr Kirstin Ferguson;

• Peter Lewis;

• Donny Walford;

• Dr Vanessa Guthrie;

• Georgina Somerset;

• Dr Jane Connors (staff elected);

• Joseph Gersh (AM);

• David Anderson (Managing Director) (appointed 6 May 2019); and

• Michelle Guthrie (Managing Director) (ceased employment 24 September 2018).

Transactions with entities controlled by the Corporation

Transactions between related parties are on normal commercial terms and conditions no more favourable than those available to other parties unless otherwise stated.

Transactions with related parties

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Considering relationships with related parties, and transactions entered into during the year by the Corporation, it has been determined that there are no additional related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

Controlled Entities

Country of incorporation

Beneficial percentage held by ABC 2019 Beneficial percentage held by ABC 2018

Ultimate parent entity:

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Controlled entities of Australian Broadcasting Corporation:

Music Choice Australia Pty Ltd Australia 100% 100%

The News Channel Pty Limited Australia 100% 100%

ABC AustraliaPlus (Shanghai) Cultural Development Co., Ltd People’s Republic of China

100% 100%

Music Choice Australia Pty Ltd and The News Channel Pty Limited

These companies are wholly owned subsidiaries of the Corporation that did not trade during the year ended 30 June 2019 and have been dormant since 2000.

ABC AustraliaPlus (Shanghai) Cultural Development Co., Ltd (AustraliaPlus)

This company is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Corporation, incorporated in the People’s Republic of China. This company did not operate during the year ended 30 June 2019.

Financial Statements 195

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

13. Related Party Disclosures (continued)

Related Parties

The Corporation is involved in the following joint arrangements

Ownership Share

2019 2018

Party to the joint operation Principal activity MediaHub Australia Pty Limited

Operating facility for television presentation

50% 50%

Freeview Australia Limited

Promote adoption of free-to-air digital television

16% 16%

National DAB Licence Company Limited

Operates the digital radio multiplex licence

50% 50%

Relationships and transactions with parties to Joint Operations

The Corporation has commercial relationships determined at reporting date to be joint operations. The Corporation’s interests in these entities are accounted for applying proportionate consolidation in accordance with AASB 11 Joint Arrangements.

The Corporation’s interest in MediaHub is included in the Corporation’s financial statements under their respective categories. Interests in Freeview Australia Limited (Freeview) and National DAB Licence Company Limited (DAB) are not material.

ABC employees who are directors of the aforementioned entities are neither remunerated nor receive any other benefits from these entities.

All transactions with parties to Joint Arrangements were at arm’s length. No dividends were received from any of these entities in 2019 (2018 nil).

Summarised financial information of MediaHub Australia Pty Limited

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

Statement of financial position Financial assets 8,422 5,308

Non-financial assets 35,005 36,519

Financial liabilities (10,332) (7,562)

Net assets 33,095 34,265

Statement of comprehensive income Income 22,076 17,734

Expense 21,454 20,507

Profit/(loss) before tax 622 (2,773)

Share of surplus/(deficit) attributable to joint arrangements Share of net profit/(loss) before tax

311 (1,387)

Share of income tax expense/ (benefit) 28 -

Share of surplus/(deficit) attributable to joint arrangements after tax

283 (1,387)

Relationships and transactions with parties to Joint Arrangements (continued)

MediaHub Australia Pty Limited

MediaHub is a joint operation between the Corporation and WIN Television Network Pty Ltd (WIN) to operate a custom designed play-out facility for television presentation.

Both the ABC and WIN own an equal number of ordinary shares in MediaHub. The ABC also owns Class B shares in MediaHub which do not confer an ownership interest. The ABC has made a cumulative net capital contribution of $19,044,703 (2018 $19,725,174) to MediaHub.

Two ABC employees are directors of MediaHub.

196 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Freeview Australia Limited

Freeview is a joint operation between many of Australia’s free-to-air national and commercial television broadcasters to promote consumer adoption of free-to-air digital television within Australia.

The ABC jointly controls Freeview and holds 160 $0.10 shares at 30 June 2019 (2018 160 $0.10 shares) equating to a 16% (2018 16%) share. At 30 June 2019, two ABC employees (2018 one) are directors of Freeview.

The Corporation contributes towards the operational costs of Freeview in proportion to its shareholding and may also provide other operational services to Freeview as required.

The Corporation did not receive any material income from Freeview. The ABC paid $772,592 in 2019 (2018 $650,000) towards the operational costs of Freeview. These costs did not constitute a capital contribution and were recognised directly in the Corporation’s Statement of Comprehensive Income.

National DAB Licence Company Limited

DAB is a joint operation between the ABC and Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) to hold the digital multiplex licence. The ABC and SBS each hold one $1 share in DAB at 30 June 2019 (2018 one $1 share each). Two ABC employees are directors of DAB.

DAB is not a party to any service contracts for the provision of digital radio and does not receive the funds for digital radio operations/ broadcast from the Government as these are paid directly to the ABC and SBS.

The ABC made contributions of $6,126 towards the operational costs of DAB in 2019 (2018 $5,053). The amounts paid were recognised directly in the ABC’s Statement of Comprehensive Income.

Financial Statements 197

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

Financial Risks and Disclosure

14. Financial Instruments

14.1 Capital Risk Management

The Corporation manages its capital to ensure that it can continue as a going concern through aligning operations with Government funded objectives. The Corporation’s overall strategy remains unchanged from previous years with borrowings limited to supporting major capital projects.

14.2 Categories of Financial Instruments

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

14.2A Financial assets and liabilities Financial Assets Other investments (held to maturity) Term deposits with an original maturity date greater than 90 days 6C 175,000 167,400

Total other investments 175,000 167,400

Loans, receivables and cash Cash and cash equivalents 6A 5,269 6,844

Goods and services receivables 6B 17,144 4,279

Other receivables 6B 34,994 4,943

Accrued revenue 6D 5,606 7,366

Total loans, receivables and cash 63,013 23,432

Assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit) Forward exchange contracts 6B 62 103

Total assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit) 62 103

Carrying amount of financial assets 238,075 190,935

Financial liabilities At amortised cost Trade creditors 8A 62,195 57,098

Interest payable 8B 134 217

Salaries and wages 8B 17,289 30,012

Superannuation 8B 487 504

Other payables 8B 3,140 3,793

Loans 9A 32,721 51,647

Total financial liabilities at amortised cost 115,966 143,271

Liabilities at fair value through surplus/(deficit) Forward exchange contracts 8B - 16

Total liabilities at fair value through surplus/(deficit) - 16

Carrying amount of financial liabilities 115,966 143,287

198 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Notes

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

Financial Assets under AASB 139 Other investments (held to maturity) Term deposits with an original maturity date greater than 90 days 6C - 167,400

Total held-to-maturity investments - 167,400

Loans and receivables Cash and cash equivalents 6A - 6,844

Goods and services receivables 6B - 4,279

Other receivables 6B - 4,943

Accrued revenue 6D - 7,366

Total loans and receivables - 23,432

Financial assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit) (held for trading) Forward exchange contracts 6B - 103

Total financial assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit) (held for trading)

- 103

Financial assets under AASB 9 at amortised cost Term deposits with an original maturity date greater than 90 days 6C 175,000 -

Cash and cash equivalents 6A 5,269 -

Goods and services receivables 6B 17,144 -

Other receivables 6B 34,994 -

Accrued revenue 6D 5,606 -

Total financial assets at amortised cost 238,013 -

Financial assets under AASB 9 at fair value through surplus/(deficit) Forward exchange contracts 6B 62 -

Total financial asset at fair value through surplus/(deficit) 62 -

Total financial assets 238,075 190,935

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade creditors 8A 62,195 57,098

Interest payable 8B 134 217

Salaries and wages 8B 17,289 30,012

Superannuation 8B 487 504

Other payables 8B 3,140 3,793

Loans 9A 32,721 51,647

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 115,966 143,271

Financial liabilities at fair value through surplus/(deficit) (held for trading) Forward exchange contracts 8B - 16

Total financial liabilities at fair value through surplus/(deficit) (held for trading)

- 16

Total financial liabilities 115,966 143,287

Financial Statements 199

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

14. Financial Instruments (continued)

Recognition and measurement

Financial Instruments

Financial Assets

The Corporation classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

• financial assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit);

• held-to-maturity investments; and

• loans and receivables.

The classification depends on the nature and purpose of the financial assets and is determined at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised and derecognised upon trade date.

Effective Interest Method

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and of allocating interest income over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset, or, where appropriate, a shorter period.

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis except for financial assets that are recognised at fair value through surplus/(deficit).

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL) or surplus/(deficit)

Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit) where the financial assets:

• have been acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future;

• are derivatives (except for derivative instruments that are designated as, and are highly effective hedging instruments); or

• are parts of an identified portfolio of financial instruments that the Corporation manages together and have a recent actual pattern of short-term profit-taking.

Forward exchange contracts in this category are classified as current assets.

Financial assets at fair value through surplus/ (deficit) are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in surplus/ (deficit). The net gain or loss recognised in surplus/(deficit) incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset. The Corporation’s financial assets in this category are forward exchange contracts which are derivative financial instruments. Gains and losses on these items are recognised through surplus/ (deficit) except if they are classified as a cash flow hedge where they are recognised in the hedging reserve within equity.

200 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Classification of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 Financial Instruments

Financial assets class

AASB 139 original classification AASB 9 new classification

AASB 139 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

($’000)

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

($’000)

Loans, receivables and cash Cash and cash equivalents Amortised cost Amortised cost 6,844 6,844

Goods and services receivables Amortised cost Amortised cost 4,279 4,279

Other receivables Amortised cost Amortised cost 4,943 4,943

Accrued revenue Amortised cost Amortised cost 7,366 7,366

Other investments (held to maturity) Amortised cost Amortised cost 167,400 167,400

Forward exchange contracts valued at fair value through surplus/(deficit) Fair value through surplus/(deficit)

Fair value through surplus/(deficit)

103 103

Total financial assets 190,935 190,935

Reconciliation of financial assets on the date of initial application of AASB 9 Financial Instruments

AASB 139 carrying amount at 30 June 2018

($’000) Reclassification ($’000) Remeasurement

($’000)

AASB 9 carrying amount at 1 July 2018

($’000)

Financial assets at amortised cost Cash and cash equivalents 6,844 - - 6,844

Goods and services receivables 4,279 - - 4,279

Other receivables 4,943 - - 4,943

Accrued revenue 7,366 - - 7,366

Other investments (held to maturity) 167,400 - - 167,400

Financial assets at fair value through surplus/(deficit) Forward exchange contracts valued at fair value through surplus/(deficit)

103 - - 103

Total financial assets 190,935 - - 190,935

Financial Statements 201

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

14. Financial Instruments (continued)

14.2B Net gains or losses from financial assets and liabilities Notes 2019 $’000 2018

$’000

Other investments (held to maturity) Interest on term deposits with an original maturity date greater than 90 days 5B 4,651 5,033

Net foreign exchange gain 5D 219 371

Net gain on other investments 4,870 5,404

Loans, receivables and cash Interest 5B 765 857

Net gain from loans and receivables 765 857

Net gains from financial assets recognised in Statement of Comprehensive Income

5,635 6,261

Financial liabilities at amortised cost Interest and finance costs 4E (951) (1,265)

Net loss from financial liabilities - at amortised cost (951) (1,265)

Net loss from financial liabilities recognised in Statement of Comprehensive Income

(951) (1,265)

Financial Liabilities

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Derivatives

Forward exchange contracts are initially recognised at fair value on the date on which the contracts are entered into and are subsequently revalued to reflect changes in fair value.

Forward exchange contracts are carried as assets when their net fair value is positive and as liabilities when their net fair value is negative. For the purpose of hedge accounting, the Corporation’s hedges are classified as cash flow hedges when they hedge exposure to variability in cash flows that is attributable either to a particular risk associated with a recognised asset, liability or to a highly probable forecast transaction.

At the inception of a hedge relationship, the Corporation formally designates and documents the hedge relationship to which the Corporation wishes to apply hedge accounting and the risk management objective

and strategy for undertaking the hedge. The documentation includes identification of the hedging instrument, the hedged item or transaction, the nature of the risk being hedged and how the Corporation will assess the hedging instrument’s effectiveness in offsetting the exposure to changes in the hedged item’s fair value or cash flow attributable to the hedged risk.

Such hedges are expected to be highly effective in achieving offsetting changes in fair value or cash flows and are assessed on an ongoing basis to determine that they have been highly effective throughout the financial reporting periods for which they were designated.

The effective portion of the gain or loss on the cash flow hedge is recognised directly in equity, while the ineffective portion is recognised in surplus/(deficit).

Amounts taken to equity are transferred to surplus/(deficit) when the hedged transaction affects the surplus/(deficit), such as when hedged income or expenses are recognised or when a forecast sale or purchase occurs. When the hedged item is the cost of a non-financial asset or liability, the amounts taken to equity are transferred to the initial carrying amount of the non-financial asset or liability.

202 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

If the forecast transaction is no longer expected to occur, amounts previously recognised in equity are transferred to surplus/(deficit). If the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated, or exercised without replacement or rollover, or if its designation as a hedge is revoked, amounts previously recognised in equity remain until the forecast transaction occurs. If the related transaction is not expected to occur, the amount is taken to surplus/(deficit).

14.3 Financial Risk Management

The Corporation’s financial risk management policies and procedures are established to identify and analyse the risks faced by the Corporation, to set appropriate risk limits and controls to monitor risks and adherence to limits. The Corporation’s policies are reviewed regularly to reflect changes in the Corporation’s activities. There has been no change in the policies from the previous year. Compliance with policies and exposure limits are reviewed by the Corporation’s internal auditors on a regular basis.

To meet the Corporation’s regular financial risk management objectives, surplus cash is invested in short term, highly liquid investments with maturities at acquisition date of greater than three months. These investments are included as other receivables.

The Corporation’s Treasury function provides advice and services to the business, coordinates access to foreign currency contracts and monitors and assesses the financial risks relating to the operations of the Corporation through internal risk reports. Where appropriate, the Corporation seeks to minimise the effects of its financial risks by using derivative financial instruments to hedge risk exposures. The use of financial derivatives is governed by the Corporation’s policies, approved by the Board of Directors, which provide written principles on foreign exchange risk, credit risk, the use of financial derivatives and investment of funds. The Corporation does not enter into trade financial instruments for speculative purposes.

Under Section 25B of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983, the Corporation’s Foreign Exchange Policy is conducted to reduce or eliminate risk on the Corporation’s known exposures and activities and will be recorded under accepted accounting standards.

The Corporation’s aims, by entering into foreign currency hedging arrangements are outlined in Note 4 Expenses and the Financial Position section under “Foreign currency transactions”.

14.4 Fair Values of Financial Instruments

Forward exchange contracts

The fair value of forward exchange contracts is taken to be the unrealised gain or loss at balance date calculated by reference to current forward exchange rates for contracts with similar maturity profiles. At 30 June 2019 this was a receivable of $62,159 (2018 net receivable of $86,503).

The fair values of financial instruments that are not traded in an active market (such as over-the-counter derivatives) are determined using a Level 2 technique based on the forward exchange rates at the end of the reporting period using assumptions that are based on market conditions at the end of each reporting period.

Loans

The fair values of long-term borrowings are estimated using discounted cash flow analysis, based on current interest rates for liabilities with similar risk profiles. At 30 June 2019, the Corporation’s loan facility with the Department of Finance is $30,000,000 (2018 $50,000,000) and progressively matures by 8 April 2021. This was to cash-flow the construction of the now complete purpose-built facility in Southbank, Victoria.

The Corporation repaid $20,000,000 during the year to 30 June 2019 (2018 $20,000,000). As disclosed in Note 9 Interest Bearing Liabilities, the fair value of the loan at 30 June 2019 is $30,476,369 (2018 $50,231,245).

Financial Statements 203

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

14. Financial Instruments (continued)

14.5 Credit Risk

Credit risk is the risk that a counterparty will default on its contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to the Corporation. Credit risk arises from the financial assets of the Corporation, which comprise cash and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables, short term investments and derivative instruments.

The Corporation has a policy of only dealing with creditworthy counterparties and obtaining collateral where appropriate, as a means of mitigating the risk of financial loss from defaults. The Corporation assesses credit ratings through independent ratings agencies and if not available, uses publicly available financial information and its own trading record to rate customers.

The Corporation manages its credit risk by undertaking credit checks on customers who wish to take on credit terms. The Corporation has policies that set limits for each individual customer. Ongoing credit evaluations are performed on the financial condition of accounts receivable. The Corporation has no material concentration of credit risk with any single customer as the Corporation has a large number of customers spread across a range of industries and geographical areas.

The credit risk arising from dealings in financial instruments is controlled by a strict policy of credit approvals, limits and monitoring procedures. Credit exposure is controlled by counterparty limits that are reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors. The Corporation does not have any significant credit risk exposure to any single counterparty. The credit risk on liquid funds and derivative financial instruments is limited because the counterparties are banks with credit ratings of at least A- as assigned by Standard & Poor’s.

The Corporation’s maximum exposure to credit risk at reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the carrying amount, net of the expected credit loss provision, of those assets as indicated in the Statement of Financial Position.

Credit exposure of foreign currency and interest rate bearing investments is represented by the net fair value of the contracts.

14.6 Hedging Instruments

The following table sets out the gross value to be received under forward exchange contracts, the weighted average contracted exchange rates and the settlement periods of outstanding contracts for the Corporation.

Sell Australian Dollars Average Exchange Rate

2019 $’000

2018 $’000 2019 2018

Buy USD Less than 1 year 2,669 1,834 0.7133 0.7705

Buy GBP Less than 1 year 176 537 0.5627 0.5555

Buy EUR Less than 1 year - 78 - 0.6329

Specific hedges

The Corporation enters into forward exchange contracts to cover specific foreign currency payments when exposures of $50,000 or greater are entered into under a firm contract for goods or services involving a specific foreign currency amount and payment date. Exposures are covered if they fall within a set period, which can generally be a minimum of 3 months or maximum of 6 months subject to market conditions. A net loss of nil (2018 net loss of $2,083) on specific hedges of foreign currency purchases, outstanding as at 30 June 2019, was recorded. The Corporation’s cash flow hedges were all effective during the period.

204 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

General hedges

The Corporation enters into forward exchange contracts to cover foreign currency payments when exposures less than $50,000, of a recurrent nature and with varying foreign currency amounts and payment dates are incurred. General cover is typically held between 20% and 80% of estimated exposures for USD, GBP and EUR subject to market conditions. At balance date, the Corporation held forward exchange contracts to buy USD, GBP and EUR. Gains/losses arising from general hedges outstanding at year end have been taken to surplus/(deficit). The net gain is $58,648 (2018 net gain of $96,486) on general hedges of anticipated foreign currency purchases, outstanding as at 30 June 2019.

Financial Statements 205

Notes to and Forming Part of the Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2019

Contingent Items

15. Contingent Assets and Liabilities

2019 $’000

2018 $’000

15A Contingent liabilities - guarantees Balance at beginning of year 641 639

Net change during the year 2 2

Total contingent liabilities - guarantees 643 641

The Corporation has provided guarantees and an indemnity to the Reserve Bank of Australia in support of bank guarantees required in the day to day operations of the Corporation.

Recognition and measurement

Contingent assets and liabilities

Contingent assets and contingent liabilities are not recognised in the Statement of Financial Position. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of an asset or liability or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured.

Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote. Contingencies are disclosed on a net basis.

Quantifiable and significant remote contingencies

The Corporation has neither material contingent assets nor remote contingent liabilities at 30 June 2019 (2018 nil).

Unquantifiable contingencies

In the normal course of activities, claims for damages and other recoveries have been lodged at the date of this report against the Corporation and its staff. The Corporation has disclaimed liability and is actively defending these actions. It is not possible to estimate the amounts of any eventual payments which may be required or amounts that may be received in relation to any of these claims.

Commitments

Lease expense, lease revenue and capital purchases commitments are disclosed in Note 4, Note 5 and Note 7 respectively.

206 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

John Hanley records a time capsule for his wife on The Recording Studio.

Financial Statements 207

208 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Giggle and Hoot celebrated 10 years on air in 2019.

