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Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council—Report for 2019-20


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Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Annual Report 2019 - 2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Administration Building 5 Bunaan Close WRECK BAY JBT 2540

website:

www.wbacc.gov.au

phone:

(02) 4442 1029 email:

admin@wbacc.gov.au

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council iii

Contents Our Vision and Purpose ......................................................................................................................... 1

Our Goals

..................................................................................................................................................2

Membership

.............................................................................................................................................5

Land Ownership and Management

.................................................................................................. 10

Functions

................................................................................................................................................ 12

Wreck Bay Village

.................................................................................................................................14

Wreck Bay Community

.........................................................................................................................15

WBACC Timeline....................................................................................................................................16

Board Members

.................................................................................................................................... 30

Details of the Accountable Authority

................................................................................................35

Executive Remuneration

..................................................................................................................... 36

Letter presenting the Annual Report

................................................................................................37

Chairperson’s Report

........................................................................................................................... 38

Governance

............................................................................................................................................ 39

Community Service

.......................................................................................................... 44

Land Management

................................................................................................................................50

Land Use P

lanning

................................................................................................................................. 51

The way ahead

....................................................................................................................................... 52

Chief Executive Officer’s Report.........................................................................................................53

Funding Grants and other income

.................................................................................................... 58

Contracts

................................................................................................................................................. 59

Compliance

.............................................................................................................................................60

The Future

...............................................................................................................................................60

Organisation Chart

............................................................................................................................... 62

WBA

CC Operations Report

................................................................................................................. 63

Governance Arrangements

................................................................................................................. 63

Environmental Impact Management

............................................................................................... 65

Work Health and Safety Management

.............................................................................................66

Operational Units

.................................................................................................................................. 67

Contract Services Team Report for 2019-20

.................................................................................. 67

Roads and Fire Trails Team—examples of work completed in 2019-20

.................................68

Cleaning T

eam—examples of work completed in 2019-20

.......................................................68

iv A nnual Report 2019-2020

Entry Station ........................................................................................................................................... 70

Gr ounds Maintenance Team—examples of work completed in 2019-20

.............................. 70

Weeds

.......................................................................................................................................................72

Gudjahgahmiamia Day Care Centre Report for 2018-19

.............................................................73

Cultural Heritage Unit

.......................................................................................................................... 76

Community Liaison and Engagement

.............................................................................................. 76

Small Grants Administration (Sporting)

...........................................................................................77

Administration Team Report for 2019-20

...................................................................................... 78

Remuneration for key management personnel

.............................................................................81

All Ongoing and Non-Ongoing Employees

.....................................................................................81

Performance Criteria

........................................................................................................................... 82

WBACC’s performance

........................................................................................................................96

How WBACC’s performance of its objectives has contributed to improved outcomes for Indigenous Australians

........................................................................................................................96

Performance Outcomes

....................................................................................................................100

Analysis of the Factors that Contributed to WBACC’s Performance Outcomes

..................100

Financial Statements

......................................................................................................................... 105

For the Year Ended 30 June 2020

................................................................................................... 105

Compliance

.......................................................................................................................................... 135

List of Requirements

— corpor

ate Commonwealth entities

.....................................................135

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1

Our Vision and Purpose Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council seeks to be a respected, equal and valued part of a culturally diverse Australian society. By controlling and managing its own land and waters, the Community aims to become self-sufficient and able to freely determine its future and lifestyle. The Community desires to do this by protecting its interests and values while preserving for future generations its unique identity, heritage and culture.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council’s purpose is:

1.

T

o manage and maintain Aboriginal Land:

•

P

rotect and conserve natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal Land •

Engage in land use planning

2

.

P

rovide services to Community members:

•

T

ake action for the benefit of the Community in relation to housing, social welfare, education, training or health needs of the Community members

3.

Conduct business enterprises for the economic/

social benefit of the Community.

Wreck Bay flags fly proudly alongside Booderee National Park flags at the entry to the Booderee National Park, owned by WBACC and jointly managed with the Director of National Parks

2 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Our Goals To achieve this vision, Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council’s goals are:

• Sole ownership of all lands and waters within Jervis Bay T

erritory;

•

Sole management of its fr

eehold land and waters, allowing for community

responsibility, empowerment and self determination •

Sole r

epresentation of the community’s united and democratically agreed interests at all levels of Government and in all external dealings, so as to protect community members’ rights; •

Envir

onmentally sustainable development to allow a productive economic base for the community by managing Booderee as an ongoing Park—the community seeks to protect the land and water while earning income, creating jobs and achieving financial security; •

Social and cultur

al development linked with appropriate cultural training and education, to improve community empowerment and management, security and wellbeing, while preserving community values; •

Impr

ovement in health, housing and living standards to levels at least comparable with other Australian communities; and •

R

ecognition and support from the wider Australian community and government to achieve these worthwhile and positive goals.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 3

George Brown Jnr, with Wreck Bay signage at the entry to the 403 lands

The Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council (the Council) is a corporate commonwealth entity which was established by the Aboriginal Land Grant Jervis Bay Territory Act 1986 (Land Grant Act), which falls within the Ministerial responsibilities of the Minister for Indigenous Australians. The Council commenced operations in March 1987 and is currently in its thirty third year of operation.

4 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Village

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 5

Membership At the time of this report there are 424 Registered Members of the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council.

Janelle Ali

L

ewis Archibald

T

eesha Archibald

Aimee Ardler

Alinta Ar

dler

Amanda Ar

dler

Anthony Ardler

A

thol Ardler

Beverley Ar

dler

Billi-Jo Ardler

Br

adley Ardler

Byr

on Ardler

Casey Ardler

Christopher Ar

dler

Clayton Ar

dler

Craig Ardler

Dillan James Ar

dler

Dylan Ar

dler

Elijah Ardler

Emma Ar

dler

Eric Ar

dler Jnr

Eric Ardler Snr

Erica Ar

dler

Ger

aldine Ardler

Ivern Ardler

Jamahl Ar

dler

Joanna Ar

dler

Joel Ardler

Josh Ar

dler

Kain Ar

dler

Karen Ardler

Karlie Joy Ar

dler

K

evin Ardler

Kimberley Ardler

Lane Ar

dler

L

eah Ardler

Leigh Ardler

Lisa Ar

dler

L

orraine Ardler

Miamba Ardler

P

aul Ardler Snr

P

aul Ardler Jnr

Raiya Ardler

Raymond Ar

dler

R

ebecca Ardler

Reuben Ardler Jnr

R

euben Ardler Snr

Richar

d Ardler

Rick John Ardler

Susan Ar

dler

T

anya Ardler

Tazma Arlder

T

errence Ardler

Ther

esa Ardler

Virginia Ardler

W

ayne Ardler

Caleb Ar

dler-Finch

Kyle Ardler-Lindsay

Joel Ar

dler-Mcleod

Hayley Barrington

Naomi Barrington

Cheryl Bassinder

Sandr

a Bloxsome

6 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Bianca Brennan L orna Briggs Melanie Briggs

R

obert Briggs

Annette Br

own

Ashleigh Br

own

Bailey Brown

Christine Br

own

C

ynthia Brown

Darren Brown

Daryll Br

own

E

vonne Brown

Gail Brown

Geor

ge Brown Snr

Geor

ge Brown Jnr

Graeme Brown

Har

old Brown

Jackson Br

own

Jacob Brown

Jannine Br

own

Jar

ed Brown

Jasmin Brown

Jer

emiah Brown

John M Br

own

John P Brown

Joseph T Br

own

Joseph Br

own

Justine Brown

Kayeleen Br

own

K

eiron Shayne Brown

Kenny Brown

K

evin Brown

Kristy Br

own

Kyle Brown

L

eon Brown

L

eslie Brown

Lynette Brown

Mar

garet Brown

Maxine Br

own

Megan Brown

Melissa Br

own

Melleak Br

own

Morgan Brown

P

atricia Brown

Michelle Br

own

Peter Brown

P

hillip Brown

P

hillip Brown

Rhonda Brown

R

ussell David Brown

Sandie

-Lee Brown

Shayne Brown

Sheryn Br

own

Simon Br

own

Stanley Brown

S

teven J Brown Jnr

S

teven John Brown

Sue-Ann Brown

S

ylvia Kay Brown

T

eagan Brown

Teea Brown

T

errence Brown

Thomas Br

own Jnr

Thomas Brown Snr

T

racey Brown

V

era Brown

Vida Brown Snr

Vida Br

own Jnr

W

endy Brown

William Brown

V

eronica Brown-Roberts

Elizabeth Cambell

Gor

don Campbell

Eileen Carberry

Andr

ew Carter

Anthea Carter

David Carter

Izaiah Carter

Jean Carter

Marie Carter

Nicholas Carter

Sally Carter

Samantha Carter

Shaquille Carter

T

ony Carter

T

rae Carter

T

yrone Carter

William Carter Jnr

Zaine Carter

Anthony Charles

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 7

Phillip Charles R oslyn E Cruikshank Jerusha Curtis

Michelle Curtis

Nathanael Curtis

Tiana Curtis

R

uth Dane

Jemma Dann

Summer Dann

K

enneth Dann

K

enny Dann Snr

P

auline Delauney

Lochlan Dickson

Douglas Dix

on

P

amela Dixon

Richard Dixon

T

roy Green

Judy Haigh-

Chapman

Adam Hampton

Eileen Hampton

Michael Hampton

Erin Hampton

Neville Hampton Jnr

Neville Hampton Snr

Cerrina F

reeman-Mcdonald

Br

andon Green

Cor

ey Green

Jason Green

K

yra Green

Larry Gr

een

Steven Green

Kay Ella

Ir

ene Rose Ellis

Annalise Foster

Shana Hampton

William Hampton

Nathanial Hampton

L

esley Foster

Mathew F

oster

Natalie Foster

Clive F

reeman Jnr

Julie F

reeman

Markeeta Freeman

Br

ooke Higgins

Demi Hoskins

Elizabeth Hoskins

F

iona Hyland

K

erry Jansen

Margaret Johnson

Liam Ingr

ey

Nicholas Kavanagh

Janice K

elly

Kristika K

umar-Williams

Anthony Little

Belinda Little

Naomi L

ocke

Angie L

onesborough

Nickole Lonesborough

P

hillip Lonesborough

T

anika Lonesborough

Phillip Longbottom

John Marks

R

obyn Marks

Brya Martin

Nathan Martin

Shar

aya Matson

James Mckenzie

Sar

ah Mckenzie

Angelina Mcleod

Arthur Mcleod

Bernar

d Mcleod

Br

ett Mcleod

Caroline Mcleod

Dale Mcleod

Dane Mcleod

Dean James Mcleod

Donna Mcleod

Eileen Mcleod

Elaine Mcleod Jnr

Gavin Mcleod

Gr

ace Mcleod

Ian K Mcleod Snr

Ian Mcleod Jnr

Iris Mcleod

Isaac Mcleod

Jamie McL

eod

Jefr

ey Mcleod

Kanika Mcleod

Kaya Mcleod

Kaylene S

ylvia Mcleod

8 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Kylie Louise Mcleod L eslie Shayne Mcleod Mathew Mcleod

Max J Mcleod

Nar

elle Mcleod

Natasha Mcleod

P

aul Mcleod

Rachelle Mcleod

R

onald Mcleod

Ronald ( Jimmy) Mcleod

Shaneah Mcleod

T

racey Mcleod

Ty Mcleod

V

anessa Marie Mcleod

Brianna Mcleod-

Cosgrove

Nyah Mcleod-Cosgrove

Amethyst Mcleod-Downing

Elliot Mcleod-L

uck

Hamish Mcleod-Luck

Marlene Mcleod-L

uck

Jay Mcleod-P

eresan

Darian Mcleod-Sheridan

Colin (

Tom) Moore

Ir

ene Moore

Julie Moore

Thomas Moor

e

Ursula Moor

e

Leslie Morgan-Ardler

Belinda M

undy

Denise M

undy

Dylan Mundy

Err

ol Mundy

Glen M

undy

Jacqueline Mundy

James M

undy

Jesse M

undy

Joel Mundy

K

evin Mundy

Jon M

undy

Lucinda Mundy

L

uke Mundy

Mark M

undy

Michael John Mundy

Sandr

a Mundy

Chelsea M

undy-Campbell

Alysha Mundy-Williams

Jamaine M

undy-Williams

Kiya M

undy-Williams

Nicole Mundy-Williams

Noelene Nunn

T

yrone Nye-Williams

Tereki Parson-Whaddy

Caterina P

erry-Thomas

Shar

on Perry-Thomas

Alison Raath

Emma Raath-P

ickering

Imer

a Raath

Charles Raath-Ardler

Anthony R

oberts Jnr

C

yril Roberts

Jessika Roberts

Jor

dan Roberts

K

elsey Roberts

Reuben Roberts

Riva R

oberts

Tilly Scott

C

yril Scott-Thomas

L

eah Seymour

Victor Sharman

Matthew John Simms

Iesha Simpson

Jocoby Simpson

Kar

en Simpson

T

yson Simpson-Brown

Douglas S

tewart

Jennifer Stewart

Norman S

tewart

P

eter Stewart

Steven Stewart

W

alter Stewart

Dennis S

tewart-Green

Keiran Stewart-Assheton

Jar

od Stubbs

Br

aidyn Sturgeon

Brittany Sturgeon

Darr

en Sturgeon

Elaine S

turgeon

Jade Sturgeon

Jarr

ed Sturgeon

Shane S

turgeon

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 9

Skye Sturgeon T errence Sturgeon Cindy T albot

Clifford Thomas

Denise Thomas

Matthew Thomas

P

eter Thomas

R

onald Thomas

Sar

ah Thomas

Sherese Thomas

Sonia Thomas

Dennis T

owers

Joseph Turner

Melinda T

urner

Shar

on Turner

David Vale

Lachlan V

ale

Amber W

aine

Daniel Waine

Ebony W

aine

Chenoa W

ellington

Eliza Wellington

F

redrick Wellington

Ivy W

ellington

Jeffrey Wellington

K

ylie Wellington

L

oretta Wellington

Melinda Wellington

Michelle W

ellington

P

aula Wellington

Samantha Wellington

Shannon W

ellington

Debr

a Went

Hannah Went

Donya Whaddy

K

ewana Whaddy

Lance Whaddy

Laur

a Whaddy

L

ynette Whaddy

Jinama Whaddy-Parso

Adrian Williams

Amanda Williams

Christopher Williams

Cor

ey Williams

Daniel Williams

Dion Williams

Douglas Williams Snr

Douglas J Williams Jnr

Ellanor

a Williams

Emma-Jane Williams

F

aith Williams

Fiona Williams

Ger

aldine Williams

Glen Williams

Gr

eg Williams

James Williams

Jeffr

ey Williams

Joshua Williams

K

oby Williams

Melanie Williams

Michael Williams

Mitchum Williams

P

enny Williams

Priscilla Williams

R

ebecca Williams

R

ebecca Williams

Robert Williams Jnr

R

obert Williams Snr

R

odney Williams

Shakeela Williams

Shane Williams

Shannon Williams

Shar

on Williams

Sheena Williams

Sonya Williams

S

tacey Williams

T

ammy Williams

T

ania Williams

Timika Williams

T

rudy Williams

T

yson Williams

Wendy Williams

Zachary Williams

Daniel Williams

-Locke

Killara Williams-Locke

L

ee Willis-Arlder

Bruce Y

uke

Coral Yuke

10 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Land Ownership and Management Establishment of Council under the Land Grant Act permitted granting of inalienable freehold title to 403 hectares of land in the Jervis Bay Territory ( JBT) to the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community. The land has been solely managed by the Council since 1987.

In the early 1990s, Council pursued further grants of land in the JBT, including the then Jervis Bay National Park and Australian National Botanic Gardens ( Jervis Bay Annex) and, in 1995, amendments were made to the Land Grant Act and the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975 and in October 1995 Council was granted title to both parcels of land. The land grant included a marine component within Jervis Bay itself.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 11

Prior to the land grant, Council agreed to lease the Park to the Director of National Parks (Director) by way of a Memorandum of Lease being negotiated and signed. The lease is currently undergoing a review and is of 99 years in duration.

In 1996, a Board of Management ( Joint Park Board) was established for Jervis Bay National Park and the Botanic Gardens with Wreck Bay Community representatives occupying five of the nine positions and in 1997 the name of the Park was changed to Booderee National Park to reflect Aboriginal ownership.

The current Joint Park Board comprises twelve members with Wreck Bay community representatives occupying seven positions. Wreck Bay community representatives are elected from the Wreck Bay Council Board of Directors.

In 2018, two further parcels of land, Blocks 151 and 152 in Jervis Bay, were granted to WBACC, In total, the area of land and water owned by the Council in the JBT is approximately 68 square kilometres; about 90% of the land.

The remaining land in the JBT is managed by the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications; with the Department of Defence managing Defence land.

Australian National Botanic Gardens ( Jervis Bay Annex)

12 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Functions In accordance with the Aboriginal Land Grant ( Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986, Council has various functions within the main categories of land holding and management, provision of community services for its members and business enterprises.

The responsible Minister for the 2019-2020 reporting period was the Minister for Indigenous Australians, the Hon Ken Wyatt MP.

Further to the Act, Council holds title to Aboriginal Land and exercises, for the benefit of the members of the community, the Council’s powers as owner of Aboriginal Land. Council can also make representations to the Minister in relation to land that Council considers should become Aboriginal Land. Following such a process, Blocks 151 and 152 were awarded in 2018-19 but they represented only about 20% of the land the subject of the claim. Council did resubmit the claim for some properties part of the original claim, however NIAA has encouraged Council to submit a new land claim covering all remaining vacant crown land in the JBT, including Jervis Bay Village Road, currently home to many Registered Members of WBACC and it is Council’s intention to make this new claim during the 2020-21 Financial Year.

Community service type functions include housing provision, repair and maintenance, upkeep of the community centre, establishment of a community garden, men’s and women’s groups, daycare, small business, education and sporting assistance, provision of training, arrangement of community events such as NAIDOC and community communication and consultation initiatives.

