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Tiwi Land Council—Report for 2018-19


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2018-2019 Annual Report 1

ANNUAL REPORT

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AUTHORITY FOR SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ANNUAL REPORT

Introduction

Pursuant to Section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, the accountable authority of the entity must prepare and give an annual report to the responsible Minister, for presentation to the Parliament, on the Land Council’s activities during the period.

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ENABLING LEGISLATION

Enabling legislation

The Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 provides a grant to the Tiwi Land Trust, and is the enabling legislation of the Tiwi Land Council established by Special Gazette No.S162 of 18 August 1978.

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RESPONSIBLE MINISTER

Responsible Minister

From 1 July 2018 to 28 May 2019, Senator the Hon Nigel Scullion was the Minister responsible for Tiwi Land Council as Minister for Indigenous Affairs. From 29 May 2019 to 30 June 2019, the Minister responsible for Tiw Land Council was the Hon Ken Wyatt AM MP, Minister for Indigenous Australians.

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LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Letter to Minister

The Honourable Ken Wyatt AM MP

Minister for Indigenous Australians

PO Box 6100

Parliament House

Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister,

FORTIETH ANNUAL REPORT

In accordance the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, I am pleased to present to you the fortieth annual report of the Tiwi Land Council for the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019. The report includes a copy of our audited financial statements forwarded to you by the Australian National Audit Office, tabled at Tiwi Land Council meeting number 311 on the 5th September 2019.

Yours sincerely,

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chairman

5th September 2019

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CONTACT

A STATEMENT OF OUR PAST

“The aboriginals of Bathurst and Melville islands remained a unified entity repelling any unwanted effects of alien contact, embracing others, and generally enjoying authority over their own lives and customs for a period of two centuries.”

(Krastins, V. “The Tiwi: A Culture Contact History of the Australian Aborigines on Bathurst and Melville Islands 1705-1942.” BA Hons Thesis, ANU:1972).

A STATEMENT OF PRESENT PURPOSE

“The Tiwi Land Council represents all Tiwi people in the protection of our land, sea and environment, while at the same time supporting sustainable economic development to improve Tiwi lives through employment, income, education and health opportunities.

Our reputation is founded on our cultural and leadership strengths, following in the footsteps of our visionary past Leaders.”

(Tiwi Land Council Leadership workshop. Chairman and Executive Managers. Pickataramoor, 27th and 28th of September 2016).

“We believe the Tiwi land Council’s purpose is to enable the Tiwi to acquire and manage land and promote economic and community development.”

(Corporate plan 2017-2021)

OUR VISION FOR THE FUTURE

“Our vision is of an independent and resilient Tiwi society built on the orderly and well managed utilization of our natural and human resources through reliance upon our own management, maintenance and protection of unique cultural and natural resource values for the enjoyment and benefit of future generations of Tiwi.”

(Tiwi Land Council Meetings and Workshops developing the strategies and responsibilities leading to publication and ratification of the Tiwi Islands Regional Natural Resource Management Strategy, 29th September 2003).

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CONTACT

Mr Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chair of Tiwi Land Council

Email: admin@tiwilandcouncil.com

Phone: (08) 8970 9373

Mail: PO Box 38545, Winnellie NT 0821

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MINISTERIAL DIRECTIONS AND GOVERNMENT POLICY ORDERS

Ministerial directions

To ensure transparency in the decision-making process of the Tiwi Land Council, no directions were issued by the responsible Minister, or other Minister(s), under the enabling legislation of the Tiwi land Council or any other legislation or legislative instruments.

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENTS

Chair's Report

Chair: Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

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CHAIR`S REPORT

Welcome to the 40th Annual Report, including our 40th unqualified audit. I would like to take some time to pay my respects to our Tiwi families who have lost loved ones over the past twelve months. Quality Tiwi men and women all, who have left a legacy on our Tiwi lives, with many leaving us far too early.

The Tiwi Land Council has taken some time lately to reflect on what we have achieved this past 12 months. I can happily report that we have been doing some amazing work for the benefit of all Tiwi people.

Just some projects and achievements over the past 12 months that have come to fruition or are in the final stages multimillion-dollar ferry pontoons and welcome centre at Wurrumiyanga and Paru and the official opening of our first own property in Darwin at 116 Reichardt Road Winnellie. We continued to work to help secure the future of the Tiwi Forestry Project, Port Melville is cranking up business, the Tiwi Bombers are looking at a new era of excellence and our Tiwi College continues to be a shining light in Indigenous Education.

Andrew Tipungwuti, as our first Tiwi CEO, embraced the role during this time. This was always part of our vision for Tiwi people to be elevated on merit to Management positions throughout the Islands and we hope other Tiwi people will follow in his footsteps.

Our TLC Executive Team is leading from the front as well, being involved in everything from housing, Environmental, Sea and Land ranger programs, Training, Education, Health, Economic Development, and Culture, to help make a better life for our people.

I was humbled back in February 2018 to have been elected as TLC Chairman for a third term, with Leslie Tungatulum as Deputy Chairman. We look forward to working for you all as we have done in the past.

And finally, as noted at the top of this introduction, we have achieved an unqualified audit for the 40th year in a row to continue the excellence in governance demanded by our past leaders many years ago.

We hope you enjoy our 2018/19 Annual Report and we look forward to the next twelve months of achievement for Tiwi people.

Muna,

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman 5th September 2019

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CHAIR`S REPORT

Welcome to the 40th Annual Report, including our 40th unqualified audit. I would like to take some time to pay my respects to our Tiwi families who have lost loved ones over the past twelve months. Quality Tiwi men and women all, who have left a legacy on our Tiwi lives, with many leaving us far too early.

The Tiwi Land Council has taken some time lately to reflect on what we have achieved this past 12 months. I can happily report that we have been doing some amazing work for the benefit of all Tiwi people.

Just some projects and achievements over the past 12 months that have come to fruition or are in the final stages multimillion-dollar ferry pontoons and welcome centre at Wurrumiyanga and Paru and the official opening of our first own property in Darwin at 116 Reichardt Road Winnellie. We continued to work to help secure the future of the Tiwi Forestry Project, Port Melville is cranking up business, the Tiwi Bombers are looking at a new era of excellence and our Tiwi College continues to be a shining light in Indigenous Education.

Andrew Tipungwuti, as our first Tiwi CEO, embraced the role during this time. This was always part of our vision for Tiwi people to be elevated on merit to Management positions throughout the Islands and we hope other Tiwi people will follow in his footsteps.

Our TLC Executive Team is leading from the front as well, being involved in everything from housing, Environmental, Sea and Land ranger programs, Training, Education, Health, Economic Development, and Culture, to help make a better life for our people.

I was humbled back in February 2018 to have been elected as TLC Chairman for a third term, with Leslie Tungatulum as Deputy Chairman. We look forward to working for you all as we have done in the past.

And finally, as noted at the top of this introduction, we have achieved an unqualified audit for the 40th year in a row to continue the excellence in governance demanded by our past leaders many years ago.

We hope you enjoy our 2018/19 Annual Report and we look forward to the next twelve months of achievement for Tiwi people.

Muna,

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman 5th September 2019

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Introductory Statement

The annual performance statement is for section 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the 2018/19 financial year and accurately presents the Land Council’s performance in accordance with section 39(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The Accountable Authority met at the Land Council meeting 311 on the 2nd September 2019, held at Wurrumiyanga.

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chair

Tiwi Land Council 2nd September 2019

Andrew Tipungwuti

Chief Executive Officer

Tiwi Land Council 2nd September 2019

Tiwi Land Council Purpose

We believe the Tiwi land Council provides a continuation of those processes now affirmed in legislation; recognising our one language and common and distinct customs; our constant contact with each other and shared hunting grounds and ceremonies; our established practice of calling meetings and seeking the advice of our elders that have served our people for thousands of years, and is recognised and respected authority for the management, protection, and development of our interests.

Functions of the Tiwi Land Council are set out under enabling legislation, Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, being consultative, assistive, determinative and informative in nature.

Summary of functions of the Tiwi Land Council under the enabling legislation;

· ascertain and express the wishes and interest of Aboriginals as to the management of Aboriginal land and the appropriate legislation concerning that land;

· protect the interests of traditional Aboriginals owners of and other Aborigines interested in Aboriginal land;

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Introductory Statement

The annual performance statement is for section 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the 2018/19 financial year and accurately presents the Land Council’s performance in accordance with section 39(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The Accountable Authority met at the Land Council meeting 311 on the 2nd September 2019, held at Wurrumiyanga.