Appendices

Contents 1. ABC Charter and duties of the Board 210

2. ABC Board and Board Committees 211

3. ABC organisational structure 215

4. ABC Code of Practice (& associated standards) 216

5. Employee profile 227

6. Executive remuneration reporting 229

7. Promotion and market research 235

8. Consultants 235

9. Overseas travel costs 236

10. Television content analysis 236

11. Television transmission channels 240

12. Radio transmission frequencies 243

13. Radio Australia, ABC Australia transmission and distribution 250

14. ABC offices 251

15. Awards received by the ABC in 2018-19 256

Appendices 209

Appendix 1 - ABC Charter and duties of the Board From the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983

6 Charter of the Corporation (1) The functions of the Corporation are:

(a) to provide within Australia innovative and comprehensive broadcasting services of a high standard as part of the Australian broadcasting system consisting of national, commercial and community sectors and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, to provide:

(i) broadcasting programs that contribute to a sense of national identity and inform and entertain, and reflect the cultural diversity of, the Australian community; and

(ii) broadcasting programs of an educational nature;

(b) to transmit to countries outside Australia broadcasting programs of news, current affairs, entertainment and cultural enrichment that will:

(i) encourage awareness of Australia and an international understanding of Australian attitudes on world affairs; and

(ii) enable Australian citizens living or travelling outside Australia to obtain information about Australian affairs and Australian attitudes on world affairs; and

(ba) to provide digital media services; and

(c) to encourage and promote the musical, dramatic and other performing arts in Australia. Note: See also section 31AA (Corporation or prescribed companies

to be the only providers of Commonwealth funded international broadcasting services).

(2) In the provision by the Corporation of its broadcasting services within Australia:

(a) the Corporation shall take account of:

(i) the broadcasting services provided by the commercial and community sectors of the Australian broadcasting system;

(ii) the standards from time to time determined by the ACMA in respect of broadcasting services;

(iii) the responsibility of the Corporation as the provider of an independent national broadcasting service to provide a balance between broadcasting programs of wide appeal and specialized broadcasting programs;

(iv) the multicultural character of the Australian community; and

(v) in connection with the provision of broadcasting programs of an educational nature—the responsibilities of the States in relation to education; and

(b) the Corporation shall take all such measures, being measures consistent with the obligations of the Corporation under paragraph (a), as, in the opinion of the Board, will be conducive to the full development by the Corporation of suitable broadcasting programs.

(3) The functions of the Corporation under subsection (1) and the duties imposed on the Corporation under subsection (2) constitute the Charter of the Corporation.

(4) Nothing in this section shall be taken to impose on the Corporation a duty that is enforceable by proceedings in a court.

210 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

8 Duties of the Board (1) It is the duty of the Board:

(a) to ensure that the functions of the Corporation are performed efficiently and with the maximum benefit to the people of Australia;

(b) to maintain the independence and integrity of the Corporation;

(c) to ensure that the gathering and presentation by the Corporation of news and information is accurate and impartial according to the recognized standards of objective journalism; and

(d) to ensure that the Corporation does not contravene, or fail to comply with:

(i) any of the provisions of this Act or any other Act that are applicable to the Corporation; or

(ii) any directions given to, or requirements made in relation to, the Corporation under any of those provisions; and

(e) to develop codes of practice relating to:

(i) programming matters; and

(ii) if the Corporation has the function of providing a datacasting service under section 6A—that service;

and to notify those codes to the ACMA.

(2) If the Minister at any time furnishes to the Board a statement of the policy of the Commonwealth Government on any matter relating to broadcasting or digital media services, or any matter of administration, that is relevant to the performance of the functions of the Corporation and requests the Board to consider that policy in the performance of its functions, the Board shall ensure that consideration is given to that policy.

(3) Nothing in subsection (1) or (2) is to be taken to impose on the Board a duty that is enforceable by proceedings in a court.

Appendix 2 - ABC Board and Board Committees The ABC Board held 6 scheduled meetings during 2018-19.

Member Meetings eligible to attend Meetings attended

Ita Buttrose AC, Chair (Appointed 7 March 2019) 2 2

Justin Milne, Chair (Resigned 27 September 2018) 4 4

Dr Kirstin Ferguson, Deputy Chair (Appointed Deputy Chair 28 September 2018) (Acting Chair 28 September - 7 March 2019) 6 6

Michelle Guthrie, Managing Director (Until 24 September 2018) 1 1

David Anderson, Managing Director (Appointed 6 May 2019) (Acting Managing Director 24 September 2018 - 5 May 2019) 4 4

Dr Jane Connors (Staff-elected Director) 6 6

Joseph Gersh 6 6

Dr Vanessa Guthrie 6 6

Peter Lewis 6 6

Georgie Somerset 6 6

Donny Walford 6 6

Appendices 211

In addition, the non-executive Directors of the Board met on 12 additional occasions during September and October 2018, and February 2019, to consider matters in connection with the employment of former Managing Director. David Anderson attended 4 of these meetings following his appointment as Acting Managing Director on 24 September 2018. Dr Vanessa Guthrie, Donny Walford and Georgie Somerset were each absent from one meeting. Peter Lewis was absent from two meetings.

One additional meeting of non-executive Directors was held in May 2019 to appoint the Managing Director.

Requests made to the Board by the Minister under section 8(2) In 2018-19, the Minister for Communications and the Arts made no requests to the Board under section 8(2) of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

Board Committees

Risk & Audit Committee The Risk & Audit Committee was established by the ABC Board on 8 February 2018.

The responsibilities of the Committee are set out in the Charter approved by the ABC Board on 8 February 2018 and include assisting the Board to fulfil its duties and responsibilities regarding the appropriateness of the Corporation’s:

• financial reporting

• performance reporting

• risk management / system of oversight and management

• system of internal control

• external audit

• internal audit.

In April 2019, the Board requested that the Committee also review and make recommendations to the Board regarding remuneration policies and practices (previously the responsibility of the People & Remuneration Committee).

The Risk & Audit Committee held six meetings in 2018-19:

Meeting No 3/2018 30 July 2018

Meeting No 4/2018 9 August 2018

Meeting No 5/2018 12 December 2018

Meeting No 1/2019 21 February 2019

Meeting No 2/2019 2 April 2019

Meeting No 3/2019 4 June 2019

Meetings were attended by Peter Lewis (Committee Chair), Donny Walford, Dr Vanessa Guthrie, Dr Jane Connors and Richard Rassi. Mr Rassi is an External Member on the Risk & Audit Committee. He is not a member of the ABC Board.

Member

Position on Committee

Meetings eligible to attend Meetings

attended

Peter Lewis

Committee Chairman 6 6

Dr Jane Connors Director 6 6

Dr Vanessa Guthrie Director 6 6

Donny Walford Director 6 5

Richard Rassi

External Member 6 6

Committee meetings were attended by representatives of the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) and its nominated representative KPMG. Meetings were also attended by people occupying the following positions with standing invitations: ABC Chair, (Acting) Managing Director, (Acting) Chief Financial Officer, General Counsel, Head Group Audit and Head Risk.

In 2018-19, the Risk & Audit Committee considered:

• financial management reports and matters related to preparation and finalisation of the Corporation’s Portfolio Budget Statements and Annual Financial Statements

• the Corporation’s Annual Performance Statements

212 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

• the Corporation’s actual and emerging principal risk exposures, management’s reporting and risk management responses, and insurance arrangements

• the adequacy and effectiveness of the Corporation’s internal control systems, including governance, financial and operational control activities, fraud risk and control and supervision of whistleblower matters

• external audit coverage, plans and reports

• the internal group audit plan, the findings of audit reports and the implementation of audit recommendations by management.

People & Remuneration Committee The People & Remuneration Committee (formerly the People Committee) was established by the ABC Board in February 2017. The Committee was dissolved by a resolution of the Board in April 2019.

Before its dissolution, the responsibilities of the Committee included assisting the Board to fulfil its duties and responsibilities in relation to:

• remuneration policies and practices

• key performance indicators (KPIs) and performance

• people strategy, culture and engagement

• succession planning and talent development

• equity and diversity strategy and reporting

• work health and safety.

These matters are now considered by the full Board. The responsibilities of the Risk & Audit Committee now include review of remuneration policies and practices for recommendation to the Board.

The People & Remuneration Committee held four meetings in 2018-19:

Meeting No 3/2018 9 August 2018

Meeting No 4/2018 25 October 2018

Meeting No 5/2018 12 December 2018

Meeting No 1/2019 21 February 2019

Meetings were attended by Dr Kirstin Ferguson (Committee Chair from 23 February 2017 to 30 September 2018), Donny Walford (Committee Chair from 30 September 2018 to 9 April 2019) and Committee members Georgie Somerset and Joseph Gersh.

Member

Position on Committee

Meetings eligible to attend Meetings

attended

Dr Kirstin Ferguson* Committee Chair 1 1

Donny Walford** Committee Chair 4 4

Georgie Somerset Director 4 4

Joseph Gersh Director 4 4

* Kirstin Ferguson stepped down as Chair of the People & Remuneration Committee on 30 September 2018 due to her appointment as Acting Chair and Deputy Chair of the ABC Board on 28 September 2018.

** Donny Walford was appointed Chair of the People & Remuneration Committee on 30 September 2018.

Committee meetings were also attended by the (Acting) Managing Director, Chief People Officer and Head HR Services.

In 2018-19, the People & Remuneration Committee considered:

• workplace culture and staff engagement

• corporate and leadership team key performance indicators

• Managing Director and leadership team performance and remuneration

• succession planning and talent development

• equity & diversity targets, performance and reporting

• WHS planning, reporting and performance

• workplace and industrial relations strategies.

The Committee also considered staff support programs such as EAP services, trauma, peer support, and cybersafety, and matters to do with workforce composition and staff entitlements.

Appendices 213

Editorial Committee The Editorial Committee was established by the ABC Board in August 2018 to provide objective, non-executive oversight of:

• editorial policy, guidance and training

• complaints reporting

• reputational risks associated with or arising from editorial governance issues.

The Editorial Committee held two meetings in 2018-19. The Committee was dissolved by a resolution of the Board in April 2019. The Editorial Director provides a report to each Board meeting.

Meeting No 1/2018 12 December 2018

Meeting No 1/2019 21 February 2019

Meetings were attended by Dr Vanessa Guthrie (Committee Chair) and Committee members Georgie Somerset and Joseph Gersh.

Member

Position on Committee

Meetings eligible to attend Meetings

attended

Dr Vanessa Guthrie Committee

Chair 2 2

Georgie Somerset Director 2 2

Joseph Gersh Director 2 2

Committee meetings were also attended by the Managing Director and Editorial Director. Presentations were received from Head, Audience & Consumer Affairs; Editorial Policies Manager (News); ABC Legal’s Team Leader, Pre-publication & Training; and an Editorial Policy Advisor.

In 2018-19, the Editorial Committee considered amendments to the Editorial Policies and Code of Conduct for recommendation to the Board. It also reviewed two of the ABC’s Editorial Standards and considered the outcomes, learnings and improvements put in place as a result of two significant resolved complaints.

Appendix 3 - ABC organisational structure as at 30 June 2019

ABC Board

Advisory Council

Managing Director

David Anderson

Editorial Director

Craig McMurtrie

Director Entertainment & Specialist

Michael Carrington (a)

Director News, Analysis & Investigations

Gaven Morris

Director Regional & Local

Judith Whelan (a)

Chief

Financial Officer

Melanie Kleyn (a)

Director Public Affairs

Michael Millett

Head Group Audit

David Joyce

* Not members of the ABC Executive Leadership Team.

Director Audiences

Leisa Bacon

Chief People Officer & Chief of Staff to the MD

Rebekah Donaldson

Head Content Ideas Lab

Angela Stengel*

Head Strategy

Mark Tapley *

Chief Digital & Information Officer

Helen Clifton

General Counsel

Connie Carnabuci*

General Manager ABC Commercial

Andrew Lambert*

Appendices 215 214 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Appendix 3 - ABC organisational structure as at 30 June 2019

* Not members of the ABC Executive Leadership Team.

Appendix 3 - ABC organisational structure as at 30 June 2019

ABC Board

Advisory Council

Managing Director

David Anderson

Editorial Director

Craig McMurtrie

Director Entertainment & Specialist

Michael Carrington (a)

Director News, Analysis & Investigations

Gaven Morris

Director Regional & Local

Judith Whelan (a)

Chief

Financial Officer

Melanie Kleyn (a)

Director Public Affairs

Michael Millett

Head Group Audit

David Joyce

* Not members of the ABC Executive Leadership Team.

Director Audiences

Leisa Bacon

Chief People Officer & Chief of Staff to the MD

Rebekah Donaldson

Head Content Ideas Lab

Angela Stengel*

Head Strategy

Mark Tapley *

Chief Digital & Information Officer

Helen Clifton

General Counsel

Connie Carnabuci*

General Manager ABC Commercial

Andrew Lambert*

Appendices 215 Appendices 215

Appendix 4 - ABC Code of Practice (& associated standards)

I. Regulatory Framework The ABC Board is required, under paragraph 8(1) (e) of the ABC Act, to develop a code of practice relating to its television and radio programming, and to notify this code to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (“the ACMA”).

A complaint alleging the ABC has acted contrary to its Code of Practice in its television or radio programming may be made to the ABC. A complainant is entitled under section 150 of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 (Cth) (“the BSA”) to take their complaint to the ACMA if, after 60 days, the ABC fails to respond to the complainant or the complainant considers the ABC’s response is inadequate.

The ACMA has a discretionary power to investigate a complaint alleging the ABC has, in providing a national broadcasting service, breached its Code of Practice. Section 151 of the BSA provides that the ACMA may investigate the complaint if it thinks that it is desirable to do so.

The ACMA’s jurisdiction under sections 150-151 does not encompass the ABC’s print content or content disseminated by the ABC over the internet or through mobile devices.

However, the eSafety Commissioner has separate jurisdiction under Schedule 7 to the BSA in relation to content hosted on websites or transmitted through mobile services where that content is either “prohibited content”1 or “age-restricted content”.2

The eSafety Commissioner is empowered under Schedule 7 to require content service providers and content hosts to remove or prevent access to these types of content.

The ABC voluntarily complies with the Content Services Code, which is registered as an industry code with the eSafety Commissioner under clause 85 of Schedule 7 to the BSA.

The Content Services Code does not apply to content delivered through online or mobile services where that content has been previously transmitted on radio or television.

Except as expressly provided by the BSA, the regulatory regime established by the BSA does not apply to the ABC: subsection 13(5) of the BSA, and section 79 of the ABC Act.

II. Scope of the Code The requirements of this Code are set out in the sections dealing with Interpretation and Standards in Part IV and the Associated Standard in Part V. The Standards in Part IV apply to radio and television programs broadcast by the ABC on its free-to-air television or radio broadcasting services. The Associated Standard in Part V applies only to television programs broadcast by the ABC on its domestic free-to-air television services.

Complaints about content on the services named above fall within the scope of the Code except where:

• the complaint concerns content which is or becomes the subject of legal proceedings;

• the complaint was frivolous or vexatious or not made in good faith;

• the complainant does not have a sufficient interest in the subject matter of the complaint, where the complaint alleges a breach of Fair and honest dealing (Standards 5.1-5.8) or Privacy (Standard 6.1).

1 Prohibited content essentially involves content that is classified either as RC (Refused Classification) or X18+. This includes real depictions of actual sexual activity, child pornography, detailed instruction in crime, and violence or drug use. 2 Age-restricted content involves content classified as R18+ or MA15+ that is delivered through a mobile device or through a service that provides audio or video content for a fee. This type of content must be subject to a restricted access system, i.e. measures put in place to protect children under the age

of 15 from exposure to unsuitable material. This category of content includes material containing strong depictions of nudity, implied sexual activity, drug use or violence, very frequent or very strong coarse language, and other material that is strong in impact.

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• the complaint was lodged with the ABC more than six weeks after the date when the program was last broadcast by the ABC on its free-to-air radio or television services, unless the complaint is accepted for investigation on the grounds that is appropriate to do so, having regard to:

- the interests of the complainant in the subject matter of the complaint;

- the seriousness of the alleged breach;

- the reason(s) for the delay;

- the availability of the program content which is the subject of the complaint; and

- any prejudice the delay may otherwise have on the ability to investigate and determine the matter fairly.

III. Resolved Complaints The ABC seeks to comply fully with the Code and to resolve complaints as soon as practicable.

A failure to comply will not be a breach of the Code if the ABC has, prior to the complaint being made to the ACMA, taken steps which were adequate and appropriate in all the circumstances to redress the cause of the complaint.

To illustrate, a failure to comply with Standards 2.1 or 2.2 (Accuracy) will not be taken to be a breach of the Code if a correction or clarification, which is adequate and appropriate in all the circumstances, is made prior to or within 30 days of the ABC receiving the complaint.

IV. Principles and Standards

Preamble The ABC belongs to the Australian people.

Earning and retaining their trust is essential to fulfilling the ABC’s charter and its responsibilities under the ABC Act to provide innovative and comprehensive services of a high standard to Australian and international audiences.

The principles and standards set out below are the means by which the ABC seeks to meet these obligations.

They uphold the fundamental journalistic principles of accuracy and impartiality, to protect the ABC’s independence and integrity.

They recognise that ABC content must be created in a way that is respectful towards audiences and mindful of community standards in areas like harm and offence.

At the same time, they recognise that the ABC needs to be adventurous, brave and creative:

Adventurous in encouraging new and sometimes confronting forms of art and entertainment.

Brave in reporting without fear or favour, even when that might be uncomfortable or unpopular; and

Creative in finding new ways of telling Australian stories, reflecting Australian culture and sharing in the Australian conversation.

By holding to these principles and standards, the ABC seeks to be accountable to the Australian people who fund us.

1. Interpretation In this Code, the Standards must be interpreted and applied in accordance with the Principles applying in each Section. From time to time, the ABC publishes Guidance Notes which do not in themselves impose obligations on the ABC, but which may be relevant in interpreting and applying the Code.

The Standards in Parts IV and V are to be interpreted and applied with due regard for the nature of the content under consideration in particular cases. The ABC is conscious that its dual obligations - for accountability and for high quality - can in practice interact in complex ways. It can be a sign of strength not weakness that journalism enrages or art shocks. The Standards are to be applied in ways that maintain independence and integrity, preserve trust and do not unduly constrain journalistic enquiry or artistic expression.

Appendices 217

2. Accuracy Principles: The ABC has a statutory duty to ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is accurate according to the recognised standards of objective journalism. Credibility depends heavily on factual accuracy. Types of fact-based content include news and analysis of current events, documentaries, factual dramas and lifestyle programs. The ABC requires that reasonable efforts must be made to ensure accuracy in all fact-based content. The ABC gauges those efforts by reference to:

• the type, subject and nature of the content;

• the likely audience expectations of the content;

• the likely impact of reliance by the audience on the accuracy of the content; and

• the circumstances in which the content was made and presented.

The ABC accuracy standard applies to assertions of fact, not to expressions of opinion. An opinion, being a value judgement or conclusion, cannot be found to be accurate or inaccurate in the way facts can. The accuracy standard requires that opinions be conveyed accurately, in the sense that quotes should be accurate and any editing should not distort the meaning of the opinion expressed.

The efforts reasonably required to ensure accuracy will depend on the circumstances. Sources with relevant expertise may be relied on more heavily than those without. Eyewitness testimony usually carries more weight than second-hand accounts. The passage of time or the inaccessibility of locations or sources can affect the standard of verification reasonably required.

The ABC should make reasonable efforts, appropriate in the context, to signal to audiences gradations in accuracy, for example by querying interviewees, qualifying bald assertions, supplementing the partly right and correcting the plainly wrong.

Standards:

2.1 Make reasonable efforts to ensure that material facts are accurate and presented in context.

2.2 Do not present factual content in a way that will materially mislead the audience. In some cases, this may require appropriate labels or other explanatory information.

3. Corrections and clarifications Principles: A commitment to accuracy includes a willingness to correct errors and clarify ambiguous or otherwise misleading information. Swift correction can reduce harmful reliance on inaccurate information, especially given content can be quickly, widely and permanently disseminated. Corrections and clarifications can contribute to achieving fairness and impartiality.

Standards:

3.1 Acknowledge and correct or clarify, in an appropriate manner as soon as reasonably practicable:

a. significant material errors that are readily apparent or have been demonstrated; or

b. information that is likely to significantly and materially mislead.

4. Impartiality and diversity of perspectives Principles: The ABC has a statutory duty to ensure that the gathering and presentation of news and information is impartial according to the recognised standards of objective journalism.

Aiming to equip audiences to make up their own minds is consistent with the public service character of the ABC. A democratic society depends on diverse sources of reliable information and contending opinions. A broadcaster operating under statute with public funds is legitimately expected to contribute in ways that may differ from commercial media, which are free to be partial to private interests.

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Judgements about whether impartiality was achieved in any given circumstances can vary among individuals according to their personal and subjective view of any given matter of contention. Acknowledging this fact of life does not change the ABC’s obligation to apply its impartiality standard as objectively as possible. In doing so, the ABC is guided by these hallmarks of impartiality:

• a balance that follows the weight of evidence;

• fair treatment;

• open-mindedness; and

• opportunities over time for principal relevant perspectives on matters of contention to be expressed.

The ABC aims to present, over time, content that addresses a broad range of subjects from a diversity of perspectives reflecting a diversity of experiences, presented in a diversity of ways from a diversity of sources, including content created by ABC staff, generated by audiences and commissioned or acquired from external content-makers.

Impartiality does not require that every perspective receives equal time, nor that every facet of every argument is presented.