Further functions include protecting and conserving natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal land, engaging in land use planning relating to Aboriginal land and managing and maintaining Aboriginal land as well as conducting business enterprises for the economic or social benefit of the community.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 13

One of BNP’s lovely walking tracks

14 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Village Wreck Bay Village is situated within the boundaries of the 403 hectares of the 1986 land grant in the JBT. It is located on the South Coast of New South Wales; approximately two and a half hours’ drive south of Sydney and three hours’ drive north east of Canberra.

The JBT is a non-self-governing Commonwealth Territory, administered by the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications.

Wreck Bay Village looking out over Summer Cloud Bay

The Wreck Bay village consists of 48 houses with a population fluctuating between 215 and 250 people. Facilities at Wreck Bay include an administration office, community centre, children’s day-care centre, bus shelter, fire shed, men’s shed and a health clinic. Other facilities include a memorial garden, children’s playground, a community garden, basketball court and two common areas which are mainly used as children’s play areas.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 15

Wreck Bay Community The Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council is the recognized owner of the land on the Bherwerre Peninsula. WBACC is made up of registered members of the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council and their children, the majority of whom live in the Wreck Bay Village, Jervis Bay Village and the towns and villages of the Shoalhaven.

One of the many beautiful places on the Peninsula

16 A nnual Report 2019-2020

WBACC Timeline

Lithograph from the early 1800s

Koori people have always used Bherwerre because of its rich diversity. It has always been a place of great significance to our people because of its unique location and its abundance of foods and medicines. It has provided us with an area where we can continue to pass on our traditional knowledge.

1800s

Early Eur

opeans are given estates on the South Coast of New South Wales which started the dispossession of land from the local Aboriginal people.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 17

Early Land Tenure Map

1830-1840 L ocal Aboriginal people listed in the record for distribution of blankets and rations.

1880s

Aboriginal r

eserves established on the South Coast due to the dispossession of traditional lands.

1912

Naval College established at Jervis Bay

.

1915

Commonwealth acquir

es the Bherwerre Peninsula; which becomes a part of the Australian Capital Territory. Efforts were made at that stage to relocate the Aboriginal Community at Wreck Bay.

18 A nnual Report 2019-2020

WB School in the early 1960s

1924 F irst school built at Wreck Bay.

1925

Aboriginal P

rotection Board of New South Wales accepts the Commonwealth’s offer to administer the Wreck Bay ‘reserve’ under the provisions of the New South Wales Aboriginal Protection Act 1909.

First manager appointed.

1929-1949

F

ish Protection Ordinance 1929-1949 has a provision that excludes Aboriginal residents of the Territory from paying fishing license fees.

Aboriginal initiative to establish a fishing industry in the region.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 19

Bherwerre Dunes

1930s F irst houses built on the reserve

Early photograph of Wreck Bay Village

1940 Aboriginal P rotection Act 1940 reflects shift from protectionism to assimilation policies in New South Wales. Aboriginal people issued with ‘dog tags’. Cultural expression continued to be outlawed to fit in with the assimilation policy of the day.

1952

The boundary of the W

reck Bay Reserve marked out by Bob Brown, Archie Moore and Reg McLeod.

20 A nnual Report 2019-2020

1954 W reck Bay Reserve is gazetted under the provisions of the Aborigines Welfare Ordinance (Australian Capital Territory). Provision of the Aborigines Protection Act of New South Wales no longer applies.

1965

Aborigines W

elfare Ordinance (Australian Capital Territory) is repealed, thus effecting the transfer of the ‘reserve’; from the Aborigines Welfare Board to the Commonwealth Department of Interior. At the same time, the reserve was abolished and declared an ‘open village’.

Assimilation policy of the day brought about attempts to house non-Aboriginals at Wreck Bay, which the Community opposed. Efforts were made to relocate the Community once again. Wreck Bay School was moved to Jervis Bay.

1965-1966

W

reck Bay Progress Association formed to counter the open village status and to secure land tenure; thus securing the community’s future.

Progress Association Meeting

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 21

Wreck Bay Village Shop

1971 P roclamation under the Public Park Ordinance (Australian Capital Territory) of the Jervis Bay Nature Reserve over the majority of the Territory; including the non-residential land of the reserve.

1973-1974

The W

reck Bay Housing Company and the Wreck Bay Women’s Committee formed. Land Rights issues were the main issues for discussion between the Community and the Government.

Community activism

22 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Thomas Brown Snr, Percy (Bing) Mumbler, Kevin Ardler Snr, Howard (Ned) Moore and Phillip McLeod

1979 Blockade of the Summer cloud Bay Road, which prevents the general public access to the Summercloud Bay day visitor area. This action was taken as a result of the land ownership issue.

1985

Announcement by the P

rime Minister of plans to transfer the Fleet Base

and Armaments depot to Jervis Bay. The Wreck Bay people opposed this decision because of the impact to the Cultural and Natural environment of the region. The land rights movement accelerates.

1986

The Aboriginal Land Gr

ant ( Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 enacted.

1987

The W

reck Bay Community secure land tenure of 403 hectares of land via the Aboriginal Land Grant ( Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 and the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council is established.

1991

P

ublic announcement of the Jervis Bay National Park is made.

1992

The Jervis Bay National P

ark is declared replacing the Jervis Bay Nature

Reserve. The Wreck Bay Community is offered two positions on a Board of Management of the newly declared Park. The offer is rejected.

1993

Commonwealth announces that the armaments depot will be built in Victoria

. The Native Title Act 1993 is enacted.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 23

Declaration of Aboriginal Land

1994 The Commonwealth Ministers for Aboriginal & T orres Strait Islander Affairs and the Environment announce intention of a land grant of the Jervis Bay National Park to the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community.

Amendments to the Aboriginal Land Grant ( Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986 and the Australian National Parks & Wildlife Service Act 1975

1995

Amendments passed in both houses of P

arliament and the Wreck Bay

Aboriginal Community Council is granted freehold title to Jervis Bay National Park. Park leased back to the Director of National Parks.

24 A nnual Report 2019-2020

1996 The Jervis Bay National P ark Board of Management is established which has a majority of Wreck Bay Community representatives on the Board. For the first time the Wreck Bay people have a real say on how traditional lands are managed.

1997

The W

reck Bay Aboriginal Community Council lodges a land claim for the remaining areas in the Jervis Bay Territory, which is not Aboriginal Land.

1998

T

o reflect Aboriginal ownership, the Jervis Bay National Park has its name changed to Booderee National Park.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 25

1999 W reck Bay Enterprises Limited is established.

2000

Inter

departmental Committee is established to look at a number of issues in Jervis Bay Territory including the Wreck Bay land claim.

2002

WBA

CC re-negotiates lease of Booderee National Park with Director of National Parks.

WBACC commences financial support for trainees in Booderee National Park.

Management Plan for Booderee National Park finalised.

Uncle Tom Brown and Uncle Phillip McLeod sign with the Director of National Parks

2003 Mar ch: WBACC and Wreck Bay Enterprises Limited register Certified Agreement.

W

reck Bay Health Clinic commences operation in new building. Amendments to legislation (Aboriginal Land Grant Act) for quorum for community meeting. Park Board membership increased from 10 to 12 with the Wreck Bay Community providing 7 of the 12 board members. December: Bushfires cause major damage to Booderee National Park November: Changes to the Aboriginal Land Grant Act passed in Parliament.

26 A nnual Report 2019-2020

2004 Mar ch: Work on new subdivision in Wreck Bay Village commences.

March: WBACC signs contract with Government to become Centrelink Agent and Access point.

2005

W

ork commenced on seven new houses that are funded through the National Aboriginal Health Strategy program.

May: WBACC signs Shared Responsibility Agreement (Housing) with the Queanbeyan ICC

June: Five of the seven families move into the new houses.

2006

January: R

eview commenced on Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council Strategic Plan.

September: Four members of the Board resign.

2007

January: Minister seeks r

eview of the Aboriginal Land Grant ( JBT) Act

1986.

June: Review of the Aboriginal Land Grant ( JBT) Act 1986 completed and report provided to the Office of Indigenous Policy Co-ordination.

December: Change of Government, new Minister is appointed.

2008

F

ebruary: Board approves Rent/Lease document and tenants commence signing leases.

June: Funding is approved by the Government to build a new childcare centre in Wreck Bay Village.

2009

W

ork commenced on the new Gudjahgahmiamia childcare centre.

2010

New Gudjahgahmiamia early education building completed.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 27

(L) Aunty Jean Carter at the Day Care Opening Ceremony

(R) Aunty Wendy Brown and Uncle Tom Brown at the Day Care Centre Opening

2012 W reck Bay Enterprises Limited ceases to operate as a separate legal entity.

2013

September: Change of Government

, new Minister is appointed.

2014

Boar

d commences reviews on Village Town Plan, Strategic Plan, Business/ Operations Plan. Council files Petitions (x2) with Parliament. Second Plan of Management for BNP is approved.

2015

Boar

d commences staff re-structure review; together with future SLAs discussions.

2016

Booder

ee National Park Second Plan of Management operating.

2016

Aboriginal Land Gr

ant ( JBT) By-Laws 2005 repealed. Aboriginal Land Grant ( JBT) By-Laws 2016 commence operating. Aboriginal Land Grant ( JBT) Regulations 2006 repealed. Aboriginal Land Grant ( JBT) Regulations 2016 commence operating. Commencement of ‘Modern’ Award for Council and Contract Services Staff.

2017

Village Community P

lan developed.

28 A nnual Report 2019-2020

2018 Defence PF AS Contamination testing proceeds on Park and Council land.

2018

Council appears in High Court of A

ustralia in legal proceedings related to

rental housing. Result is unfavourable to Council. Council develops Home Ownership Implementation Strategy in response.

Two further parcels of land, Blocks 151 and 152 in Jervis Bay, are granted.

2019

New Minister appointed

2020

Home Ownership Implementation S

trategy approved by Government and

first amount of funding of $3 million released.

Caring for Country Rangers Program approved and funded by Government.

WBACC business entity restructure exercise begins

Discussions begin for Legislative changes to the Land Grant ( Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 29

Page 1

A Cultural Heritage Action Framework for Bherwerre Peninsula Aboriginal Lands (403,151,152)

Preamble

Purpose To set out goals and ac ons for sustainable management of effec ve, needed cultural heritage outcomes for Aboriginal Lands (403, 151 and 152), with a view to eventually adop ng a broader, unified cultural heritage strategy for the Bherwerre Peninsula.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council (WBACC) are responsible for the protec on and conserva on of natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal Land under the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986. WBACC is made up of a close community of Registered Members who are recognised as the Tradi onal Owners of Bherwerre Peninsula Aboriginal Land. At this me “Aboriginal Land” includes the ini al grant of the 403 Ha parcel (DP 7092) as well as Jervis Bay Territory Blocks 151 and 152 (Part DP 9271), and Booderee Na onal Park.

This Cultural Heritage Framework has been developed to provide guidance to WBACC and other stakeholders for management of be er cultural heritage outcomes for the 403, 151 and 152, guided by the Aboriginal La nd Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) By-Laws 2016. The Framework is intended to work in parallel with a cultural heritage strategy for Booderee Na onal Park (BNP) which is being developed in accordance with the Park Management Plan and guided by the Environment Protec on and Biodiversity Conserva on Act 1999.

There are other lands on the Bherwerre Peninsula for which WBACC has no legislated responsibility. However, from a cultural heritage standpoint WBACC consider the Penins ula and surrounding waters as one landscape. One country with an ancient history. A history that does not recognise today’s boundaries. And a history that is increasingly threatened through land use and loss of knowledge. The inten on is that this Framework will represent an important step towards eventual adop on of a unified strategy for cultural heritage management of the en re Bherwerre Peninsula.

WRECK BAY ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY COUNCIL

Dra V4c June 2020

Recognition In developing this Cultural Heritage Framework WBACC acknowledge and pay respect to the Tradi onal Custodians - those who cared for, maintained and conserved Aboriginal culture from the me of crea on. Acknowledgement and respect is also extended to our Elders, past, present and emerging.

From Colonial se lement Aboriginal people have struggled to survive, forced off tradi onal lands, suffered through unspeakable massacres and imported diseases, segregated and clustered into missions and res erves. Despite this hardship the Wreck Bay community, through ongoing struggle, resilience and determina on of its people, has reclaimed tle to much of the Bherwerre Peninsula. Country that the Registered Members (the current Custodians) call home.

This document is in draft and is copyright to WBACC. ©2020

1 | P a g e

Four-year Cultural Heritage Strategy for Booderee National Park.

This strategy sets out a four-year implementation plan and linked budget, designed around five key aspects of cultural heritage management:

1) Consultation with Registered Members to inform implementation of the strategy 2) Education of BNP and WBACC staff, Registered Members and visitors. 3) Identification, recording and management of significant cultural places 4) Identification, recording and management of objects 5) Recording of oral history

Each of the five key aspects is itself a strategy, broken down into parts and budgeted.

There are deliverables for each year of the plan, set out in the stepped budget.

The Plan does not attempt to identify actual places, objects or histories, rather it sets a framework and a series of flowcharts for how to identify, record, map and manage cultural heritage in BNP for the benefit of current and future generations.

The implementation period will see the management of country and building of a database based on this framework.

Draft Cultural Heritage Strategies for the 403, 151, 152 and Booderee National Park developed and ready for consultation.

30 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Board Members

WBACC Board 2019-20

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 31

Chair, Annette Brown has been involved with both the Board and the administration of the Council for many years and has made a commitment to advance the Community in the areas of governance, land management and community services whilst protecting the unique arrangements within our community.

Deputy Chair, Leon Brown grew up on Wreck bay and works to improve opportunities for Wreck Bay youth. He was elected to the Board in December 2018.

32 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Julie Freeman has her own Cultural Interpretation Business, with responsibilities to both the Park and to the Community. Julie’s ability to interpret culturally appropriate stories and information to the public is widely recognised. She brings cultural sensitivity and appropriateness to the Board to consider with all negotiations and opportunities.

Beverley Ardler has a strong commitment to help our children through education and social and emotional development. She holds a degree in Social and Emotional Development and Wellbeing. She has a passion to help teach our children about their culture and feels that it is vital for the children to have a voice in our community.

Jeff McLeod is a board member who was raised and lived on Wreck Bay all his life. He has worked in Nowra for 10 years and now works for WBACC in the Roads Department. He is passionate about anything regarding Wreck Bay issues.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 33

Clive Freeman has dedicated his life to the conservation of the world’s oldest surviving culture. As an Aboriginal scientist he has combined an understanding of the Arts and Culture with a deep conservation ethic to enrich caring for country in both natural and cultural heritage management.

Erica Ardler has lived at Wreck Bay for most of her life. She has three children and five grandsons. Her visions is to help council and community to progress by looking to future generations and what they can offer. She hopes that WBACC will one day be able to run Booderee National Park as sole manager. She also wants to see improved health and wellbeing in the community and for youth and elderly to be able to access services without having to leave the community.

Kaylene McLeod was elected to the Board for the first time in December 2018. She loves working to further the interests of her community. Kaylene works in Booderee National Park.

34 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Tom Brown Snr has lived in Wreck Bay all his life and is from a family of thirteen children. He is married and has four children and four grandchildren. Presently his favourite past times are watching his grandchildren grow and working on his artworks. In the past, Tom has been employed as a Community coordinator and as the WBACC Works Department Manager (1992-2002). He was Chairman of the Board in the early 2000s and has been a Board member since that time

Tom’s interest is for future progression via the establishment of a register of people endemic to country, with a blood line to country.

Members of the Board meet with Minister Wyatt and staff

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 35

Details of the Accountable Authority

Period as the accountable authority or member

Name Qualifications of the

Accountable Authority Experience of the Accountable Authority Position Title/

Position held Executive/Non-Executive

Date of Commencement Date of cessation

Number of meetings of the board of the company

Annette Brown Long involvement with WBACC and Government; Governance Training; Due Diligence Training

Board member since early 2000s; Joint Board member Chair Chair since 2017;

Board member for several terms prior

25

Leon Brown Governance Training; currently studying for university qualification; project Management Training

Experience working on youth and employment programs Deputy Chair

December 2018 17

Beverley Ardler Qualifications in childhood education; Governance Training; Due Diligence Training

Board member since 2017; Joint Board Chair Executive member

2017 25

Thomas Brown Long involvement with WBACC and Government; Governance Training, Due Diligence Training

Board member for many years; Joint Board member for many years

Executive Member

- 25

Jeff McLeod Trade qualifications; Governance Training; Due Diligence Training Board member since 2013; Joint Board member

Executive Member

2013 25

Clive Freeman Business owner; science and anthropology qualifications; Governance Training, Due Diligence Training

Board member since Jan 2015; Joint Board member, elected joint Board Chair 2019

Executive Member

2015 24

Julie Freeman Business owner; long history with WBACC and Government; Governance Training, Due Diligence Training

Board member since 1991; Joint Board member Executive Member

2015 23

Erica Ardler Governance Training. Experience working in the

community

Executive Member

December 2018 18

Kaylene McLeod BNP Training Officer; Governance Training Experience working for BNP Executive Member

December 2018 18

36 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Executive Remuneration Total remuneration bands Short-term benefits Short-term benefits Short-term benefits Post-employment

benefits

Other long-term benefits

Number of senior executives

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

Average other long-term benefits

$0-$220,000 9 $6794 $0 $0 $679 $0 $0

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 3 7

Letter presenting the Annual Report

38 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Chairperson’s Report Dear Members

On behalf of the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council, I am pleased to present to you our annual report for the 2019-2020 financial year, a year characterised by many unexpected events requiring WBACC, like other organisations across the country, to act flexibly and creatively. After the trials of the bushfires and COVID-19, WBACC received some very welcome news at the end of the financial year in relation to our Home Ownership Implementation Strategy, Caring for Country Rangers’ Program and a new Cultural/Visitor’s Centre for Booderee National Park that all bode well for a really positive future for WBACC and its Registered Members.

Thanks to Council staff for their work to support the Executive Committee (the Board) and to implement Board decisions and also to registered members for the confidence they have shown by re-electing me as Chair at the December 2018 annual general meeting. Thanks also to my fellow eight directors for their service to the community and for the support that they have given to me in decision making on some very complex matters over the last twelve months.

Council is regulated by the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act, 2013 (PGPA Act). The Executive Committee under Section 28 of the Aboriginal Land Grant ( Jervis Bay Territory) Act, 1986 (Land Grant Act) is the accountable authority under the PGPA Act.