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chair

Tiwi Land Council 2nd September 2019

Andrew Tipungwuti

Chief Executive Officer

Tiwi Land Council 2nd September 2019

Tiwi Land Council Purpose

We believe the Tiwi land Council provides a continuation of those processes now affirmed in legislation; recognising our one language and common and distinct customs; our constant contact with each other and shared hunting grounds and ceremonies; our established practice of calling meetings and seeking the advice of our elders that have served our people for thousands of years, and is recognised and respected authority for the management, protection, and development of our interests.

Functions of the Tiwi Land Council are set out under enabling legislation, Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, being consultative, assistive, determinative and informative in nature.

Summary of functions of the Tiwi Land Council under the enabling legislation;

· ascertain and express the wishes and interest of Aboriginals as to the management of Aboriginal land and the appropriate legislation concerning that land;

· protect the interests of traditional Aboriginals owners of and other Aborigines interested in Aboriginal land;

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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Introductory Statement

The annual performance statement is for section 39(1)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 for the 2018/19 financial year and accurately presents the Land Council’s performance in accordance with section 39(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

In our opinion, these annual performance statements are based on properly maintained records, accurately reflect the performance of the entity, and comply with subsection 39(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013.

The Accountable Authority met at the Land Council meeting 311 on the 2nd September 2019, held at Wurrumiyanga.

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chair

Tiwi Land Council 2nd September 2019

Andrew Tipungwuti

Chief Executive Officer

Tiwi Land Council 2nd September 2019

Tiwi Land Council Purpose

We believe the Tiwi land Council provides a continuation of those processes now affirmed in legislation; recognising our one language and common and distinct customs; our constant contact with each other and shared hunting grounds and ceremonies; our established practice of calling meetings and seeking the advice of our elders that have served our people for thousands of years, and is recognised and respected authority for the management, protection, and development of our interests.

Functions of the Tiwi Land Council are set out under enabling legislation, Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, being consultative, assistive, determinative and informative in nature.

Summary of functions of the Tiwi Land Council under the enabling legislation;

· ascertain and express the wishes and interest of Aboriginals as to the management of Aboriginal land and the appropriate legislation concerning that land;

· protect the interests of traditional Aboriginals owners of and other Aborigines interested in Aboriginal land;

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· assist Aboriginals in the protection of sacred sites on land and sea;

· consult Aboriginal traditional owners and others interested Aboriginal on any proposal relating to the use of Aboriginal land;

· negotiate with persons wanting to obtain an estate or interest in land where the land is held by a Land Trust;

· assist Aboriginals to carry out commercial activities in a manner that will not cause the Land Council to incur financial liability or receive financial benefit;

· where the land is a community living area assist the owner of that land in relation to any dealings on that land;

· arrange and pay for legal assistance to help Aboriginals pursue a land claim;

· compile and keep a register of names of the members of the Land Council, and the members of the Land Trust;

· supervise and provide administrative support or other assistance to the Tiwi Aboriginal Land Trust;

· perform any function that is conferred by a law of the Northern Territory in respect to the protection of sacred sites, access to Aboriginal land and the management of wildlife on Aboriginal land;

· the Land Council shall not take any action, including the giving or withholding of consent, in any matter concerning land managed by the Land trust, unless the land Council is satisfied that:

· the traditional Aboriginal owners of that land understand the purpose of the proposed action and have consented to it as a group; and

· any Aboriginal community or group that may be affected by the proposed action has been consulted;

· the Land Council has function pertaining to the method of endorsing or rejecting exploration and petroleum applications;

· the granting of section 19 leases; and

· determination of the distribution of mining royalties’ equivalents.

Analysis of performance against purpose

The consistent decision-making approach, pertaining to decisions on matters of land, articulated on 1st June 1977 by Matthew Wonaeamirri, Eric Brooks, Hyacinth Tungatulum, Raphael Apuatimi, Cyril Rioli, a Special Meeting of Clan Leaders at Pularumpi, continues to lead to considerable practical discomfort in approval of the method of choice. We see this as an opportunity to display the uniqueness and intricacies of Tiwi culture and will continue to forward this position.

Results

Performance criterion communication

Tiwi communication focuses upon the spoken language allowing comprehensive communicative acts to be undertaken during meetings. Publication of written material, of matters of interest to the Tiwi is produced, with distribution in excess of 1,200 copies on a bi-monthly cycle.

Criterion Source

Communication is referred to on page 9 of the Tiwi Land Council Corporate Plan 2018-2022. located at http://tiwilandcouncil.com/documents/Uploads/Corporate_Plan_2018-2022.pdf.

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Criterion Budget Performance

Measure

Actual Performance Measure Comment

Land Council Meeting 6 6

Executive Management Committee 12 8

Consultative Committee Attendance at consultative committee meetings at least half-yearly

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are established in the 4 areas of township leasing, (Wurrumiyanga, Milikapiti and Ranku, and Pirlangimpi), with Land Development Corporation and Department of Fisheries and Primary Industries.

Family Trust Meeting Attend family trust meetings twice yearly 15

Publications Production of: Bi-monthly

newsletter

The Tiwi 6

Annual Report 1

Audit Financial Report 1

Result against performance criterion

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Performance criterion education

Familiarisation by the governing body of the scope and power afforded to the Tiwi Land Council under its enabling legislation is aimed at aiding the decision-making process. Responsibilities of members and officeholders imposed upon Government entities under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and associated Rules, have provided a stable foundation on dealing with accountability and transparency.

Criterion Source

Communication is referred to on page 9 of the Tiwi Land Council Corporate Plan 2018-2022. located at http://tiwilandcouncil.com/documents/Uploads/Corporate_Plan_2018-2022.pdf.

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Criterion Budget Performance

Measure

Actual Performance Measure Comment

Familiarisation with legislation Training in Executive Management

· General Corporate governance

· PGPA Act and Rules

· ALRA Act

In house general accounting concepts

and distinguishing income, expense, asset, liabilities, and equity.

Method of choice Trustee and delegates to review every six months Revisit the method of choice, approach in

determination remains consistent since the commencement of the land council in 1978.

Tiwi continues to maintain its decision-making process pertaining to land and will pursue consistency of their approach with incorporation within the method of choice.

Meetings of Land Council Review every six months:

· Process on convening meetings, defining what is a quorum of a meeting

· Confirm that a question is to be settled by a majority of votes of members present and voting

· Circumstances when the presiding member has a casting vote

Outline of sections 31(1) to (4) of the ALRA, determines who may call meetings and the necessary numbers that met the quorum requirements.

Questions arising at meetings shall be decided by majority section 31(5) of the ALRA.

Under section 31(6) the presiding member of a land council meeting has

Meeting protocols and framework development of agenda has increased meeting efficiency, aiding in focusing on agenda items and developing respectful forums and sound debating of issues.

Meeting rules including the inclusion of proxies is in a development and applicability phase.

Result against performance criterion

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· Review the written rules of convening and conduct of meetings that have been approved by the Minister

a casting vote in the case of an even vote count.

Draft document draw, further matters dealing with co-opted and proxy participation.

Community Corporation Training of Executive Management Committee

General corporate governance

General financial interpretation

Director’s roles and responsibilities

Development of draft document, Protocols: dealing with Tiwi and Associated Entities.

KPMG (pro-bono) 10 months of assessment of corporate governance focused on Tiwi entities that seek assistance from Land Council.

Operational overview financial reports have been presented by business entities.

In house general assessment of corporate governance focused on Tiwi entities that seek assistance from Land Council

Draft protocols have been developed by an external party, highlighting the separation of duties of associated entities.

Increased related party disclosures in financial accounts in 2018-19, as required by accounting standards, will require continued work in the coming year on the foundations created.

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Annual reporting requirements

Basis: Section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 requires preparation of an Annual Report.

Financial Statements: This report contains our prepared financial statements, including the Auditor- General`s report on those financial statements.

Report of Operations: Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (PGPA) Rule 2014. This report contains that detail required.

Staff Retained and Employed

Limited and best use of funds has required the Land Council retain external professional staff to provide key services:

Legal - Bowden McCormack Lawyers & Advisors.