Assessing the impartiality due in given circumstances requires consideration in context of all relevant factors including:

• the type, subject and nature of the content;

• the circumstances in which the content is made and presented;

• the likely audience expectations of the content;

• the degree to which the matter to which the content relates is contentious;

• the range of principal relevant perspectives on the matter of contention; and

• the timeframe within which it would be appropriate for the ABC to provide opportunities for the principal relevant perspectives to be expressed, having regard to the public importance of the matter of contention and the extent to which it is the subject of current debate.

Standards:

4.1 Gather and present news and information with due impartiality.

4.2 Present a diversity of perspectives so that, over time, no significant strand of thought or belief within the community is knowingly excluded or disproportionately represented.

4.3 Do not state or imply that any perspective is the editorial opinion of the ABC. The ABC takes no editorial stance other than its commitment to fundamental democratic principles including the rule of law, freedom of speech and religion, parliamentary democracy and equality of opportunity.

4.4 Do not misrepresent any perspective.

4.5 Do not unduly favour one perspective over another.

5. Fair and honest dealing Principles: Fair and honest dealing is essential to maintaining trust with audiences and with those who participate in or are otherwise directly affected by ABC content. In rare circumstances, deception or a breach of an undertaking may be justified. Because of the potential damage to trust, deception or breach of an undertaking must be explained openly afterwards unless there are compelling reasons not to do so.

Standards:

Dealing with participants

5.1 Participants in ABC content should normally be informed of the general nature of their participation.

5.2 A refusal to participate will not be overridden without good cause.

Opportunity to respond

5.3 Where allegations are made about a person or organisation, make reasonable efforts in the circumstances to provide a fair opportunity to respond.

Appendices 219

Attribution and sources

5.4 Aim to attribute information to its source.

5.5 Where a source seeks anonymity, do not agree without first considering the source’s motive and any alternative attributable sources.

5.6 Do not misrepresent another’s work as your own.

Undertakings

5.7 Assurances given in relation to conditions of participation, use of content, confidentiality or anonymity must be honoured except in rare cases where justified in the public interest.

Secret recording and other types of deception

5.8 Secret recording, misrepresentation or other types of deception must not be used by the ABC or its co-production partners to obtain or seek information, audio, pictures or an agreement to participate except where:

(a) justified in the public interest and the material cannot reasonably be obtained by any other means; or

(b) consent is obtained from the subject or identities are effectively obscured; or

(c) the deception is integral to an artistic work.

In cases, the potential for harm must be taken into consideration.

6. Privacy Principles: Privacy is necessary to human dignity and every person reasonably expects that their privacy will be respected. But privacy is not absolute. The ABC seeks to balance the public interest in respect for privacy with the public interest in disclosure of information and freedom of expression.

Standards:

6.1 Intrusion into a person’s private life without consent must be justified in the public interest and the extent of the intrusion must be limited to what is proportionate in the circumstances.

7. Harm and offence Principles: The ABC broadcasts comprehensive and innovative content that aims to inform, entertain and educate diverse audiences. This involves a willingness to take risks, invent and experiment with new ideas. It can result in challenging content which may offend some of the audience some of the time. But it also contributes to diversity of content in the media and to fulfilling the ABC’s function to encourage and promote the musical, dramatic and other performing arts. The ABC acknowledges that a public broadcaster should never gratuitously harm or offend and accordingly any content which is likely to harm or offend must have a clear editorial purpose.

The ABC potentially reaches the whole community, so it must take into account community standards. However, the community recognises that what is and is not acceptable in ABC content largely depends upon the particular context, including the nature of the content, its target audience, and any signposting that equips audiences to make informed choices about what they see, hear or read. Applying the harm and offence standard, therefore, requires careful judgement. What may be inappropriate and unacceptable in one context may be appropriate and acceptable in another. Coarse language, disturbing images or unconventional situations may form a legitimate part of reportage, debate, documentaries or a humorous, satirical, dramatic or other artistic work.

Standards:

7.1 Content that is likely to cause harm or offence must be justified by the editorial context.

7.2 Where content is likely to cause harm or offence, having regard to the context, make reasonable efforts to provide information about the nature of the content through the use of classification labels or other warnings or advice.

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7.3 Ensure all domestic television programs - with the exception of news, current affairs and sporting events - are classified and scheduled for broadcast in accordance with the ABC’s Associated Standard on Television Program Classification.

7.4 If inadvertent or unexpected actions, audio or images in live content are likely to cause harm or offence, take appropriate steps to mitigate.

7.5 The reporting or depiction of violence, tragedy or trauma must be handled with extreme sensitivity. Avoid causing undue distress to victims, witnesses or bereaved relatives. Be sensitive to significant cultural practices when depicting or reporting on recently deceased persons.

7.6 Where there is editorial justification for content which may lead to dangerous imitation or exacerbate serious threats to individual or public health, safety or welfare, take appropriate steps to mitigate those risks, particularly by taking care with how content is expressed or presented.

7.7 Avoid the unjustified use of stereotypes or discriminatory content that could reasonably be interpreted as condoning or encouraging prejudice.

8. Children and young people Principles: The ABC aims to provide children and young people (under the age of 18) with enjoyable and enriching content, as well as opportunities for them to express themselves.

Children and young people participate and interact with the ABC in various ways - as actors, presenters, interviewees, subjects, content makers and audience members.

The ABC has a responsibility to protect children and young people from potential harm that might arise during their engagement with the ABC and its content. The ABC shares this responsibility with parents/guardians and with the child or young person him/herself.

In particular, the ABC recommends that parents/ guardians supervise children and young people’s access to content, their participation in interactive services, and their exposure to news and current affairs. It is not always possible to avoid presenting content that may be distressing to some audience members.

Standards:

8.1 Take due care over the dignity and physical and emotional welfare of children and young people who are involved in making, participating in and presenting content produced or commissioned by the ABC.

8.2 Before significant participation of a child or young person in content produced or commissioned by the ABC, or in interactive services offered by the ABC, consider whether it is appropriate to obtain the consent of both the child/young person and the parent/guardian.

8.3 Adopt appropriate measures wherever practicable to enable children and young people, or those who supervise them, to manage risks associated with the child/ young person’s participation with, use of and exposure to ABC content and services designed for them.

8.4 Take particular care to minimise risks of exposure to unsuitable content or inappropriate contact by peers or strangers.

V. Associated Standard: Television Program Classification

Status of Associated Standard This Associated Standard is approved by the ABC Board and is binding. It is for consideration by relevant editorial decision-makers when providing advice on compliance and by complaints bodies when dealing with complaints. The Associated Standard is provided to assist interpretation of or otherwise supplement the standard in the Editorial Policies to which the Associated Standard relates.

Appendices 221

This Associated Standard forms part of the Code of Practice notified to the Australian Communications and Media Authority under section 8(1)(e) of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983.

Key Editorial Standard 7.3 Ensure all domestic television programs - with the exception of news, current affairs and sporting events - are classified and

scheduled for broadcast in accordance with the ABC’s Associated Standard on Television Program Classification.

Principles:

The ABC applies the classifications listed below to the broadcast of all its domestic television programs with the exception of news, current affairs and sporting events.

The ABC classifications are adapted from the Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Computer Games issued by the Classification Board made under the Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995.

The guiding principle in the application of the following classifications is context. What is inappropriate and unacceptable in one context may be appropriate and acceptable in another. Factors to be taken into account include: the artistic or educational merit of the production, the purpose of a sequence, the tone, the camera work, the intensity and relevance of the material, the treatment, and the intended audience.

Standards:

7.3.1 Television Classifications

G - GENERAL

G programs may be shown at any time. G programs, which include programs designed for pre-school and school-aged children, are suitable for children to watch on their own.

Some G programs may be more appropriate for older children.

The G classification does not necessarily indicate that the program is one that children will enjoy. Some G programs contain themes or storylines that are not of interest to children.

Whether or not the program is intended for children, the treatment of themes and other classifiable elements will be careful and discreet.

Themes: The treatment of themes should be discreet, justified by context, and very mild in impact.

The presentation of dangerous, imitable behaviour is not permitted except in those circumstances where it is justified by context. Any depiction of such behaviour must not encourage dangerous imitation.

Violence: Violence may be very discreetly implied, but should:

• have a light tone, or

• have a very low sense of threat or menace, and

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Sex: Sexual activity should:

• only be suggested in very discreet visual or verbal references, and

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Artistic or cultural depictions of nudity in a sexual context may be permitted if the treatment is discreet, justified by context, and very mild in impact.

Language: Coarse language should:

• be very mild and infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Drug Use: The depiction of the use of legal drugs should be handled with care. Illegal drug use should be implied only very discreetly and be justified by context.

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Nudity: Nudity outside of a sexual context should be:

• infrequent, and

• not detailed, and

• not gratuitous.

PG - PARENTAL GUIDANCE

(Parental Guidance recommended for people under 15 years)

Subject to the Implementation Guidelines at 7.3.2, PG programs may be shown in accordance with Time Zone Charts at 7.3.5.

PG programs may contain themes and concepts which, when viewed by those under 15 years, may require the guidance of an adult. The PG classification signals to parents that material in this category contains depictions or references which could be confusing or upsetting to children without adult guidance. Material classified PG will not be harmful or disturbing to children.

Parents may choose to preview the material for their children. Some may choose to watch the material with their children. Others might find it sufficient to be accessible during or after the viewing to discuss the content.

Themes: The treatment of themes should be discreet and mild in impact. More disturbing themes are not generally dealt with at PG level. Supernatural or mild horror themes may be included.

Violence: Violence may be discreetly implied or stylised and should also be:

• mild in impact, and

• not shown in detail.

Sex: Sexual activity and nudity in a sexual context may be suggested, but should:

• be discreet, and

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Verbal references to sexual activity should be discreet.

Language: Coarse language should be mild and infrequent.

Drug Use: Discreet verbal references and mild, incidental visuals of drug use may be included, but these should not promote or encourage drug use.

Nudity: Nudity outside of a sexual context should not be detailed or gratuitous.

M - MATURE

(Recommended for people aged 15 years and over)

Subject to the Implementation Guidelines at 7.3.2, M programs may be shown in accordance with the Time Zone Charts at 7.3.5.

The M category is recommended for people aged over 15 years. Programs classified M contain material that is considered to be potentially harmful or disturbing to those under 15 years.

Depictions and references to classifiable elements may contain detail.

While most themes may be dealt with, the degree of explicitness and intensity of treatment will determine what can be accommodated in the M category - the less explicit or less intense material will be included in the M classification and the more explicit or more intense material, especially violent material, will be included in the MA15+ classification.

Themes: Most themes can be dealt with, but the treatment should be discreet and the impact should not be strong.

Violence: Generally, depictions of violence should:

• not contain a lot of detail, and

• not be prolonged.

In realistic treatments, depictions of violence that contain detail should:

• be infrequent, and

• not have a strong impact, and

• not be gratuitous.

Appendices 223

In stylised treatments, depictions of violence may contain more detail and be more frequent if this does not increase the impact.

Verbal and visual references to sexual violence may only be included if they are:

• discreet and infrequent, and

• strongly justified by the narrative or documentary context.

Sex: Sexual activity may be discreetly implied.

Nudity in a sexual context should not contain a lot of detail or be prolonged.

Verbal references to sexual activity may be more detailed than depictions if this does not increase the impact.

Language: Coarse language may be used.

Generally, coarse language that is stronger, detailed or very aggressive should:

• be infrequent, and

• not be gratuitous.

Drug Use: Drug use may be discreetly shown.

Drug use should not be promoted or encouraged.

Nudity: Nudity outside of a sexual context may be shown but depictions that contain any detail should not be gratuitous.

MA15+ - MATURE AUDIENCE

(Not suitable for people under 15 years)

Subject to the Implementation Guidelines at 7.3.2, MA15+ programs may be shown in accordance with the Time Zone Charts at 7.3.5.

MA15+ programs, because of the matter they contain or because of the way it is treated, are not suitable for people aged under 15 years.

Material classified MA15+ deals with issues or contains depictions which require a more mature perspective. This is because the impact of individual elements or a combination of elements is considered likely to be harmful or disturbing to viewers under 15 years of age. While most themes may be dealt with, the degree of explicitness and intensity of treatment will determine what can be

accommodated in the MA15+ category - the more explicit or more intense material, especially violent material, will be included in the MA15+ classification and the less explicit or less intense material will be included in the M classification.

Themes: The treatment of themes with a high degree of intensity should not be gratuitous.

Violence: Generally, depictions of violence should not have a high impact.

In realistic treatments, detailed depictions of violence with a strong impact should:

• be infrequent, and

• not be prolonged, and

• not be gratuitous.

Depictions of violence in stylised treatments may be more detailed and more frequent if this does not increase the impact.

Depictions of sexual violence are permitted only if they are not frequent, prolonged, gratuitous or exploitative.

Sex: Sexual activity may be implied.

Depictions of nudity in a sexual context which contain detail should not be exploitative.

Verbal references may be more detailed than depictions if this does not increase the impact.

Language: Coarse language may be used.

Coarse language that is very strong, aggressive or detailed should not be gratuitous.

Drug Use: Drug use may be shown but should not be promoted or encouraged.

More detailed depictions should not have a high degree of impact.

Nudity: Nudity should be justified by context.

7.3.2 Implementation Guidelines

The time zones for each program classification are guides to the most likely placement of programs within that classification. They are not hard and fast rules and there will be occasions on which programs or segments of programs appear in other time zones.

224 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

There must be sound reasons for any departure from the time zone for a program classification. Possible reasons might include, for example, the need to schedule programs which are serious presentations of moral, social or cultural issues, in timeslots most suitable for their target audiences.

Programs, including those having a particular classification under the Classification Board’s Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Computer Games, may be modified so that they are suitable for broadcast or suitable for broadcast at particular times.

Broken Hill in New South Wales shares a time zone with South Australia but ordinarily receives the ABC’s New South Wales TV services. Given the time zone difference, some programs are broadcast outside their classification time zone.

7.3.3 Television Classification Symbols

The classification symbol of the PG, M or MA15+ program (except for news, current affairs or sporting events) being shown will be displayed at the beginning of the program.

The classification symbol of the PG, M or MA15+ program (except for news, current affairs or sporting events) being promoted will be displayed during the promotion.

7.3.4 Consumer Advice

Audio and visual consumer advice on the reasons for an M or MA15+ classification will be given prior to the beginning of an M or MA15+ program.

7.3.5 Classification of Live Content

Many live programs fall into the classification exemption categories (news, current affairs and sporting events). Some, such as live music or comedy programs, do not fall into the exemption categories and pose a particular challenge to classify accurately. The ABC makes reasonable efforts to classify these programs accurately by reviewing scripts, lyrics, outlines, and any pre-recorded material, and briefing program makers and talent as required.

A failure to provide an accurate classification symbol or consumer advice prior to a live (or as-live) program will not be regarded as a breach of standards as long as reasonable efforts were made to classify it and appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any harm or offence.

ABC main channel / ABC NEWS

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G • • • • • • •

PG • • • • • • •

M • • • •

MA • •

ABC COMEDY

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G

(ABC COMEDY is not on air at this time)

• • •

PG • • •

M • • •

MA • •

ABC KIDS

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G • • • •

(ABC KIDS is not on air at this time)

PG

M

MA

ABC ME

5am 12pm 3pm 7pm 7.30pm 8.30pm 9pm 5am

G • • • • • • •

PG • • • • • • •

M • •

MA •

Appendices 225

How to make a complaint

If you are concerned that a radio or television program broadcast by the ABC does not comply with this Code of Practice, you are entitled to make a complaint.

The law requires that you first make your complaint to the ABC. You can do so by completing the online Complaint Form at www.abc.net.au/contact/complain.htm or by writing to:

Audience and Consumer Affairs Australian Broadcasting Corporation GPO Box 9994, in the capital city of your State or Territory

Your complaint should:

• include your name and an address where you can be contacted (this can be an email address);

• specify the ABC program which concerned you;

• include the time, date and channel/station of the broadcast;

• be made within six weeks of the date of broadcast or, if made after six weeks, explain why you believe the ABC should nevertheless investigate the matter;

• provide a short summary of what concerned you, including any relevant Standard of the Code you believe may have been breached (see the section “Principles and Standards”);

• if you are complaining about a breach of the Standards relating to Privacy, or to Fair and Honest Dealing, indicate your interest in the subject matter (e.g., was your personal privacy affected, or were you a participant in a program and believe you were unfairly or dishonestly treated?).

If you are dissatisfied with the ABC’s response, or if you have not received a response within 60 days of making your complaint to the ABC, then you are entitled to complain to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (the ACMA). You can write to the ACMA at:

Australian Communications and Media Authority PO Box Q500, Queen Victoria Building Sydney NSW 2000

Fax: 02 9334 7799

Email: broadcasting@acma.gov.au

If you make a complaint to the ACMA, you should provide:

• a copy of your complaint to the ABC

• a copy of the ABC’s response to you, if received

• the reasons you consider the ABC’s response to be inadequate.

Note: ABC complaints procedures do not form part of the ABC Code of Practice.

226 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Appendix 5 - Employee profile

Reports required by paragraph 17BE(ka) of the PGPA Rule Statistics calculated and reported on a head count basis (number of employees) at the end of the period

All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2018-19)

Male Female Gender Diverse* Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total Gender Diverse

NSW 739 43 782 693 220 913 1 - 1 1,696

Qld 151 8 159 125 49 174 - - - 333

SA 90 3 93 95 35 130 - - - 223

Tas 51 2 53 45 17 62 - - - 115

Vic 227 21 248 177 70 247 - - - 495

WA 79 4 83 62 22 84 - - - 167

ACT 68 5 73 50 12 62 - - - 135

NT 44 5 49 45 4 49 - - - 98

Overseas 11 - 11 6 - 6 - - - 17

Total 1,460 91 1,551 1,298 429 1,727 1 - 1 3,279

* The ABC uses the term ‘gender diverse’ to describe a wide range of gender identities. This may include, but is not limited to people who are Transgender, those who identify as gender diverse, Bigender, Gender Queer, neither gender or both.

All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2017-18)

Male Female Gender Diverse* Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total Gender Diverse

NSW 776 37 813 715 216 931 - - - 1,744

Qld 152 10 162 120 46 166 - - - 328

SA 105 4 109 80 36 116 - - - 225

Tas 52 3 55 42 18 60 - - - 115

Vic 239 14 253 181 76 257 - - - 510

WA 75 4 79 62 21 83 - - - 162

ACT 68 5 73 52 15 67 - - - 140

NT 47 3 50 34 5 39 - - - 89

Overseas 14 - 14 5 - 5 - - - 19

Total 1,528 80 1,608 1,291 433 1,724 - - - 3,332

* The ABC uses the term ‘gender diverse’ to describe a wide range of gender identities. This may include, but is not limited to people who are Transgender, those who identify as gender diverse, Bigender, Gender Queer, neither gender or both.

Appendices 227

All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2018-19)

Male Female Gender Diverse* Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total Gender Diverse

NSW 133 15 148 148 58 206 1 1 2 356

Qld 20 4 24 24 8 32 - - - 56

SA 10 1 11 12 5 17 - - - 28

Tas 3 1 4 6 4 10 - - - 14

Vic 47 21 68 64 23 87 1 - 1 156

WA 13 2 15 14 6 20 - - - 35

ACT 7 3 10 10 4 14 - - - 24

NT 5 1 6 6 4 10 - - - 16

Overseas 1 - 1 - - - - - - 1

Total 239 48 287 284 112 396 2 1 3 686

* The ABC uses the term ‘gender diverse’ to describe a wide range of gender identities. This may include, but is not limited to people who are Transgender, those who identify as gender diverse, Bigender, Gender Queer, neither gender or both.

All Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2017-18)

Male Female Gender Diverse* Total

Full-time

Part-time

Total Male

Full-time

Part-time

Total Female

Full-time

Part-time

Total Gender Diverse

NSW 176 9 185 212 59 271 - - - 456

Qld 25 5 30 33 7 40 - - - 70

SA 11 1 12 12 3 15 - - - 27

Tas 7 2 9 4 1 5 - - - 14

Vic 39 9 48 61 11 72 - - - 120

WA 17 1 18 16 4 20 - - - 38

ACT 10 4 14 9 2 11 - - - 25

NT 7 1 8 13 4 17 - - - 25

Overseas 1 - 1 - - - - - - 1

Total 293 32 325 360 91 451 - - - 776

* The ABC uses the term ‘gender diverse’ to describe a wide range of gender identities. This may include, but is not limited to people who are Transgender, those who identify as gender diverse, Bigender, Gender Queer, neither gender or both.

228 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Appendix 6 - Executive remuneration reporting As a Commonwealth entity, the ABC is required to disclose executive remuneration information in annual reports in accordance with the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 (the PGPA Rule).

Commonwealth entities are required to present remuneration for key management personnel, senior executives and other highly paid staff, as defined in the PGPA Rule.

Key management personnel Key management personnel (KMP) are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. The Corporation determined KMP as the members of the Board, the Managing Director, Content Team Directors and the Chief Financial Officer.