In this report I have briefly discussed each of the areas of Board responsibility and outlined the Board’s approach for the 2019-20 financial year.

Annette Brown, Chair, WBACC Executive Committee

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 39

Governance Governance responsibilities include:

• gr

ant control and reporting •

financial r

eporting

•

policy development •

community engagement and liaison •

management of the by

-laws

•

Boar

d participation; and •

human r

esources.

Grant control and Financial reporting: Council partners the Commonwealth, the National Indigenous Australian’s Agency (NIAA), in a three-year Funding Agreement ending in the 2021-22 financial year. The ‘Indigenous Advancement Strategy’ (IAS) provides funding for Jobs, Land and Economy.

The program outcomes include:

•

employment for Indigenous A

ustralians

•

work r

eadiness through community and other activities and work experience •

the fostering of Indigenous business •

assistance to Indigenous A

ustralians to generate economic and social benefits

•

effective and sustainable management of land; and •

assistance to Indigenous A

ustralians to progress land and sea claims under

commonwealth native title and land rights legislation.

This program continues to give Council opportunities for its registered members. WBACC spends the grant monies on the programs discussed throughout this report.

Grant funding also comes from the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications for land council and local government activities and from the Department of Education for WBACC’s day care centre, Gudjahgahmiamia (which means ‘children’s shelter’).

Council met its reporting and acquittal requirements for all grant funding. Meeting the acquittal requirements means demonstrating that the activities funded have been conducted. Council reports twice each year to the funding departments to demonstrate proper expenditure of money on required activities. The summer bushfires and COVID-19 did have an effect on the ability of WBACC to deliver some of its community based programs, however, with the assistance and understanding of NIAA, delivery was staggered over the funding cycle to ensure that a hiatus of several months did not prevent the programs being delivered across the year.

Policy Development: Community policy development and implementation remain priority projects for the Board. This year the Board updated and upgraded many of its community policies, including those for Bond Assistance, Funeral and Wake Assistance and Tertiary Education Assistance . WBACC also updated its social media policy and

40 A nnual Report 2019-2020

did a large amount of work to progress its work health and safety (WHS) policies and procedures.

Importantly, the Board and Council staff progressed the Home Ownership Implementation Strategy this year, designed to attract funding to improve housing in Wreck Bay Village on a large scale and to effect the Board’s decision to facilitate home ownership for its current housing tenants. In June 2020, Government approved the first amount of funding of the strategy ($3 million) and a tender has been released to secure a project planner to develop and cost the steps towards home ownership. Work to assess all existing housing, survey lots, register title and to develop 99 year leases, similar to the Crown Leases in the ACT will begin in earnest at the beginning of the 2020-21 Financial Year.

Community Engagement: The 2019-20 financial year saw the continuation of extra methods for community consultation and communication. Council modified its monthly newsletter, introduced a staff newsletter, continued and built on its closed Facebook group (adding a staff page, a day care page and a youth page) and new community programs aimed at youth, including a school holiday program and homework club, were introduced.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 41

Various service organisations were invited to present regular information sessions to community. These included information and assistance to develop wills, provided by Shoalcoast Legal and information from Indigenous Business Australia on investment opportunities available to WBACC, Scientific information was presented by Council engaged scientists in relation to PFAS, as was legal information in relation to potential legal action over PFAS contamination. Town planning sessions were also conducted by representatives from Indigenous Community Volunteers (now re-branded Community First Development) and 2020-21 will see the further development of the new Town Plan. Council’s Community Liaison Office (CLO), along with its HR and training arms, conducted regular whole of community mailouts to provide information on job opportunities offered by Council and Parks Australia and organised, with Parks Australia, a careers expo at the local Vincentia High School. Unfortunately the event was unable to go ahead due to the impact of COVID-19 but the planning work will be vital for a time when restrictions ease. Our yearly NAIDOC event held in July 2019, was a great success.

Our men’s and women’s groups had the benefit of gym programs this year, our elder’s enjoyed a Christmas lunch and most recently, our community veggie garden became a reality, with a water tank installed and fencing and garden beds and soil delivered and installation underway.

Management of the By-Laws: WBACC undertook two very important pieces of work this year, developing draft Cultural Heritage Strategies for the 403, 151 and 152 and the Booderee National Park. The draft strategies are currently being consulted with Registered Members. The 403 strategy made very clear the need to monitor activities on the 403 and the importance of the by-laws under the Land Grant Act. WBACC’s current by-laws have limited enforcement options and require amendment. WBACC is currently negotiating with NIAA for legislative reform associated with necessary changes to the way WBACC manages its housing and it is expected that there will also be associated changes to the by-laws and other parts of the legislation. As the financial year ended, NIAA provided its suggestions for legislative change, including changes to allow enforcement of the by-laws and I am relieved to say that there is a program in place to achieve legislative reform, including the community consultation required, with a process and timeline established. Legislative Reform takes time—all going to plan, we should achieve it by the end of 2021. The successful grant application for WBACC’s Caring for Country Rangers, along with the draft Cultural Heritage Strategy, assists the case, as one of their many functions to be achieved under the funding arrangement is the enforcement of the by-laws on the 403.

42 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Elders enjoying the Christmas party

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 43

Board participation: In 2019-20 the Board maintained its rhythm of one meeting per month. The Board has made some difficult decisions this year, all within required time frames for the progression of WBACC business. The audit committee of Council also held meetings providing financial and other relevant information at Board meetings. 2019-20 also saw the establishment of economic development, community services, cultural heritage and governance sub-committees of the Board, made up of Board, community and staff representatives. The Committees brought several recommendations to Council, including revamping of the WBACC website (which is now ready for 2020-21); a presentation from Indigenous Business Australia on investment options (which occurred late in 2019); the development of a Cultural Heritage Strategy for the 403, culminating in a draft strategy ready for consultation at the end of the financial year); the development of a community well-being policy (a draft is currently with the governance and community services sub-committees for consultation) and the development of more youth programs—leading to discussions for the establishment of a youth council which will be further explored this financial year. In June 2020, the Board decided to extend the sub-committees for another year, and I expect to report more successes in next year’s annual report.

The Board continued its ongoing governance training program. This year the Board received training focusing on financial governance and implemented some further measures to ensure proper reporting of real or perceived conflicts of interest. This coming year will include governance training focusing on the Board’s WH&S responsibilities.

Human resources: WBACC has provided several training courses for community and staff this year, with the intent of improving skills for job readiness and job progression. These included courses in leadership, governance, project management, first aid, GIS training, cleaning operations, plant operator license training and WHS. Council also sponsored several staff in their higher education pursuits, as well as six community young people in their tertiary pursuits. Three year 11 students from Community, were signed up for school based apprenticeships and traineeship (SBAT) in Early Learning (Child Care), AFL mentoring and Civil Construction; thanks to the hard work of Council HR staff, collaborating with the Australian Training Company and Vincentia High School.

Current staff of WBACC continued with team building exercises. In the last quarter of the year, WBACC worked with a volunteer from CFD to begin a restructure of the organisation. The restructure is aimed at filling gaps in the current organisational structure and providing more flexibility for staff to enable skills to be built up in different areas. The exercise was somewhat hampered by COVID and delivery dates have been pushed back to the end of the 2021 financial year.

44 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Community Service The Board’s community service responsibility includes:

•

housing •

education (including early childhood education

)

•

health •

r

ecreational activities.

Housing: The 2019-20 year saw the continued preparation of the Home Ownership Implementation Strategy. As the year concludes, with NIAA funding, a tender has been released to engage a consultant to schedule and cost the whole activity. This report and submission for further funding will go to the minister in the second quarter of 2020-21.

Education: Gudjahgahmiamia Early Learning Centre is a purpose built centre which was built to provide Aboriginal families in the Wreck Bay Community and surrounding areas early Childhood care and education. The centre is funded with a Community Child Care Fund (CCF) grant from the Department of Education, parent fees and contributions from WBACC.

Gudjahgahmiamia is licenced by the Early Childhood Policy and Regulation Unit in Canberra to care for thirty children each day. They make regular visits and the centre is required to provide written evidence that the centre is consistently meeting the ACT Children’s Services Standards.

Enrolments for 2019-20 have been steady with the largest demand for care in the nursery room.

The Centre is currently providing care for children from twenty five families, the majority of whom have a family connection to the Wreck Bay community.

WBACC is investigating methods to expand its enrolments and is actively working on a marketing campaign with help from the Commonwealth government.

WBACC’s day care bus, bought with CCF funding in August 2018, continues to be a valuable service. Staff are able to transport three children under four years of age and seven children over four to and from the centre three days a week. Under the new CCS funding we are not able to claim subsidy for the time the children are on the bus so a nominal fee of $7 is charged. In 2019-2020, whilst the bus was well used, no children were using the bus as their sole method of transport. When the bus run stopped in March 2020 due to COVID-19 ,all children were still able to attend their usual days, with alternative transport organised by parents and carers.

Gudjahgahmiamia was closed from 24th March-25th May 2020 due to COVID-19. Whilst there were no cases, the centre is situated in Wreck Bay, a vulnerable Aboriginal community, and the decision was taken to close the centre as part of a closure of the village to all but residents.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 45

Staff continued to stay in touch with families through emails and text messages, sending home activities ideas, useful Facebook pages and websites and updates on the when the centre would re-open.

Before the centre re-opened all staff and families were given information about additional practices that would be implemented to support the good health of children, staff and families. These included taking the children’s temperature before they entered the playroom, asking all families to wait in the foyers, additional cleaning throughout the day and limiting the number of staff working in small rooms.

It has been an ongoing challenge to recruit trained casual staff. To overcome this difficulty, WBACC has offered a number of short term contracts which better support the staffing needs of the centre while offering more stability for employees. Gudjahgahmiamia in partnership with Vincentia High School has created a SBAT position. The student is due to complete their Cert III in Children’s Studies at the end of 2020.

In August, 2019, the centre submitted its quality improvement plan to NSW/ACT Department of Education and Training. While this is a requirement of our funding agreement it also provides the staff an opportunity to reflect on best practice.

The Dental team visited the centre to check the children’s teeth in November 2019 but weren’t able to visit in May 2020 due to COVID-19. Having the dental team visit regularly has been a wonderful opportunity for the children to have a positive experience and we hope they can resume their visits in the near future to support the children’s good dental health in later life.

Noah’s Ark Early Intervention Service and its staff continue to develop respectful and supportive relationships with the children, families and staff of Gudjahgahmiamia and the Wreck Bay community. Having Noah’s Ark early childhood teachers come to the centre weekly to support the children and staff is a very valuable service. The teachers have been able to work with children and staff over time to develop skills and helpful strategies.

Gudjahgahmiamia was invited by Noah’s Ark to participate in the SWAY program (Sounds Words Aboriginal language and Yarning).This involved a Gudjahgahmiamia staff member being trained and then implementing the program weekly. The Speech Therapist also works with the 3-5 year old once a week. SWAY is an oral language and literacy program based on Aboriginal knowledge, culture and stories. It was developed by Educators, Aboriginal Education Officers and Speech Pathologists at the Royal Far West School in Manly, NSW.

The good relationship between WBACC and Jervis Bay Primary School continues. The school works with WBACC on the Junior Rangers Program and the Big Cuz, Little Cuz program to ensure children have as smooth as possible transition through the levels of development and education.

46 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Likewise, WBACC is working closely with Vincentia High School to identify school based apprenticeship opportunities as well as arrange for information sessions for students on educational and employment opportunities.

Dates to Remember

Father’s Day Breakfast 8.30am Tuesday 27th August please RSVP

October - re enrolment forms to go home. Due back 31st October

Thursday 17th October WBACC Team Building day - Gudjahgahmiamia closed, no fees charged for the day

November - spots for 2020 will be confirmed.

Please note that families will not be given a 2020 spot until their fees are up to date, that is owing less than $100.

November - dental check-up for all enrolled children

Children’s Christmas party

Friday 6th December at Matty’s Playtime 5.30pm to 7.30pm

WBACC will pay the entry fee for each child enrolled at Gudjahgahmiamia and a small present. Party food will be supplied for all children and families

Graduation for children going to School in 2020

1pm Tuesday 17th December

1.30pm Afternoon tea

Friday 20th December - last day for the year.

Centre will re -open Tuesday 21st January 2020

(L) Day Care flyer (R) Medical clinic flyer

Health: South Coast Illawarra Health Service, the Aboriginal Medical Service (AMS) and Waminda Women’s Health Service all provide health services to the community. Council is currently working with the services to increase the breadth of service delivery within Wreck Bay, to alleviate the stresses of travel, particularly for elders. 2019-20 saw the introduction of podiatry services delivered in Wreck Bay and discussions continue to occur in an attempt to establish a renal nurse and renal chairs in the community.

Healthy Recreational Activities: WBACC implemented several of the recommendations of the corporate and community plans this year. The community veggie garden has been built and a gym program has been established for men’s and women’s groups. Council organised its regular trip to the Huskisson Carnival for community children

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 47

Community garden underway

Men’s group flyer

48 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Families enjoyed the Husky Carnival tickets provided by WBACC

After lots of lobbying the NBN was installed in Wreck Bay and Jervis Bay.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 49

A homework centre and holiday program were implemented

WBACC homework club and JB Primary school kids celebrate the new NBN node featuring their artwork

(L) Holiday program (R) Lunch after a busy day out

A community well being policy was developed and will be implemented throughout 2020-21. This policy assists community members to attend the local gym and to become involved in other activities that promote health and well-being.

50 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Land Management The Board’s responsibilities in land management include:

• cultur

al heritage management •

land use planning •

weed

/feral animal control •

contr

acts for maintenance of the Booderee National Park.

Cultural heritage: As well as the Cultural heritage strategy for the 403, 2019-20 saw the first year of the Cultural Heritage contract with the Director of National Parks, requiring the establishment of a cultural heritage function. Under the agreement, WBACC developed a Cultural Heritage Strategy for Booderee National Park. It was due to be approved by the Joint Board of Management in March however COVID restrictions resulted in reduced agendas with the strategy now due for review in July. The WBACC Board has endorsed the strategy which bodes well for Joint Board approval. When this is achieved a four year contract to implement the strategy will be negotiated with Parks.

This document is in draft and is copyright to WBACC. ©2020

1 | P a g e

Four-year Cultural Heritage Strategy for Booderee National Park.

This strategy sets out a four-year implementation plan and linked budget, designed around five key aspects of cultural heritage management:

1) Consultation with Registered Members to inform implementation of the strategy 2) Education of BNP and WBACC staff, Registered Members and visitors. 3) Identification, recording and management of significant cultural places 4) Identification, recording and management of objects 5) Recording of oral history

Each of the five key aspects is itself a strategy, broken down into parts and budgeted.

There are deliverables for each year of the plan, set out in the stepped budget.

The Plan does not attempt to identify actual places, objects or histories, rather it sets a framework and a series of flowcharts for how to identify, record, map and manage cultural heritage in BNP for the benefit of current and future generations.

The implementation period will see the management of country and building of a database based on this framework.

Page 1

A Cultural Heritage Action Framework for Bherwerre Peninsula Aboriginal Lands (403,151,152)

Preamble

Purpose To set out goals and ac ons for sustainable management of effec ve, needed cultural heritage outcomes for Aboriginal Lands (403, 151 and 152), with a view to eventually adop ng a broader, unified cultural heritage strategy for the Bherwerre Peninsula.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council (WBACC) are responsible for the protec on and conserva on of natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal Land under the Aboriginal Land Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) Act 1986. WBACC is made up of a close community of Registered Members who are recognised as the Tradi onal Owners of Bherwerre Peninsula Aboriginal Land. At this me “Aboriginal Land” includes the ini al grant of the 403 Ha parcel (DP 7092) as well as Jervis Bay Territory Blocks 151 and 152 (Part DP 9271), and Booderee Na onal Park.

This Cultural Heritage Framework has been developed to provide guidance to WBACC and other stakeholders for management of be er cultural heritage outcomes for the 403, 151 and 152, guided by the Aboriginal La nd Grant (Jervis Bay Territory) By-Laws 2016. The Framework is intended to work in parallel with a cultural heritage strategy for Booderee Na onal Park (BNP) which is being developed in accordance with the Park Management Plan and guided by the Environment Protec on and Biodiversity Conserva on Act 1999.

There are other lands on the Bherwerre Peninsula for which WBACC has no legislated responsibility. However, from a cultural heritage standpoint WBACC consider the Penins ula and surrounding waters as one landscape. One country with an ancient history. A history that does not recognise today’s boundaries. And a history that is increasingly threatened through land use and loss of knowledge. The inten on is that this Framework will represent an important step towards eventual adop on of a unified strategy for cultural heritage management of the en re Bherwerre Peninsula.

WRECK BAY ABORIGINAL COMMUNITY COUNCIL

Dra V4c June 2020

Recognition In developing this Cultural Heritage Framework WBACC acknowledge and pay respect to the Tradi onal Custodians - those who cared for, maintained and conserved Aboriginal culture from the me of crea on. Acknowledgement and respect is also extended to our Elders, past, present and emerging.

From Colonial se lement Aboriginal people have struggled to survive, forced off tradi onal lands, suffered through unspeakable massacres and imported diseases, segregated and clustered into missions and res erves. Despite this hardship the Wreck Bay community, through ongoing struggle, resilience and determina on of its people, has reclaimed tle to much of the Bherwerre Peninsula. Country that the Registered Members (the current Custodians) call home.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 5 1

Land Use Planning WBACC worked with Community First Development this year to develop a Town Plan. The plan is complicated by the jurisdictional issues within the JBT and the team is still working on the application of the ACT planning laws to Wreck Bay. Unfortunately COVID put a stop to community consultation for development of the plan and it is likely that the work will continue throughout 2020-21. Work on the plan will focus on the identification of various zones. This work will assist WBACC in its Land Grant claim.

The Department of Defence released two draft final reports this year regarding the PFAS contamination in the Jervis Bay Territory. Council’s Independent experts from the University of Newcastle had reviewed the Defence reports and provided scientific information back to Council which had allowed us to respond to Defence in an informed way. WBACC’s responses led to improvements in the final management and monitoring plans. WBACC continues to investigate its options in relation to compensation for PFAS contamination.