The Land Council is required to employ permanent staff. During the 2018/19 Financial Year it directly employed nine persons:

1. Chief Executive Officer, Andrew Tipungwuti.

2. General Manager, Garry Cross.

3. Chief Financial Officer and Principal Legal Officer, Derek Mayger.

4. Registrar of Traditional Owners, Emma Kerinauia.

5. Finance Manager, Josephine Martens.

6. Senior Administration Officer, Leonie Melder.

7. Land and Resource Manager, Kate Hadden.

8. Executive Officer, Terry Larkin.

9. Receptionist, Thomasina Woody.

Review of operations and future prospects

The functions of the Land Council are described at Section 23 of the enabling legislation and refer to the good management, protection, and development of land pursuant to the express wishes of those who own the land, having regard to the opinions of others who also live on that

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land. Timeliness, resource allocation, and priority protection mandates are also provided at Section 23AA.

To implement the functions of the Land Council with increased efficiency and efficacy, training has been identified as strategic development, focus on corporate governance, financial management, and statutory legislation and regulations interpretation.

Land Council will continue the well-respected natural resource management of the Tiwi Islands, along with any negotiations pertaining to exploration licence applications, petroleum exploration permit applications and section 19 leases with traditional owners and interested businesses.

In 2019-2020 it is anticipated that the Tiwi private economy will employ increased Tiwi’s in real jobs, creating income streams on investments. The Land Council looks forward to assisting these enterprises in accordance with section 23(ea) of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976.

We are entering a new phase, with the Executive Management Committee setting a strong foundation for the future direction of the Tiwi Land Council.

Performance

Through the past decade, the Land Council has adopted key performance indicators integrated within the outcome budgeting and financial management process.

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Note - Where appropriate a reference to Land also refers to Sea or other Waterways secured as a result of High Court determinations 2007/08.

Performance is measured and monitored within these output groups.

Financial resources and application

Detailed audited financial statements are attached. In summary, the Land Council received $4,521,000 from the Commonwealth in section 64(1) funding, with carried forward funding of $455,287 and earnings of $8,433, totaling $4,984,720. It was allocated during the financial year against the four output groups as illustrated in the charts below:

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Dollar expenditure for the financial year can be summarized in this accompanying graphic:

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Analysis of Performance

Tiwi Land Council expended funds in accordance with approved estimates, sections 34 and 35 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, with total expenditure of $1,497,229 below budget. Commitment to purchase at the end of June 2019, of communication equipment and a water bore and associated storage facility was $235,000, these good and service were not received by the 30 June 2019 and had not been recorded in the accounts.

Surplus for the year ending 30 June 2019 of $1,813,088 (2018: $1,152,800 surplus) included $265,864 (2018: $147,220) of depreciation non-cash expense, with cash increase of $378,706 (2018:$456,163 decrease) to $2,388,976 (2018: $2,010,270) representing 50.7% (2018: 71.9%) of equity.

The Tiwi Land Council holds on trust for the Office of Township Leasing an insurance settlement for the Wurrumiyanga pontoon destroyed by fire. These funds, $122,551, were used towards the construction phase of the new ferry pontoon terminal.

Funds received under s64(4) of the ALR Act, for the purchase of an office, were recognized as income of $642,086 (2018: $950,293) and as prepayments received of $207,621 (2018: $889,592) in 2019 financial year.

In addition to these funds, the Land Council also applies for and is in receipt of grants, significantly applied for management and environmental compliance in the use of land. Grant totals are reflected in our financial statements and noted in the Principal Output Group.

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LAND SEA AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Our vision is of an independent and resilient Tiwi society built on the orderly and well-managed utilisation of our natural resources. Inherent in this is the maintenance and protection of our unique cultural and natural resource values for the enjoyment and benefit of future generations of Tiwi.

A significant outcome for the year was entering into an agreement with Inpex (delivered through the Indigenous Land Corporation) to provide fire management funding to the Tiwi Ranger program up until 2021. This is the culmination of nearly 10 years work by the Tiwi Land Council partnering with research organisations to determine the science; and focusing Ranger work programs on changing burning regimes in order to reduce greenhouse gases and, subsequently, generate carbon credits. In return for operational funding, Inpex will receive up to the same value in Kyoto compliant carbon credits. Additional credits generated in any given year will remain with Tiwi.

Under current market conditions, credits generated by the Tiwi Fire Project are not sufficient to fund the entire Land and Marine Ranger programs. In 2017-18 the Commonwealth Government provided one year of funding to the Tiwi Land Rangers and Tiwi Marine Rangers through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy and Working on Country, respectively. As a result, Land Rangers were placed back onto full-time wages, and two vacant positions were filled. Marine Ranger staffing remained at 4 positions.

Successful negotiations with the Commonwealth Government resulted in a commitment to provide Ranger funding at the current level for a further three years to 2021. It is anticipated that income from fire management will be diverted to fill the gap in Marine Ranger support for Bathurst Island, however, funds for capital equipment still need to be sourced.

While fire management was a primary focus for the year, work continued in conventional areas such as weed and feral animal control, quarantine monitoring, marine debris surveys, and clean-ups, threatened species monitoring, coastal and land-based patrols, pre-development surveys, and support for visiting researchers. Weed and feral animal control activities will increase from 2018 due to additional funding support from the NT Government Ranger Grants program for Melville Island feral pig control, tramp ant management, and WONS weed management.

Tiwi Ranger professional development activities continued and included attendance and/or contribution to:

• Territory NRM Conference in Darwin.

• National forum on North Australian savanna.

• Workshops on best practice prescribed burning; climate change adaption.

• Committees; including Tiwi Coastal Waters Consultative Committee, Tiwi/University of Melbourne Science Reference Committee, Tiwi Island Fire and Weed Committee, TLC Executive Committee, Bushfires NT Arnhem Regional Committee, Bushfires NT Committee.

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• Hosting visits from PM&C staff, Commonwealth Ministers and overseas Ambassadors.

• Carrying out joint patrols with NT Fisheries.

• Accredited and non-accredited training in WHS, bio-security, fuel spills, weed treatment and chemical handling, navigation, incendiary use, and best practice prescribed burning. One Marine Ranger qualified with Certificate II in Fisheries Compliance, bringing the complement to all 4 Marine Rangers.

Significant gains were made during the year in integrated land use planning and strategic management. A successful ARC Linkage grant application will bring together Tiwi Landowners with high-quality researchers from several universities to develop Tiwi capacity for making land-use decisions on a landscape scale. A prospectus was also produced in support of an Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) on the Tiwi Islands, and the Land Council will apply for an IPA in the latter part of 2018 when the Commonwealth Government calls for applications.

Research partnerships and projects continued to flourish throughout 2018-198, and the Tiwi Land Council/University of Melbourne Science Reference Committee (SRC) met twice during the year. Two projects assessing mammal and seedling responses to different fire regimes were completed and results presented to the SRC. Other projects under discussion or underway include assessing the potential to manage feral cat impact through fire management, the response of olive ridley turtle hatchlings to inundation from rising sea levels, impacts of recreational fishing in local Tiwi waters, and several projects assessing threats and management opportunities for small mammal populations. The long-standing research relationship with CSIRO continued through studies on carbon sequestration and biodiversity in 18 experimental plots subjected to different fire treatments.

The Tiwi Land Council's Land Use Request process was maintained, ensuring that environmental matters are considered prior to any natural resource use or modification and that landowners are adequately consulted. A review of the Land Use Request process will be undertaken in 2019-20. 30 requests were processed for minor projects that involved natural resource use. The new Researcher Protocols were successfully implemented and have been well received by researchers, who all agreed to the conditions set out. The Protocols have now been used as a template for other areas such as Media, recreational fishers and general visitors.