Senior executives Senior executives are employees employed in a position equivalent to classification Groups 9 to 11 of the table in Schedule 1 to the Public Service Classification Rules 2000. The Corporation determined senior executives as executive directors who are not KMP (Senior Executives).

Other highly paid staff Other highly paid staff are employees who are neither KMP nor senior executive and whose total remuneration paid during the year exceeded $220,000 (Other Highly Paid Staff).

Total remuneration Total remuneration is defined in the PGPA rule as the sum of the following (calculated on an accrual basis):

a) base salary

b) performance pay and bonuses

c) other benefits and allowances

d) superannuation contributions (made by the employer)

e) long service leave

f) other long-term benefits

g) termination benefits.

Executive and employee remuneration policy At the core of the ABC’s approach to remuneration is a need to ensure the Corporation can realise its strategic priorities through an ability to attract and retain employees who deliver on its priorities and deliver value for audiences into the future.

On the next page is ABC’s approach to remuneration for Executive Key Management Personnel, Senior Executives and Other Highly Paid Staff for the year ended 30 June 2019.

Appendices 229

Remuneration principles

Remuneration framework

Equitable

We ensure our remuneration approach is consistent and equitable

Market competitive

We attract and retain the best talent to meet our current and future workforce needs

Performance aligned

We recognise and reward for contribution to performance goals and targets

Transparent

We have a transparent and disciplined approach to managing remuneration

decisions and costs

Fixed remuneration At risk remuneration

Element Fixed remuneration comprises base salary, superannuation and benefits.

Executive KMP, Senior Executives and some Other Highly Paid Staff are eligible to receive an at risk payment for the achievement of performance targets.

The Commonwealth Remuneration Tribunal (the Tribunal), consented to the removal of at risk pay for the Managing Director (MD) from 1 June 2018.

Performance Reviewed annually to reflect the experience, competence and contribution of individuals whilst remaining conservatively competitive against the market.

For Executive KMP and Senior Executives, half of the at risk opportunity is linked to ABC corporate objectives and half is linked to individual objectives.

Some Other Highly Paid Staff are eligible to receive an at risk payment for the achievement of performance targets, some are eligible to be paid a performance bonus in accordance with the terms in the Senior Employment Agreement 2015 and some are eligible to be paid a bonus in accordance with the ABC Enterprise Agreement 2016-19.

Alignment Attracts and retains the best talent to meet ABC’s strategic priorities.

Varies annual remuneration up or down to reflect contribution, aligned with ABC’s strategic priorities.

Target remuneration mix

Executive KMP (excluding MD) and Senior Executives

Eligible Other Highly Paid Staff

Fixed remuneration At risk remuneration

83-93%

87-98%

7-17%

2-13%

230 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Remuneration governance All Executive KMP, Senior Executives and Other Highly Paid Staff are employees of the ABC. Remuneration and other terms of employment are formalised as follows:

• Executive KMP and Senior Executives (Executives): Individual employment agreement.

• Other Highly Paid Staff: Individual employment agreement or engaged through either the ABC Senior Employment Agreement 2015 or the ABC Enterprise Agreement 2016-19.

During the year ended 30 June 2019, ABC’s People & Remuneration Committee (PRC) assisted the Board in fulfilling its governance responsibilities in relation to remuneration. Outlined below is the ABC’s approach for setting, monitoring and approving remuneration policy and amounts. Note that the Managing Director’s (MD) remuneration arrangements, including the MD’s annual total remuneration amount, are set by the Commonwealth Remuneration Tribunal (the Tribunal).

The PRC was dissolved by a resolution of the Board in April 2019. Beyond this date, matters considered by the PRC will be considered by the full Board. The responsibilities of the Risk & Audit Committee now include review of remuneration policies and practices for recommendation to the Board.

MD • Recommend Executive KPIs

• Evaluate and provide recommendations regarding Executive performance assessments and remuneration outcomes

• Approve performance assessments and remuneration outcomes for Other Highly Paid Staff, as recommended by ABC’s managers

PRC • Review MD’s proposals regarding staff

• Approve Executive remuneration policies and practices with respect to individual remuneration arrangements, KPIs, performance assessments and remuneration outcomes

• Provide recommendations regarding MD KPIs and performance assessments against those targets

ABC Board • Review and approve recommendations referred by the PRC

Appendices 231

Non-executive director (NED) remuneration All ABC NEDs are appointed by the Commonwealth of Australia through the Shareholder Ministers.

The Commonwealth Remuneration Tribunal, an independent statutory body overseeing the remuneration of key Commonwealth offices, determines fees for all ABC NEDs. ABC is required to comply with the Tribunal’s determinations and plays no role in the consideration or determination of NED fees.

The Tribunal sets annual Chair, Deputy Chair and Board Member fees (exclusive of statutory superannuation contributions) which are inclusive of all activities undertaken by NEDs on behalf of ABC (i.e., inclusive of Committee participation). Statutory superannuation is paid in addition to the fees set by the Tribunal.

The Commonwealth Remuneration Tribunal determination for the relevant period set the following ABC Board fees:

• Chair: $174,690

• Deputy Chair: $86,240

• Member: $57,510

Key management personnel remuneration Key management personnel (KMP) are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity. The Corporation determined KMP as the members of the Board, the Managing Director, Content Team Directors and the Chief Financial Officer.

232 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Name Position Title

Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other

long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Base salary

($)

At Risk payments

($)

Other benefits and allowances

($)

Superannuation contributions

($)

Long

service leave

($)

Termination benefits

($)

Total

remuneration

($)

Executive key management personnel

David Anderson Managing Director 799,136 - - 73,310 265,933 - 1,138,380

Michael Carrington Acting Director Entertainment &

Specialist

287,963 9,216 - 15,399 9,679 - 322,257

Michelle Guthrie

Former Managing Director 211,983 - - 4,920 - 1,347,814 1,564,717

Louise Higgins

Chief Financial & Strategy Officer 258,967 90,000 - 38,110 - - 387,076

Melanie Kleyn

Chief Financial Officer

201,067 1,189 - 10,318 2,623 - 215,197

Michael Mason

Director Regional & Local 165,335 60,000 - 28,606 4,128 642,854 900,922

Gaven Morris Director News, Analysis & Investigations

422,462 82,000 - 64,473 31,211 - 600,146

Judith Whelan

Acting Director Regional & Local 276,627 7,587 - 13,511 10,779 - 308,504

Board

Ita Buttrose Chair 53,863 - - 8,295 - - 62,158

Dr Jane Connors

Staff Elected Director

57,510 - - 10,007 - - 67,517

Dr Kirstin Ferguson

Deputy Chair 115,916 - - 11,012 - - 126,928

Joseph Gersh Director 57,510 - - 5,463 - - 62,973

Dr Vanessa Guthrie Director 57,563 - - 5,469 - - 63,032

Peter Lewis Director 57,510 - - 8,857 - - 66,367

Justin Milne Former Chair 43,673 - - 4,149 - - 47,821

Georgina Somerset

Director 58,972 - - 5,602 - - 64,574

Donny Walford

Director 57,510 - - 5,463 - - 62,973

Total 3,183,565 249,992 - 312,963 324,353 1,990,668 6,061,541

Notes on key management personnel remuneration a. The number and remuneration totals (on a pro rata basis) for key management personnel includes those who ceased in their roles as well as their replacements.

The following Executive KMP served for part of the financial year:

• Michael Carrington - 24 September 2018 to 30 June 2019 • Michelle Guthrie - 1 July 2018 to 24 September 2018 • Louise Higgins - 1 July 2018 to 22 February 2018 • Melanie Kleyn - 17 December 2018 to 30 June 2019 • Michael Mason - 1 July 2018 to 11 December 2018 • Judith Whelan - 17 October 2018 to 30 June 2019

David Anderson performed the following Executive Management roles during the financial year:

• Director Entertainment and Specialist - 1 July 2018 to 23 September 2018 • Acting Managing Director - 24 September 2018 to 3 May 2019 • Managing Director - 3 May 2019 to 30 June 2019

The following Board members served for part of the financial year:

• Ita Buttrose - 7 March 2019 to 30 June 2019 • Justin Milne - 1 July 2018 to 27 September 2019

Dr Kirstin Ferguson was appointed Deputy Chair on 28 September 2018. Dr Ferguson performed the following Non-Executive Director roles during the financial year:

• Non-Executive Director - 1 July 2018 to 27 September 2018 • Acting Chair - 28 September 2019 to 6 March 2019 • Deputy Chair - 7 March 2019 to 30 June 2019

b. The above table is prepared on an accrual basis, including remuneration at risk. Other long term employee benefits: Long Service Leave reflects the estimated entitlement to long service leave that was accrued during the period, calculated in accordance with the methodology explained in Note 11 to the financial statements.

c. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister’s remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Corporation.

Appendices 233

Senior executive remuneration Senior executives are employees employed in a position equivalent to classification Groups 9 to 11 of the table in Schedule 1 to the Public Service Classification Rules 2000. The Corporation determined senior executives as executive directors who are not KMP.

Remuneration Band

Number of Senior Executives

Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other

long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Average Base salary

($)

Average At Risk payments

($)

Average Other

benefits and allowances

($)

Average Long service leave

($)

Average Long service leave

($)

Average Termination benefits

($)

Average total remuneration

($)

$0 - $220,000 2 74,018 - - 9,915 4,556 - 88,489

$270,001 - $295,000 1 - - - - - 277,739 277,739

$295,001 - $320,000 1 217,590 36,000 - 45,427 - - 299,018

$395,001 - $420,000 1 352,991 33,000 - 20,531 4,515 - 411,037

$445,001 - $470,000 1 370,663 50,000 - 20,531 11,936 - 453,130

$495,001 - $520,000 1 389,900 75,000 - 20,531 17,072 - 502,504

$545,001 - $570,000 1 417,355 80,000 - 49,017 12,318 - 558,691

Other highly paid staff remuneration Other highly paid staff are employees who are neither KMP nor senior executive and whose total remuneration paid during the year exceeded $220,000.

Remuneration Band

Number of Other Highly Paid Staff

Short-term benefits

Post-

employment benefits

Other

long-term benefits Termination benefits

Total

remuneration

Average Base salary

($)

Average At Risk and other bonus payments

($)

Average Other

benefits and allowances

($)

Average

Superannuation contributions

($)

Average Long service leave

($)

Average Termination benefits

($)

Average total remuneration

($)

$220,001 - $245,000 53 180,698 3,193 - 29,458 9,911 8,699 231,958

$245,001 - $270,000 26 196,093 6,485 - 32,291 5,602 15,145 255,616

$270,001 - $295,000 12 183,473 13,348 - 30,651 4,197 50,693 282,363

$295,001 - $320,000 12 249,650 8,564 - 37,859 9,674 - 305,747

$320,001 - $345,000 8 253,744 12,621 - 36,420 4,199 21,450 328,435

$345,001 - $370,000 5 138,180 - - 30,071 3,138 188,728 360,119

$370,001 - $395,000 6 185,172 8,750 - 33,498 7,136 154,146 388,701

$395,001 - $420,000 3 220,643 29,507 - 25,461 3,218 130,716 409,545

$470,001 - $495,000 2 320,117 36,000 - 20,531 107,306 - 483,955

$495,001 - $520,000 2 311,172 12,241 - 50,559 9,982 119,796 503,750

$545,001 - $570,000 1 167,824 29,520 - 39,567 - 317,349 554,261

234 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Appendix 7 - Promotion and market research

Expenditure

2018-19 $m

2017-18 $m

2016-17 $m

2015-16 $m

2014-15 $m

Market Research 5.7 5.6 5.4 3.1 2.5

Advertising 2.7 5.2 3.6 5.8 5.8

Promotion 1.3 1.1 1.1 1.8 3.1

Total 9.7 12.0 10.0 10.7 11.3

Appendix 8 - Consultants

Consultant Purpose of Consultancy

Total $

(paid or payable as at 30 June 2019)

Below $10,000

Various Various 92,984

$10,000-$50,000

L.E.K. Consulting Australia Pty Ltd Technical advice 10,000

Modern Building Certifiers Technical advice 11,550

Directioneering Pty Ltd Career advice - redundancies 12,000

D Humphrys Strategic advice 15,452

Webb Australia Group (NSW) Pty Ltd Technical advice 18,000

Aon Risk Services Australia Limited Risk assessment and analysis 25,000

Todd Davies and Associates Risk assessment and analysis 25,900

Jones Lang LaSalle (NSW) Pty Ltd Property valuation and advisory services 28,459

DJRD Pty Ltd Technical advice 30,258

Venture Consulting Pty Limited Strategic advice 31,402

Deloitte Access Economics Pty Ltd Economic analysis 33,503

PricewaterhouseCoopers Securities Ltd Finance and other advisory services 35,000

Knight Frank Australia Pty Ltd Property valuation and advisory services 37,607

Deloitte Risk Advisory Pty Limited Risk assessment and analysis 44,108

Intelligent Risks Pty Ltd Risk assessment and analysis 49,084

Subtotal 407,323

Above $50,000

Trevor-Roberts Associates Career advice - redundancies 61,500

Medias Consulting Pty Ltd Strategic advice 62,659

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu^ Finance and other advisory services 75,394

Partners in Performance International Pty Ltd Efficiency review 100,000

CBRE (GCS) Pty Ltd Risk assessment and analysis; technical

advice

285,672

Deloitte Consulting Pty Limited Strategic advice 328,829

PricewaterhouseCoopers Consulting (Australia) Pty Limited Strategic advice 333,684

Subtotal 1,247,738

TOTAL 1,748,045

^ These items relate fully or partly to international development projects funded by AusAID.

Appendices 235

Appendix 9 - Overseas travel costs

Cost

2018-19 $m

2017-18 $m

2016-17 $m

2015-16 $m

2014-15 $m

Travel allowances and accommodation 2.1 2.1 1.8 2.2 2.0

Airfares 1.4 1.4 1.3 1.6 1.6

Other* 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9

TOTAL 4.1 4.1 3.8 4.6 4.5

* Other includes car hire, taxis, excess baggage, hire of personnel and equipment.

Appendix 10 - Television content analysis

Australian content - ABC main channel, 6am-midnight Australian first-release and repeat linear content as a percentage of linear hours broadcast.

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

2009-10

36%

2010-11

38%

2011-12

47%

2012-13

47%

2013-14

51%

2014-15

52%

2015-16

47%

2016-17

47%

2017-18

48%

2018-19

49%

18% 17%

15% 15%

15%

17%

22% 22% 21%

25%

First Release Repeat

Notes: This table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and NSW transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other states and territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

Australian children’s content - ABC KIDS and ABC ME

ABC TV Channel

1 July 2017 - 30 June 2018 1 July 2018 - 30 June 2019

Total hours

broadcast

Hours of Australian Children’s Content % of total

Total hours

broadcast

Hours of Australian Children’s Content % of total

ABC ME* 6,754 2,124 31.45% 6,759 2,279 33.72%

ABC KIDS*^ 5,110 1,927 37.71% 5,293 1,865 35.24%

TOTAL 11,864 4,051 34.14% 12,052 4,144 34.39%

* Australian hours includes interstitials.

^ ABC KIDS hours were 5am-7pm in 2017-18 and 5am-7.30pm in 2018-19.

236 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC main channel linear program hours transmitted 24 hours

Australian Overseas Total

Genre

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2018-19 2017-18

Arts and Culture 14 98 113 1 8 9 122 124

Children’s 0 7 7 0 1 1 8 8

Current Affairs 665 506 1,172 0 3 3 1,175 1,035

Documentary 49 308 358 17 227 244 602 453

Drama 55 214 268 80 1,089 1,169 1,437 1,686

Entertainment 1,371 435 1,806 23 221 244 2,050 2,116

Factual 84 489 573 3 429 432 1,005 963

Indigenous 2 8 10 0 0 0 10 11

Movies 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3

News 1,796 60 1,856 0 0 0 1,856 1,869

Religion and Ethics 12 48 60 10 16 26 87 73

Sport 56 13 69 0 21 21 90 125

Total Program Hours 4,105 2,188 6,293 135 2,019 2,153 8,446 8,467

% of Total Program Hours 48.6% 25.9% 74.5% 1.6% 23.9% 25.5% 100.0% 100.0%

Other* 314 314 293

Total Hours 6,607 2,153 8,760 8,760

% of Total Hours 75% 25%

* Other: includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements. Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and NSW transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other States and Territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

ABC KIDS linear program hours transmitted 5am-7.30pm **

Australian Overseas Total

Genre

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2018-19 2017-18

Children’s 114 1,420 1,534 104 3,323 3,427 4,962 4,778

Total Program Hours 114 1,420 1,534 104 3,323 3,427 4,962 4,778

% of Total Program Hours 2.3% 28.6% 30.9% 2.1% 67.0% 69.1% 100.0% 100.0%

Other* 331 331 332

Total Program Hours, including interstitials 1,865 3,427 5,293 5,110

% of Total Hours 35% 65%

* Other: includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements. ** This year ABC KIDS programming closed at 7.30pm. Close time in previous years was 7pm.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and NSW transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other States and Territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

Appendices 237

ABC COMEDY linear program hours transmitted 7.30pm-2am**

Australian Overseas Total

Genre

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2018-19 2017-18

Arts and Culture 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 23

Children’s 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 93

Current Affairs 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Documentary 0 0 0 4 38 42 42 612

Drama 2 105 106 22 1,182 1,204 1,311 846

Entertainment 27 389 415 14 427 441 857 766

Factual 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 50

Indigenous 0 4 4 0 0 0 4 7

Movies 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

News 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 1

Religion and Ethics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Sport 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Total Program Hours 29 499 528 40 1,649 1,689 2,217 2,402

% of Total Program Hours 1.3% 22.5% 23.8% 1.8% 74.4% 76.2% 100.0% 100.0%

Other* 155 155 153

Total Hours 683 1,689 2,373 2,555

% of Total Hours 29% 71%

* Other: includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements. ** This year ABC COMEDY programming commenced at 7.30pm. Commencement time in previous years was 7pm.

Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and NSW transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other States and Territories as a result of varying levels of local content. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

ABC ME linear program hours transmitted 6am-varied close

Australian Overseas Total

Genre

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2018-19 2017-18

Arts/Culture 0 1 1 0 12 12 13 7

Children’s 113 1,465 1,578 128 4,276 4,404 5,982 5,847

Current Affairs 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Documentary 0 3 3 0 0 0 3 7

Drama 0 0 0 0 26 26 26 106

Entertainment 1 418 418 0 25 25 443 448

Factual 0 13 13 0 14 14 27 32

Indigenous 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2

Movies 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

News 0 4 4 0 0 0 4 48

Religion and Ethics 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Sport 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Program Hours 114 1,905 2,019 128 4,352 4,480 6,499 6,501

% of Total Program Hours 1.8% 29.3% 31.1% 2.0% 67.0% 68.9% 100.0% 100%

Other* 260 260 253

Total Program Hours, including interstitials 2,279 4,480 6,759 6,754

34% 66%

* Other: includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements. Notes: This Table reflects linear hours broadcast from the Sydney transmitter, comprising national and NSW transmission. Figures may differ slightly in other States and Territories as a result of varying levels of local content. The ABC ME close times are varied. Hours have been rounded to nearest whole number.

238 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC iview program hours 24 hours

Australian Overseas Total

Genre

First

Release Repeat Total Australian First

Release Repeat Total Overseas 2018-19 2017-18

Arts and Culture 17 123 140 0 22 22 162 211

Children’s 47 2,429 2,476 22 7,092 7,115 9,591 8,941

Current Affairs 14 1,157 1,171 0 2 2 1,172 969

Documentary 6 258 264 0 181 181 445 686

Drama 4 425 429 10 1,166 1,176 1,605 1,826

Entertainment 124 559 682 0 284 284 966 980

Factual 10 153 163 0 228 228 391 575

Indigenous 2 7 9 0 0 0 9 15

Movies 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2

News 16 2,551 2,567 0 0 0 2,567 2,567

Religion and Ethics 0 24 24 0 18 18 42 39

Sport 93 48 141 0 14 14 155 98

Total Program Hours 333 7,734 8,066 32 9,009 9,041 17,108 16,909

% of Total Program Hours 1.9% 45.2% 47.2% 0.2% 52.7% 52.8% 100.0% 100.0%

Other* 2 2 0

Total Hours 8,068 9,041 17,110 16,909

% of Total Hours 47% 53%

* Other: includes interstitial material, program announcements and community service announcements. Notes: This Table reflects hours of content detailed in the OnAir schedule that were uploaded to iview.