The South Coast People’s Native Title Claim continued this year. Council has become a party to the claim and has instructed lawyers accordingly to look after Council’s interests.

Weed/feral animal control: WBACC used funding provided by NIAA to continue its weed control program, with significant improvement in the control of bitou bush and Sea Spurge. It is unlikely that these weeds of national importance will be completely eradicated but the team has established a pattern of control which should prevent the weeds from spreading further. Work has been undertaken to assess all trees in the village for safety and there was a program of tree lopping and removal during 2019-20. Feral animals such as foxes in the BNP are largely controlled by park rangers. The Caring for Country Rangers Program will train Wreck Bay Rangers to assist in feral animal control in BNP and on Wreck Bay lands.

Contract Services: Roads and trails, cleaning services, infrastructure, ground maintenance and entry station services continue to be provided by Council to the Director of National Parks under Service Level Agreements with Parks Australia. Contracts are also held with the territory administration (DITRDC) for grounds maintenance, roads and infrastructure services. All contracts were reviewed this year and re-signed. Unfortunately COVID pushed out the Commonwealth budget process so that Parks Australia and DITRDC required short term extension of contracts until October 2020 and it is expected that at that time, the services under the Parks contracts will be finalised and budgeted properly to allow for four year agreements to be entered (under a five year Head Agreement already in place).

52 A nnual Report 2019-2020

The way ahead The Board looks forward to an exciting and eventful 2020-21, with the introduction of the home ownership implementation strategy and associated funding, the Caring for Country Rangers program and plans and money for a new Cultural Centre in BNP. The Board sub-committees offer a further great opportunity for community participation in the future development of WBACC. Architectural design work on the re-development of our community centre and hall will continue (after a COVID hiatus), as will finalisation of the Town Plan and work on another Land Claim for further parcels of land in the Jervis Bay Territory.

A view of Booderee National Park after rain

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 5 3

Chief Executive Officer’s Report 2019-20 has indeed been a busy and challenging year. The Jervis Bay Territory was lucky enough to escape the devastating December and January bushfires so close to our borders however it was a very stressful time for all residents, with fires only a few kilometers away and at one point threatening to jump from Sussex Inlet into the Booderee National Park. The National Park and Wreck Bay Fire Brigades excelled themselves at home and away. WBACC learned lessons about the need for a Wreck Bay Village Emergency Management and Evacuation Plan (the plan at the time was wrapped up in a outdated JBT Plan) and the need for targeted communication to village residents. Since the fires, WBACC has engaged consultants to develop a WBACC Emergency Management Plan and is currently consulting on the plan and organising an exercise later in the 2020 calendar year.

The closure of the National Park due to the bushfires had a significant impact on the Park’s, and therefore WBACC’s income. Workers who were not able to work due to the Park’s closure were redirected to activities within the village, many related to fire preparation. WBACC also took on traffic management work for the Park to maintain employment levels and ensure visitors did not enter the park in such dangerous times.

After a short period of recovery and increased tourist numbers back into the Park, March saw the closure of the Park again by order of the Director of National Parks, following the COVID-19 outbreak.

WBACC CEO, Anne-Marie Farrugia

54 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Fire Brigade during the January 2020 bushfires

WBACC had enacted its COVID-19 Business Continuity Plan in mid march, which required staff who were able to work from home to work from home. This was a challenge for WBACC and its staff, practically and culturally. Our computer hardware at that point was outdated with one laptop only. Luckily we were able to secure laptops and have them configured in a short period of time so that the majority of administrative staff could perform their duties at home. The concept of working from home was alien to many staff and this did cause some teething problems, with some staff returning to the physical workplace with careful attention to social distancing. Most community services continued. Limited Centrelink services, delivery of mail, development of community newsletters, scholarship application processes, elders payments etc still happened, although at times it was a challenge to communicate this to community members. Some online training sessions and community mailouts helped, however overall working from home was a challenge for all of WBACC, despite higher levels of productivity for Senior Management and administrative staff working from home and involved in the production of documentation.

Our daycare staff used the closure of the centre to do some important online training. Day Care staff became our go to staff for organising food and essential item deliveries to community members to alleviate the need for the vulnerable community to visit the shops. So many charities provided goods for distribution to Wreck Bay and Jervis Bay however the Park closure meant that thy could not deliver, so this became a task for WBACC staff.

Staff assembling grocery deliveries during the COVID shutdown

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 55

Of course, many of WBACC’s staff were unable to work from home because of the nature of their work, which is maintaining the National Park. WBACC worked with Park’s management to ensure ongoing employment for staff and income for WBACC. We came up with projects to replace work lost (mainly cleaning work not required when tourists were not coming) and projects which were easier completed when the Park was shut but would improve the Park to attract tourists into the future.

Entry station before and after

It was great seeing WBACC and BNP staff working together on projects that included re-painting, cleaning and repairs for entry station booths; re-landscaping of gardens beds; installation of six new flag poles and banners at the entry station; new line markings, road signage and speed humps.

(L) The WBACC Grounds team and BNP staff working to beautify the entry precinct during the COVID shutdown (R) WBACC cleaning staff during the painting of the entry station booths

Work was also done to deal with damage to the Botanic Gardens rainforest which was caused by wind and mass bat relocations due to bushfires; new concreted mulch bins for the botanic gardens; extensive refurbishment of Bristol Point campground; paths, walking tracks, boardwalks and bridges repaired across the park.

56 A nnual Report 2019-2020

(L) WBACC cleaning staff worked with BNP staff on jobs to improve the Park whilst it was shut. (R) WBACC and BNP staff during Reconciliation Week

These good examples of Parks and WBACC staff working together were an excellent pre-empting of the announcements made at the end of the financial year in relation to the Caring for Country Rangers Program and the funding of a new Visitors/Cultural Centre. These projects require collaboration and cohesion amongst the two workforces. Our organisations are intending to hold workshops early in the new financial year to jointly plan for these programs.

WBACC continues to offer employment opportunities to registered members, with a new Cultural Heritage Officer , Grants Officer and HR/Daycare Trainee appointed and nine new positions (one supervisor and eight trainee rangers in the Caring for Country Rangers program) announced this year. School based apprenticeships continued for the second year of a two year program, with our civil construction and daycare school based apprentices to graduate later this calendar year. New SBAT opportunities are currently being arranged for the new financial year.

We were sorry to say goodbye to our long terms Community Engagement Officer, Aunty Wendy Brown, who retired this year after over 20 years of service to the Community.

(L) Annette and Wendy Brown at Wendy’s farewell (R) Rachelle McLeod and Wendy Brown

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 57

Community services provided to Wreck Bay Council registered members have continued to expand, with the establishment of a homework centre and school holiday program and the continued development of the community veggie garden. The financial year kicked off with another fantastic NAIDOC week and Christmas saw a Christmas lunch for elders.

NAIDOC week at Wreck Bay, July 2019

NAIDOC carnival before the action, July 2019

58 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Unfortunately the planned Christmas party for community kids had to be cancelled due to the bush fires. However the Wreck Bay Fire Brigade made a special effort on Christmas day, and Santa still made it to Wreck Bay despite the fires.

I approved two small business grants for a clothing design and manufacture business and a tree management business and six applications for higher education assistance during the 2019-20 year, with courses ranging from bachelor of arts to bachelor of psychology, and a postgraduate degree. Tertiary education of the community’s young people is an important component in the progress towards community and business development and the Board and I am hopeful that these students of today will be the leaders of tomorrow, that qualifications and skills will be brought back for the benefit of the community and that registered members who the Council helped to educate will be sitting in positions of influence in government and the private sector beyond the JBT.

Funding Grants and other income Council received quarterly instalments of the annual lease payment from the Director of National Parks and a 25% share of entry and camping fees from Booderee National Park (although camping was severely impacted by bush fires and COVID). The funding is used for provision of community services and other outcomes beneficial to registered members. The leasing arrangements between Council and the Director of National Parks will be re-negotiated in September 2020.

WBACC continues its strong relationship with NIAA and the Department of Education. The grant funds provided form the basis for many of the important programs WBACC runs and undoubtedly contribute to the wellbeing of WBACC registered members.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 59

Discussions within the Council organisation this year have gravitated towards the development of new revenue streams to supplement, and ultimately supersede grant monies. Whilst it is recognised that this is a long term proposition, small steps have been taken towards examining potential business opportunities. This year WBACC successfully quoted for horticulture work for the Department of Defence and capital works for Parks Australia. WBACC also took on a contract for management of the ACT Sports Grants Program.

Council was lucky enough this year to receive special grants to assist with some office improvements (a new kitchen, flooring and air conditioning) and a community cleanup. These small grants made a huge difference to the wellbeing of staff and community.

WBACC’s new kitchen partly funded by a Building Better Communities Program

Whilst the Economic Development sub-committee, like all sub-committees, was unable to meet for several months due to COVID, work continued on the development of a proposal to establish some tourist ventures in the national park. These will be presented to the Board later in the calendar year.

Contracts The Contract Services division of Council currently contributes approximately 40% of total revenue. Contracts are held with Parks Australia, the Department of infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Cities and Centrelink and NIAA.

I reported in last year’s annual report that in April 2019, WBACC signed a five year head agreement with Parks Australia. The head agreement attaches five service level agreements (for entry station, grounds maintenance, infrastructure, cleaning and roads

60 A nnual Report 2019-2020

and trail upkeep) which have an initial one year term. At the end of that term, longer term four year SLAs were planned to be signed. Unfortunately, COVID prevented the finalisation of the four year agreements, related to the delivery of the federal budget being moved to October. The SLAs were instead extended on the same terms (with the application of CPI) and will be renegotiated and executed in October. Importantly, the 2019-20 agreement included a WHS Capacity Building Payment. WBACC used that money to deal with asbestos issues in some of our leased buildings, conduct a chemical cleanup of our sheds, cover an old mechanics pit and make improvements against other Corrective Actions identified in a COMCARE audit.

Contracts with DITRDC, for road infrastructure, line marking, grounds maintenance and building maintenance and repair work on DITRDC owned houses in Jervis Bay Village have run quite smoothly. An extension to the main agreement was signed in June 2020. The agreement was intended to be fully re-negotiated, with the addition of some new grounds maintenance work currently let to Shoalhaven City Council by this time, however the delay of the federal budget also affected this contract. The new agreement will be presented for execution in October.

Compliance As a commonwealth corporate entity, WBACC is required to adhere to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (‘PGPA’ Act). The Executive Committee is defined as the ‘accountable authority’ and is responsible for the preparation and content of the annual report.

WBACC is bound by the Commonwealth Fraud Control Guidelines. During this reporting period, I have no knowledge of evidence relating to fraud within the organisation. In addition, I am of the honest and reasonable belief that appropriate and necessary measures operate to ensure fraud is minimised.

I undertake to adhere to the strict legal obligation placed upon me in the event of fraud. Suspected fraud matters will be reported to the appropriate authorities for possible prosecution.

The Future The immediate future will be dominated by WBACC’s home ownership implementation strategy. This is a five year plan of extensive work on village infrastructure and housing, in tandem with survey work to define lots and register title, legal work to develop leases and community skills development in the benefits and responsibilities of home ownership.

Effective Communication with Registered Members continues to be a challenge for WBACC. Various methods of communication are employed, including hard copy, on-line, emails and face to face—both group and individual meetings, however WBACC recognises that there is still a way to go. In this coming year, Council intends to hold more community meetings on various issues to improve two way communication with the community.

Longer term, sole management of Booderee National Park is the ultimate aim of the Wreck Bay community and this organisation. It is a long term goal, and formulating the

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 6 1

strategy to reach it poses many complexities. In the coming year, the WBACC Board will build on work done this year to strengthen relationships will be working with Parks Australia and a consultant in order to design a road map to sole management. This will form the basis for our corporate planning in the coming years.

Governor’s Head

On the business front, WBACC will be introducing the Sharepoint data management system as soon as the NBN is switched on (hopefully mid September 2020) as well as an automated time management system.

View over Summer Cloud Beach from Wreck Bay

I look forward to the challenges and opportunities ahead. I am thankful to the Board, staff and registered members for continuing to support me in the role of CEO and for the privilege of working in this beautiful place.

62 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Organisation Chart

WBACC Board

CEO

Deputy CEO

Contract Services Manager/Entry Station Team Leader

Team Leader Administration/ Accounts

Admin O*cer Accounts

Daycare Director Diploma x3 Cert III x 5 SBAT

Community Engagemen

Admin/Community Engagement

Senior Weeds O*cer

Weeds Crew x2

Infrastructure Team Leader Infrastructure Crew x2

Cleaning Team Leader Cleaning Crew x2

Road and Trails Team Leader Road and Trails Crew x2

Grounds Team Leader Grounds Crew x1

Entry Station

Crew x2

Cultural Heritage O*cer

Admin O*cer- Sports Grant Scheme

HR Manager Cleaning O*cer

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 63

WBACC Operations Report Governance Arrangements During this financial year there have been no changes to Council’s enabling legislation or any other legislation directly relevant to its operation.

There were no adverse reports about Council by the Auditor-General, Commonwealth Ombudsman, a Parliamentary Committee or the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

No indemnities were given to Council’s officers against a liability, legal or otherwise, including premiums paid or agreed to be paid for insurance against an officer’s liability for legal costs.

There was one Annual General Meeting (AGM) of Council this financial year, a non-election year.

As required by the PGPA Act; the Council has an Audit Committee consisting of:

•

T

ony Federici: Senior Accountant (retired), Booth & Co, Nowra; •

Neville Hampton: Community R

epresentative;

•

T

om Brown Snr: Executive Board Member (Chair); •

Clive F

reeman; Executive Board Member •

Rhonda Br

own: Community Representative.

Audit Committee (PGPA Rule Section 17BE)

Member name Qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience (include formal and informal as relevant)

Number of meetings attended/total number of meetings

Total annual remuneration

Tony Federici Qualified Accountant and Auditor, has worked assisting WBACC for over 20 years 4 $0

Tom Brown Retired WBACC Works Department Manager and Community Coordinator 4 $2228

Neville Hampton Jnr Qualified Accountant, formerly CFO of WBACC 4 $2228

Rhonda Brown Retired public servant (training officer) 4 $2228

Clive Freeman Ex Commonwealth and State public servant, Bachelor of Science, 4 $2228

64 A nnual Report 2019-2020

The Audit Committee met regularly; according to its Charter which can be found at https://www.wbacc.gov.au/corporate-documents/ The Audit Committee’s role involves reporting to the Board against government funding and other sources and ensuring that Council’s investments are targeted and appropriate.

The Audit Committee, along with the full WBACC Board, undertook financial governance training this year, and also spent some time on a review of current WBACC Administrative Policies. The Audit Committee also made recommendations to improve transparency relating to potential conflicts of interest within the Board.

The Work Health and Safety Committee held its regular meetings, with a hiatus during COVID. This year, the Committee focused on the development of electronic incident and injury reporting forms, which are now in place. The committee also further developed the WHS quarterly reporting template for presentation to the Board.

Further to section 17BE(h) of the PGPA, WBACC did not have any non-compliances recorded.

There were no directions issued by the responsible Minister, or other Minister, under the enabling legislation of the Council or other legislation during the reporting period. There were no general policy orders that applied to WBACC during the reporting period under s. 22 of the PGPA Act.

The Privacy Commissioner did not issue a report on Council pursuant to Section 30 of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth), with no personal privacy complaints being made against Council during the reporting period.

Council complied with the requirements further to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act, 2013 (PGPA Act) in preparing its Annual Report.

This Annual Report was approved by the Directors at a meeting of the Board Directors on 26th October 2020; and referred to in a letter signed by the Chairperson of the Board of Directors and dated 26th October 2020; to the Minister for Indigenous Australians, Senator the Hon Ken Wyatt.

Team meeting at the Botanic Gardens

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 65

Environmental Impact Management Under Section 516A of the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (‘EPBC Act’) Australian Government organisations are required to detail their environmental performance and contributions to Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD).

WBACC has an Environmental Management Policy which sets out WBACC’s approach to: •

ener

gy and water conservation and waste water disposal •

minimisation and elimination of harmful substances •

the corr

ect and safe disposal of all substances •

the minimisation of waste gener

ation through reduction, reuse and recycling

•

the Minimisation of pollution—noise, visual, electr

omagnetic radiation, odour

•

addr

essing environmental concerns in all planning and landscaping decisions •

encour

agement of procedures that adhere to the principles of the Environmental Management Policy •

r

egular audits of its Environmental Management System.

In the 2019-20 year Council continued its on-line communication methods, reducing the number of hard copy mailouts to members, and made efforts to reduce paper use in the WBACC offices.

All chemicals used on site and within the BNP as part of our cleaning operations are properly stored and were disposed of properly. They were also reviewed for their environmental impact, with some replacements made.

An Asbestos Management Plan is implemented, and all asbestos (which occurs in the buildings owned by DITRDC, leased to Parks and sub-leased to WBACC) is contained.

Noise pollution on the Depot site has had its impact reduced by conducting noisy operations in a different location within the Depot, away from offices and houses.

Bioluminescence at Scottish Rocks, within the Booderee National Park

66 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Work Health and Safety Management In accordance with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011, WBACC is required to report on the Workplace Health and Safety management arrangements of Council.

WBACC has a WH&S Management System and WH&S policies. WBACC continues to monitor its WH&S performance against the results of the COMCARE audit undertaken in the 2019-19 year and in June 2020 finalised the Corrective actions out of that report.

The COMCARE audit had been conducted as part of an Agreement with Parks Australia, which paid WBACC a WHS Capacity Building Payment to assist with our WH&S compliance. WBACC received the last of those payments in June 2020, which covered the costs incurred by WBACC to meet all corrective actions.

WBACC has a Health and Safety Committee responsible for development and implementation of strategies to protect employees against risks to their health and safety. The Committee meets regularly to perform this function. Membership of that committee has been stable this year.

In 2019-20 there were no accidents or dangerous incidents that required notification to COMCARE, however WBACC did notify COMCARE of two incidents that were likely to result in COMCARE claims.

Council staff are up to date with all required training relating to WH&S, the operation of plant etc, manual handling, sun protection, what to do in the case of snakes etc. All council staff and some registered members undertook their yearly first aid training, including in the use of defibrillators.