Details of consultants engaged

Total Land and Resource Management Consultancies 2018-2019: $ 30,240

ABA Homelands location and costing:

• NBC Consulting $30,240

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Grants received

Funding stream & project Project/purpose Estimated Budget

2017/18

Amount received 2017/18

ABA ABA- Tiwi Funeral Fund $0.00 $226,006.86

ABA ABA- Land & Sea $807,012.00 $807,012.00

ABA ABA- Boat $236,565.00 $236,565.00

Department of Environment and Natural Resources OGR- Dept -IPA $9,285.00 $9,285.00

Department of Environment and Natural Resources OGR- Dept - Outliers $143,763.00 $143,763.00

Department of Local Government and Community Services

ORG - Business Plan $81,818.18 $81,818.18

Depart of Infrastructure Reg Development & Cities ORG- BBRF $3,610,000.00 $647,053.00

NT Fisheries OIN- Marine Ranger

Programme

$137,497.69 $137,497.69

Total $5,025,940.87 $2,289,000.73

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Fee for service received section 37(2)

Payor Received by Tiwi Land Council

2018/2019

Nil

Total NIL

Permit Administration 2018/19

Authority to issue permits is provided under the Aboriginal Land Act 2010 (NT) amended. Tiwi require that there be an on-island resident person or organisation willing to undertake responsibility for the visitor and the visit. We also attach some quarantine restrictions to permits in regard to feral animals, invasive weeds and other documented and advised environmental risks.

Trends over the last 40 years illustrate changing patterns and influences upon owners and residents of the Tiwi Islands. Total numbers of known annual visitors barely exceeded 1000 people in the period from 1978 to 1993. Numbers reached a peak of over 7000 by 2008 and have collapsed again to pre-2000 levels.

Fishing tourists managed by our Tiwi owned Tiwi Islands Adventures from their fishing lodges are a significant reason for visitor numbers. There is also some evidence of increasing tourist numbers to the Islands as a result of affordable sea ferry fares on the professionally operated service which commenced in 2014. The operators, Sealink, have recently with our landowners and Tiwi Islands Adventures to expand the tourism experience and attractions.

Permits are the process of the Permission Principle that underwrites Tiwi traditional governance now being more strongly asserted by the current generation of leaders and landowners.

As part of updating the Tiwi Land Council website, the online permit application process was completely restructured during the year. New permit types were identified that better reflect Landowner approval processes, and the online applications now require uploads of project summaries, agreement to conditions, and project results. The new system went live in August 2018, and has streamline approval processes, reducing staff time and allow immediate access to information about visitors and projects.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIAL SERVICES

The Land Council strategy over many decades has sought to found and facilitate a Tiwi private economy. 18.5% of expenditure targets those industries and activities capable of providing jobs and a viable Tiwi economic future. The land, and assets upon the land (other than land under lease), is owned and held by the Tiwi Aboriginal Land Trust. The only organisation able to direct and operate that Trust is the Tiwi Land Council. Since the 1980`s Land Owners, in development of their private economy, have been required to take commercial risks - something the Land Council is prevented from entertaining by law. Landowners have developed their own private trustee corporations, each having beneficial purposes, to manage and develop their assets, including plantations, commercial sub-divisions, and multiplier industry and activity linked to these core industries and a private company to manage the port.

Tiwi Enterprises

Tiwi Enterprises Pty Ltd was established in 2007 by the 8 Tiwi Land Groups to provide expertise, develop, facilitate and manage economic development opportunities, many of these as a result of Township Leasing at Wurrumiyanga and with their the Mantiyupwi owners. At 30 June 2019 Tiwi Enterprises had 49 employees, 32 of these are Tiwi. Tiwi Enterprises has grown significantly since its inception, and throughout 2018­-19 has been going through a strategic planning process to assist with managing this growth into the future.

As a result of this strategic planning, the Directors of Tiwi Enterprises have elected to start a new company (Tiwi Enterprises Ltd) which will be a ‘Not for Profit Company’. The business will commence trading from 1 July 2019. The existing Directors will continue in their existing roles of representing the eight Tiwi families.

Activities of Tiwi Enterprises in 2018-­19 are summarized below:

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Management of Mantiyupwi projects, including

Mantiyupwi Motel now has 42 self­contained single units available for visitors. The 6­room complex has been converted to office space and is rented to Territory Housing. A 12 man contracting quarters is also in regular use. The motel also has a conference room, commercial kitchen, an outdoor meeting area, and the office space is utilised by TITEB for their CDP program.

Shopping Centre, Wurrumiyanga - has now been open for business for 6 years. It is a busy complex and Tiwi Enterprises provides the cleaning service. Landlord support services for Mantiyupwi Pty Ltd property is on-going and running well.

Workshops

Garage has the dual purpose of keeping the hire fleet in good repair as well as providing mechanical workshop services to the community. Currently employs 5 people, 2 of whom are Tiwi.

The Milikapiti Workshop has been established to not only service the Milikapiti community but to maintain the Tuparipiya Bus Service fleet. There are 2 employees, 1 of whom is Tiwi.

Small Business initiatives

Hire car service - now have a fleet of 9 cars, all based in Wurrumiyanga. Two of the vehicles are owned by Tiwi Landowner organisations and are managed by Tiwi Enterprises. Garden and maintenance service established in early 2012.

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Management and administration of grants for the operations of:

ILC Milikapiti Nursery/Farm - employs 6 Tiwi staff.

Tuparipiya Bus Service

The bus service commenced with the support of contract manager, Katherine Coaches. After 2 years the service is now managed in house. Based in Milikapiti, the service provides regular transport between Milikapiti, Paru, and Pirlangimpi, and operates 6 days per week, fitting in with the Sealink ferry service which runs 3 times a week from Darwin. We also provide charters upon request. The fleet consists of 2 x 4WD 28 ­seater buses, and 2 x 9­seater Troop Carriers. There is currently a manager and 3 drivers.

Nguiu Barge Facility

The barge facility is managed on behalf of the NT Government. In its third year of operations, we provide freight service to the community, including businesses, that ensures freight is delivered in a timely and safe manner. The service has provided efficiencies for barge companies who provide regular delivery services to the islands and can unload their cargo at any time of the day, knowing that it will be kept in a secure facility. Chartered barge deliveries are also catered for. Our team works at the facility as required - throughout June we had 10 different workers at the facility, 9 of whom were Tiwi.

Civil Works

The civil works team has had a consistent year of works on Bathurst Island and Melville Island. Our team has been heavily involved in the works to raise the foundations to create the new visitor centre as part of the Pontoon project.

Maintenance Service

On-going maintenance of Mantiupwyi owned properties has allowed for this part of the business to grow. Other local businesses have undertaken new works with the maintenance team and with constant increases in opportunity allows for this part of the business to grow further during 2019/2020 financial year. It has allowed for the team to grow with 2 Tiwi workers employed under supervision.

Tiwi Plantation Corporation and Port Melville

The Tiwi forestry and port businesses are managed by the Independent ASIC registered companies, Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd (TPC) and Port Melville Pty Ltd (PMPL) respectively. Shareholders of TPC are Tiwi representatives of the 8 Tiwi landowning groups.

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Shareholder of PMPL is the Tiwi company Pirntubula Pty Ltd, Trustee company for the Tiwi Islands Community Trust. Directors and Board Members of both companies are Tiwi.

Regular briefings are provided to Tiwi Land Council Executive Managers on progress and status of both businesses by the General Manager of both companies. The Tiwi Land Council is not involved and has no role in the businesses of either company.

Forestry

In 1999/2000 Sylvatech received approval under the Environmental Assessment Act 1982 (NT) to plant 5200 ha of Acacia mangium on Melville Island.

In 2001 the Australian Plantation Group and TLC received approval under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Commonwealth) for a further 26,000 ha of hardwood plantations on Melville Island. At that time, this was the only forestry project in Australia assessed under the EPBC Act. The Australian Plantation Group was subsequently bought out by Great Southern.

On the 18th of May 2009 Receivers and Managers (McGrath Nicol) were appointed to the Great Southern group parent company and certain subsidiaries of the group. The Great Southern project was high cost and unsustainable.

On 30th September 2009 the Receivers and Managers issued a notice that they were no longer using, in possession of or occupying the leases of the Tiwi Islands Forestry Project and forfeited property rights in relation to the leases and stopped paying rent. The Receivers abandoned the leases.

The Leases were terminated by Tiwi Landowners on 1st October 2009. Tiwi now own, control and manage the Tiwi Islands Forestry Project.

Tiwi Landowners established Tiwi Plantations Corporation Pty Ltd (TPC) to manage the plantations on behalf of the traditional landowners. TPC was registered on 2/11/2009. TPC partnered with Plantation Management Partners (PMP) to bring the plantations to harvest. PMP was a small company formed by ex-employees of Great Southern.