Appendices 239

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

ACT

Canberra 8

Tuggeranong 41

Weston Creek/Woden 41

NSW

Adelong 39

Albury North 31

Armidale 36

Armidale North 7

Ashford 41

Balranald 40

Batemans Bay/ Moruya 41

Bathurst 7

Batlow 41

Bega 31

Bombala 47

Bonalbo 41

Bouddi 41

Bourke 6

Bowral/Mittagong 47

Braidwood 47

Broken Hill 10

Captains Flat 41

Cassilis 30

Central Tablelands 36

Central Western Slopes 12

Cobar 6

Coffs Harbour 45

Condobolin 41

Coolah 47

Cooma Town 41

Cooma/Monaro 29

Cowra 42

Crookwell 32

Deniliquin 41

Dubbo 41

Dungog 41

Eden 47

Glen Innes 41

Gloucester 29

Goodooga 7

Gosford 41

Goulburn 41

Grafton/Kempsey 36

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Hay 41

Illawarra 35

Inverell 41

Ivanhoe 8

Jerilderie 41

Jindabyne 41

Kandos 47

Khancoban 46

Kings Cross 30

Kotara 37

Kyogle 41

Laurieton 41

Lightning Ridge 11

Lithgow 31

Lithgow East 47

Manly/Mosman 30

Manning River 7

Menindee 41

Merewether 37

Merriwa 43

Mudgee 41

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area 28

Murrurundi 37

Murwillumbah 29

Narooma 47

Newcastle 37

Nowra North 47

Nyngan 41

Oberon 42

Port Stephens 30

Portland/ Wallerawang 41

Richmond/Tweed 29

Stanwell Park 47

SW Slopes/E Riverina 46

Sydney 12

Talbingo 41

Tamworth 41

Tenterfield 47

Thredbo 33

Tottenham 47

Tumbarumba 41

Tumut 41

Ulladulla 28

Upper Hunter 47

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Upper Namoi 29

Vacy 32

Wagga Wagga 41

Walcha 45

Walgett 40

Wilcannia 9

Wollongong 41

Wyong 41

Young 41

NT

Alice Springs 8

Batchelor 41

Bathurst Island 11

Borroloola 10

Daly River 7

Darwin 30

Darwin City 41

Galiwinku 10

Groote Eylandt 7

Jabiru 7

Katherine 8

Mataranka 8

Nhulunbuy 7

Pine Creek 10

Tennant Creek 9A

Qld

Airlie Beach 39

Alpha 7

Aramac 8

Atherton 47

Augathella 7

Ayr 45

Babinda 48

Barcaldine 7

Bedourie 6

Bell 41

Birdsville 7

Blackall 7

Blackwater 47

Boonah 42

Bowen Town 39

Boyne Island 41

Brisbane 12

Cairns 8

Cairns East 42

Cairns North 35

Appendix 11 - Television transmission channels

240 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Camooweal 7

Capella 31

Cardwell 48

Charleville 11

Charters Towers 45

Clermont 35

Cloncurry 6

Collinsville 35

Cooktown 40

Cunnamulla 11

Currumbin 50

Darling Downs 29

Dimbulah 42

Dirranbandi 7

Dysart 41

Eidsvold 47

Emerald 11

Esk 39

Georgetown 7

Gladstone East 33

Gladstone West 47

Gold Coast 41

Gold Coast Southern Hinterland 50

Goondiwindi 41

Gordonvale 48

Gympie 41

Gympie Town 49

Herberton 35

Hervey Bay 41

Hughenden 8

Injune 6

Jericho 6

Julia Creek 11

Karumba 7

Longreach 10

Mackay 28

Mareeba 42

Meandarra 47

Middlemount 35

Miles 41

Miriam Vale/Bororen 41

Mission Beach 48

Mitchell 12

Monto 41

Moranbah 48

Moranbah Town 35

Morven 8

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Mossman 33

Mount Garnet 35

Mount Isa 7

Mount Molloy 42

Moura 47

Murgon 41

Muttaburra 11

Nambour 41

Nebo 35

Noosa/Tewantin 41

Normanton 8

Port Douglas 47

Proserpine 45

Quilpie 9

Ravenshoe 42

Redlynch 47

Richmond 7

Rockhampton 34

Rockhampton East 41

Roma 8

Shute Harbour 47

Southern Downs 35

Springsure 41

St George 12

Stuart 46

Sunshine Coast North 49

Sunshine Coast South 39

Surat 10

Tambo 7

Tara 41

Taroom 10

Texas 41

Theodore 41

Thursday Island 9

Tieri 35

Toowoomba 47

Townsville 34

Townsville North 46

Tully 41

Wandoan 47

Wangetti 42

Warwick 41

Weipa 6

Wide Bay 11

Winton 7

Yeppoon 41

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

SA

Adelaide 12

Adelaide Foothills 39

Andamooka 7

Bordertown 42

Burra 35

Caralue Bluff 47

Ceduna/Smoky Bay 39

Clare 47

Coffin Bay 44

Coober Pedy 7

Cowell 36

Craigmore/Hillbank 39

Hawker 47

Keith 38

Kingston SE/Robe 38

Lameroo 42

Leigh Creek South 8

Naracoorte 42

Pinnaroo 38

Port Lincoln 49

Quorn 47

Renmark/Loxton 31

Roxby Downs 40

South East 31

Spencer Gulf North 43

Streaky Bay 11

Tumby Bay 30

Victor Harbor 39

Waikerie 47

Wirrulla 9A

Woomera 37

Wudinna 36

Tas

Acton Road 36

Barrington Valley 48

Bicheno 36

Binalong Bay 37

Burnie 47

Cygnet 44

Derby (Tas) 47

Dover 47

Dover South 43

East Devonport 35

Geeveston 35

Gladstone 47

Goshen/Goulds Country 35

Appendices 241

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Hillwood 47

Hobart 8

Hobart NE Suburbs 47

King Island 47

Launceston 35

Lileah 8

Lilydale 47

Maydena 42

Meander 48

Montumana IBL 47

NE Tasmania 41

New Norfolk 35

Orford 41

Penguin 35

Port Sorell 28

Queenstown/Zeehan 47

Ringarooma 29

Rosebery 32

Savage River 47

Smithton 35

St Helens 29

St Marys 47

Strahan 41

Swansea 47

Taroona 45

Ulverstone 35

Waratah 35

Wynyard 28

Vic

Alexandra 47

Alexandra Environs 41

Apollo Bay 47

Bairnsdale 35

Ballarat 35

Bendigo 29

Bonnie Doon 32

Bright 31

Bruthen 47

Cann River 47

Casterton 41

Churchill 49

Cobden 41

Colac 47

Coleraine 47

Corryong 36

Eildon 34

Eildon Town 41

Ferntree Gully 43

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Foster 41

Genoa 36

Goulburn Valley 37

Halls Gap 47

Hopetoun-Beulah 33

Horsham 41

Kiewa 41

Lakes Entrance 47

Latrobe Valley 29

Lorne 35

Mallacoota 47

Mansfield 47

Marysville 35

Melbourne 12

Mildura/Sunraysia 11

Murray Valley 47

Myrtleford 47

Nhill 47

Nowa Nowa 29

Orbost 41

Portland 41

Rosebud 43

Safety Beach 43

Selby 35

Seymour 41

South Yarra 43

Tawonga South 31

Upper Murray 11

Upwey 35

Warburton 35

Warrnambool 50

Warrnambool City 29

Western Victoria 6

Yea 34

WA

Albany 43

Augusta 46

Bridgetown 45

Broome 9

Bruce Rock 50

Bunbury 36

Carnamah 46

Carnarvon 6

Central Agricultural 45

Cervantes 47

Cue 10

Dalwallinu 49

Dampier 28

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Denham 7

Derby (WA) 9

Esperance 9A

Exmouth 7

Fitzroy Crossing 41

Geraldton 41

Halls Creek 9

Hopetoun (WA) 40

Jurien 37

Kalbarri 8

Kalgoorlie 9A

Kambalda 40

Karratha 42

Katanning 45

Kojonup 50

Kununurra 8

Kununurra East 40

Lake Grace 34

Laverton 11

Leeman 6

Leinster 11

Leonora 10

Mandurah/Waroona 41

Manjimup 46

Marble Bar 7

Margaret River 45

Meekatharra 9

Menzies 10

Merredin 50

Mingenew 46

Moora 38

Morawa 7

Mount Magnet 9

Mullewa 46

Nannup 31

Narembeen 50

Narrogin 50

Newman 6

Norseman 6

Northam 50

Northampton 46

Onslow 7

Pannawonica 9

Paraburdoo 9A

Pemberton 32

Perth 12

Port Hedland 8

Ravensthorpe 10

242 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Roebourne 9A

Roleystone 41

Southern Agricultural 11

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Southern Cross 7

Tom Price 12

Toodyay 47

Wagin 29

Digital Television

Area Served Channel

Wongan Hills 47

Wyndham 12

Yalgoo 10

Television transmitter statistics as at 30 June 2019 TELEVISION ACT NSW NT Qld SA Tas Vic WA Total

ABC Television 3 92 15 113 32 41 53 71 420

Appendix 12 - Radio transmission frequencies Digital Radio

Area Served

Frequency (MHz) Channel Block

ACT

Canberra 206.352 (9C)

Tuggeranong Valley 206.352 (9C)

NSW

Campbelltown 206.352 (9C)

Collaroy Plateau 206.352 (9C)

Penrith 206.352 (9C)

Sydney 206.352 (9C)

Sydney City 206.352 (9C)

Sydney Inner South 206.352 (9C)

Sydney Northern Beaches

206.352 (9C)

NT

Darwin 206.352 (9C)

Darwin City 206.352 (9C)

Qld

Brisbane 206.352 (9C)

Caboolture 206.352 (9C)

Digital Radio

Area Served

Frequency (MHz) Channel Block

SA

Adelaide 206.352 (9C)

Tas

Hobart 206.352 (9C)

Taroona 206.352 (9C)

Vic

Melbourne 206.352 (9C)

Melbourne City 206.352 (9C)

Port Melbourne 206.352 (9C)

Werribee 206.352 (9C)

WA

Perth 206.352 (9C)

Perth City 206.352 (9C)

Perth Northern Beaches 206.352 (9C)

Appendices 243

ABC Radio

Area Served Frequency

ACT

Canberra 666

NSW

Armidale 101.9

Ashford 107.9

Batemans Bay/ Moruya

103.5

Bega 810

Bombala 94.1

Bonalbo 91.3

Broken Hill 999

Byrock 657

Central Western Slopes

107.1

Cobar 106.1

Cooma 1602

Corowa 675

Crookwell 106.9

Cumnock, Central NSW

549

Dubbo 95.9

Eden 106.3

Glen Innes 819

Gloucester 100.9

Goodooga 99.3

Gosford 92.5

Goulburn (town) 90.3

Grafton 738

Grafton/Kempsey 92.3

Hay 88.1

Illawarra 97.3

Ivanhoe 106.1

Jindabyne 95.5

Kandos 96.3

Kempsey 684

Lightning Ridge 92.1

Lithgow 1395

Manning River 95.5

Menindee 97.3

Merriwa 101.9

Mudgee 99.5

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area

100.5

Murrurundi 96.9

Murwillumbah 720

Muswellbrook 1044

Newcastle 1233

Nyngan 95.1

ABC Radio

Area Served Frequency

Port Stephens 95.9

Portland/ Wallerawang

94.1

Richmond/Tweed 94.5

SW Slopes/E Riverina

89.9

Sydney 702

Tamworth 648

Taree 756

Tenterfield 88.9

Thredbo 88.9

Tottenham 99.3

Tumut 97.9

Upper Hunter 105.7

Upper Namoi 99.1

Wagga Wagga 102.7

Walcha 88.5

Walgett 105.9

Wilcannia 1584

Young 96.3

NT

Adelaide River 98.9

Alice Springs 783

Bathurst Island 91.3

Borroloola 106.1

Daly River 106.1

Darwin 105.7

Galiwinku 105.9

Groote Eylandt 106.1

Jabiru 747

Katherine 106.1

Mataranka 106.1

Newcastle Waters 106.1

Nhulunbuy 990

Pine Creek 106.1

Tennant Creek 106.1

Qld

Airlie Beach 89.9

Alpha 105.7

Atherton 720

Babinda 95.7

Bedourie 106.1

Biloela 94.9

Birdsville 106.1

Boulia 106.1

Brisbane 612

Cairns (AM) 801

Cairns 106.7

ABC Radio

Area Served Frequency

Cairns North 95.5

Camooweal 106.1

Charleville 603

Coen 105.9

Collinsville 106.1

Cooktown 105.7

Croydon 105.9

Cunnamulla 106.1

Dimbulah 91.7

Dysart 91.7

Eidsvold 855

Emerald 1548

Georgetown 106.1

Gladstone 99.1

Glenden 92.5

Gold Coast 91.7

Goondiwindi 92.7

Greenvale 105.9

Gympie 95.3

Gympie 1566

Hughenden 1485

Injune 105.9

Julia Creek 567

Karumba 106.1

Lakeland 106.1

Laura 106.1

Longreach 540

Mackay 101.1

Middlemount 106.1

Miriam Vale 88.3

Mission Beach 89.3

Mitchell 106.1

Moranbah 104.9

Mossman 639

Mount Garnet 95.7

Mount Isa 106.5

Mount Molloy 95.7

Moura 96.1

Nambour 90.3

Normanton 105.7

Pentland 106.1

Pialba-Dundowran (Wide Bay)

855

Quilpie 106.1

Rockhampton 837

Roma 105.7

Roma/St George 711

Southern Downs 104.9

244 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC Radio

Area Served Frequency

Tambo 105.9

Taroom 106.1

Theodore 105.9

Thursday Island (Torres Strait)

1062

Toowoomba 747

Townsville 630

Tully 95.5

Wandoan 98.1

Weipa 1044

Wide Bay 100.1

SA

Adelaide 891

Andamooka 105.9

Coober Pedy 106.1

Leigh Creek South 1602

Marree 105.7

Mount Gambier 1476

Naracoorte 1161

Port Lincoln 1485

Port Pirie 639

Renmark/Loxton 1062

Roxby Downs 102.7

Streaky Bay 693

Woomera 1584

Tas

Bicheno 89.7

Burnie 102.5

East Devonport 100.5

Fingal 1161

Hobart 936

King Island 88.5

Launceston City 102.7

Lileah 91.3

NE Tasmania 91.7

Orford 90.5

Queenstown/ Zeehan

90.5

Rosebery 106.3

Savage River/ Waratah

104.1

St Helens 1584

St Marys 102.7

Strahan 107.5

Swansea 106.1

Waratah 103.3

Weldborough 97.3

Vic

Alexandra 102.9

ABC Radio

Area Served Frequency

Apollo Bay 89.5

Ballarat 107.9

Bendigo 91.1

Bright 89.7

Cann River 106.1

Corryong 99.7

Eildon 98.1

Goulburn Valley 97.7

Horsham 594

Latrobe Valley 100.7

Mallacoota 104.9

Mansfield 103.7

Melbourne 774

Mildura/Sunraysia 104.3

Murray Valley 102.1

Myrtleford 91.7

Omeo 720

Orbost 97.1

Portland 96.9

Sale 828

Upper Murray, Albury/Wodonga

106.5

Warrnambool 1602

Western Victoria 94.1

WA

Albany 630

Argyle 105.9

Augusta 98.3

Bridgetown 1044

Broome 675

Bunbury (Busselton)

684

Carnarvon 846

Cue 106.1

Dalwallinu 531

Derby 873

Esperance 837

Exmouth 1188

Fitzroy Crossing 106.1

Geraldton 828

Halls Creek 106.1

Hopetoun 105.3

Kalbarri 106.1

Kalgoorlie 648

Karratha 702

Kununurra 819

Laverton 106.1

Leonora 105.7

ABC Radio

Area Served Frequency

Manjimup 738

Marble Bar 105.9

Meekatharra 106.3

Menzies 106.1

Mount Magnet 105.7

Nannup 98.1

Newman 567

Norseman 105.7

Northam 1215

Pannawonica 567

Paraburdoo 567

Perth 720

Port Hedland 603

Ravensthorpe 105.9

Southern Cross 106.3

Tom Price 567

Wagin 558

Wyndham 1017

Yalgoo 106.1

RN

Area Served Frequency

ACT

Canberra 666

NSW

Armidale 720

Balranald 93.1

Batemans Bay/ Moruya

105.1

Bathurst (City) 96.7

Bega/Cooma 100.9

Bonalbo 92.1

Bourke 101.1

Broken Hill 102.9

Central Tablelands 104.3

Central Western Slopes

107.9

Cobar 107.7

Condobolin 88.9

Cooma (town) 95.3

Crookwell 107.7

Deniliquin 99.3

Eden 107.9

Emmaville 93.1

Glen Innes 105.1

Gloucester 102.5

Goodooga 100.9

Goulburn 1098

Appendices 245

RN

Area Served Frequency

Grafton/Kempsey 99.5

Hay 88.9

Ivanhoe 107.7

Jerilderie 94.1

Jindabyne 97.1

Kandos 100.3

Lightning Ridge 93.7

Lithgow 92.1

Manning River 97.1

Menindee 95.7

Merriwa 103.5

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area

98.9

Murrurundi 104.1

Newcastle 1512

Nowra 603

Port Stephens 98.3

Portland/ Wallerawang

92.5

Richmond/Tweed 96.9

SW Slopes/E Riverina

89.1

Sydney 576

Tamworth 93.9

Tenterfield 90.5

Thredbo 90.5

Tumut 99.5

Upper Namoi 100.7

Wagga Wagga 104.3

Walcha 90.1

Walgett 107.5

Wilcannia 1485

Wollongong 1431

Young 97.1

NT

Adelaide River 100.5

Alice Springs 99.7

Bathurst Island 92.9

Borroloola 107.7

Daly River 107.7

Darwin 657

Galiwinku 107.5

Groote Eylandt 107.7

Jabiru 107.7

Katherine 639

Mataranka 107.7

Newcastle Waters 107.7

Nhulunbuy 107.7

Pine Creek 107.7

RN

Area Served Frequency

Tennant Creek 684

Qld

Airlie Beach 93.1

Alpha 107.3

Aramac 107.9

Augathella 107.7

Babinda 94.1

Barcaldine 107.3

Bedourie 107.7

Birdsville 107.7

Blackall 107.9

Blackwater 94.3

Boulia 107.7

Bowen 92.7

Brisbane 792

Cairns 105.1

Cairns North 93.9

Camooweal 107.7

Capella 107.3

Charleville 107.3

Charters Towers 97.5

Clermont 107.7

Cloncurry 107.7

Coen 107.5

Collinsville 107.7

Cooktown 107.3

Corfield 107.3

Croydon 107.5

Cunnamulla 107.7

Darling Downs 105.7

Dimbulah 93.3

Dirranbandi 107.3

Dysart 93.3

Eidsvold 102.7

Emerald 93.9

Georgetown 107.7

Gladstone 95.9

Glenden 93.3

Gold Coast 90.1

Goondiwindi 94.3

Greenvale 101.9

Gympie 96.9

Herberton 93.1

Hughenden 107.5

Injune 107.5

Isisford 107.7

Jericho 107.7

Julia Creek 107.5

RN

Area Served Frequency

Karumba 107.7

Lakeland 107.7

Laura 107.7

Longreach 99.1

Mackay 102.7

Meandarra 104.3

Middlemount 107.7

Miles 92.1

Miriam Vale 89.9

Mission Beach 90.9

Mitchell 107.7

Monto 101.9

Moranbah 106.5

Morven 107.5

Mossman 90.1

Mount Garnet 97.3

Mount Isa 107.3

Mount Molloy 97.3

Moura 96.9

Muttaburra 107.7

Normanton 107.3

Pentland 107.7

Quilpie 107.7

Richmond 107.7

Rockhampton 103.1

Roma 107.3

Southern Downs 106.5

Springsure 100.9

St George 107.7

Surat 107.5

Tambo 107.5

Taroom 107.7

Theodore 107.5

Thursday Island 107.7

Townsville 104.7

Townsville North 96.7

Tully 96.3

Wandoan 98.9

Weipa 107.3

Wide Bay 100.9

Winton 107.9

SA

Adelaide 729

Andamooka 107.5

Ceduna/Smoky Bay 107.7

Coober Pedy 107.7

Hawker 107.5

Keith 96.9

246 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

RN

Area Served Frequency

Leigh Creek South 106.1

Marree 107.3

Mount Gambier 103.3

Quorn 107.9

Renmark/Loxton 1305

Roxby Downs 101.9

Spencer Gulf North 106.7

Streaky Bay 100.9

Tumby Bay 101.9

Wirrulla 107.3

Woomera 105.7

Wudinna 107.7

Tas

Bicheno 91.3

Hobart 585

Lileah 89.7

NE Tasmania 94.1

Orford 88.9

Queenstown 630

Rosebery 107.9

St Helens 96.1

St Marys 101.1

Strahan 105.9

Swansea 107.7

Waratah 104.9

Weldborough 98.9

Vic

Albury/Wodonga 990

Alexandra 104.5

Bairnsdale 106.3

Bright 88.9

Cann River 107.7

Corryong 98.1

Eildon 97.3

Hopetoun (VIC) 88.3

Horsham 99.7

Mallacoota 103.3

Mansfield 105.3

Melbourne 621

Mildura/Sunraysia 105.9

Nhill 95.7

Omeo 99.7

Orbost 98.7

Portland 98.5

Swifts Creek 103.5

Wangaratta 756

Warrnambool 101.7

Western Victoria 92.5

RN

Area Served Frequency

WA

Argyle 107.5

Augusta 99.1

Broome 107.7

Bunbury (Busselton)