Day Care staff at First Aid Training

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 67

Operational Units WBACC operates:

• a contr

act services team which provides services to Parks Australia and DITRDC •

a day car

e centre which is licensed for 30 children •

an administr

ation section which is responsible for community services, human resources, financial management, cultural heritage and procurement and contracting functions.

Overall, WBACC had a good year as evidenced in the Financial Reports. WBACC attracted a large amount of government funding in the final week of the year for housing and Rangers programs. Whilst extremely welcome, the injection of funds meant that the percentage of own source income sourced from the rendering of services under contract, dropped from over 50% to approximately 40%.

Total comprehensive income also increased on the previous year, as did cash on hand despite Council using reserve monies to repair and maintain housing.

Contract Services Team Report for 2019-20 The Contract Services Team operates out of the WBACC Depot in Jervis Bay Village. This year there was a contract with DITRDC for works in the Jervis Bay Village and Wreck Bay Village, grant funding from NIAA for weed control and five Service Level Agreements (‘SLAs’) with BNP for:

•

R

oads and Fire Trails •

Cleaning •

Entry S

tation

•

Gr

ounds maintenance; and •

Infr

astructure

WBACC also regularly undertakes contract work over and above that within the DITRDC and Parks Australia Statements of Work. This work is arranged under individual work orders and is often funded out of Government’s capital expenditure budget.

This year the Contract Services Team attracted 1.24 million in payments for services rendered.

Will Hampton, Contract Services Manager

68 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Roads and Fire Trails Team—examples of work completed in 2019-20 As well as completing all required work under the Service Level Agreements (grading, pothole repairs, slashing of vegetation to maintain tracks and fire trails), the team also completed re-establishment of gravel and sealed road verges and cleaning of roadside drains.

During the year the busiest jobs have been the blowouts and pothole repairs on Ellmoos and Stoney creek roads, APZ clearings and stormwater repairs at visitor carparks.

The team also undertook a work schedule for the 403, consisting of maintenance work on several roads and fire trails, Boorala and Cemetery road

(L) Michael Pascoe, Roads and Trails Team Member (R) Jarred Sturgeon, Roads and Trails team Member

Cleaning Team—examples of work completed in 2019-20 The Team completed all required work under the Service Level Agreements-cleaning of all amenities, where the team works to a time schedule for each toilet and shower block in the campgrounds, barbeques, rubbish removal within BNP, cleaning of Parks and DITRDC buildings, daily maintenance checks and reporting of any incidents. Cleaning and entry station staff are often the face of WBACC for visitors because they are in the BNP so often and deal directly with visitors. Staff have developed useful customer service skills as a result of this. The staff undertook ‘verbal judo’ training to assist them to develop skills in dealing with difficult customers.

The cleaning team was the team most affected by the Booderee National Park closures as a result of bushfires and COVID-19. In order to retain income and jobs, WBACC and Parks negotiated for the team to work on other activities instead. The team were involved in camping and picnic area improvements, re-planting, mulching and installing of new flagpoles in the garden beds at the Entry Station and Visitor Centre precinct.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 69

(L) Elijah Ardler, Cleaning Team Leader (R) Josh Williams, Cleaning Team member

(L) Kyle Brown, Cleaning Services Team member (R) Ronald McLeod, Cleaning Services Team member

George St. Maite, Cleaning Services Team member

70 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Entry Station As well as completing all required work under the Service Level Agreements (manning the Entry Station, issuing tickets, undertaking traffic control measures) the Team also conducted traffic control activities during the bushfires and COVID-19 and worked with Parks Australia to manage communication with tourists who turned up despite the closures and to record numbers of people each day. There was also work related to the Prime Minister’s announcement of free park entry. The team undertook a course in customer aggression training and learnt to operate the new boom gates and camera system.

Sarah Cook, Entry Station Team member

Grounds Maintenance Team—examples of work completed in 2019-20 As well as completing all required work under the Service Level Agreements (maintenance of gardens throughout the Park, mowing, trimming, weeding, maintaining garden beds etc) the Team also has a daily schedule of work on the 403. Part of this work is the twice a year clean-up of Wreck Bay Village in June and December. This year, the team had a Communities Environment grant to assist with the end of year cleanup. As well as doing work within the village, this cleanup extended to the beaches of Wreck Bay, with community members also chipping in to collect marine debris.

During the next review of the SLA agreement in October 2020 the grounds maintenance team hopes to pick up work for various sites within BNP not currently included. For the first time, this year saw the team successfully quote for work for the Department of Defence, with some re-vegetation work at HMAS Creswell, which will be underway early in the new financial year

During the COVID lockdown, the team worked collaboratively with BNP staff on a makeover of the Visitor’ Centre and entry station garden beds.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 71

WBACC and Park’s staff working together Our teams help keep the environment suitable for flora and fauna such as this Jacky Dragon

The good work of the grounds team was recognised by Parks Australia this year for its quality and timeliness.

Shayne Brown, Grounds Team Leader

Examples of work—Infrastructure team, 2019-20 As well as completing all required work under the Service Level Agreements (repairing and maintaining structures within BNP), the team conducted maintenance on BNP fireshed, campground roofing repairs, display boards at caves beach and Botanic Gardens. Toilet seat replacement in campground toilet blocks.

The Team also completed several new kitchens and painting jobs on houses in Jervis Bay Village, contracted to DITRDC.

Importantly, the infrastructure team also organised and carried out much of the work on housing in Wreck Bay Village, installing new kitchens and bathrooms (on thirteen houses); windows, verandahs and awnings, roof repairs and conducting emergency repairs.

72 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Jeff McLeod and Max McLeod, Infrastructure Team members

Weeds The weed monitoring and eradication strategy is an ongoing program performed on the 403 hectares of land owned by the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council.

Hand removal of sea spurge and bitou bush seedlings is currently ongoing, splatter guns are being used on satellite infestations of bitou bush in areas that are inaccessible for vehicle access, and a high pressure spray unit is also used to eradicate larger areas of infestations.

The team has also been monitoring the effects of overspray from round up on non-targeted species (natives, orchids and succulents) and monitoring vegetation that is highly sensitive to overspray at Summercloud beach, Mary beach, the headlands and cliffs at Shelley’s point and cemetery point.

A shared agreement between Parks Australia and the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council has allowed both parties to work together on eradicating both species. Work completed on sea spurge at Shelley’s point, caves beach, Marys beach, Summercloud beach, Pommies beach and cemetery point has reduced the population of sea spurge significantly.

Whilst is important to eradicate and reduce the population of bitou bush and sea spurge, it is also very important to research and monitor both species in their current environment. Collecting data and recording through GPS mapping and data entries has been a high priority for the Weeds crew and will continue as a major function for the purpose of Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council’s obligation to Natural Area Management and Land Management practices.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 73

(L) Dan Williams, Weeds Team member (R) Kevin Mundy, Weeds Team member

Gudjahgahmiamia Day Care Centre Report for 2018-19

A socially distanced daycare team

The day care centre is located in Wreck Bay Village.

The day care centre is not a financially profitable exercise for WBACC, but its important role in providing community services to members justifies WBACC’s decision to continue to operate it.

This year, Gudjahgahmiamia’s operations were affected by the local bushfires in December 2019 and COVID-19 from March 2020. Both of these events impacted on attendance and income for the centre. The centre application for the 50% COVID-19 Child Care Relief Package was successful. This enable the Gudjahgahmiamia team to work from home completing a variety of on-line learning opportunities, professional reading and to send regular emails to families with updates and activities ideas. While

74 A nnual Report 2019-2020

all but one family returned to care in May 2020 when the centre re-opened, some families reduced or increased their days to reflect changes in their child care needs.

The centre met all licensing requirements and acquittals for the financial year.

(L) Sarah Ketelhohn, Day Care Centre Director (R) Aunty Leslie Morgan

One aspect of the day care centre’s operations, is the ongoing collaboration with a local service called Noah’s Ark which supports children who require early intervention services.

This year the day care team worked with the Noah’s Ark team and a Speech Therapist to incorporate the SWAY (Sounds, Words, Aboriginal Language and Yarning) program in our centre.

•

One staff member completed the thr

ee-day training program and then shared the

resources and ideas with the team. •

F

amilies of children aged three to five were provided with information about the SWAY and were invited to sign permission notes so their child could participate in the SWAY program. •

The day car

e staff member presented and explored the activities with small groups each week. •

These sessions ar

e documented in the daily journal for all families to read and share with their child. •

The Speech Ther

apist presents a targeted program to small groups of children one day a week. This session supports the children who have not had a formal speech assessment but are showing some delay in their speech or language development. •

Handouts ar

e sent home for children to share activities with their family and continue the learning at home. •

The staff member participates in SW

AY networking sessions. This supports the staff

member to implement the program and is also an opportunity to share experiences, knowledge and ask questions of their peers.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 75

Moving forward • W orking with a local business to create a Facebook page to promote the centre, recruit staff and promote the services the Gudjahgahmiamia provides, including the SWAY program.

•

Additional day car

e staff to participate in the three-day SWAY training. •

Day Car

e staff and Noah’s Ark staff continue to build on their solid relationship which will be valuable for future collaborations. •

All parties feel they can r

espectfully share information.

•

F

or the child, often their first access to a small group speech therapy session. •

F

amilies have access to high quality early childhood services in a culturally safe space. •

Aboriginal staff in early childhood services ar

e trained and qualified.

•

F

amilies feel safe to access services because of the reputation of the Centre. •

S

taff learning good strategies for working with children. •

P

arents and staff developing good relationships. •

P

arents and families are getting good information about their child’s developmental needs. •

P

arents are involved in the process, and family members are encouraged to practice at home.

Immediate outcomes • Childr en are getting correct diagnoses. •

F

amilies are able to access funding to support their child if they are diagnosed with developmental issues. •

Child is accessing specialists who can pr

ovide support.

•

P

arents are making more effective decisions to support their child. •

S

taff learning good strategies for working with children. •

S

taff capacity to conduct accurate developmental diagnosis is increased. •

S

taff confidence is increased. •

P

arents and staff developing good relationships. •

P

arents and families are getting good information about their child’s developmental needs.

Day Care Centre with updated resources

76 A nnual Report 2019-2020

(L) Marnie Waaka, Day Care Team member (R) Akala Maybury, Day Care Team member

Tabitha Moore, Day Care team member

Cultural Heritage Unit This year saw the establishment of the Cultural Heritage Unit consisting of a single staff member to develop a BNP Cultural Heritage Strategy and Implementation Plan, under contract to BNP. This contract has been 25 years in the making and marked an important milestone for WBACC. The approval of the draft plan by the BNP Joint Board of Management at the end of the financial year means that WBACC is now in a position to negotiate a four year Cultural Heritage Contract with BNP. The protocols developed in the Implementation Plan are already being tested and the work of the unit has extended to some fee for service work for NBN Co, which required Cultural Heritage Inductions for its staff. Next year, the team hopes to provide further induction training to the Defence Department and the Territory Administration, as well as to perform the services and develop the Projects under contract.

Community Liaison and Engagement This year saw the long term incumbent of the CLO position retire and the employment of another Registered Member to take on the role. The position focused on the reinstitution of regular meeting with Parks’ management to discuss community questions and concerns with management and operations of the BNP and as a conduit

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 77

from BNP management to community with information about what is happening in the Park. The position took on management of the staff and community newsletters and included a BNP section in each newsletter, to improve the information flow between the Park and WBACC membership. As COVID lifts, the position will be organising community information sessions where Park staff will regularly address WBACC members on such issues as species monitoring, reintroduction of species, seed propagation in the botanic gardens etc. The position also went about establishing holiday and homework programs for community school children, which were very well attended.

(L) Clive Freeman, WBACC’s Cultural Heritage Officer (R) Fiona Dann, WBACC’s Community Liaison and Engagement Officer

Small Grants Administration (Sporting) WBACC took on administration of the small grants program from the ACT Government this year, under contract to NIAA. The scheme provides small grant assistance to Indigenous sporting teams in the ACT, including the JBT. This contract is an important step towards WBACC’s self sufficiency, given that our administration skills have been recognised as good enough to award us a contract to manage a government scheme. The work of the program was heavily impacted by COVID, given that no-one could join sporting teams for half the year, however the staff member employed under the contract was able to utilise her skills to investigate grant opportunities for WBACC, which resulted in several grant applications still under consideration.

Sharon Brown, WBACC’s Grants Officer

78 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Administration Team Report for 2019-20 The administrative team is the backbone of WBACC. It’s work ensures the funds for the day care and contract services teams to operate, and facilitates all land management and community services obligations. The functions of the team are wide and varied, encompassing:

•

Support to the Boar

d of Management—arrangement of Board meetings, Board papers and minutes; policy development. •

Contr

act and Procurement Management—tendering and contracting, contract performance management, negotiation with government and contractors. •

F

inancial Management—funding applications and acquittals, invoicing, accounts payable, payroll, budgeting, administration of community policies and payments (eg. higher education, sporting and small business grants). •

Human R

esources—management of all employment contracts, performance, WH&S, training and education outcomes.

(L) Rachel McLeod, Accounts Manager (R) Naomi Brown, Accounts Team member

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 79

(L) Kevin (KJ) Ardler, Accounts Team member (L) George Brown, WBACC’s Human Resources Manager

(L) Sherrie Tripp, HR and Day Care Admin trainee (R) Loretta Wellington, Administration Team member

Community Liaison/Engagement—organisation of community events, meetings, consultations; delivery of community programs (eg. Big Cuz, Little Cuz, Second bite, community garden). •

Cultur

al Heritage Management—development of strategy, policies consultations, communication. •

Gener

al Administration—reception, data entry, file management, archiving, dissemination of community information. •

JBT networking

—Council maintains its obligation to various committees established to effectively plan and advocate for residents of Jervis Bay Territory. (eg. Jervis Bay Emergency Management Committee).

This year the administration team attracted $5.57 million in government grant funding through grant applications, renewals and negotiations. It acquitted all funds accurately and on time. The team also negotiated and managed the contracts performed by the contract services and other teams, to the value of $2.28 million. It managed day care fees, rent payments and income from investments.

80 A nnual Report 2019-2020

The team also managed outgoings. It arranged insurances, legals, banking, payroll and supplier contracts and payments.

Significant work of the team this year included: •

submission of gr

ant applications for WBACC’s Home ownership implementation strategy and Caring for Country Rangers •

finalisation of a Cultur

al Heritage Implementation strategy for Booderee National Park •

management of SLAs, including a WHS capacity building payment; •

arr

angements of leadership training and team building for staff; •

pr

ogression of WHS policies including WHS Incident and Injury online forms and WHS Management System •

negotiation of the payment of old debt by P

arks Australia;

•

development of a checklist system for contr

act services staff to assist with better

preparation of tax invoices; •

development of a home ownership implementation str

ategy, the associated steps

and the Ministerial submission.

WBACC Team Building Day Oct 2019

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 81

Remuneration for key management personnel

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits Other long-term benefits Termination

benefits

Total

remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses Other benefits

and allowances Superannuation contributions Long service

leave

Other long-term benefits

Reuben Ardler Deputy $100,859 $10,534 $2,591 $113,984

Anne-Marie Farrugia CEO $167,610 $16,071 $3,800 $187,481

All Ongoing and Non-Ongoing Employees All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2019-20) Male Female TotalFull Time Part Time Total Full Time Part Time Total15 9 24 9 10 19 43 All Non-Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2019-20) Male Female Total Full Time Part Time Total Full Time Part Time Total

16 16 19 19 35

All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2018-19) Male Female Total Full Time Part Time Total Full Time Part Time Total

14 9 23 8 9 17 40

All Non-Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2018-19) Male Female Total Full Time Part Time Total Full Time Part Time Total

0 16 16 0 9 9 25

82 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Performance Criteria Performance has been reported against each of the Performance Criteria set out in the 2019-23 Corporate Plan. The Annual Performance Statements are provided further to Section 39(1)(a) of the PGPA Act for the 2019-20 financial year and accurately present Council’s performance in accordance with Section 39(2) of the PGPA Act. The annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with Subsection 39(2) of the PGPA Act.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 83

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

To manage and maintain Aboriginal Land by protecting and conserving natural and cultural sites on Aboriginal Land

Appointment of Cultural Heritage Officer within WBACC, to collate all existing information and formulate a Cultural Heritage Strategy and Implementation Plan;

Cultural Heritage Officer will be employed under a contractual arrangement with Parks Australia;

Collation work and Cultural Heritage Strategy and Implementation Plan is complete and delivered to the Board (by end June 2020) with implementation ongoing in years thereafter.

The contract with Parks Australia was signed and the Cultural heritage Officer was appointed. The Cultural Heritage Strategy and Implementation Plan were developed and approved by the Joint Board of Management in June 2020. COVID pushed out the federal budget until October 2020 which meant that we were unable to sign the four year contract for July, however a contract was signed until the end of October, for beginning implementation and testing of the protocols in the Plan.

The new four year contract to be signed in October 2020.

BNP is using the Strategy and Implementation Plan to ensure Tourism and Works activities within BNP are protecting Natural and Cultural Heritage.

BNP is using the protocols in the Strategy and engaging the Cultural Heritage Officer for all activities in the Park which could impact Cultural Heritage. This year, the CH officer has advised on works at Caves Beach, the Botanic Gardens, the Cove and for NBN installation in the Park.

BNP and WBACC to continue to work using the protocols for work in the park, particularly on CAPEX projects during 2020-21

Cultural Heritage Sub-Committee, with community representation, of WBACC Board to meet quarterly and make recommendations for Cultural Heritage activities to the Board;

Cultural Heritage Sub-Committee is being funded out of DTIRDC funding $20k per year;

Number of Cultural Heritage proposals presented to and accepted by the Board by Cultural Heritage Sub-Committee.

The Cultural Heritage Sub-Committee made one major recommendation for the development of a Cultural Heritage Management Plan for the 403 lands, which was accepted by the Board. The Sub-Committee then worked with Community First Development, whose representative acted as a scribe, to develop the plan. COVID restrictions resulted in the Sub-Committee being unable to meet for a time and members of the WBACC Board progressed the document which was then presented back to the whole Sub-committee for review and comment. The Draft Cultural Heritage Action Plan for the 403 and newly granted lands 151 and 152 was accepted by the Board in June 2020 and is currently with the WBACC community for consultation.