In 2010/11 independent forestry consultants Poyry determined 28,390 ha was planted to Acacia mangium and 937 ha was planted to Pinus caribaea. Pinus caribaea plantings took place over the period 1975 to 1985.

In 2016 MBAC assessed available volume at 1.137 million BDMT of woodchip; an export industry worth USD 130 million at current prices. Trial plantings of eucalypt hybrids suggest potential increase in productivity of up to 60%. Plantations comprise about 5% of Melville Island.

Harvesting commenced in mid-June 2015, with the export of the first woodchip consignment in November 2015. This was the first time in Australia that woodchip loading of a 3.6 million cubic foot woodchip carrier had been undertaken with mobile conveyors from a floating pontoon

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wharf. 16 shipments of woodchip and 2 shipments of pine logs have been sent out to date to customers in China and Japan.

Australia’s largest exporter and processor of forest products, Midway Ltd, acquired PMP in August 2017.

PMP, now a wholly owned subsidiary of Midway, entered into an agreement with TPC in October 2018 which provides for

• substantial improvement in harvesting and trucking capability;

• construction of a truck unloader at the port;

• pine log extraction and export capability;

• upgrades and extended capacity at Yapilika forestry headquarters, and

• expenditure on roads.

PMP is now responsible for harvesting, trucking, loading, marketing and sales of Tiwi woodchip and pine logs. They have achieved an 18% increase in the price of Tiwi woodchip and propose to export 7 shipments of woodchip and two shipments of pine logs in 2019, with 9 shipments per year to the end of the 1st rotation in 2023.

30 Tiwi are currently employed in forestry operations, comprising 25% of the workforce. Recruitment and training strategies are focused on increasing the number of Tiwi in the workforce.

Planning has started in preparation for a 2nd rotation, potentially of eucalypt/eucalypt hybrid.

Port Melville

On 16th October 2015, the Chairman of the NTEPA advised that Port Melville did not require assessment under the NT Environmental Assessment Act provided it was carried out in accordance with the EOLHT Operational Environmental Management Plan and in accordance with a number of additional recommendations.

Plans to operate the port as a marine supply base by the port operator Ezion Offshore Logistics Hub (Tiwi) Pty Ltd (now NT Port and Marine) were referred to the Australian Government Department of Environment under the EPBC Act. On 26th October 2015 the Department of Environment advised that operating the port as a refuelling facility and oil/gas industry supply base was not a controlled action under the EPBC Act provided it was carried out in the manner set out in the decision.

On 6th December 2016, the delegate of the Minister for the Environment accepted a variation of the proposed Port Melville Marine Supply Base. This now allows the operation of a marine supply base at Port Melville for the shipment of equipment and supplies for projects such as the construction and operation of offshore oil and gas fields, with up to a maximum of 233 vessel berths at Port Melville per annum (including pilot vessels).

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Diesel fuel sales from Port Melville started at the end of 2017 and continue for marine vessels as well as sales to TPC and Tiwi communities at competitive prices.

Export of Tiwi woodchip and pine logs is still the major operation at the port.

Roger Smith General Manager Tiwi Plantations Corporation & Port Melville Pty Ltd

Process and assist Land Use Agreements

The following major activities summarize the significant focus of landowners, staff, and consultations at meetings through the year. These are the links between Landowner strategies to achieve employment and private industry participation, tied to the authority`s principal outputs.

• Further development of Ranger and Land Management programs.

• Ongoing development of Marine Ranger powers and training.

• Ongoing coordination with medical researchers studying Tiwi susceptibility to kidney disease and other afflictions.

• Management of Exploration Licence Applications from a range of mining companies.

• Fishing and hunting permits managed through Land Council staff, improved efficiency and reduced costs have been achieved by keeping this function in-house.

• Construction projects and consultations in reference to landowner revenue from gravel, soil and sand extraction.

• Continuing harvest and collection of Crocodile Eggs on Bathurst and Melville Islands and payments related thereto.

• Continuing assessment of various incidents of beach erosion and coastal threats.

• Continuing feral animal and weed discovery and eradication programs.

• Continuing support and discussion with the Land Ranger program targeting endangered species, soils, water, weeds, fire management, buffer zone compliance.

• Integration of Fire Management for Greenhouse Abatement with general Land Council strategies and landowner participation assisted through CSIRO research.

• Support and planning with Land and Marine Rangers in border security and bio-security monitoring.

Outcomes and Benefits Outcomes from land-use agreements are the strength and self-reliance being generated by Tiwi society in returning to their own use of land and participating in its management to secure the economic use required by 21st century Tiwi living and working on their land. The tensions of “cultural economic land use” and “sustainable economic land use” once indivisible, continue to be promoted by sections of the media. Tiwi landowners have settled upon the use of up to 10% of their land for the purposes of engaging with, and participating in, the Australian economy.

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Benefits include:

• Roads constructed.

• Educational infrastructure.

• Housing.

• Plans for a safer and more sustainable water supply for Pirlangimpi community.

• Sporting infrastructure.

• Land security (weeds, feral animals, endangered species management) and protection.

• Land management expertise and landowner identification with improving use and required skills.

• Township Planning and professional appraisal of living spaces.

• Improved, more efficient electricity supply into communities through linking Wurrumiyanga, Pirlangimpi, and Milikapiti, including plans for the addition of a solar array at Wurrumiyanga.

• Elevated governance and compliance regimes are driven by economic purposes now exposed to validation and transparency demands of all landowners.

• Business appraisals and planning linked to professional advisers across a range of industries agri-business; tourism and small business.

• Attracting required Tiwi good science through the Scientific Reference Committee.

• Increasing identification of jobs with behaviour purposes and the skills required to attain them and participate in the Tiwi beneficial purpose.

• Increasing landowner investments from their use of land income are also beginning to return revenues to their trust accounts. Profits from Hire Cars; Rents from investment houses and buildings; Contracts secured; Interest on funds deposited - are all over six-figure amounts.

Assist economic advancement through employment education and training

The Tiwi Land Council’s focus on training and education is manifest in its ongoing support for the Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board and Tiwi Education Board. Reports on the operations of these bodies are provided on subsequent pages of this report.

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Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board

TITEB was incepted in 1998 by the Tiwi Land Council from a strategic and social strategic initiative to ensure that Tiwi had access to education, training and employment pathways and would be able to gain access to paid employment both locally and beyond. Currently, the 5 businesses running from TITEB are

1. RTO (Registered Training Organisation), delivering for levels from literacy and numeracy for adults through to Certificate and Diploma level courses that support employment into a range of industries.

2. The Community Development Program, delivering employment and community activities for unemployed job seekers who receive New Start Allowance, Youth Allowance, DSP, and or Parenting payment with children over the age of six.

3. Group Training Organisation, supports Tiwi to become qualified in a range of industries through apprenticeships and traineeships with local employers.

4 Remote School Attendance Strategy, that supports all school-aged children in all 3 of the larger communities to attend school and supporting families to improve their children's’ attendance.

5. School Nutrition Program (Milikapiti) providing a range of nutritious meal options for the children attending Milikapiti Primary School.

The year 2018/19 has been one of securing the foundations of our Strategic Plan having worked hard across all our contracts and successfully renewing all 5 main businesses with PMC and ASQA. The huge undertaking of implementing our own Finance and Administration section to facilitate the best services for our employees and client base. By the end of the first phase, there have been many business improvements both internal processes and wealth management as well as the integrity of our data and finances is being administered at a high Australian standard and is supported by

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The backbone business of TITEB is the RTO and there is a strong emphasis and getting Tiwi to re-engage in training to support all aspects of life, not just accredited courses that get people jobs. The Group Training Organisation continues to grow in strength and numbers of Apprentices and Trainees currently at the highest ratio with 36 apprentices/trainees across a range of occupations on both Islands including 20 School-Based Apprentices at Tiwi College, doing Sports and Recreation and Business. Huge reforms in the Remote School Attendance program has meant that there is a stronger emphasis on working closely with families to strengthen an education first culture on the Tiwi Islands. The CDP continues to be the largest and most challenging but rewarding program to roll out. Our newest and smallest program the Milikapiti School meals has gone from strength to strength and have also now started contributing to School events such as the annual Fete and the School Christmas lunch on the break-up week of the year.