1269

Carnarvon 107.7

Cue 107.7

Dalwallinu 612

Dampier 107.9

Denham 107.5

Derby 107.5

Eneabba 107.7

Esperance 106.3

Exmouth 107.7

Fitzroy Crossing 107.7

Geraldton 99.7

Halls Creek 107.7

Hopetoun (WA) 106.9

Jurien 107.9

Kalbarri 107.7

Kalgoorlie 97.1

Kambalda 93.9

Karratha 100.9

Kununurra 107.3

Laverton 107.7

Leeman 107.3

Leonora 107.3

Marble Bar 107.5

Meekatharra 107.9

Menzies 107.7

Merredin 107.3

Mount Magnet 107.3

Mullewa 107.5

Nannup 98.9

Narembeen 107.7

Newman 93.7

Norseman 107.3

Onslow 107.5

Pannawonica 107.7

Paraburdoo 107.7

Perth 810

Port Hedland 95.7

Ravensthorpe 107.5

Roebourne 107.5

Salmon Gums 100.7

Southern Agricultural 96.9

RN

Area Served Frequency

Southern Cross 107.9

Tom Price 107.3

Wagin 1296

Wyndham 107.7

Yalgoo 107.7

ABC Classic

Area Served

Frequency (MHz)

ACT

Canberra 102.3

Tuggeranong 99.1

NSW

Armidale 103.5

Batemans Bay/ Moruya

101.9

Bathurst (City) 97.5

Bega/Cooma 99.3

Broken Hill 103.7

Central Tablelands 102.7

Central Western Slopes

105.5

Goulburn (town) 89.5

Grafton/Kempsey 97.9

Illawarra 95.7

Manning River 98.7

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area

97.3

Newcastle 106.1

Richmond/Tweed 95.3

SW Slopes/E Riverina

88.3

Sydney 92.9

Tamworth 103.1

Upper Namoi 96.7

Wagga Wagga 105.9

NT

Alice Springs 97.9

Darwin 107.3

Qld

Airlie Beach 95.5

Brisbane 106.1

Cairns 105.9

Cairns North 94.7

Clermont 104.5

Darling Downs 107.3

Emerald 90.7

Gold Coast 88.5

Gympie 93.7

Appendices 247

ABC Classic

Area Served

Frequency (MHz)

Mackay 97.9

Mount Isa 101.7

Nambour 88.7

Rockhampton 106.3

Roma 97.7

Southern Downs 101.7

Townsville 101.5

Townsville North 95.9

Wide Bay 98.5

SA

Adelaide 103.9

Adelaide Foothills 97.5

Mount Gambier 104.1

Renmark/Loxton 105.1

Roxby Downs 103.5

Spencer Gulf North 104.3

Tas

Hobart 93.9

NE Tasmania 93.3

Vic

Ballarat (Lookout Hill)

105.5

Bendigo 92.7

Bright 88.1

Goulburn Valley 96.1

Latrobe Valley 101.5

Melbourne 105.9

Mildura/Sunraysia 102.7

Murray Valley 103.7

Upper Murray 104.1

Warrnambool 92.1

Western Victoria 93.3

WA

Bunbury 93.3

Central Agricultural

98.9

Esperance 104.7

Geraldton 94.9

Kalgoorlie 95.5

Narrogin 92.5

Perth 97.7

Southern Agricultural

94.5

triple j

Area Served

Frequency (MHz)

ACT

Canberra 101.5

Tuggeranong 95.9

NSW

Armidale 101.1

Bathurst (City) 95.9

Bega/Cooma 100.1

Broken Hill 102.1

Central Tablelands 101.9

Central Western Slopes

102.3

Goulburn (town) 88.7

Grafton/Kempsey 91.5

Illawarra 98.9

Manning River 96.3

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area

96.5

Newcastle 102.1

Richmond/Tweed 96.1

SW Slopes/E Riverina

90.7

Sydney 105.7

Tamworth 94.7

Upper Namoi 99.9

Wagga Wagga 101.1

NT

Alice Springs 94.9

Darwin 103.3

Qld

Brisbane 107.7

Cairns 107.5

Cairns North 97.1

Darling Downs 104.1

Gold Coast 97.7

Mackay 99.5

Mount Isa 104.1

Nambour 89.5

Rockhampton 104.7

Southern Downs 103.3

Townsville 105.5

Townsville North 97.5

Wide Bay 99.3

triple j

Area Served

Frequency (MHz)

SA

Adelaide 105.5

Adelaide Foothills 95.9

Mount Gambier 102.5

Renmark/Loxton 101.9

Spencer Gulf North 103.5

Tas

Hobart 92.9

NE Tasmania 90.9

Vic

Ballarat (Lookout Hill)

107.1

Bendigo 90.3

Goulburn Valley 94.5

Latrobe Valley 96.7

Melbourne 107.5

Mildura/Sunraysia 101.1

Murray Valley 105.3

Upper Murray 103.3

Warrnambool 89.7

Western Victoria 94.9

WA

Bunbury 94.1

Central Agricultural

98.1

Geraldton 98.9

Kalgoorlie 98.7

Perth 99.3

Southern Agricultural

92.9

248 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

ABC NEWS on radio

Area Served Frequency

ACT

Canberra 103.9

Tuggeranong 99.9

NSW

Armidale 102.7

Batemans Bay/ Moruya

100.5

Bathurst 98.3

Bega/Cooma 89.7

Broken Hill 104.5

Central Tablelands 91.9

Central Western Slopes

106.3

Deniliquin 100.9

Gosford 98.1

Goulburn 99.9

Grafton/Kempsey 90.7

Illawarra 90.9

Inverell 93.5

Lithgow 91.3

Manning River 94.7

Mudgee 101.1

Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area

98.1

Newcastle 1458

Port Stephens 95.1

Richmond/Tweed 98.5

SW Slopes/E Riverina

91.5

Sydney 630

Tamworth 91.7

Upper Hunter 104.9

Upper Namoi 101.5

ABC NEWS on radio

Area Served Frequency

Wagga Wagga 105.1

NT

Alice Springs 104.1

Darwin 102.5

Katherine 105.3

Qld

Airlie Beach 93.9

Bowen 96.7

Brisbane 936

Cairns 101.1

Cairns North 96.3

Emerald 89.1

Gladstone 96.7

Gold Coast 95.7

Gympie 94.5

Mackay 104.3

Mount Isa 104.9

Rockhampton 105.5

Sunshine Coast 94.5

Toowoomba 96.7

Townsville 94.3

Townsville North 93.5

Warwick 96.3

Wide Bay 97.7

SA

Adelaide 972

Mount Gambier 105.7

Renmark/Loxton 93.9

Spencer Gulf North 102.7

Tumby Bay 91.5

Tas

Burnie 90.5

East Devonport 102.1

ABC NEWS on radio

Area Served Frequency

Hobart 747

NE Tasmania 92.5

Vic

Bairnsdale 107.9

Ballarat 94.3

Bendigo 89.5

Colac 104.7

Goulburn Valley 107.7

Horsham 89.3

Latrobe Valley 95.1

Melbourne 1026

Mildura/Sunraysia 100.3

Murray Valley 95.9

Portland 97.7

Upper Murray 100.9

Warrnambool 91.3

Western Victoria 91.7

WA

Broome 106.9

Bunbury (Busselton)

1152

Carnarvon 106.1

Central Agricultural

99.7

Esperance 103.1

Geraldton 101.3

Kalgoorlie 100.3

Karratha 104.1

Perth 585

Port Hedland 94.9

Southern Agricultural

92.1

Wagin 96.3

Appendices 249

Radio transmitter statistics as at 30 June 2019 ACT NSW NT Qld SA Tas Vic WA Total

RADIO

Digital Radio 2 7 2 2 1 2 4 3 23

ABC Local Radio 1 59 15 68 13 19 24 41 240

RN 1 52 15 87 18 13 21 50 257

ABC Classic 2 19 2 18 6 2 11 8 68

triple j 2 18 2 13 5 2 10 6 58

ABC NEWS on Radio 2 26 3 18 5 4 14 12 84

Total Radio 10 180 38 206 48 42 84 120 728

Appendix 13 - Radio Australia and ABC Australia distribution and transmission

Radio Australia Frequencies Radio English - 24 hours

Tonga Nuku’alofa 103 FM

Fiji Nadi 106.6 FM

Suva 106.6 FM

Vanuatu Port Vila 103 FM

Luganville 103 FM

Solomon Islands Honiara 107 FM

Papua New Guinea

Port Moresby 101.9 FM

Lae 101.9 FM

Goroka 101.9 FM

Mt Hagan 101.9 FM

Arawa 101.9 FM

Samoa Apia 102 FM

East Timor Dili 106.5FM

Radio English - Part rebroadcast

Papua New Guinea

NBC network 1 national

station and 19 provincial

Papua New Guinea

FM100 network:

Lae 100.3 FM

Kimbe 100.8 FM

Kavieng 100.3 FM

Goroka 100.2 FM

Buka 100.8 FM

Boregoro 107.7 FM

Dimodimo 107.1 FM

Samoa Samoa Quality

Broadcasting

89.9 FM

Solomon Islands Honiara 97.7/101.7 FM

Paoa FM

Tonga Tonga

Broadcasting

1017 AM

Languages other than English—rebroadcast partner stations

Pidgin (Tok Pisin)

Papua New Guinea FM100 Network Madang 100.8 FM

Lae 100.3 FM

Kimbe 100.8 FM

Kavieng 100.3 FM

Goroka 100.2 FM

Buka 100.8 FM

Boregoro 107.7 FM

Dimodimo 107.1 FM

NBC Provincial Stations

Bougainville

Central

East New Britain

East Sepic

Eastern Highlands

Enga

Gulf

Madang

Manus

Milne Bay

Marobe

New Island

Northern

Simbu

Southern Highlands

West New Britain

West Sepik

Western

Western Highlands

Solomon Islands

Honiara 1035 AM

250 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Satellite distribution - ABC Australia and ABC Radio Australia The ABC Australia television service and ABC Radio Australia are distributed together across the Asia-Pacific region on Intelsat 18 and Intelsat 20 satellites. This makes the two networks available to rebroadcasters and direct-to-home viewers across the region.

ABC Australia The ABC Australia television service is distributed by Intelsat and is downlinked by 126 television rebroadcasters in the Asia Pacific region, across 37 countries and territories. In the Pacific, the ABC Australia television service is also available as a direct to home free to air satellite service.  Information on rebroadcast partners can be found on the ABC Australia website: http://www.abcaustralia.net.au/tuning.

Appendix 14 - ABC offices as at 30 June 2019

ABC Head Office Australian Broadcasting Corporation ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1500

Australian Capital Territory ABC Radio Canberra Cnr Northbourne and Wakefield Avenues Dickson ACT 2602 (GPO Box 9994 Canberra ACT 2601) Phone (02) 6275 4555 SMS 0467 922 666 Editor ABC Canberra:

Michelle Ainsworth

New South Wales ABC Radio Sydney ABC Ultimo Centre 700 Harris Street Ultimo NSW 2007 (GPO Box 9994 Sydney NSW 2001) Phone (02) 8333 1234 SMS 0467 922 702 Manager ABC Radio Sydney:

Melanie Withnall

Bega Unit 1, First Floor The Roy Howard Building Ayers Walkway 184 Carp Street (PO Box 336) Bega NSW 2550 Phone (02) 6491 6011 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC South East NSW) Chief of Staff: Lisa Markham

Coffs Harbour 24 Gordon Street Coffs Harbour NSW 2450 Phone (02) 6650 3611 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Coffs Coast) Chief of Staff: Benjamin Shuhyta

Dubbo 45 Wingewarra Street (PO Box 985) Dubbo NSW 2830 Phone (02) 6881 1811 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Western Plains) Chief of Staff: Nick Lowther

Gosford 131 Donnison Street Gosford NSW 2250 Phone (02) 4367 1911 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station:

ABC Central Coast) Chief of Staff: Lucia Hill

Lismore 61 High Street (PO Box 908) Lismore Heights NSW 2480 Phone (02) 6627 2011 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC North Coast) Chief of Staff: Justine Frazier

Muswellbrook 36A Brook Street Muswellbrook NSW 2333 Phone (02) 6542 2811 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Upper Hunter) Chief of Staff: Lucia Hill (Acting)

Appendices 251

Newcastle 24 Wood Street (Cnr Wood and Parry Streets) Newcastle West NSW 2302 PO Box 2205 Dangar NSW 2309 Phone (02) 4922 1200 SMS 0487 991 233 (Local Radio station: ABC Newcastle) Chief of Staff: Lucia Hill

Orange 46 Bathurst Road (PO Box 8549) East Orange NSW 2800 Phone (02) 6393 2511 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Central West NSW) Chief of Staff: Brooke Daniels

Port Macquarie 51 Lord St (PO Box 42) Port Macquarie NSW 2444 Phone (02) 6588 1211 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Mid North Coast) Chief of Staff: Benjamin Shuhyta

Tamworth 470 Peel Street Level 1, Parry Shire Building (PO Box 558) Tamworth NSW 2340 Phone (02) 6760 2411 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC New England North West) Chief of Staff: Anna Moulder

Wagga Wagga 100 Fitzmaurice Street Wagga Wagga NSW 2650 Phone (02) 6923 4811 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Riverina) Chief of Staff: Lauren Pezet

Wollongong 13 Victoria St Wollongong NSW 2500 (PO Box 973 Wollongong NSW 2520) Phone (02) 4224 5011 SMS 0467 922 684 (Local Radio station: ABC Illawarra) Chief of Staff: Jennifer Lacey

Northern Territory ABC Radio Darwin 1 Cavenagh Street Darwin NT 0800 (GPO Box 9994 Darwin NT 0801) Phone (08) 8943 3222 SMS 0487 991 057 Manager ABC Radio Darwin:

Stephen McClelland

Alice Springs Cnr Gap Road and Speed Street Alice Springs NT 0870 (PO Box 1144 Alice Springs NT 0871) Phone (08) 8950 4711 SMS 0487 991 057 (Local Radio station: ABC Alice Springs) Chief of Staff: Michael Murdoch

Katherine Stuart Highway Katherine NT 0850 (PO Box 1240 Katherine NT 0851) Phone (08) 8972 5711 SMS 0487 991 057 (Local Radio station: ABC Katherine) Chief of Staff: Michael Murdoch

Queensland ABC Radio Brisbane 114 Grey Street South Brisbane QLD 4101 (GPO Box 9994 Brisbane QLD 4001) Phone (07) 3377 5222 SMS 0467 922 612 Manager ABC Radio Brisbane: Simon Scoble

Bundaberg Shop 6 58 Woongarra Street (PO Box 1152) Bundaberg QLD 4670 Phone (07) 4155 4911 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Wide Bay) Chief of Staff: Scott Lamond

Cairns Cnr Sheridan and Upward Streets (PO Box 932) Cairns QLD 4870 Phone (07) 4044 2011 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Far North Queensland) Chief of Staff: Fiona Sewell

Gold Coast Cnr Gold Coast Highway and Francis Street (PO Box 217) Mermaid Beach QLD 4218 Phone (07) 5595 2917 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Gold Coast) Chief of Staff: Blythe Moore

Longreach Duck Street (PO Box 318) Longreach QLD 4730 Phone (07) 4658 4011 (Local Radio station: ABC Western Queensland) Chief of Staff: Damien Larkins (Acting)

252 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Mackay 2 Wellington Street (PO Box 127) Mackay QLD 4740 Phone (07) 4957 1111 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Tropical North) Chief of Staff: Tegan Philpott (Acting)

Mt Isa 114 Camooweal Street Mt Isa QLD 4825 Phone (07) 4744 1311 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC North West Queensland) Chief of Staff: Andrew Saunders

Rockhampton 236 Quay Street (PO Box 911) Rockhampton QLD 4700 Phone (07) 4924 5111 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Capricornia) Chief of Staff: Chrissy Arthur

Sunshine Coast Level 1 15 Carnaby Street (PO Box 1212) Maroochydore QLD 4558 Phone (07) 5475 5000 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Sunshine Coast) Chief of Staff: Bianca Clare

Toowoomba 297 Margaret Street (PO Box 358) Toowoomba QLD 4350 Phone (07) 4631 3811 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC Southern Queensland) Chief of Staff: Vicki Thompson

Townsville 8-10 Wickham Street (PO Box 694) Townsville QLD 4810 Phone (07) 4722 3011 SMS 0487 993 222 (Local Radio station: ABC North Queensland) Chief of Staff: Paula Tapiolas

South Australia ABC Radio Adelaide 85 North East Road Collinswood SA 5081 (GPO Box 9994 Adelaide SA 5001) Phone (08) 8343 4000 SMS: 0467 922 891 Manager ABC Radio Adelaide: Graeme Bennett

Broken Hill (administered by ABC South Australia) 454 Argent Street (PO Box 315) Broken Hill NSW 2880 Phone (08) 8082 4011 SMS 0467 922 783 (Local Radio station: ABC Broken Hill) Chief of Staff: Andrew Schmidt

Mount Gambier 31 Penola Road (PO Box 1448) Mt Gambier SA 5290 Phone (08) 8724 1011 SMS 0467 922 783 (Local Radio station: ABC South East SA) Chief of Staff: Stuart Stansfield

Port Lincoln

First Floor, Civic Centre 60 Tasman Terrace (PO Box 679) Port Lincoln SA 5606 Phone (08) 8683 2611 SMS 0487 922 783 (Local Radio station: ABC Eyre Peninsula) Chief of Staff: Khama Reid

Port Pirie 85 Grey Terrace (PO Box 289) Port Pirie SA 5540 Phone (08) 8638 4811 SMS 0467 922 783 (Local Radio station: ABC North and West SA) Chief of Staff: Khama Reid

Renmark Ral Ral Avenue (PO Box 20) Renmark SA 5341 Phone (08) 8586 1311 SMS 0467 922 783 (Local Radio station: ABC Riverland) Chief of Staff: Meg Vonic-Joyce

Tasmania ABC Radio Hobart ABC Centre 1-7 Liverpool Street (GPO Box 9994 Hobart TAS 7001) Phone (03) 6235 3217 SMS 0438 922 936 Manager ABC Radio Hobart:

Samantha Stayner

Burnie 81 Mount Street (PO Box 533) Burnie TAS 7320 Phone (03) 6430 1211 SMS 0467 922 917 (Local Radio station: ABC Northern Tasmania) Chief of Staff: Deniker Gerrity

Appendices 253

Launceston 45 Ann Street (PO Box 201) Launceston TAS 7250 Phone (03) 6323 1011 SMS 0467 922 917 (Local Radio station: ABC Northern Tasmania) Chief of Staff: Deniker Gerrity

Victoria ABC Radio Melbourne ABC Southbank Centre 120 Southbank Boulevard Southbank VIC 3006 (GPO Box 9994 Melbourne VIC 3001) Phone (03) 8646 1500 SMS 0437 774 774 Manager ABC Radio Melbourne: Dina Rosendorff

Ballarat 5 Dawson Street South Ballarat VIC 3350 (PO Box 7 Ballarat VIC 3353) Phone (03) 5320 1011 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC Ballarat) Chief of Staff: Prue Bentley

Bendigo 278 Napier Street (PO Box 637) Bendigo VIC 3550 Phone (03) 5440 1711 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC Central Victoria) Chief of Staff: Sian Gard

Horsham Shop 3 148 Baillie Street Horsham VIC 3400 (PO Box 506 Horsham VIC 3402) Phone (03) 5381 5311 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC Wimmera) Chief of Staff: Sarah Tomlinson

Mildura 73 Pine Ave (PO Box 10083) Mildura VIC 3502 Phone (03) 5022 4511 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC Mildura-Swan Hill) Chief of Staff: Sarah Tomlinson

Sale 340 York Street (PO Box 330) Sale VIC 3850 Phone (03) 5143 5511 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC Gippsland) Chief of Staff: Kellie Lazzaro

Shepparton 50A Wyndham Street (PO Box 1922) Shepparton VIC 3630 Phone (03) 5820 4011 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio Station: ABC Goulburn-Murray) Chief of Staff: Gaye Pattison

Warrnambool 166B Koroit Street (PO Box 310) Warrnambool VIC 3280 Phone (03) 5560 3111 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC South West Victoria) Chief of Staff: Prue Bentley

Wodonga 1 High Street (PO Box 1063) Wodonga VIC 3690 Phone (02) 6049 2011 SMS 0467 842 722 (Local Radio station: ABC Goulburn-Murray) Chief of Staff: Gaye Pattison

Western Australia ABC Radio Perth 30 Fielder Street East Perth WA 6004 (GPO Box 9994 Perth WA 6848) Phone (08) 9220 2700 SMS 0437 922 720 Manager ABC Radio Perth: Sarah Knight

Albany 2 St Emilie Way Albany WA 6330 Phone (08) 9842 4011 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio Station: ABC Great Southern WA) Chief of Staff: John Dobson

Broome 23 Hamersley Street (PO Box 217) Broome WA 6725 Phone (08) 9191 3011 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC Kimberley) Chief of Staff: Sam Tomlin

Bunbury 72 Wittenoom Street (PO Box 242) Bunbury WA 6231 Phone (08) 9792 2711 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC South West WA) Chief of Staff: Meghan Woods (Acting)

254 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Esperance 80b Windich Street (PO Box 230) Esperance WA 6450 Phone (08) 9083 2011 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC Goldfields) Chief of Staff: Andrew Tyndall

Geraldton 245 Marine Terrace (PO Box 211) Geraldton WA 6531 Phone (08) 9923 4111 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC Midwest and Wheatbelt) Chief of Staff: Natasha Harradine

Kalgoorlie 353 Hannan Street (PO Box 125) Kalgoorlie WA 6430 Phone (08) 9093 7011 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC Goldfields) Chief of Staff: Andrew Tyndall

Karratha DeGrey Place (PO Box 994) Karratha WA 6714 Phone (08) 9183 5011 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC Pilbara) Chief of Staff: Karen Michelmore

Kununurra 114b Collibah Drive (PO Box 984) Kununurra WA 6743 Phone: (08) 9168 4300 SMS 0448 922 604 (Local Radio station: ABC Kimberley) Chief of Staff: Sam Tomlin

In addition: ABC Regional & Local has a home-based reporter in Nowra

Overseas Offices Beijing 8-121 Qi Jia Yuan Diplomatic Compound Chaoyang District Beijing 100600 China Phone +86 10 6532 6819 Fax +86 10 6532 2514

Jakarta Level 16 Deutsche Bank Jl. Imam Bonjol 80 Jakarta 10310 Indonesia Phone +62 21 390 8123 Fax +62 21 390 8124

London 2nd floor 4 Millbank Westminster SW1P 3JA London United Kingdom Phone +44 20 7808 1360 Fax +44 20 7799 5482

Nairobi Nivina Towers Westlands Road Museum Hill, Westlands Nairobi Kenya

Port Moresby Airvos Avenue GPO Box 779 Port Moresby Papua New Guinea Phone +675 321 2666 (321 2503) Fax +675 321 2131

Tokyo NHK Hoso Centre 2-2-1 Jinnan Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8001 Japan Phone +81 3 3469 8089 Fax +81 3 3468 8445

Washington Suite 660 2000 M Street NW Washington DC 20036 USA Phone +1 202 466 8575

In addition: the ABC has home-based reporters in Bangkok (Thailand), Beirut (Lebanon), Jerusalem (Israel) and New Delhi (India).