The consultation on the draft CH strategy and action plan for the 403 will continue into the new financial year. The consultation will be important to identify cultural zones. Once this occurs, the new Caring for Country Rangers will have a role in progressing work under the strategy.

84 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

WBACC will manage its operations in a way that will have minimal/no adverse environmental impacts and protect the environment.

Environmental compliance is largely unfunded, except when related to WHS compliance (eg. asbestos management) which is funded out of the profits of the enterprise.'

Environmental Biodiversity Management Team to be funded using grant funding (currently at bid stage) from NIAA under the IAS.

Dedicated wash area for cars used.

Asbestos Management plans in place and provided to contractors working in the village and on the depot.

BNP Environmental protocols are being followed for all SLA and contract work in the Park.

Cultural and Natural Heritage strategies are in place and in use in BNP and on the 403.

Work teams are washing their cars in the dedicated wash bay.

Asbestos Management Plans are in place and have been provided to the plumbers, electricians etc working on the housing program. Two WBACC staff undertook training in removing asbestos.

Protocols were introduced towards the end of the financial year and training for WBACC staff in the requirements has started. The first CAPEX project being negotiated since the introduction of the protocols has had them applied.

The Caring for Country Rangers team, approved by the Minister at the end of June, is the result of this funding submission.

Council continued its community cleanups this year and extended the cleanup to a clean of the surrounding beaches, using grant monies from the Communities Environment Program.

PFAS contamination from the Department of Defence's historical use of Fire Fighting Foam is an environmental issue for the JBT. The WBACC Board is considering options at the end of the financial year and will make an announcement about next steps in the first or second quarter of the new financial year.

As more projects with the capacity to impact the environment are quoted, the cultural and environmental protocols will be followed.

The Team will be established and begin work on managing country in the 2020-21 financial year.

WBACC will work with the community to encourage re-use and recycling and use of Shoalhaven City Council tip vouchers as an alternative to community cleanups organised by Council, which are expensive and have the disadvantage of hard rubbish being left on road verges.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 85

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

WBACC will manage its operations in a way that will have minimal/no adverse environmental impacts and protect the environment.

Environmental compliance is largely unfunded, except when related to WHS compliance (eg. asbestos management) which is funded out of the profits of the enterprise.'

Environmental Biodiversity Management Team to be funded using grant funding (currently at bid stage) from NIAA under the IAS.

Dedicated wash area for cars used.

Asbestos Management plans in place and provided to contractors working in the village and on the depot.

BNP Environmental protocols are being followed for all SLA and contract work in the Park.

Cultural and Natural Heritage strategies are in place and in use in BNP and on the 403.

Work teams are washing their cars in the dedicated wash bay.

Asbestos Management Plans are in place and have been provided to the plumbers, electricians etc working on the housing program. Two WBACC staff undertook training in removing asbestos.

Protocols were introduced towards the end of the financial year and training for WBACC staff in the requirements has started. The first CAPEX project being negotiated since the introduction of the protocols has had them applied.

The Caring for Country Rangers team, approved by the Minister at the end of June, is the result of this funding submission.

Council continued its community cleanups this year and extended the cleanup to a clean of the surrounding beaches, using grant monies from the Communities Environment Program.

PFAS contamination from the Department of Defence's historical use of Fire Fighting Foam is an environmental issue for the JBT. The WBACC Board is considering options at the end of the financial year and will make an announcement about next steps in the first or second quarter of the new financial year.

As more projects with the capacity to impact the environment are quoted, the cultural and environmental protocols will be followed.

The Team will be established and begin work on managing country in the 2020-21 financial year.

WBACC will work with the community to encourage re-use and recycling and use of Shoalhaven City Council tip vouchers as an alternative to community cleanups organised by Council, which are expensive and have the disadvantage of hard rubbish being left on road verges.

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Existing Weeds Team to expand to form larger Environmental Biodiversity Management Team to take on fire management, feral animal control and Ranger functions.

Weed control is funded by NIAA under the IAS JLEP Program.

Dedicated Weed control continued this year. Glysophate (Roundup) continues to be the chemical of choice. Following a request from the WBACC Board, the team did consider some work done in other parts of Australia using steam to kill bitou bush, however the results are still not in for those other trails. WBACC will continue to monitor this and any other potential replacements for Glysophate.

Bitou bush and Sea Spurge control is maintained in easily accessible areas, but continue to be a problem in areas where there are no tracks or trails for staff to use and on cliff faces etc. Weeds will continue to be a significant ongoing problem, including on the 403, where Coral Trees are prolific. Removal of these weeds is complex because of potential land destabilisation, and Council continues to work on solutions involving replacement stabilising native vegetation.

The new Caring for Country Rangers as well as the existing weeds team will continue to manage weeds on the peninsula, with the Caring for Country Rangers concentrating on the 403.

WBACC to make submissions to Minister for Indigenous Affairs for new Land Grants.

Submissions for new Land Grants and Legislative change unfunded (CEO role)

Submission made A submission was made in November 2019, listing a number of blocks but excluding the residential lots. (This was following the Previous Minister's advice that he would not approve handover of land including housing until WBACC had sorted its housing management issues brought to the forefront during the high court action of 2018, reported on in last year's annual report)).

In June 2020, the current Minister for Indigenous Australians visited Wreck Bay and NIAA then made the suggestion that WBACC submit a new land claim, including all the residences in the JB village. Advice was to the effect that now that WBACC is beginning implementation of the Home Ownership Implementation Strategy, it is demonstrating the ability to manage housing and this will likely be looked on favourably.

A new Land Grant claim to be submitted to the Minister in August 2020

86 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Enforce By-Laws on Aboriginal Land - longer term strategy of amending Legislation and Regulations (talks began in 2019).

The legislative change is necessary because currently the legislation does not allow for enforcement in the form of fines. The only way to enforce a breach is to begin a court action, an expensive option for WBACC.

There is no funding for this activity. It is the role of WBACC wardens (appointed staff members of WBACC) and Registered Members.

Legislative Reform process underway by end of 2019-20 financial year.

Submission for Ranger Program to include role for the rangers in exercising the By-Laws.

WBACC has been working with NIAA since August 2019 to identify all required changes to the legislation , including changes to the By-Laws, which are part of the Regulations under the Land Grant Act. NIAA has presented the WBACC Board with a list of proposed changes and legal advice has been provided by WBACC's lawyers.

The Ranger Program is approved and the grant funding requires the Rangers to learn the By-Laws and monitor compliance on Aboriginal Land.

NIAA will consult with the WBACC Board and the community during 2020-21 with a timeline for Parliamentary approval towards the end of the 2021 calendar year.

Training in the By-Laws for the new Rangers is set for October 2020, and compliance training will occur not long after. Rangers, all registered Members, will be appointed as wardens and will have an influential role in asking people to stop breaching the By-Laws. Until the legislative reform happens they will not be able to issue fines, but WBACC is hopeful that their presence and monitoring will go some way towards stopping breaches.

Engage in land use planning

Deliver Wreck Bay Village Town Plan. WBACC has engaged a Town

Planner through Indigenous Community Volunteers (now Community First Development) to deliver the Town Plan. This has no associated financial costs.

Town Plan Delivered and implementation steps in priority order are being followed in WBACC’s workplans.

Unfortunately this project was delayed due to COVID-19. The project depends heavily on site visits and face to face community consultation. Some initial documentation has been created by the team but they will not be able to resume until COVID travel restrictions are lifted. Community First Development is retaining the project and volunteers on its books until this time, when it will be resumed.

When COVID restrictions are lifted for CFD volunteers, consultations will start again.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 87

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Finalise WBACC Home Ownership Implementation Strategy.

WBACC currently has a submission with NIAA for grant funding ($20m) to assist with the Home Ownership Implementation Scheme.

Grant submission is successful and Home Ownership Implementation Plan is underway.

In the last week of the financial year, the Minister for Indigenous Australians approved an initial $3m for WBACC's Home Ownership Implementation Strategy. Some of this money is for the engagement of an expert scheduling/budgeting consultancy. The tender for this activity was issued at the end of the financial year and it is expected that the consultancy will start work in September. Funds will also be spent to improve drainage and retaining wall issues, to seek surveying and legal expertise and to continue with wet area repairs in the Wreck Bay houses.

Work with the consultancy to develop a comprehensive, well costed plan to present to the Minister as part of a submission for full funding of the Program.

Continue the Home Maintenance and Repairs Program.

Work with Engineers to draw up plans for fixing drainage and water damage issues.

Consider proposals for use of newly acquired Blocks 151 and 152, and for any further blocks acquired during the life of the Corporate Plan.

The Board had a presentation from the Indigenous Entrepreneurship Program to broadly consider some tourism opportunities for the newly acquired land, however the land use will require considerable consultation and will be a long term project.

The Town Plan Project will undertake the important work of identifying zones on Aboriginal Land and will assist with land usage decisions.

The Town Plan project will resume as COVID restrictions ease. The Town Planning discussions will consider land usage zones on the newly acquired blocks.

The Board has given the CEO an action to investigate options for a multipurpose building to house community services, community businesses and offices, perhaps on the newly acquired blocks. This work will occur over the next couple of years.

88 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Provide services to Community members:

Booderee National Park Lease monies and income from BNP takings are used by WBACC to provide services to the community;

Review number of increased community services offered (specifically, number of scholarships, grants, events, training, housing maintenance and repairs), compared to previous financial years.

Six tertiary education scholarships were approved; 2 new business grants were approved; 4 individual sports assistance grants were approved. The drop in the number of business and sports grants compared to last year is directly related to COVID-19.

Likewise, the rate of housing repairs decreased during the worst of COVID because WBACC workers did not enter houses except for emergencies. Nevertheless, approximately thirteen new kitchens and bathrooms were installed.

Events held included NAIDOC week in July 2020, Elders Christmas lunch in December 2020, however the kids' Christmas party had to be cancelled due to the bushfires; AGM in February went ahead, and all large events for the rest of the year were cancelled due to bushfires or COVID.

Small events happened, such as a youth bbq towards the end of 2019, kids homework club and kids school holiday program (except for March-June due to COVID); and NBN node uncovering event in June 2020..

WBACC achieved two significant milestones this year to benefit the community. Council successfully worked with the JBT administration to attract NBN to Wreck Bay and Council worked with Australia Post to establish a mail delivery service to Wreck Bay. Both improvements will be rolled out early in the new financial year.

Unfortunately Council has not yet been able to solve the mobile phone reception issue. It applied for blackspot finding with Telstra and Optus but was unsuccessful. In the new financial year, talks will begin with the JBT Administration for a localised response.

Community service provision will continue and Council will try to become more responsive to community suggestions for services. This will occur through the sub-committee process and face to face consultation sessions with community.

Council will continue to work with the JBT administration for improvements to service delivered under cross jurisdictional agreements with NSW Health etc and for improvements to communication services.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 89

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Ongoing provision of training to community members

Review number of training courses offered and uptake.

Survey community on training needs.

Community was offered courses in governance, traffic control chainsaw use, civil construction, plant operation and first aid. There was small uptake, averaging 4 community members per course.

A survey was conducted on community training needs. 17 responses were received (of 427 Registered Members), which makes it difficult to draw conclusions, however WBACC has responded with the intent to organise courses in the areas that people have expressed an interest.

Vincentia High School students were also surveyed, with a higher rate of response (40 students) and WBACC will investigate SBAT and other opportunities based on those priorities.

Courses will continue to be offered to community members.

WBACC will continue to advertise positions offered by TAFE under the Smart and Skilled Program as they become available.

A mentoring program for elders has already been booked in for the second quarter of 2020-21.

WBACC will arrange six SBAT opportunities for 2020-21, in the areas identified by Vincentia High Students.

WBACC will begin taking on Year 10 and 11 Work experience students in the 2020-21 Financial year.

Ongoing provision of education scholarships; business grants, sporting assistance grants, elders’ assistance, bereavement and funeral assistance;

Community Satisfaction Survey shows over 75% satisfaction with services delivered.

WBACC was not able to conduct a community satisfaction survey this year. The mailed out and online training survey demonstrated the difficulty of attracting responses when face to face meetings are not held. COVID prevented face to face meetings in the last quarter, which is when WBACC would have conducted the survey

Plans are underway for a series of face to face meetings in 2020-21, where community satisfaction will be gauged.

90 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Ongoing repair and maintenance of community housing.

WBACC continues to use existing ARLS money, matched dollar for dollar by WBACC, for its housing repair and maintenance program.

Number of houses with new kitchens and bathrooms compared to previous year.

Thirteen houses received kitchens and bathroom this year. The rate of installation was affected by COVID in the last quarter of the year, with no work done inside houses during that time.

Number of community reporting that they are more comfortable in their homes in Community Satisfaction Survey

WBACC was not able to conduct a community satisfaction survey this year. The mailed out and online training survey demonstrated the difficulty of attracting responses when face to face meetings are not held. COVID prevented face to face meetings in the last quarter, which is when WBACC would have conducted the survey.

Anecdotally, people who have had repairs done on their houses are happy that the work has been done.

Plans are underway for a series of face to face meetings in 2020-21, where community satisfaction will be gauged.

Introduction of 99 year leases on community houses, on the ACT ‘crown lease’ model - effectively home ownership;

Commonwealth grant funding from NIAA for the Home Ownership Implementation Strategy

Measured by progress against the steps in the Home Ownership Implementation Plan

Grant funding for the first stage of the Program was announced in the last week of the Financial Year. Preparation work conducted by WBACC prior to the funding announcement meant that WBACC could release the tender for the Scheduling/Budgeting consultancy by the end of the financial year

At the time of annual report publication the Scheduling/ Budgeting consultancy is engaged and preparing its report, legal work for preparation of the leases has started, survey work has commenced and work to deal with drainage and retaining wall issues has started. The first resident consultation on the Plan has occurred and will be followed by numerous sessions throughout the four year life of the project.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 91

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Ongoing operation of Men’s, Women’s, youth groups and Junior Rangers Program.

The Men's, Women's and Youth Programs are funded out of IAS money, in the JLEP Program. The Junior Rangers Program is funded by BNP, with WBACC contributing human resources.

Programs are up and running and well attended.

All programs were running until March but experienced a hiatus from March-June due to COVID, when groups did not meet. The women's program made and sold craft during NAIDOC week, the Women's and Men's programs both visited the gym. The women had a second hand shopping day and lunch in Wollongong,

The kids enjoyed days at bowling, beach and bush walks, the Huskisson Carnival and lots of art and craft activities.

Early talks occurred with BNP and JB school for revival of the Junior Rangers Program.

All programs will start up again as COVID restrictions ease.

Junior Rangers Program to start up again in September 2020.

Ongoing operation of childcare centre. The Cay Care Centre is

funded by the Commonwealth Department of Education.

Day Care Centre is operational and financially able to support itself (ie, without assistance from community reserves)

The Day Care Centre has been self sufficient for two financial years now. The attraction of more families and children, combined with viability funding from the Department of Education bodes well for the following year as well.

Finalisation of establishment of Community Veggie Garden

The Community Garden is funded out of IAS money, in the JLEP Program.

Community Veggie garden up and running Whilst infrastructure is in place. the veggie garden has not yet been planted, predominantly due to the impact

of COVID.

It is expected that planting will occur early in the new financial year and the new Ranger Team will assist with any works required.

92 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Community Services and Governance Sub-Committees of WBACC Board to meet quarterly and make recommendations for community services and Governance improvements to the Board.

Community Services sub-committee is being funded $20k per year out of DITRDC money

Number of Community Services proposals presented to the Board by the Community Services sub-committee.

The Community Services Sub-committee presented recommendations to the Board in relation to Youth programs, which resulted in a youth BBQ to determine priorities and the development of a home work program and a school holiday program, all of which were very well attended.

The Sub-Committee also made a recommendation to update the WBACC website. This was also taken up, with the new website, with online forms for all community grants up and running by the end of June 2020.

The Sub-Committee made a recommendation for a ramp to be installed to the Community Centre. This was completed prior to Christmas 2019.

Conduct business enterprises for the economic/ social benefit of the Community; increase employment of community members.

Secure additional Service Level Agreements with Parks Australia (Cultural Heritage Agreement; Environmental Biodiversity Management Team Agreement);

No specific financial allocation for negotiation of agreements (CEO role);

Review number of extra services contracts held by WBACC.

A Cultural Heritage Agreement was signed at the beginning of the financial year and extended at the end of the financial year. This contract created one new job.

The new Cultural Heritage Contract due in October to create two new positions.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 93

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Secure additional grant funding under ARLS for Environmental Biodiversity Management Team and Ranger training;

Bid has been placed with NIAA for additional ARLS funding of $5-7 million over five years for establishment of Environmental Biodiversity Management team.

Review number of new jobs for community members created at WBACC.

NIAA has approved the WBACC Caring for Country Rangers Program. The Program was initially for one year but WBACC was offered the opportunity to extend by a further seven years following an application process. Budgets and workplans have been submitted by WBACC to Government for these future years. Nine new jobs were created by the Caring for Country Rangers Program.

There was one new Trainee job, across HR and Daycare administration.

There was one new job created for the Cultural Heritage Contract with Park.

There was one new job created out of the Contract with NIAA for Sports Grants Administration for the ACT.

Recruitment for the Caring for Country Rangers Program to be finalised by the end of September 2020 with Rangers to start in the first week of October.

Application for next seven years to be developed further in third quarter 2020-21.

On execution of the Cultural Heritage Contract with Parks, two new jobs will be created, for male and female Assistant Cultural Heritage officers

Market the Child Care Centre to surrounding towns to increase numbers and make the centre more financially viable.

The Commonwealth to provide funding to assist WBACC to develop a marketing strategy for the Childcare centre. There will be little financial cost to WBACC.

Demonstrate Increased income from year to year. The Gudjahgahmiamia team have engaged a Shoalhaven business to lead their local marketing. Two

of the Gudjahgahmiamia team meet with business to answer a comprehensive set of questions to ensure that it was clear what our goal, message and audience was.

From that a Facebook page was created. This page will be closely monitored and strategies have been put in place to manage any inappropriate comments.