2018/19 Staffing Break up

Current Number of Employees : 97

Tiwi : 77 Non Tiwi: 21

Started from June 2018 to June 2019: 9 Finished from June 2018 to June 2019: 7

Program staff numbers

CDP: 48 TRAINING: 6 GTO:20 RSAS: 14 SNP: 4 CORPORATE: 5

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Community Development Program

The Community Development program is delivered by Titeb on behalf of the Federal Government through Prime Minister and Cabinet, National Indigenous Australian’s Agency. There are 60 CDP providers across Australia and we are proud to be a fully Tiwi Owned organisation running such a complex and lucrative funding agreement. We are rank as meeting all requirements in our last Performance Review across 9 targets/benchmarks.

Employment Services

This year saw a decline in the number of vacancies but a steady outcome base from the placements that were brokered with local employers. The Employment Services team delivers case management and referral to Activities and their number one objective is to get as many of our 700 plus Tiwi job seekers paid employment, where it’s not possible we are able to offer meaningful activities or Training programs that can support our clients to increase their chances of gaining work in the future. The employment services are responsible for highly technical and specialised delivery of these services in a mainstream competitive environment.

EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

2016/17 2017/18 2018/19

Job Placements: 148 Job Placements: 187 Job Placements: 130

13 Week Outcomes: 47 13 Week Outcomes: 86 13 Week Outcomes: 55

26 Week Outcomes: 30 26 Week Outcomes: 58 26 Week Outcomes: 40

Employer Incentives: 11 Employer Incentives: 54 Employer Incentives: 29

Activity Services

TITEB ACTIVITIES

The work for the Dole regime that is a large part of the CDP program has been reformed and participants now undertake 20 hours per week instead of 25. Running activities in Remote Communities where there is limited paid work does give opportunities for Community development to take place whilst increasing the capacity of the participants through learning new skills. We do our best to have activities that are meaningful and are worth getting to. A list of our activities during 2018/19 is below.

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Community Development Program

The Community Development program is delivered by Titeb on behalf of the Federal Government through Prime Minister and Cabinet, National Indigenous Australian’s Agency. There are 60 CDP providers across Australia and we are proud to be a fully Tiwi Owned organisation running such a complex and lucrative funding agreement. We are rank as meeting all requirements in our last Performance Review across 9 targets/benchmarks.

Employment Services

This year saw a decline in the number of vacancies but a steady outcome base from the placements that were brokered with local employers. The Employment Services team delivers case management and referral to Activities and their number one objective is to get as many of our 700 plus Tiwi job seekers paid employment, where it’s not possible we are able to offer meaningful activities or Training programs that can support our clients to increase their chances of gaining work in the future. The employment services are responsible for highly technical and specialised delivery of these services in a mainstream competitive environment.

EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS

2016/17 2017/18 2018/19

Job Placements: 148 Job Placements: 187 Job Placements: 130

13 Week Outcomes: 47 13 Week Outcomes: 86 13 Week Outcomes: 55

26 Week Outcomes: 30 26 Week Outcomes: 58 26 Week Outcomes: 40

Employer Incentives: 11 Employer Incentives: 54 Employer Incentives: 29

Activity Services

TITEB ACTIVITIES

The work for the Dole regime that is a large part of the CDP program has been reformed and participants now undertake 20 hours per week instead of 25. Running activities in Remote Communities where there is limited paid work does give opportunities for Community development to take place whilst increasing the capacity of the participants through learning new skills. We do our best to have activities that are meaningful and are worth getting to. A list of our activities during 2018/19 is below.

Activity ID Activity Title Engagement Rate Attended

Hours Proportion

DNAV Hours Proportion DNAI Hours Proportion

2052742 Foundation Skills 60.1% 32.1% 28.0% 35.1%

3033362 Munupi Arts 92.1% 67.8% 24.3% 4.1%

3234802 Wurrumiyanga Farm 68.4% 44.0% 24.4% 27.3%

3782081 Milikapati Mens Group 73.3% 35.6% 37.6% 21.6%

5244472 TIRC Childcare Wurrumiyanga 54.8% 18.5% 36.3% 42.7%

5533372 Fishing Operations 79.0% 64.2% 14.7% 18.2%

5712752 Catholic School Wurrumiyanga 73.9% 45.2% 28.6% 22.0%

8571081 Pirlangimpi Outdoor activities 73.7% 40.3% 33.4% 22.2%

8630081 Pirlangimpi Women 76.1% 50.9% 25.2% 19.5%

9523372 NGARUWANAJIRRI Arts Centre 72.7% 49.7% 23.0% 23.8%

27349112 Milikapiti Hydroponics 74.3% 45.9% 28.4% 22.8%

34757142 Ranku Mens Activities 90.9% 58.2% 32.7% 0.0%

50183242 Ranku Womens Activities 53.9% 38.2% 15.7% 11.8%

53172452 Pularumpi School Hosted Activity 92.7% 78.0% 14.6% 0.0%

73731612 BIMA WEAR 74.3% 52.2% 22.1% 22.5%

74207512 Property and Assets 81.5% 49.9% 31.6% 15.0%

76517522 Sista Gals 83.9% 37.8% 46.1% 12.4%

79394081 Milikapati Womens group 76.3% 16.6% 59.7% 20.2%

79938971 Tiwi Designs 88.4% 63.1% 25.3% 8.0%

81863322 Red Cross 81.2% 48.6% 32.6% 15.0%

86889971 Jilamarra 87.5% 50.3% 37.1% 8.5%

87229362 Taracumbi Outstation Rehabilitation 92.6% 83.3% 9.3% 1.9%

87720081 Wurrumiyanga Outdoor Activities 67.7% 39.7% 28.0% 28.0%

88382081 WQurrumiyanga Womens Activities 75.9% 37.6% 38.2% 20.5%

93984442 Hosted work placement Bathurst Museum 95.7% 82.6% 13.0% 0.0%

94124682 Pitjiramirra 75.0% 68.8% 6.3% 0.0%

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HOSTED ACTIVITIES We are pleased to be able to work with other organisations to increase the variety of activities available to our participants. In a lot of cases, participants can gain employment at their host when positions become available, it also lets participants attend places in the community that they affiliate with and can feel culturally comfortable to be themselves.

• Munupi Arts - Pirlangimpi

• Pularumpi School - Pirlangimpi

• Jilarmarra Arts - Milikapiti

• Tiwi Design - Wurrimyanga

• Red Cross - Wurrimyanga

• Bathurst Museum - Wurrimyanga

• Bima Wear - Wurrimyanga

• NGARUWANAJIRRI Arts Centre - Wurrimyanga

• Xavier College - Wurrimiyanga

• Tiwi Islands Regional Council - Wurrimiyanga

Remote School Attendance Strategy - Yellow Shirts

The Community Development program is delivered by Titeb on behalf of the Federal Government through Prime Minister and Cabinet, National Indigenous Australian’s Agency. It is a Closing the Gap initiative around improving school attendance and education levels in Remote Australia.

The RSAS, known as the Yellow Shirts across the Tiwi Islands is an allied education service that works with the school community, families and stakeholders to increase the attendance rate at all 4 main schools on Bathurst and Melville Islands. All Yellow Shirts that work in each community are fantastic at the work they do, anything from getting a hungry late student some breakfast before settling them into class, to supporting parents to be proactive in getting their children to school, excursions, clinic support. The program has been recently reformed and has a complex range of requirements and the team members are all multi-skilled and able to do different aspects of the work. Of the 15 staff that work in RSAS only 1 is non-Tiwi and their role is to ensure the staff all develop the skills to continue to meet the requirements of the funding agreement, the coordination and operations of the program are done by all Tiwi staff in the field.

There is lots of work to be done in this space, we work in collaboration with the PMC Engagement team as well as just about all stakeholders in the Tiwi Islands in one way or another to support the program to make a difference on the ground. RSAS program has been on the Tiwi’s since 2014 and is increasing an education-centric culture over time that is for the better of all Tiwi’s future generations.