Appendices 255

Appendix 15 - Awards received by the ABC in 2018-19

International Awards AIPS Sport Media Awards 2018

• Audio Storytelling (silver medal): Aaron Kearney, ‘Orchids Bloom’, ABC International Development

Australasian Sound Recordings Association Awards 2018

• For Excellence in Sound Recording and Production: Virginia Read, ABC Music/ ABC Classic

British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Children’s Awards 2018

• Best International Live Action: Nowhere Boys: Two Moons Rising, Matchbox Pictures (in association with ABC)

Banff World Media Festival Awards (the Rockies) 2019

• Best Animation: The Twist, Broken Yellow (in association with ABC)

• Web Fiction: Wrong Kind of Black, Princess Pictures (in association with ABC)

Country Music Association (CMA) International Awards 2019

• CMA Jeff Walker Global Country Artist Award: Travis Collins (ABC Music and Universal Music)

The International Federation of Agricultural Journalists (IFAJ) 2019

• IFAJ/Alltech Young Leaders in Agricultural Journalism Award: Angus Verley, ABC  Wimmera

Japan Prize 2018

• Audiovisual Division (Lifelong Learning Prize): Employable Me Series 1, Northern Pictures (in association with ABC)

MIPCOM Diversify TV Excellence Awards

• Inaugural prize for excellence in kids’ programming in all genres: First Day, Epic Films (in association with ABC)

New York Festivals International Radio Awards 2018

• Gold Award - Information/Documentary, Human Relations: Earshot, ‘Robert Manne’s Voice’, RN

• Gold Award - News Programs, Best Investigative Report: Jane Bardon, Background Briefing, ‘Rough Justice: Can the NT keep its kids safe?’, RN

• Bronze Award - Information/Documentary, Culture & The Arts: The History Listen, ‘The Monstrous Worm - a myth migrates to Australia’, RN

Promax Global Excellence Awards 2019

• Children Clip Based Programming Spot (Silver): ABC ME: ‘Girls Change The World’ Film Challenge, ABC MADE

• Out of Home Ad (Bronze): War on Waste, ABC MADE

PromaxBDA ANZ Awards 2018

• Best Branding Design (Gold): ABC COMEDY Rebrand, ABC MADE

• Best Children’s Promo (Gold): ABC ME: ‘Girls Change The World’ Film Challenge, ABC MADE

• Best Children’s Promo (Silver): ABC ME: ‘Triple treat Halloween’ Promo, ABC MADE

• Best Drama Campaign (Gold): ABC iview drama binge, ABC MADE

• Best Interstitial (Silver): ABC Fierce Girls, ABC MADE

• Best News/Caff Promo (Silver): ABC Foreign Correspondent relaunch, ABC MADE

• Best Outdoor (Gold): War on Waste, ABC MADE

Venice Television Awards 2018

• Best Reality Series: Employable Me Series 1, Northern Pictures (in association with ABC)

256 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

National Awards AIR Independent Music Awards 2018

• Best Independent Blues and Roots Album: All Our Exes Live In Texas, When We Fall, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Best Independent Classical Album: Australian Chamber Orchestra/Richard Tognetti, Jonny Greenwood Water I Mozart Night Music, ABC Music/ABC Classic and Universal Music

• Best Independent Jazz Album: James Morrison/BBC Concert Orchestra/Keith Lockhart, The Great American Songbook, ABC Music/ABC Jazz and Universal Music

AMEC Media Awards 2018

• Online/Digital Media Award: Jarrod Lucas, ‘Australia’s major gold miners digging deeper underground in hunt for major discoveries’, ABC Goldfields

ATOM Awards 2018

• Best Children’s Program: A Field Guide To Being a 12-Year-Old Girl, Closer Productions (in association with ABC)

• Best Documentary - Science, Technology and the Environment: War on Waste Series 1, Lune Media (in association with ABC)

Australasian Reporting Awards (ARAs) 2019

• Gold Award: ABC Annual Report 2018

Australian Academy Cinema Television Arts (AACTA) Awards 2018

• Best Direction in Nonfiction Television: Hawke: The Larrikin and the Leader, Southern Pictures (in association with ABC)

• Best Documentary or Factual Programme: Employable Me Series 1, Northern Pictures (in association with ABC)

• Best Entertainment Program: The Weekly with Charlie Pickering, Half Hour News Hour (in association with ABC)

Australian Council of Agricultural Journalists Awards

• The ACAJ Star Prize for Excellence in Radio/ Audio Journalism 2019: Cassandra Hough, South Australian Country Hour, ‘Counter season vegetables help improve women’s lives in north-western Vietnam’

• The ACAJ Star Prize for Excellence in Online/ Digital 2019: Melanie Groves, ‘Hoping for a reality check’, ABC Rural

Australian Directors Guild Awards 2019

• Best Direction in Factual Series: Employable Me Series 1, Northern Pictures (in association with ABC)

• Best Direction in an Online Drama Series: Billie Pfeiffer, Deadlock, Every Cloud Productions (in association with ABC)

• Best Direction in a TV or SVOD Drama Series episode: Rachel Perkins, Mystery Road, Bunya Productions (in association with ABC)

• Best Direction in a TV or SVOD Mini Series and Telefeature: Jeffrey Walker, Riot, Werner Film Productions (in association with ABC)

Australian Podcast Awards 2019

• Documentary and storytelling: Jill Emberson, Still Jill, ABC Radio

• Lifestyle, Health and Wellness: The Pineapple Project, ABC Radio

• Technology: Download This Show, RN

• Political, Social and Cultural Affairs: Russia, If You’re Listening, ABC Radio

• Family and Kids: Fierce Girls, ABC Radio

• Science and Medicine: Science Friction, RN

• Fiction: The Fitzroy Diaries, RN

Australian Recording Industry Association Awards (the ARIAs) 2018

• Best Children’s Album: Justine Clarke, The Justine Clarke Show!, ABC Music/ ABC KIDS and Universal Music

• Best Classical Album: Slava Grigoryan, Bach: Cello Suites Volume II, ABC Music/ ABC Classic and Universal Music

• Best Comedy Release: ‘Sex Pest’ by the Tonightly with Tom Ballard team, ABC Music and Universal Music

Appendices 257

Australian Screen Editor Awards 2018

• Best Editor (Documentary): Employable Me Series 1, Northern Pictures (in association with ABC)

Australian Writers Guild Awards (the AWGIEs) 2018

• Children’s Television - ‘C’ classification (Children’s 5-14 years), original or adapted, animated or performed: Mustangs FC, ‘Flawless’, Matchbox Pictures (in association with ABC)

• Children’s Television - ‘P’ classification (Preschool-under 5 years), original or adapted, animated or performed: Little J & Big Cuz, ‘Where’s Aron’, Ned Lander Media and NITV (in association with ABC)

Churchill Fellowship 2018

• NT Fellow: Jano Gibson, ABC News Online

Country Music Australia Awards (the Golden Guitars) 2019

• Album of The Year: The Wolfe Brothers, Country Heart, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Contemporary Country Album of The Year: The Wolfe Brothers, Country Heart ABC Music and Universal Music

• Country Music Capital News Group or Duo of the Year: The Wolfe Brothers, Country Heart, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Female Artist of The Year: Beccy Cole, Lioness, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Male Artist of The Year: Travis Collins, Brave & The Broken, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Song of The Year: The Wolfe Brothers, Ain’t Seen It Yet, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Galaxy of the Stars Inductee: Travis Collins (ABC Music and Universal Music)

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade: Australia-Indonesia Institute

• 2019 Elizabeth O’Neill Journalism Award: Sinead Mangan, Australia Wide

Dreamtime Awards 2018

• Female Artist of The Year: Mojo Juju, ABC Music and Universal Music

Endeavour Leadership Program 2019

• Endeavour Executive Leadership Scholarship: Jocelyn Nettlefold

Equity Ensemble Awards 2019

• Outstanding Performance By An Ensemble In A Drama Series: Mystery Road, Bunya Productions (in association with ABC)

• Outstanding Performance By An Ensemble In A Mini-Series/Telemovie: Riot, Werner Film Productions (in association with ABC)

Helpmann Awards 2019

• Best Individual Classical Music Performance: Asher Fisch, Tristan und Isolde (recorded live in concert by ABC Music)

• Best Symphony Orchestra Concert: West Australian Symphony Orchestra, Tristan und Isolde (recorded live in concert by ABC Music)

J Awards 2018

• Australian Music Video of the Year: Mojo Juju, Native Tongue, ABC Music and Universal Music

Logies 2019

• Most Outstanding Actress: Jenna Coleman, The Cry

• Most Outstanding Children’s Program: Bluey, Ludo Studio (in association with ABC)

• Most Outstanding News Coverage or Public Affairs Report: Four Corners, ‘Out of the Dark’ (coverage of the Thai cave rescue)

• Most Popular Actor: Luke McGregor, Rosehaven

• Most Popular Actress: Deborah Mailman, Bite Club/Mystery Road

• Most Popular Drama Program: Mystery Road, Bunya Productions (in association with ABC)

• Most Popular Lifestyle Program: Gardening Australia

• Most Popular Presenter: Costa Georgiadis, Gardening Australia

• Graham Kennedy Award for Most Popular New Talent: Dylan Alcott (ABC: The Set / Invictus Games Tonight)

• Gold Logie - Most Popular Personality on Australian TV: Tom Gleeson, Hard Quiz, ABC and Thinkative TV

Ministerial Advisory Council on the Ageing Awards 2018

• Current Affairs: 7.30, ‘Concerns over the rise in the number of elderly who are homeless’

258 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The Monthly Awards 2018

• TV: You Can’t Ask That Series 3, Aaron Smith and Kirk Docker (in association with ABC)

National Live Music Awards 2018

• R&B/Soul Act of The Year: Mojo Juju, ABC Music and Universal Music

• Blues and Roots Live Act of The Year: All Our Exes Live in Texas, ABC Music and Universal Music

National Press Club of Australia Journalism Awards

• 2018 Caroline Jones Women in Media Young Journalists Award: Emily Smith, ABC Kimberley

The NRMA Kennedy Awards for Excellence in Journalism

• Paul Lockyer Award for Outstanding Regional Broadcast Reporting: Anna Henderson, 7.30 ‘Where is Paddy Moriarty and his dog Kellie?’

Screen Diversity & Inclusion Network (SDIN) Awards 2018

• Inaugural SDIN Award: Little J & Big Cuz, Ned Lander Media and NITV (in association with ABC)

Screen Music Awards 2018

• Best Original Song Composed for the Screen: Oscar Joe Gross, Now I Know from the program Pulse, ABC Music Publishing and Mushroom Music Publishing

• Best Television Theme: Matteo Zingales, Harrow

• Best Music for a Mini-Series or Telemovie: Antony Partos and Matteo Zingales, Mystery Road

• Best Music for a Documentary: Sean Tinnion, A Stargazer’s Guide to the Cosmos

• Best Music for Children’s Television: Nerida Tyson-Chew, The Deep Series 2 Episode 11 ‘The Missing’

Screen Producers Australia (SPA) Awards 2018

• Children’s Series Production of the Year: Grace Beside Me, Magpie Pictures (in association with ABC)

• Documentary or Documentary Series Production of the Year: Anh’s Brush with Fame, Screentime (in association with ABC)

• Comedy Series Production of the Year: Rosehaven, What Horse?/Guesswork Television (in association with ABC)

• Light Entertainment Series Production of the Year: Gruen, CJZ (in association with ABC)

• Online Series Production of the Year: Fucking Adelaide, Closer Productions (in association with ABC)

• Telemovie or Mini Series Production of the Year: Mystery Road, Bunya Productions (in association with the ABC)

Sports Australia Media Awards 2018

• Best depiction of inclusive sport: Emma Race, Kate Seear, Lucy Race, Nicole Hayes, Felicity Race and Alicia Sometimes, The Outer Sanctum podcast

UN Day Media Awards 2018

• Promotion of Empowerment of People with Disability: Sarah Dingle, Alice Brennan, Leila Shunnar, David Lewis, Jess O’Callaghan and Brendan King, Background Briefing , ‘Carers who kill’, RN

• Promotion of Responsible Consumption and Production: Sarah Dingle, Alice Brennan, Leila Shunnar, David Lewis, Jess O’Callaghan, Brendan King, Background Briefing, ‘Best Laid Plans’, RN

• Promotion of Social Cohesion: Jane Bardon and Owain Stia-James, ‘Rough Justice: a new future for our youth?’, ABC News

Walkley Awards 2018

• All Media: Coverage of Indigenous Affairs: Allan Clarke & Yale Macgillivray, Unravel: Blood on the Tracks

• Camerawork: Aaron Hollett, Four Corners, ‘City of Ghosts’

• Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism: Sean Dorney

• Nikon-Walkley Contemporary Australian Daily Life Prize: Matthew Abbott, ‘Not a farmer’s wife’, ABC Online

• Production: Four Corners, ‘I Am That Girl’

• Public Service Journalism: Louise Milligan, Sashka Koloff, Mary Fallon and Lucy Carter, Four Corners, ‘I am that Girl’

Appendices 259

• Radio/Audio Current Affairs: Jane Bardon, AM / RN Breakfast / ABC News Online, ‘NT Youth Detention and Child Protection Systems in Crisis Despite Royal Commission’

• Television Current Affairs: Lorna Knowles, Alison Branley (with Kate McClymont and Tracey Spicer) 7.30, ‘Women claim Don Burke sexually harassed them’

• TV Current Affairs (Long): Four Corners, ‘Out of the Dark’

• TV News reporting: Alexandra Blucher and Mark Willacy, 7pm News, ‘Corruption concerns at one of Australia’s biggest councils’

Walkley Mid-Year Celebration 2019

• All media: Coverage of Community and Regional Affairs: Henry Zwartz, ‘This is Tasmania’s Ballarat: Abuse survivors speak out’

• All media: Longform feature or special: Oliver Gordon, Background Briefing , ‘Inside Australia’s segregated hotel rooms’, RN

• All media: Shortform Journalism: Isabella Higgins, ‘Life in the grips of a suicide crisis’, ‘Strength in the suicide community’, ‘The fight of our lives’

• All media: Visual Storytelling: Annika Blau and Zoe Osborne, ‘Women in Asia’: ‘Growing up as a living goddess’, ‘My Huong thought she’d finally found her mother after the war’, ‘Inside Nepal’s forbidden kingdom’

• All media: Arts Journalism Prize: Jane Howard, ‘How Australian theatre rebalanced its gender disparity’

• Media Diversity Australia Award: You Can’t Ask That Series 4, ‘Deaf’, ‘African Australians’, ‘Intersex’, Aaron Smith and Kirk Docker (in association with ABC)

• Our Watch Award for Excellence in Reporting on Violence Against Women and Children: Sarah Dingle and the RN Background Briefing team, ‘Australia on Trial’: ‘Carers who kill’, ‘Slavery in the suburbs’, ‘Murder on trial’

• Walkley Young Australian Journalist of the Year: Oliver Gordon, Background Briefing, ‘Inside Australia’s segregated hotel rooms’, RN

State and Territory Awards

Australian Capital Territory Yogie Awards (Youth Coalition of the ACT)

• 2018 Youth in the Media Award: Adam Shirley and Ainslie MacGibbon, ABC Radio Canberra

New South Wales Farm Writers’ Association of NSW 2018

• Star Prize for Rural Broadcasting: Kerry Staight, Landline

Northern Territory NT Media Awards 2018

• All media - Excellence in Northern reporting: Steven Schubert ‘How Zak Grieve backed out of a murder plot but got life anyway’, ABC News

• Print/text - Best feature writing: Steven Schubert, ‘NT police and courts failing Indigenous people’, ABC News

• Print/text - Best news coverage: Steven Schubert, ‘Indigenous murder cases go cold amidst police infighting’, ABC News

• Young Journalist of the Year 2018: Thea Halpin, Body of Work for ABC News

• Journalist/Photojournalist of the Year 2018: Steven Schubert, ABC News

SA and NT Rural Media Awards 2018

• Best Rural Broadcast Journalist Award - Audio/Radio: Cassandra Hough, ABC Rural

• Best Rural Broadcast Journalist Award - Digital/Online: Lydia Burton, ABC Rural

• Best Rural Broadcast Journalist Award - Video/Television: Kristy O’Brien, Landline

Queensland Queensland Clarion Awards 2018

• All Media - social issues: Ruth de Glas and Emma Griffiths, Focus, ‘How can the DV abuser change?’, ABC Brisbane

• Business Journalism: David Lewis, Suzanne Smith, Jess O’Callaghan and Leila Shunnar, Background Briefing , ‘A whisky business’, RN

260 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

• Regional and Community - broadcast report: Nicole Bond ‘The good, the bad and the ugly: drought and optimism in Western Queensland’, ABC Western Queensland

• Rural Journalism: Dominque Schwartz, Alexandra Blucher ‘Tension on the Tracks’, ABC News Online

• Television - The John Bean Award for News and Current Affairs Camerawork: Brendan Mounter Landline, ‘Prisoners Raising Gentle Cattle’

• Television Current Affairs: Mark Willacy, Four Corners, ‘All That Glitters’

• Text News Report: Mark Willacy and Alexandra Blucher, Body of Work for ABC News Online

Queensland Mental Health Week Achievement Awards 2018

• Media Award: You Can’t Ask That Series 3, ‘Schizophrenia’ and ‘Eating Disorders’, Aaron Smith and Kirk Docker (in association with ABC)

• Earle Duus Overall Award: You Can’t Ask That Series 3, ‘Schizophrenia’ and ‘Eating Disorders’, Aaron Smith and Kirk Docker (in association with ABC)

Queensland Rural Media Awards 2019

• Excellence in Rural Journalism - Multimedia: Melanie Groves, ‘Animal Welfare in Drought’, ABC Rural

• Excellence in Rural Journalism - Overall winner: Kristy Sexton-McGrath, ‘Cattle stations to be handed back’, ABC Far North Queensland

• Excellence in Rural photography - People: Melanie Groves, ‘Jumping off the cottonseed’, from ABC multimedia piece ‘The big dry: ‘See us, hear us, help us’

• Excellence in Rural Journalism - Radio: Kristy Sexton-McGrath, ‘Cattle stations to be handed back’, ABC Far North Queensland

• Most outstanding contribution to Journalism: Ben Hawke, Landline

Queensland Rural Press Club 2018

• Hall of Fame: Pip Courtney, Landline

South Australia The Governor’s Multicultural Awards 2018

• Media Award: Sowaibah Hanifie, ABC Riverland

SA and NT Rural Media Awards 2018

See Northern Territory for award list.