Over the next year the plan is for Gudjahgahmiamia staff to create regular content for the page and to learn how to use this medium to attract local families, increase our pool of casual staff and to share all the great things we do with the local communities.

94 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Demonstrate increase of two child care enrolments by end of June 2020, with two each year thereafter for life of Corporate Plan, ensuring maintenance of current funding arrangements.

There were eight new childcare enrollments this year, jumping from 22 to 30 children enrolled, with a big growth in the nursery room. The number of families increased from approximately 18 to 25.

Child Care centre remains operational providing vital, culturally appropriate, early childcare education services to regional Indigenous children.

The Childcare centre is operational, with an increase in the number of children and some new families.

Engagement with Regional Development Officer (DITRDC) funded.

No specific financial allocation for engagement with RDO (CEO role and community workshops)

Review number of increased employment opportunities and community services offered (specifically, number of scholarships, grants, events, training, housing maintenance and repairs), compared to previous financial years as a result of increased profits.

the RDO assisted WBACC to win several grants this year, ranging from a kitchen upgrade and installation of air conditioning in the WBACC Office to the community cleanup of WB Village and Mary's and Summercloud beaches and the Caring for Country Rangers Program.

WBACC to work with RDO to apply for recently announced Indigenous employment promotion programs.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 95

Objective Delivery Strategy Resourcing Performance Monitoring and Measurement

Result Next Steps

Economic Development Sub-committee of WBACC Board, with community representation, to meet quarterly and make recommendations for economic development to the Board.

Economic Development Sub-Committee was funded out of DITRDC $20k per year.

Review number of new projects created as a result of Economic Sub-Committee recommendations to WBACC Board.

The Economic Development Sub-committee recommended to the Board a presentation from Indigenous Business Australia on investment options for WBACC. The session was organised and the Board made valuable contacts within IBA and have options to consider for future years.

The Sub-committee also recommended a presentation to the Board from the Commonwealth's Indigenous Entrepreneurship facilitator. WBACC went on the engage the facilitator to assist with the design for the new Caring for Country Ranger program.

WBACC to investigate services offered by IBA and the Indigenous Entrepreneurship Program for progression of business opportunities within the Caring for Country Rangers Program.

Economic Development Sub-Committee to develop a business case for a tourism business to present to the Board in the third quarter of 2020-21

96 A nnual Report 2019-2020

WBACC’s performance How WBACC’s performance of its objectives has contributed to improved outcomes for Indigenous Australians WBACC’s performance this year has directly resulted in improved outcomes for WBACC Registered Members, all of whom are Indigenous Australians.

Outcomes in the management and maintenance of Aboriginal Land include finalisation of strategies for caring for country and cultural heritage protection in the Booderee National Park and the 403, 151 and 152 lands. These are very significant documents, literally years in the making. Their publication marks a turning point in the Indigenous management of land in the Jervis Bay Territory, with WBACC already applying the protocols set out in the documents to manage and protect places of great significance to Wreck Bay people. Recognition of the role of the community in the management of country, through these documents, has revitalised the community’s desire to properly care for the land, for elders to share knowledge with younger generations and for members to educate the wider community in the importance of cultural and environmental land management.

Outcomes in the provision of services to Community members include enhanced quality of life through improved housing conditions brought about by the Home Maintenance and Repair Program, with the majority of residents now enjoying new kitchens and bathrooms. The 10% increase in the number of households paying rent to Council is evidence of a growing recognition of the obligations and benefits of managing one’s home, and their is excitement about impending Indigenous home ownership through the Home Ownership Implementation Strategy. A recent community session on homeownership attracted over 35 of the 48 tenants in Wreck Bay, a big jump from a similar session held last year, which attracted approximately 20 people. There has also been increased interest in the will development services provided through Council by Shoalcoast Legal, with tenants recognising the link between having a will and ensuring the housing security of future generations.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 97

Indigenous education and training outcomes include:

• seven new tertiary education scholarships for W

reck Bay Registered members in the

fields of social science/psychology, business/finance; business management; beauty therapy and arts •

two continuing school based appr

enticeships with apprentices due to graduate at

the end of the calendar year •

tr

aining for staff and community in leadership, governance, project management, first aid, GIS training, cleaning operations, plant operator license training, chainsaw operation and WHS with the intent of improving skills for job readiness and job progression •

an incr

ease in utilisation of the pre-school by registered members.

Chainsaw training for WBACC staff and community

Training and education opportunities for Wreck Bay Registered Members directly result in higher levels of tertiary education for Indigenous people, leading to better employment opportunities and a general upskilling for the benefit of the community as a whole, particularly as young educated members come back to work for Council or to run their own businesses in the local area.

98 A nnual Report 2019-2020

An increase in preschool enrolments has a general effect of improving literacy and numeracy outcomes for young Indigenous children who enter primary school with some basic skills already in place.

Indigenous employment outcomes include:

•

eleven new dir

ect ongoing jobs for locally based registered members; •

two continuing school based appr

enticeships with apprentices due to graduate at

the end of the calendar year; •

contr

acting of Registered Member businesses to undertake contract work for Council, including in the carpentry and arborist trades; •

Employment outcomes also include jobs for spouses of R

egistered Members who

have been successful in traineeship and daycare center positions.

Induction for WBACC’s new Caring for Country Rangers, due to start early in the 2020-21 financial year

Vincentia High School students enrolled in WBACC’s 2019-20 School Based Apprenticeship Program

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 99

Employment of Wreck Bay Registered members results not only in increased income within the community, and an associated growth in businesses servicing the community (eg. the child care centre has increased numbers due to an increase in the number of workers) but in a sense of pride in what the community has been and will be able to achieve in the future.

WBACC’s use of the Commonwealth Indigenous Procurement Policy to contract Registered Member businesses also brings income to the community and encourages Indigenous entrepreneurship, evident in the successful applications for new businesses under WBACC’s Business Grant policy.

100 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Performance Outcomes Analysis of the Factors that Contributed to WBACC’s Performance Outcomes Overall, WBACC is tracking well against the achievement of its purposes which are the management and maintenance of Aboriginal land, the provision of services to community members and the conduct of business enterprises for the economic and social benefit of the Community. Evidence of WBACC’s achievement in these areas can be found:

•

in WBA

CC’s ongoing dedication through its staffing and work plans to maintaining and improving the land, Workplans for grounds, infrastructure, roads and trails, and weed control are adhered to throughout the year by our contract services and weeds control teams, ensuring Booderee National Park and the lands of the 403 remain beautiful places to be enjoyed by registered members and visitors. •

in the amounts of money pr

ovided through community support policies and the

number of registered members benefiting from these policies. $98,000 in direct financial assistance has been provided to community members, through our business support, tertiary education support, sporting support and elders support policies. •

in incr

eased education and skill levels, evident in the number and quality of registered member candidates applying for positions at WBACC. It is a given that increased education levels lead to increased employment opportunities and higher incomes. This year two Wreck Bay registered members who had done training and casual work on Council’s roads team were successful in obtaining traineeships and ongoing work with Fulton Hogan, a major civil construction company. WBACC worked with Fulton Hogan to attract five Wreck bay Registered Members to the training Program. •

in the impr

ovement to the ability of residents to participate in wider society through better communications infrastructure, with the introduction of the NBN after much lobbying from Council and a new service of mail delivery from Australia Post, with residents receiving mail delivered by Australia Post to Wreck Bay Village mailboxes.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 10 1

Two WBACC Registered Members were sponsored through the Fulton Hogan Civil Engineering Program and won ongoing positions

Mailboxes for Wreck Bay residents, with deliveries by Australia Post

102 A nnual Report 2019-2020

• in the opportunities for R egistered members to participate in community activities whilst learning new skills and having fun.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1 03

• in the ability of the business entity to attr act new contracts (sports grants, cultural heritage, land management work for the Department of Defence) and new grant funding (Caring for Country Rangers Program) and to expand its area of operations to include parts of the JBT not previously funded for management. The growth of the enterprise not only leads to further Indigenous employment (eleven new staff this year) but also to the generation of income to contribute to community services and to the multiplier effects—the need for more services to cater to extra employees and the need for more office amenities (extra day care, building, plumbing, vehicle maintenance and upkeep etc) all providing extra work for community and local businesses who employ community members).

104 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Factors that have Contributed to these Performance Results include: • good governance at Boar d and Joint Board level and within the business entity, with ongoing governance training, good meeting records and decisions made in an

accountable and transparent fashion and good budgeting; •

good staff management

, with performance management in place; workplans well monitored; team building exercises and communication mechanisms well utilised;

WBACC Teambuilding Day October 2019

• accountability to government —acquittal processes and contract monitoring ensure that grant monies are properly spent and that contracts are well performed.

Joint Board meetings during COVID

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1 05

Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2020 Certification ...............................................................................................................................106

P rimary Financial Statement

................................................................................................. 108

S

tatement of Comprehensive Income

................................................................................109

Statement of Financial Position

............................................................................................110

Statement of Changes in Equity

.............................................................................................111

Cash Flow Statement

............................................................................................................... 112

Overview

..................................................................................................................................... 113

Notes to the Financial Statements

....................................................................................... 113

1.

F

inancial Performance

................................................................................................ 115

1.1

Expenses

........................................................................................................................ 115

1.2

Own-

Source Revenue and Gains

...............................................................................117

2.

F

inancial Position

......................................................................................................... 119

2.1

F

inancial Assets

............................................................................................................ 119

2.2

Non-F

inancial Assets

................................................................................................... 121

2.3

P

ayables......................................................................................................................... 124

3.

P

eople and Relationships

...........................................................................................125

3.1

Employee P

rovisions

...................................................................................................125

3.2

K

ey Management Personnel Remuneration..........................................................127

3.3

R

elated Party Disclosures

...........................................................................................127

3.4

R

emuneration of Auditors

.........................................................................................128

4.

Managing Uncertainties

.............................................................................................129

4.1

Contingent Assets and Liabilities

.............................................................................129

4.2

F

inancial Instruments

................................................................................................ 130

4.3

F

air Value Measurements

..........................................................................................133

5.

Other Information

....................................................................................................... 134

5.1A

Aggr

egate Assets and Liabilities

.............................................................................. 134

106 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1 07

108 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 10 9

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Statement of Comprehensive Income

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 2020 2019

NET COST OF SERVICES $ $

Expenses Employee benefits 1.1A 2,939,185 2,370,637

Suppliers 1.1B 1,075,347 678,799

Occupancy expenses 1.1C 171,992 73,634

Community grants 1.1D 98,379 78,738

Depreciation and amortisation 2.2A 404,128 366,469

Impairment loss on financial instruments 1.1E - 5,424

Other expenses 1.1F 604,290 634,611

Total expenses 5,293,321 4,208,312

Own-Source Income

Own-source revenue Revenue from contracts with customers 1.2A 2,277,374 2,151,456

Interest 1.2B 20,211 30,533

Gains 1.2C - 2,273

Total own-source revenue 2,297,585 2,184,262

Revenue from Government 1.2D 2,471,787 1,954,547

Total revenue 4,769,372 4,138,809

Net (cost of)/contribution by services (523,949) (69,503)

Surplus/(deficit) before income tax on continuing operations (523,949) (69,503)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services Land Contribution from Government 1.2E - 300,000

Changes in asset revaluation reserve - 1,047,325

Total other comprehensive income - 1,347,325

Total Comprehensive income/(Loss) (523,949) 1,277,822

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

110 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Statement of Financial Position

as at 30 June 2020

Note 2020 2019

ASSETS $ $

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents 2.1A 4,321,916 1,365,551

Trade and other receivables 2.1B 785,478 549,091

Other financial assets 2.1C 1,080,723 1,060,913

Total financial assets 6,188,117 2,975,555

Non-financial assets Land and buildings 2.2A 55,381,364 55,634,279

Infrastructure, plant & equipment 2.2A 414,407 369,877

Total non-financial assets 55,795,771 56,004,156

Total assets 61,983,888 58,979,711

LIABILITIES Payables Suppliers 2.3A 301,453 236,736

Other payables 2.3B 3,742,543 249,598

Total payables 4,043,996 486,334

Provisions Employee provisions 3.1A 296,312 263,347

Former employee provisions 3.1B 96,958 159,459

Total provisions 393,270 422,806

Total liabilities 4,437,266 909,140

Net assets 57,546,622 58,070,571

EQUITY Reserves 32,309,832 32,309,832

Retained surplus 25,236,790 25,760,739

Total equity 57,546,622 58,070,571

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 111

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Statement of Changes in Equity

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 2020 2019

RETAINED EARNINGS $ $

Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 25,760,739 25,530,242

Adjusted opening balance 25,760,739 25,530,242

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (523,949) (69,503)

Other comprehensive income - 300,000

Total comprehensive income (523,949) 230,497

Closing balance as at 30 June 25,236,790 25,760,739

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 32,309,832 31,262,507

Comprehensive income Other comprehensive income - 1,047,325

Total comprehensive income - 1,047,325

Closing balance as at 30 June 32,309,832 32,309,832

TOTAL EQUITY Opening balance Balance carried forward from previous period 58,070,571 56,792,749

Adjusted opening balance 58,070,571 56,792,749

Comprehensive income Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (523,949) (69,503)

Other comprehensive income - 1,347,325

Total comprehensive income (523,949) 1,277,822

Closing balance as at 30 June 57,546,622 58,070,571

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

112 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Cash Flow Statement

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Note 2020 2019

OPERATING ACTIVITIES $ $

Cash received Revenues from Government 5,565,006 1,978,017

Rendering of services 3,302,256 2,374,925

Interest 20,211 22,531

Total cash received 8,887,473 4,375,473

Cash used Community grants (97,959) (93,331)

Employees (3,083,551) (2,447,341)

Suppliers (1,935,777) (1,248,549)

Net GST paid (598,268) (209,343)

Total cash used (5,715,555) (3,998,564)

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 3,171,918 376,909

INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash received Proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment - 2,273

Total cash received - 2,273

Cash used Purchase of property, plant & equipment 2.2A (195,744) (227,271)

Increase in term deposit (19,809) (12,668)

Total cash used (215,553) (239,939)

Net cash from/(used by) investing activities (215,553) (237,666)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held 2,956,365 139,243

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,365,551 1,226,308 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 2.1A 4,321,916 1,365,551

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1 13

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Overview

The Basis of Preparation

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by subsection 42 of Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

•

P

ublic Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

•

A

ustralian Accounting Standards and Interpretations—Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars.

New Accounting Standards

All new/revised/amending standards and/or interpretations that were issued prior to the sign-off date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect, and are not expected to have a future material effect, on the Council's financial statements.

Standard/Interpretation Nature of change in accounting policy, transitional provisions¹, and adjustment to financial statements

AASB15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers/AASB 2016-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards—Australian Implementation Guidance for Not-for-Profit Entities and AASB 1058 Income for Not-For-Profit Entities

AASB 15, AASB 2016-8 and AASB 1058 became effective 1 July 2019.

AASB 15 establishes a comprehensive framework for determining whether, how much and when the revenue is recognised. It replaces existing revenue recognition guidance, including AASB 118 Revenue, AASB 111 Construction Contracts and Interpretation 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes. The core principle of AASB 15 is that an entity recognises revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

AASB 1058 is relevant in circumstances where AASB 15 does not apply. AASB 1058 replaces most of the not-for-profit (NFP) provisions of AASB 1004 Contributions and applies to transactions where the consideration to acquire an asset is significantly less than fair value principally to enable the entity to further its objectives, and where volunteer services are received.

The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

114 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

AASB 16 Leases AASB 16 became effective on 1 July 2019.

This new standard has replaced AASB 117 Leases, Interpretations 4 Determining whether an Arrangement contains a Lease, Interpretations 115 Operating Leases—Incentives and Interpretation 127 Evaluation the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease.

AASB 16 provides a single lessee accounting model, requiring the recognition of assets and liabilities for all leases, together with options to exclude leases where the lease term is 12 months or less, or where the underlying asset is of low value. AASB 16 substantially carries forward the lessor accounting in AASB 117, with the distinction between operating leases and finance leases being retained. The details of the changes in accounting policies, transitional provisions and adjustments are disclosed below and in the relevant notes to the financial statements.

Application of AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers/AASB 1058 Income for Not-For-Profit Entities

The Council adopted AASB 15 and AASB 1058 using the modified retrospective approach, under which the cumulative effect of the initial application is recognised in retained earnings at 1 July 2019. Accordingly, the comparative information presented for 2019 is not restated, that is, it is presented as previously reported under the various applicable AASB's and related interpretations.

Under the new income recognition model the Council shall first determine whether an enforceable agreement exists and whether the promises to transfer goods or services to the customers are 'sufficiently specific'. If an enforceable agreement exists and the promises are 'sufficiently specific' (to a transaction or part of a transaction), the Council applies the general AASB 15 principles to determine the appropriate revenue recognition. If these criteria are not met the Council shall consider whether AASB 1058 applies.

AASB 15 and AASB 1058 did not have any impact on the Council on transition.

AASB 16 did not have any impact on the Council on transition.

Taxation

The Council is exempt from all forms of taxation except for Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Events after the Reporting Period

The COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 is still ongoing as at 30 June 2020 and it is expected that it continue for some time. Effects experienced by the Council due to the pandemic include reduced camping fee income and daycare income reduced on expectation.

The pandemic will continue to impact the Councils camping fee income and daycare revenue, however it is difficult to estimate the total future impact due to the uncertainty of when the COVID-19 restrictions will be fully lifted.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1 15

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE This section analyses the financial performance of the Council for the year ended 30 June 2020.

1.1: Expenses

2020 2019

$ $

1.1A: Employee Benefits Wages and salaries 2,291,127 1,796,809

Superannuation —Defined contribution plans 264,707 193,130

Leave and other entitlements 233,160 276,752

Director's fees 150,190 103,946

Total employee benefits 2,939,185 2,370,637

Accounting Policy

Accounting policies for employee related expenses is contained in the People and relationships section.