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Registered Training Organisation

The RTO has gone through an ASQA (Australian Standards Quality Assurance) the National Training Regulatory for a re-registration, we passed, with some work to do to ensure we can continue to deliver accredited courses that align with jobs and industry. Our scope has been cut back to ensure that we can deliver to the level of our target groups. The Federal Government’s reforms to the National Literacy program SEE has meant that TITEB was unable to enter a bid for just the Tiwi Islands and therefore the service was diminished removing our ability to deliver structured Literacy and Numeracy Training. To compensate for this, every course that we deliver is supported with contextualised literacy and numeracy. The VET training environment has changed significantly, and funding is much harder to secure unless there is evidence that there are employment outcomes that will transpire as a result of the training. We get great support from the NT Department of Business Workforce Unit who is the funding body for Training in the NT.

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Course Completed for the last

12 months

Location

CHC22015 - Certificate II in Community Services 11 Wurrumiyanga

BSB10115 - Certificate I in Business 5 and others are

ongoing

Wurrumiyanga

Certificate I in Tourism and Hospitality (CDU) 8 participants but Kristen will still be back in two weeks time to complete

Wurrumiyanga

CPCCOHS1001A - Prepare to work safely in the construction industry 37 Groote Eylandt, Pirlingimpi,

Wurrumiyanga, Nhulunbuy

Certificate I in Engineering (Batchelor Institute) 17 Wurrumiyanga

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Group Training Organisation

Apprentices and Trainees gain real paid workplace experience while also undertaking industry-related structured training that helps them achieve set benchmarks of skills in each respective industry. This part of our business runs at cost and is well worth the investment as the outputs are qualified and competent Tiwi workers that can work successfully on the Tiwi Islands and beyond.

Total active Apprentices and Trainees

Total Commencements 20

• 11 Cert II Community Services. RTO TITEB

• 3 Cert III in Educational Support RTO CDU

• 2 Cert II in Business. School-Based Trainees. RTO TITEB

• 3 Cert II in Sport and Recreation. School-Based Trainees RTO CDU/SEDA

• 1 Cert III in Light Vehicle Automotive. RTO CDU

Completions 11

• 11 Cert II Community Services. RTO TITEB

Cancellations 8

• 1 Cert III in Carpentry

• 5 Cert II in Sport and Rec

• 2 Cert III in Education support

Total number of Apprentices and Trainees engaged over the 18/19 Financial year 53

School Meals

The School Meals program continues to do a great service to the school children of Milkapiti, there were around 5754 meals served during the financial year and extra services such as food stalls for the Annual Fete and a great Christmas spread for the whole school to close the year off and healthy note. All 3 School Meals Workers are Tiwi and they enjoy being able to ensure that the children of the community get the best start in life from healthy diet choices.

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The Road Ahead Over the 2019/20 year we will continue to progress the Strategic Plan of the organisation and support ongoing continuous improvement to ensure our viability into the future, we will be seeking to continue to broker and invest in close working relationships with all Tiwi Businesses and stakeholders as well as business and industry and facilitate social and economic benefits to the Tiwi people and their communities’. The Tiwi Islands Regional Council Finance team is now based at the TITEB Darwin complex, Tiwi Education Board corporate services are also based there, we are privileged to be able to be situated at the same site.

Maria Harvey CEO Tiwi Islands Training and Employment Board

Tiwi Education Board

Principal’s Summary

Introduction

This year marked the tenth year since Tiwi College officially opened early in 2008. A lot has changed during this time but there has been one overwhelming vision that has remained from when the elders of the Tiwi Islands came together all those years ago. This vision has been to deliver a quality education ran by Tiwi, for Tiwi on Tiwi country.

The school began with around 40 students enrolled with fairly poor attendance but gradually each year the school has been growing in numbers and in more regular student attendance. This year was one of growth as we made another step forward in quality education for the young Tiwi opening another young women’s class and another young men’s class. The school now provides quality education in the Classroom, Family Group Home and Academy for over 100 students.

Many of the goals for the year were achieved including:

• A whole school focus on reading;

• Completing whole school Berry Street Training and implementing this school wide;

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• Aligning our Family Group Home practices with national boarding standards;

• Continuing the College Building Program as part of our growth phase;

• Strengthening Tiwi Academy program with particular focus on Culture;

• Establishing a more effective school wide staff performance management process;

• Preparing for and achieving satisfactory assessment of our 5-year re-registration deadline.

A whole school focus on reading

With the guidance from our Academic Coordinator, 2018 saw us make great improvement in reading across the school:

• The Reading Clinic, literacy and numeracy block focused on consolidating the comprehension skills diagnosed during PM testing

• There is a much stronger focus on basic literacy skills based on ESL/EAL best practice.

• Teachers and support staff developed skills with Fitzroy Readers and all classes facilitated this daily. Fitzroy Readers are used internationally (created in Australia) but widely recognized as one of the best tools for increasing and assessing students language development using IELTS banding which is the equivalent to international standards of speaking.

• Reading and decoding skills consolidated

• Using 32 apps on the Ipads as part of their literacy block rotation

• Students who had between 70-100 % attendance in the last year showed a significant increase in reading levels.

Whole school Berry Street Training and implement this school wide;

With the guidance from our Assistance Principal, 2018 saw us complete whole school Berry Street Training. This model of education is based around an understanding how trauma effects our students and how best to support their learning. This is a natural progression from our Restorative Practices and Calmer classrooms approach that have been a constant for the past 7 years. This model recognises strategies we already have in place and has also provided a tool kit of new strategies for us to use school wide. Some of the strategies implemented in 2018 included:

• Safety plans written by students and staff using a modified Berry Street template

• More regular check-in and out circles in all areas, staff and students.

• De-escalation spaces set up in Academic, Family Group Home and Academy areas

• ‘Energizer’ and ‘brain break’ activities scheduled throughout learning to assure optimum engagement and learning.

Family Group Homes and Boarding Standards

In recent years, a committee led by the Family Group Home Coordinator began a process of auditing the Family Group Homes’ current policies, procedures and structures against the recently developed Australian Boarding Standard. The committee used the standards as a framework for self-assessment, to ensure that our practices align with national and international best practice. We have been pleased to find that we are already achieving “best practice” in most areas audited so far. We will continue to work closely with Boarding Australia as developments in their boarding standards framework occur, assuring that we are parallel with them as we continue to seek up to date knowledge in the field and provide an outstanding boarding model. The audit process will continue into 2019.

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Tiwi College Building Program

In 2018 three single bedroom houses were built. We were grateful to receive a grant for them from the Block Grant Authority.

In 2017 two houses & one classroom were built. We were grateful to receive a grant for one house from Stronger Futures funding, one classroom was constructed via the Block Grant Authority and one house from the Building Better Schools Program, from the Dept of Education, Northern Territory Government. These houses and classroom were utilized in 2018 when we opened 2 new classes and employed 2 teachers. This increase allowed us to provide a higher quality education for a larger number of students as we grew by 25%.

In 2015 the college was successful in receiving 2.5 million over three years from the PM&C Indigenous Advancement Strategy to build two new Family Group Homes. The first Girls FGH opened in 2016 which allowed us to increase our enrollments in 2016 & 2017. The second Boys FGH opened in Term 3 2018 which allowed for increased male enrollments in 2018.

Tiwi Academy Program

The Tiwi Academy program continued to grow and develop in 2018 with support of a further 2.5-year IAS (Indigenous Advancement Strategy) grant. The grant is used to expand the programs offered by the Academy, including student incentive and reward programs, cultural education programs and health and well being programs. The Academy program now has as its mantra, "Strong Bodies, Strong Minds, Strong Culture". Dept of Prime Minister and Cabinet extension of the Tiwi Academy Program for a further two and a half years with a grant totaling $400,000. This is a testament to the value placed by federal Government on the outcomes being achieved through this Academy.

The Tiwi Land Council also provided a funding grant of $33,000 to be used for cultural purposes. This grant has allowed us to expand the Tiwi Academy cultural education program. This included bringing elders onto the campus for cultural education and running cultural immersion camps.

Establishing a more effective staff performance management process.

Significant work in 2018 was conducted on establishing a more effective staff performance management process. For teachers this was aligned with the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership model. In the FGH we used the Boarding Australia model and all other staff received a modified Performance Management process that was very effective. The end result is something that will be rolled out in its entirety in 2019.

Prepare for and achieve satisfactory assessment of our 5 year re-registration

This year our 5 year re-registration was due which provided a great opportunity to complete a thorough self-assessment of our school.

• We established self-evaluation Committees to ensure that appropriate evidence supports assertions and that stakeholders are engaged. This has become a major initiative driving improvement across the school.