SA Media Awards 2019

• Bronze Award, All Media: Best Rural/Regional Journalist: Brooke Neindorf, ‘Dear doctors… please come to Kimba’, ‘Smelly birds cause chaos for farmers’, ’30 years of oyster farming’, ABC Eyre Peninsula

• Bronze Award, Radio: Best Radio News or Current Affairs or Features Report: Glen Moret, ‘From the South via radio’, ABC South East SA

• Bronze Award, Television: Best TV Current Affairs or Feature: Angelique Donnellan, ‘Borrowed Time’

• Bronze Award, Print/Digital: Best News or Lifestyle Feature: Rebecca Puddy, Rhett Burnie, Jessica Haynes and Tony Hill, ‘Take a dive with the Wet Mules’

• Silver Award, Radio: Best Radio Broadcaster: Caroline Winter, AM, ‘SA election coverage 2018’

• Silver Award, Television: Best TV Broadcaster (Presenter, Reporter and/or Camera): Angelique Donnellan, 7.30, ‘Pet food scandal’, ‘Dust-covered and disappointed’, ‘Newstart struggle’

• Journalist of the Year: Angelique Donnellan

SA Press Club Awards 2018

• Best Long Form Television Report: Angelique Donnellan and Sofie Wainwright, 7.30, ‘You may not have hear of Sally Zou, but she’s one of the Liberal Party’s biggest donors’,

• Best Radio Report: Caroline Winter, PM, ‘Summer Special: Australia’s space race’

• Regional or Rural Reporting: Angelique Donnellan, 7.30, ‘Dust-covered and disappointed’

• Scoop of the Year: Isabel Dayman, ‘Xenophon candidate sacked’

• Young Journalist of the Year: Isabel Dayman, ABC News

Appendices 261

Tasmania Tasmanian Media Awards 2019

• Feature, Documentary or Current Affairs: Henry Zwartz, ‘Inside Tasmania’s Drug Trade’, ABC Northern Tasmania

• Science, Technology and Environment: Henry Zwartz, ‘Salmon farming and seal treatment’, ABC Northern Tasmania

• Health Reporting: Rhiana Whitson, ‘Pressure Point health series’

• Keith Welsh Award For Outstanding Contribution to Journalism: Peter Gee, ABC

Victoria Melbourne Press Club Quill Awards 2018

• Business News: Adele Ferguson, Lesley Robinson, Nassim Khadem and Lucy Carter, Four Corners (with The Age), ‘Mongrel Bunch of Bastards’

• The Keith Dunstan Quill for Commentary: Barrie Cassidy, Insiders Extra

• Radio Journalism (Long Form): Jane Lee, Alice Brennan, Jess O’Callaghan and Leila Shunnar, Background Briefing , ‘Death of Jeremy Hu’, RN

• Radio Journalism (Short Form): Amy Bainbridge, Rachael Brown and Naomi Selvaratnam, AM, ‘Insurance Industry Reports’

• TV/Video Feature (Long Form): Louise Milligan, Mary Fallon, Sashka Koloff and Lucy Carter, Four Corners, ‘I am that girl’

• The Victorian Government Quill for Reporting on Disability Issues: Rachel Lucas, ‘Access to Fashion’, ABC Gippsland

• The Young Journalist of the Year: Matilda Marozzi, ABC Melbourne

• The 2018 MPC Lifetime Achievement Award: Barrie Cassidy

Melbourne Press Club Michael Gordon Fellowship

• Grace Jennings-Edquist, ‘Refugees in Regional Australia’, ABC Life

Melbourne Webfest 2018

• Best Australian Non-Fiction Web Series Award: Shalom Almond, Prisoners and Pups (in association with ABC)

Rural Press Club of Victoria Awards 2018

• Best Feature Story: Tim Lee, Landline, ‘Standing Tall’

• Best News Story - Online: Winner: Bridget Rollason, ‘Council admits flood money missing’, ABC Ballarat

• Best News Story - Radio: Kellie Lazzaro, ‘Esso considers a buy up of farmland’, ABC Gippsland

• Best News Story - TV: Charlotte King, ‘Victoria Police cop criticism over investigation of alleged assaults by Ballarat officers’, ABC Ballarat

• Ray Frawley Young Journalist of the Year: Bridget Rollason, ABC Ballarat

Western Australia Rural Media Association of Western Australia (RMA) Awards 2018

• Best News Coverage - Broadcast: Jo Prendergast, ‘Listeria outbreak sees thousands of rockmelons left to rot’, ABC Rural

• Best New Entrant: Kit Mochan, ABC Great Southern WA

WA Media Awards 2018

• Health/Medical Report - All Media: Claire Moodie and team, 7.30, ‘Mesh Victims Fight Back’

• New Journalist or Cadet: James Carmody, Body of Work for ABC

• Best Three News Stories or Features - Community/Regional - All Media: Sam Tomlin, Body of Work for ABC Kimberley

• Science and Environmental Report - All Media: Kathryn Diss, ‘How the Gorgon gas plant could wipe out a year of solar emissions savings’

• News Story or Feature - Radio/Audio Journalism: Kirsti Melville, Earshot, ‘A portrait of a foster family’, RN

• News Story or Feature - Television/Audio-Visual Journalism: Charlotte Hamlyn, ‘David Goodall’, ABC News

• News Report - Print/Text: Charlotte Hamlyn, ‘David Goodall’, ABC News Online

262 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Reference 263

ABC Radio Darwin’s Jess Ong.

Reference

Contents Compliance Index 264

Glossary 266

Index 267

ABC Annual Report 2019

Reports required under section 80 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983 Section Requirement Statement / Location

s.80(a) - s.80(daa) Directions from the Minister relating to a broadcast or provision of content on a digital media service

No such directions received 2018-19

s.80(da) Codes of practice developed under subsection 8(1) See Appendix 4 (pages 216-26)

s.80(e) Particulars of any request made to the Board by the Minister during that year under subsection 8(2) and the action (if any) taken by the Board in respect of the request

No such requests made in 2018-19 See Appendix 2 (page 212)

s.80(f) Particulars of any gift, devise or bequest accepted by the Corporation during that year The Corporation received no gifts or donations within the meaning of section 80

of the Australian Broadcasting Act 1983

s.80(g) Particulars of any advice received by the Board during that year from the ABC Advisory Council See Yours in the Community, ABC Advisory Council (pages 55-6)

s.80(j) Activities under subsection 25A See Financial Statements, Note 13

(pages 195-6)

s.80(k) Particulars of any activities during the year of any authorised business with which the Corporation is associated under that subsection

See Financial Statements, Note 13 (pages 195-6)

s.80(l) Particulars of significant changes of transmission coverage and quality See pages 119-20

Reports required under section 43 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 Section Requirement Statement / Location

s.43(1) Auditor-General’s report Provided to the Minister on 22 August 2018

(page 159)

s.43(4) Financial Statements See Financial Statements 150-207

Compliance Index

264 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

Reports required under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 Section Requirement Statement / Location

s.17BE(ka) Statistics on numbers of employees See Appendix 5 (pages 227-8)

s.17BE(q) Judicial decisions and reviews by Outside Bodies Matters referred to the Australian Communications and Media Authority for review, see page 148. No other judicial decisions or decision of administrative tribunals were made in 2018-19 which had, or may have, a significant effect on the ABC's operations

s.17BE(t) Indemnities and insurance premiums for Officers The ABC has indemnified its officers and acquired appropriate insurances from Comcover including Directors and Officers liability insurance on terms and conditions which are consistent with the provisions of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 and the standing Board resolutions. The premium for the Directors and Officers liability insurance was $211,094.79

s.17BE(u) Index of Annual Report Requirements This Compliance Index satisfies section 17BE(u)

Other requirements of section 17BE of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014 Section Requirement Statement / Location

s.17BE(a) Details of the legislation establishing the body See Enabling legislation (page 142)

s.17BE(b)(i) Summary of the objects and functions of the entity See Purpose and Vision (page 8) and Appendix 1 (pages 210-11)

s.17BE(b)(ii) Purposes of the entity as included in the ABC Corporate Plan 2017-18 See Annual Performance Statements (pages 87-99)

s.17BE(c) The responsible Minister See Responsible Minister (page 142)

s.17BE(d) Ministerial directions Nil

s.17BE(e) Government policy orders Nil

s.17BE(g) Annual Performance Statements See Annual Performance Statements (pages 87-99)

s.17BE(h) Statement regarding significant non-compliance See Compliance reporting (page 145)

s.17BE(j) Information about members of the accountable authority See The Board (pages 4-7)

s.17BE(k) Outline of organisational structure See Appendix 3 (page 215)

s.17BE(l) Outline of location of major activities or facilities See Where We Are (pages 10-11) and Appendix 14 (pages 251-5)

s.17BE(m) Information in relation to the main corporate governance practices See Governance and management processes (page 142)

s.17BE(n) Related entity transactions Nil

s.17BE(p) Significant activities and changes affecting the agency All sections

s.17BE(r) Particulars of reports on the ABC Nil

s.17BE(s) Obtaining information from subsidiaries N/A

s.17BE(ta) Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C See Appendix 6 (pages 229-34)

Reference 265

Charter - the fundamental operating responsibilities of the ABC, as set out in section 6 of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983

Consolidated 28 - total viewings of television broadcast content including those watched live and those played back within 28 days of the live broadcast

DAB+ - a radio frequency allowing digital simulcast of analogue stations and the broadcast of digital-only stations

first release - the first time a program has been broadcast in Australia

five-city metropolitan reach - the combined audience reach of a television or radio service in the five cities of Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney

gif - graphics files created for use and distribution on the internet, particularly social media

Google Analytics - Google Analytics only reports demographics for around half of all unique users, and so should be treated as an indicative sample rather than an absolute measurement

interstitial - content that is not a television program and is put to air between programs, for example station identification, program promotions and ABC merchandising

livestream/ing - broadcast of an event or content on an internet-capable device as it happens

multiplatform - content produced for and delivered on more than one media platform

prime time - peak viewing/listening time for television and radio audiences

Q&D - the ABC Quality & Distinctiveness Study measures ABC audiences’ responses to programs and content they have watched, read or listened to across ABC television, radio and digital properties

reach - the total number of people who have viewed, listened or visited a service over a given time frame

share - the percentage of the listening/viewing audience tuned to a particular service on a platform over a given time frame

spill - viewing a TV station which can be received outside its geographic coverage area

Acronyms/Abbreviations RN formerly Radio National

ABCID ABC International Development

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

CALD culturally and linguistically diverse

A&CA ABC Audience and Consumer Affairs

ACMA Australian Communications and Media Authority

APS Annual Performance Statements

DAB+ digital radio - see Glossary

DCR digital content ratings

DISC Diversity & Inclusion Standing Committee

DRM Digital Ratings (Monthly)

E&S the ABC Entertainment & Specialist content team

EAP Employee Assistance Program

ECRC Election Coverage Review Committee

FTE full-time equivalent

GIF graphic interchange format

GIG Great Ideas Grant

IMS Integrated Media System

MDI Media Development Initiative

NA&I the ABC News, Analysis & Investigations content team

PGPA the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 or Rule 2014

Q&D quality & distinctiveness

R&L the ABC Regional & Local content team

SLA Service Level Agreement

TAM television audience measurement

VAST Viewer Access Satellite Television

VPM video player measurement

WHS work health and safety

Glossary

266 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

A ABC Act 8, 52, 88, 115, 142-3, 210-14, 216-17, 222, 263

ABC Advisory Council 52-6, 110, 128, 215, 263

ABC Australia 12, 46-7, 83, 85, 250-1

ABC Books 50, 129

ABC Board i, 2-7, 52, 55-6, 142-3, 211-16, 221, 231-2

ABC Charter 8, 88, 142, 210, 212, 217

ABC Classic 12, 30-1, 33, 35, 37, 43, 49, 98, 121, 124, 247-8, 250, 256-8

ABC Code of Practice 91, 115, 117, 124, 147-8, 216-26

ABC COMEDY 12, 74, 77, 129, 225, 238

ABC Commercial 37, 48-50, 102, 109, 126, 131, 140, 215

ABC Entertainment & Specialist 9, 24-37, 58, 92, 102, 106, 109, 112, 215, 233

ABC KIDS 12, 24-5, 49, 50, 78, 79-80, 121, 124, 129, 225, 236-7, 257

ABC KIDS listen 12, 24, 43, 47, 71, 73

ABC Life 42-3, 45-6, 55, 85, 119, 262

ABC listen app 12, 18, 23, 35, 47, 55, 73, 94, 119, 124-5, 129-30

ABC main channel 21-2, 76, 129, 225, 236-7

ABC Magazines 50, 115

ABC ME 12, 24, 26, 42, 74, 76, 78-80, 124, 129-30, 225, 237-8, 256, 262

ABC Music and Events 12, 49, 256-9

ABC NEWS 12, 22-3, 39, 46, 56, 61, 71, 74, 76, 80-2, 86, 90, 98, 118, 121, 124, 129-30, 225, 249-50, 252, 259-62

ABC News, Analysis & Investigations 9, 18-23, 55, 90, 102, 105-6, 112, 116, 215, 233

ABC Regional & Local 9, 19, 38-42, 47, 58, 61, 90, 102, 105-6, 109, 112, 130-1, 215, 233, 255

ABC services 12

accessibility 56, 124, 129-30

accountability 141-9, 217, 229, 263-4

ACMA 115, 123, 148, 210-11, 216-17, 226

arts 32, 44, 210, 212, 220, 237, 238-9

audiences throughout, and 65-86, 215, 217-20, 225, 229

- feedback 91, 124-5, 147-8

- reach and share 71-87, 92

- satisfaction 66-7

audit 112, 142, 144, 212-13, 215, 231

awards 13, 27, 28, 30, 35, 45, 49, 56

Australian Story 20, 41, 70, 76, 81

B Bonner Committee 108-9

BtN 18, 26, 34, 131

budget 14, 15, 212 see also Financial Statements

business affairs 37

business continuity 143

C capital works 122

Catalyst 33-4, 41, 49, 85, 148

children 236-9

- ABC Education 34, 47, 55, 57, 131

- child protection 112, 130-1, 140, 218, 221-3

- children’s content 12, 24-6, 35, 41, 43, 49-50, 61, 78, 88, 125, 129, 136, 236

Comcare 112-13

Comcover 263

comedy 27-8, 35-7, 45, 77, 225, 238

commercial see ABC Commercial

Commonwealth Ombudsman 148

community

- engagement 51-64, 137-8

- in content 38-42, 58-60

- perceptions/sentiment 66-7, 92

Compass 32-4

complaints

- editorial 115-17

- general feedback 124-5

- legal 126

- processes 214, 216-17, 221, 226

- product 140

compliance index 263-4

compliance reporting 145, 264

Connecting Communities 38-9, 60

Content Ideas Lab 43-7, 215

content innovation 18, 23, 42-3, 46

Index

Reference 267

Content Plan 14, 143

content sales 12, 48

corporate governance 126, 142-3

Corporate Plan 88-99, 143, 145, 264

corporate responsibility 128

- feedback 128

- in a broadcasting context 129-31

- reporting 128

corporate services 123-6

corporate strategy 123

corrections and clarifications 116, 217-18

current affairs 18-21, 26-7, 39, 47, 66-70, 72, 81, 125-6, 210, 221-2, 225, 237-9

cyber security 119

D digital literacy 131

distribution 12, 18-19, 36, 42, 47-8, 50, 89, 93, 98, 118-19, 250-1

diversity 14, 29, 40, 67, 88, 107-11

Double J 12, 31, 35, 37, 71, 89, 119, 121

drama 15, 26-7, 36, 76, 79, 125, 136, 236-9

E Editorial Policies 90, 102, 109, 115, 117, 124, 129-30, 147

editorial quality 90, 115-17

editorial training 90, 105, 115-16

education 24, 32, 34, 37, 47, 55, 57-8, 64, 67, 130-1, 137

election coverage 2, 18-19, 40, 82, 130

- Election Coverage Review Committee 90, 117

- federal election 13, 20, 22-3, 31, 34, 76, 80-2, 117

- state elections 61, 90

emergency broadcasting 38, 62-3, 112, 136, 138

emissions 132

employees 100-114

- distribution 102

- diversity 107-11

- gender profile 110

- Indigenous 108-9

- profile 227-8

Employment Agreements 104

enabling legislation 142

energy consumption 132, 134

entertainment 29, 37, 236-9

environmental responsibility 132-5

environmental sustainability 134

Equity and Diversity Plan 107

Equity and Diversity Report 107, 109

events 2, 12, 36-7, 40, 46, 49, 58

Executive Leadership Team 9, 14, 55, 104, 108-9, 142

expenditure

- consultants 235

- see Financial Statements

- promotion and market research 235

- see Remuneration

- travel 236

F factual 26-8, 35-7, 47, 58, 60, 125, 236-9

Financial Statements 150-206

Financial Summary 152-5

Four Corners 20-1, 44, 47, 70, 76, 81

Foreign Correspondent 20, 70, 81

freedom of expression 129

freedom of information 145

G Giggle and Hoot 24, 36

government submissions 123

Great Ideas Grant (GIG) 43, 45

268 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

H Hack 22-3, 30, 57, 83, 131

heritage strategy 134

Heywire 42, 55, 57, 130

humanitarian appeals 138

I Independent Auditor’s Report 156-7

Indigenous

- Bonner Committee 108-9

- content 24, 26-7, 35-7, 42, 55, 236-9

- employment 108-9

- events 61

- song competition 34

- Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) 14, 109

infrastructure 118-19

International 12, 46-7, 134, 138

- audiences 46, 82, 85-6, 94

- Development (ABCID) 64, 103, 138

- distribution 27, 36-7, 48-9

- locations 10, 120

- news 18-19, 139

- strategy 43, 46, 126

iview 12, 24, 27-8, 35-6, 41, 47, 55-6, 76, 78-80, 82-3, 89, 93, 118-19, 124-5, 130, 239

K kids, see children

L leadership training 105-6

legal 3, 105, 111, 116, 125-6

Letter to the Minister i

licensing 12, 48, 50, 126

locations 10-11

M management processes 142

Managing Director 2, 4, 14-15, 55, 57, 109, 123, 142, 211-15

media literacy 34, 57, 131

mental health 139

music 24, 28-32, 37, 43, 47-50, 58-9, 61, 89, 136

N news and current affairs

- audience data 69-72, 81-2, 86

- performance 18-23

- training 105-6

O offices see locations

One Night Stand 30, 59

operations 36, 58, 106, 118-22

organisational structure 215

P Play School 24, 36, 57-8, 131

podcasts 18, 21, 28, 32, 34-6, 44, 71, 73, 86

privacy 129-30, 146

product responsibility 140

publishing 48, 50

purpose 8, 88

Q quality assurance 125, 140

Reference 269

R radio

- reach and share 40, 71

- transmission frequencies 243-9

Radio Australia 12, 46-7

reception advice 121

recycling 133, 137

religion & ethics 32-3

remuneration 193, 213, 229-34

retail 48, 50, 140

revenue see Financial Statements

risk 63, 112, 118-19, 125-6, 130, 139, 143-4, 146

responsibility 127-140

RN 21, 32-4, 42, 47, 57, 61, 71-2, 89, 98, 121

S science 32-3, 37, 44, 58, 83, 85

security 119, 122

social responsibility 128, 136-40

specialist (content) 18-19, 32, 47

sport 19, 32, 35, 41-2, 46, 64, 136

staff, see employees

stakeholder inclusiveness 128

strategy see corporate strategy

streaming 12, 31, 49, 85, 119, 121

- live streams 80, 82, 86

syndication 18, 48, 86

T technology 14-15, 45, 102, 105-6, 112, 118-19, 122, 126, 132, 144

television

- content analysis 236-9

- reach and share 74-8

- transmission channels 240-3

training and development 105-6

transmission services 119-21, 240-50

travel and transport 134

triple j 21-2, 30-2, 35, 37, 46, 49-50, 57, 59, 71-3, 83, 86, 89, 94, 98, 119, 121, 124, 131

trust 2-3, 13, 20, 66, 92, 128, 131, 146

U Unearthed 30-1, 35, 37, 71, 83, 89, 119, 121, 124

V values 103-4, 107

vision 8

W waste 26, 28, 34, 58, 81, 133, 137

water use 132-3, 135

work health and safety 105, 112-14

Y young and vulnerable audiences 130

270 AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION ANNUAL REPORT 2019

The face of ABC News in Victoria, Ian Henderson, in an episode of Catalyst. “Hendo” presented his last 7pm News bulletin in late 2018. Image: Johanna Gibson

GPO Box 9994

in your state/territory capital

Phone 13 9994

TTY 1800 627 854

abc.net.au