1.1B: Suppliers Goods and services supplied or rendered Equipment hire 109,311 122,223

Contractors 630,140 310,026

Materials & supplies 228,695 184,940

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 968,146 617,189

Goods supplied 337,006 307,163

Services rendered 631,140 310,026

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 968,146 617,189

Other suppliers Workers compensation expenses 97,721 61,610

Low value leases 9,480 -

Total other suppliers 107,201 61,610

Total suppliers 1,075,347 678,799

116 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Accounting Policy

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets The Council has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $20,000). The Council recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The Council has no short-term leasing commitments as at 30 June 2020.

1.1C: Occupancy Expenses Repairs & maintenance 50,104 18,621

Water rates 84,491 23,808

Other 37,397 31,205

Total occupancy expenses 171,992 73,634

1.1D: Community Grants Other grants and activities 98,379 78,738

Total community grants 98,379 78,738

2020 2019

$ $

1.1E: Impairment Loss Allowance on Financial Instruments Impairment on trade and other receivables - 5,424

Total finance costs - 5,424

1.1F: Other Expenses Accountancy fees 189,951 180,940

Annual report printing 524 14,326

Audit fees 21,000 44,000

Bank charges 3,125 590

Board costs 3,635 4,125

Computer costs 23,864 2,059

Consultancy fees - 9,000

Conference & travel expenses 13,931 9,524

Fines & penalties 2,866 2,333

General expenses 18,268 20,774

Insurance 75,241 80,727

Legal costs 34,598 75,741

Minor equipment replacement 11,731 367

Motor vehicle expenses 100,051 102,254

Office supplies 30,360 31,804

Staff amenities 7,284 6,688

Telephone, fax & internet costs 20,433 25,764

Work, health and safety expenses 47,428 23,595

Total other expenses 604,290 634,611

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 11 7

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

1.2: Own-Source Revenue and Gains 2020 2019

$ $

Own-Source Revenue

1.2A: Revenue from contracts with customers Rendering of services 1,243,305 1,093,100

Housing rentals 62,487 61,285

Park lease - annual rental 315,861 310,602

- 25% of park income 417,703 515,752

Daycare fees 36,661 31,474

CCCS Daycare Subsidy 99,923 81,410

ATO Cashflow Boost 50,000 -

Other income 51,434 57,833

Total revenue from contracts with customers 2,277,374 2,151,456

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic the national park was closed from March through to June and as a result the park Camping fees, daycare fees and CCS Daycare subsidy income were down.

Disaggregation of revenue from contracts with customers Major service line Construction services 68,753 145,120

Cleaning services 473,481 348,763

Roads services 402,770 400,552

Grounds services 36,029 34,357

Entry services 228,453 130,810

Service delivery 33,819 33,497

Housing rentals 62,487 61,285

Park Lease 733,564 826,354

Daycare income 136,584 112,884

ATO Cashflow Boost 50,000 0

Other income 51,434 57,833

2,277,374 2,151,456

Type of customer Australian government entities (related parties) 2,240,713 2,119,982

Private sector 36,661 31,474

2,277,374 2,151,456

Timing of transfer of services Over time 2,277,374 2,151,456

2,277,374 2,151,456

118 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Accounting Policy

Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised when control has been transferred to the buyer. All of the Council's current contracts for services have been reviewed and assessed and it has been determined that they are in scope of AASB 15 and that the performance obligations are sufficiently specific to determine when they are satisfied.

The following is a description of principal activities from which the council generates its revenue: Housing rentals, daycare operations, Park lease, road repairs and maintenance, grounds maintenance, cleaning of public facilities and offices, entry station operations, building and infrastructure maintenance.

The transaction price is the total amount of consideration to which the Council expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring promised goods or services to a customer. The consideration promised in a contract with a customer may include fixed amounts, variable amounts, or both.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30 day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

2020 2019

$ $

1.2B: Interest Deposits 20,211 30,533

Total interest 20,211 30,533

Accounting Policy

Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest method.

1.2C: Other Gains Other - 2,273

Total Other Gains - 2,273

Accounting Policy

Sale of Assets Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has been passed to the buyer.

1.2D: Revenue from Government Australian Government Entities (related entity) 2,471,787 1,954,547

Total Revenue from Government 2,471,787 1,954,547

Accounting Policy

Revenue from Government Revenue from Government is recognised when Council obtains control of the grant and it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to Council and the amount of the grant can be reliably measured.

If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before it is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied.

1.2E: Contribution from Government Land contributed by Australian Government Entities - 300,000

Total Contribution from Government - 300,000

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 11 9

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

FINANCIAL POSITION This section analyses the Council's assets used to conduct its operations and the operating liabilities incurred as a result.

Employee related information is disclosed in the People and Relationships section.

2.1: Financial Assets 2020 2019

$ $

2.1A: Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash on hand or on deposit 4,321,916 1,365,551

Total cash and cash equivalents 4,321,916 1,365,551

The closing balance of Cash on hand or on deposit does not include amounts held in Term Deposit.

See note 2.1C Other Financial Assets for more information.

Accounting Policy

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount, Cash and cash equivalents includes:

a) cash on hand;

b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of 3 months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value; and

c) cash in special accounts.

2.1B: Trade and Other Receivables Goods and services receivable Goods and services 780,511 553,627

Total goods and services receivable 780,511 553,627

Other receivables Interest receivable 4,967 8,460

Total other receivables 4,967 8,460

Total trade and other receivables (gross) 785,478 562,087

Less impairment allowance - (12,996)

Total trade and other receivables (net) 785,478 549,091

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2019: 30 days).

120 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy

Financial Assets Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting contractual cashflows where the cashflows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

Accounting Policy

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period.

2020 2019

$ $

2.1C: Other Financial Assets Term deposits 1,080,723 1,060,913

Total other financial assets 1,080,723 1,060,913

Term deposits are expected to be recovered in no more than 12 months.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 12 1

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council

ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

2.2: Non-Financial Assets 2.2A: Reconciliation of the Opening and Closing Balances of Property, Plant and Equipment

Item Land Buildings on

freehold land Leasehold improvements Computer

Equipment Plant & Equipment Furniture Vehicles TOTAL

As at 1 July 2019 Gross book value 45,000,000 10,543,091 258,244 71,846 511,922 108,522 451,950 56,945,575

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (711) (166,345) (58,494) (326,690) (84,422) (304,757) (941,419)

Total as at 1 July 2019 45,000,000 10,542,380 91,899 13,352 185,232 24,100 147,193 56,004,156

Additions Purchase - 3,866 33,813 24,819 103,618 29,627 - 195,743

Depreciation (264,464) (26,130) (11,997) (63,380) (6,391) (31,766) (404,128)

Disposals - - - - - -

Total as at 30 June 2020 45,000,000 10,281,782 99,582 26,174 225,470 47,336 115,427 55,795,771

Total as at 30 June 2020 represented by Gross book value 45,000,000 10,546,957 292,057 96,665 615,540 138,149 451,950 57,141,318

Accumulated depreciation and impairment - (265,175) (192,475) (70,491) (390,070) (90,813) (336,523) (1,345,547)

Total as at 30 June 2020 45,000,000 10,281,782 99,582 26,174 225,470 47,336 115,427 55,795,771

No property, plant and equipment are expected to be sold or disposed within the next 12 months.

Revaluations of non-financial assets All revaluations were conducted in accordance with the revaluation policy as stated on note 2.2B. On 30th June 2019, an independent valuer conducted the revaluations of Land and Buildings.

122 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

2.2B: Accounting Policy Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition.

Asset Recognition Threshold Purchases of property, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $500, which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

Revaluations Following initial recognition at cost, property, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations are conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extend that they reverse a previous revaluation increment for that class. Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued amount.

Depreciation Depreciable property, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to Council, using in all cases, the straight line method of depreciation. Leasehold improvements are amortised on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the estimated useful life of the improvements of the unexpired period of the lease.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current and future reporting periods, as appropriate.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 12 3

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2019 2018

Building on Freehold Land 40 Years 40 Years

Leasehold Improvements 10 to 40 Years 10 to 40 Years

Plant and Equipment 3 to 10 years 3 to 10 years

The depreciation rates for the ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2020. Where indications of impairment exist, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated and an impairment adjustment made if the asset’s recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs of disposal and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Council were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

124 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

2.3: Payables 2020 2019

$ $

2.3A: Suppliers Trade creditors and accruals 301,453 236,736

Total suppliers 301,453 236,736

All supplier payables are expected to be settled within 12 months. Settlement is usually made within 30 days.

2.3B: Other Payables Wages and salaries 114,676 66,657

Superannuation 39,008 33,000

Rent received in advance (Park) 78,438 77,356

Grants income in advance—Australian Government Entities 3,510,421 72,585 Total other payables 3,742,543 249,598

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 1 25

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

PEOPLE AND RELATIONSHIPS This section describes a range of employment and post employment benefits provided to our people and our relationships with other key people.

3: Employee Provisions 2020 2019

$ $

Note 3.1A: Employee Provisions Leave 296,312 263,347

Total employee provisions 296,312 263,347

Accounting Policy Liabilities for 'short-term employee benefits' and termination benefits expected within twelve months of the end of the reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave. Employees have the opportunity to elect if they wish to have their personal leave balance paid out at the end of the financial year. For those who choose not to, the balance is provided for in the employee benefits.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees' remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the Council's employer superannuation contribution rates, to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been calculated using the Department of Finance's short-hand method; in assessing the on-costs and the probability factors for employees. The liability for long service leave takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

Superannuation The Council's staff are members of the AMP Superleader Scheme, the Health Employees Superannuation

Trust Australia (HESTA), Australian Super, First State Super and LG Super.

Employer Contributions amounting to $258,700 (2019: $199,483) for the Council, in relation to these schemes have been expensed in these financial statements.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June represents outstanding contributions.

126 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

2020 2019

$ $

Note 3.1B: Former Employee Provisions Provision of leave on termination of employment 96,958 159,459

Total former employee provisions 96,958 159,459

The former CEO's employment ceased in October 2018, due to the clauses of his contract, the Council will continue to payout his entitlements at half pay until January 2022.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 12 7

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

3.2: Key Management Personnel Remuneration

Key management personnel are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of the Council. The Council has determined the key management personnel to be the CEO and the Deputy CEO. Key management personnel remuneration is reported on the table below:

2020 2019

$ $

Short-term employee benefits 268,469 312,690

Post-employment benefits 26,605 24,026

Other long-term employee benefits 6,391 6,023

Total senior executive remuneration expenses 301,465 342,738

The total number of key management personnel that are included in the above table are two (2019: three).

1. The above key management personnel remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister's remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Council.

3.3: Related Party Disclosures

Related party relationships:

The Council is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties to the Council are Directors, Key Management Personnel, Community Members, Portfolio Minister and other Australian Government entities.

Transactions with related parties:

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. Such transactions include the payment or refund of taxes, receipt of Medicare rebate or higher education loans. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

The main functions of Council are land holding and management, provision of community services for its members and business enterprises. Therefore, community members transact with the Council in the daily operations. Such transactions include the payment of daycare fees, housing rental, receipts of scholarships, assistance payments, employment wages and participation in community activities that the Council put on. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

128 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

The following transactions with related parties occurred during the financial year:

2020 2019

$ $

—Directors fees paid to board members during the year. There is no balance outstanding at year end. 150,190 102,310

150,190 102,310

—William Brown, a registered member, was employed as a contractor to carry out repairs on houses. These were arms lengths transactions paid at a commercial rate. There is no balance outstanding at year end.

2,080 -

—Jervis Bay Underground Pty Ltd, a company of a registered members spouse, was employed to carry out asbestos removal and truck hire. These were arms lengths transactions paid at a commercial rate. There is no balance outstanding at year end.

4,649 -

—Bruce Yuke, a registered member, was invoiced for art supplies. This was an arms length transaction and paid at a commercial rate. There is no balance outstanding at the year end.

375 -

—JB Tree Services, a business of a registered member's son was employed to carry out the removal of tree branches. This was an arms length transaction and paid at a commercial rate. There is no outstanding balance at the year end.

300 -

3.4: Remuneration of Auditors Remuneration to the Australian National Audit Office for auditing the financial statements for the reporting period 33,000 32,000

33,000 32,000

No other services were provided by the ANAO.

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 12 9

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

MANAGING UNCERTAINTIES This section analyses how the Council manages financial risks within its operating environment.

4.1: Contingent Assets and Liabilities

Claims for damages or costs Total

2020 $

2019 $

2020 $

2019 $

Contingent liabilities Balance from previous period 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000

New contingent liabilities recognised - 50,000 - 50,000

Liabilities realised (50,000) (50,000) (50,000) (50,000)

Total contingent liabilities - 50,000 - 50,000

Net contingent liabilities - 50,000

Quantifiable Contingencies There is currently nil contingencies that council is aware of.

Accounting Policy Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

130 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

4.2: Financial Instruments 2020 2019

$ $

4.2A: Categories of Financial Instruments

Financial assets Financial assets at amortised cost Term deposits 1,080,723 1,060,913

Cash and cash equivalents 4,321,916 1,365,551

Trade and other receivables 785,478 562,087

Total financial assets at amortised cost

6,188,117 2,988,551

Total financial assets 6,188,117 2,988,551

Financial liabilities Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost Trade creditors & accrued expenses 301,453 236,736

Rent received in advance (Park) 78,438 77,356

Grants in advance 3,510,421 72,585

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

3,890,312 386,677

Total financial liabilities 3,890,312 386,677

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 13 1

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

Accounting Policy

Financial assets With the implementation of AASB 9 Financial Instruments for the first time in 2019, Council classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss:

b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and

c) financial assets at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both Council’s business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of the initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when Council becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial Assets at Amortised Cost Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

Effective Interest Method Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI) Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as a result of fair value measurement of the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL) Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial assets either doesn’t meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment of Financial Assets Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

132 A nnual Report 2019-2020

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Financial Liabilities Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade’ date.

Financial Liabilities at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial Liabilities at Amortised Cost Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost.

Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 13 3

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

4.2B: Net Gains or Losses on Financial Assets 2020 2019

$ $

Financial assets at amortised cost Interest revenue 20,211 30,533

Net gains/(losses) on financial assets at amortised cost 20,211 30,533

Net gains on financial assets 20,211 30,533

The net income from financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss is $20,211 (2019: $30,533).

4.3: Fair Value Measurements

Accounting Policy

Land and buildings are valued by an independent valuer using the market valuation method.

Leasehold improvements, other property, plant and equipment are valued using the depreciation replacement cost method.

134 A nnual Report 2019-2020

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council ABN: 62 564 797 956

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements

for the period ended 30 June 2020

4.3A: Fair Value Measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period 2020 2019

$ $

Non-financial assets Land 45,000,000 45,000,000

Leasehold improvements 99,582 91,899

Buildings on freehold land 10,281,782 10,542,380

Other property, plant & equipment 414,407 369,877

Total fair value measurements of assets in the statement of financial position 55,795,771 56,004,156

1. Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council did not measure any non-financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2020.

5.1A: Aggregate Assets and Liabilities

2020 2019

$ $

Assets are expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months 6,188,117 2,975,555

More than 12 months 55,795,771 56,004,156

Total Assets 61,983,888 58,979,711

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months 4,307,643 669,513

More than 12 months 129,623 239,627

Total Liabilities 4,437,266 909,140

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 13 5

Compliance List of Requirements — corpor ate Commonwealth entities PGPA Rule

Reference

Page Number

Description Requirement

17BE Contents of annual report

17BE(a) 3 Details of the legislation establishing the body. Mandatory

17BE(b)(i) 12 A summary of the objects and functions of the entity

as set out in legislation.

Mandatory

17BE(b)(ii) 2 The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s

corporate plan for the reporting period. Mandatory

17BE(c) 12 The names of the persons holding the position

of responsible Minister or responsible Ministers during the reporting period, and the titles of those responsible Ministers.

Mandatory

17BE(d) NA Directions given to the entity by the Minister under

an Act or instrument during the reporting period. If applicable, mandatory

17BE(e) NA Any government policy order that applied in relation

to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(f) NA Particulars of non-compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(g) 82 Annual performance statements in accordance with

paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the rule.

Mandatory

136 A nnual Report 2019-2020

PGPA Rule Reference

Page Number

Description Requirement

17BE(h),17BE(i) NA A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(j) 30 Information on the accountable authority, or each

member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period.

Mandatory

17BE(k) 62 Outline of the organisational structure of the entity

(including any subsidiaries of the entity). Mandatory

17BE(ka) 81 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing

and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees;

(b) statistics on part-time employees;

(c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location.

Mandatory

17BE(l) 14 Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia)

of major activities or facilities of the entity. Mandatory

17BE(m) 14 Information relating to the main corporate

governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period.

Mandatory

17BE(n), 17BE(o)

63 For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value of the transactions.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(p) NA Any significant activities and changes that affected

the operation or structure of the entity during the reporting period.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(q) NA Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of

administrative tribunals that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, mandatory

Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council 13 7

PGPA Rule Reference

Page Number

Description Requirement

17BE(r) NA Particulars of any reports on the entity given by:

(a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(s) NA An explanation of information not obtained from a

subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report.

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(t) NA Details of any indemnity that applied during the

reporting period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs).

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(taa) 63 The following information about the audit

committee for the entity:

(a) a direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the audit committee;

(b) the name of each member of the audit committee;

(c) the qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the audit committee;

(d) information about each member’s attendance at meetings of the audit committee;

(e) the remuneration of each member of the audit committee.

Mandatory

17BE(ta) 36 Information about executive remuneration. Mandatory

17BF Disclosure requirements for government business enterprises

17BF(1)(a)(i) NA An assessment of significant changes in the entity’s overall financial structure and financial conditions. If applicable, mandatory

17BF(1)(a)(ii) NA An assessment of any events or risks that could cause financial information that is reported not to be indicative of future operations or financial conditions.

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(1)(b) NA Information on dividends paid or recommended. If applicable,

mandatory

138 A nnual Report 2019-2020

PGPA Rule Reference

Page Number

Description Requirement

17BF(1)(c) NA Details of any community service obligations the government business enterprise has including:

(a) an outline of actions taken to fulfil those obligations; and

(b) an assessment of the cost of fulfilling those obligations.

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(2) NA A statement regarding the exclusion of

information on the grounds that the information is commercially sensitive and would be likely to result in unreasonable commercial prejudice to the government business enterprise.

If applicable, mandatory