• Following the conduct of this Routine Assessment it was recommended that Tiwi College be recognised as complying with the requirements on a non-government school under the Registration of a Non-Government School policy, the Education Act 2015 and the Education Regulations.

The Future

After celebrating our tenth year of Tiwi College, 2019 will be one of settling and consolidating the growth phase the past three years has brought. The 2019-2023 strategic plan developed

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over 2018 will be implemented and lead by the Tiwi Education Board guiding us for the next 5 years. See below the key goals set for 2019.

Students

Teaching and Learning:

• Develop culturally appropriate curriculum;

• Develop and implement a whole school consistent approach to Literacy and Numeracy;

• Develop a scope and sequence for Science, IT, Geography and History.

Well being

• Employ a Special Education Needs Coordinator and improve special needs provision;

• Establish partnership and affiliation with partner Girls school;

• Refurbish FGHs.

Transition

• Strengthen TITEB and TC partnership;

• Develop extended VET opportunities for students.

Staff

Professional Development

• Consolidate Performance Management process;

• Relevant and quality PD opportunities.

Well being

• Offer staff well-being services and outlets;

• Improve current staff living provisions.

Recruitment and Retention

• Improve recruitment and induction process;

• Succession planning and incentive for key roles.

Community

Picka Family

• Build student resilience;

• Recruit Groundsman.

Tiwi Community and Identify

• Improve and expand existing stakeholders;

• Improve school and community relations.

Friends and Partners of Tiwi College

• Maintain current friendships and partnerships;

• Create more partnerships that are mutually beneficial.

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The Tiwi College team look forward to another exciting and fulfilling year in which we work together, guided by the Tiwi Education Board Incorporated, to provide the best care and education possible for young Tiwi people.

Stuart Ward Principal

Tiwi College

Process mining and exploration applications

TABLE OF RECEIVED MINING APPLICATIONS AND PROCESSES

ELA NUMBER APPLICANT APPLIED AND CONSENTED DATE BY WHICH

PROPOSAL MUST BE LODGED

CONSULTATION PERIOD ENDS

Discussions with Landowners must occur prior to this date

27664 Rio-Tinto 30.4.2010 30.7.2010 31 October 2019

Initial exploration discussions completed. Agreements in draft.

28617 Rio-Tinto 14.2.2011 7.12.2011 31 October 2019

Moratorium ID No 616 - 11

November 2011 to 11 November

2016

29035 Kalbar Resources 4.9.2012 30.11.2012 31 October 2019

Substantive detail presented under consideration

29036 Kalbar Resources 4.9.2012 30.11.2012 31 October 2019

Substantive detail presented under consideration

29222 Kalbar Resources 12.6.2012 1.12.2012 31 October 2019

Substantive detail presented under consideration

29243 Rio-Tinto 17.7.2012 27.6.2012 31 October 2019

Substantive detail presented under consideration

Received

10.07.2012

29244 Rio-Tinto 17.4.2012 27.6.2012

Received

10.07.2012

31 October 2019

Substantive detail presented under consideration

30924 MZI Resources

Limited

12.10.2015 14.01.2016

Received

18.01.2016

31 October 2019

EP(A)216 MBS 15.2.2011 5.7.2012 31 October 2019

Substantive detail presented under consideration

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The Tiwi College team look forward to another exciting and fulfilling year in which we work together, guided by the Tiwi Education Board Incorporated, to provide the best care and education possible for young Tiwi people.

Stuart Ward Principal

Tiwi College

Process mining and exploration applications

TABLE OF RECEIVED MINING APPLICATIONS AND PROCESSES

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Provide research and assistance for Infrastructure needs

Several studies by the Northern Territory Government have substantiated and engineered road infrastructure costs for the Tiwi Islands at over $35m required to be spent over five years. Local Government lacks both revenue and capacity for road works beyond small and minor maintenance tasks. Road closures remain a certainty every wet season on every road.

The Northern Territory Government also funded and has responded to a study of inter and intra island sea transport needs. A Darwin to Tiwi passenger ferry service commenced in September 2014, providing subsidized fares each way.

The Science Reference Committee (SRC) with Melbourne University met twice during the year. Work has continued with University support and includes:

· Effects of different fire regimes on small mammal populations

· Effects of different fire regimes on native seedling recruitment

· Development of dynamic models of economic development, biodiversity, and ecosystem services, to understand and predict the benefits and impacts of development options.

· Research ethics and further genetic investigation particularly related to kidney disease and impacts.

New research needs were identified in the areas of:

· Recreational fishing impact in response to the Fisheries Settlement Deed under Blue Mud Bay

· Feral buffalo herd management for environmental protection and food

· Managing biosecurity threats from the mainland

CSIRO partnerships have been enhanced through the continuation of Carbon-fire studies with Land Rangers and our students at Tiwi College.

Details of consultants engaged

Economic and Commercial Services Consultancies 2018/19: $127,485

Piper Alderman - Legal $ 2,000 Bowden McCormack Lawyers and Advisers; Township Leases $125,485

ADVOCACY SERVICES

Promote Public Awareness

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The outcomes of public awareness enhance the general outcomes sought by the Land Council of enhancing social, political and economic participation and equity for Tiwi people.

The output tools to achieve these outcomes are:

· Publication of “The Tiwi”, a newsletter published every second month by the Tiwi Land Council to advise our landowners of the key activities undertaken by the Land Council throughout the year. “The Tiwi” contains a range of historically and environmentally relevant articles designed to ensure that our people receive accurate information about the history and traditions of Tiwi people and are able to make those connections of land use and beneficial purpose in the modern era. It is posted online to our web site as well as 1,000+ copies distributed among our people and stakeholders, along with a presence on social media.

· Publications and booklets of our people, our land and of the Land Council on sale and through distribution retail outlets.

· Press and media releases and commentaries on general Land Council activity during the year in television; print media and various web pages.

· Annual Report itself, 215 copies.

• Corporate plan 2018-2022, published at http://tiwilandcouncil.com/documents/Uploads/Corporate_Plan_2018-2022.pdf

• Tiwi Land Council web site - with links to other partners and organisations. A re-design of our website during the year has occurred with a large amount of new information to go live during the 2018-19 year. The website averaged over 4,621 visits per month over the course of the year.

• An online version of ‘The Tiwi’ (our bi-monthly newspaper for landowners) has been active since January 2014. This online version is a dedicated Facebook page, closely monitored by staff. It provides us with the ability to keep the Tiwi community up to date more regularly via ‘posts’ such as meeting notices and text/photos relating to current events/items of interest across the islands. This came in response to landowners clearly using social media more and more to communicate in this digital age.

Provide Advocacy and representation

Promoting, protecting and advancing the rights and interests of Tiwi people through advocacy and representation continues to enhance the outcomes sought by the Land Council.

Direct and minuted consultations of the Management Committee and the Land Council number between 30 and 40 a year. Meeting every fortnight is required to manage the business. This is far less

than the 80-100 or so meetings that have been recorded annually in past years. This decline is attributable to the increasing number of Tiwi-owned and operated businesses that now lay claim to the attentions of Traditional Owners and are unrelated to Land Council functions. The Office of Township Leasing and township Landowners engage in their own meetings. In addition, the Land Council Management Committee is required to operate a small budget and must balance the frequency of meetings with available funds. It does this on the basis that such a reduction does not result in a reduction of the Land Council’s ability to represent Tiwi people.

Consultations provide the foundation of Land Council decision-making across all output groups.

Exhaustive advocacy and representation are increasingly provided through various strategic committees and workshops initiated by the Land Council covering particular issues including coastal and fisheries management, weed management, threatened species management and natural resource management, monitoring and evaluation. Additionally, education, health,

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governance, and other forums extend the range of representation and the interests of members determined to secure their future on their land.

Cultural and Heritage Support

Support was provided during the year for:

· Kulama Ceremony funding and support.

· Funding for a funeral ceremony related to death and group respect.

· Funding to Art Centres for interaction with primary school children and teaching by artists.

· Land Ranger survey of Sites of Significance in areas that may be affected by various land use proposals and developments.

· Meetings of landowners to discuss genealogies, inheritance patterns, and considerations by landowners for their management of risks related to land ownership and use of land.

Facilitate Community Development Initiatives

Promotion and advancement of rights and interests continue to achieve the outcomes of social, political and economic participation and equity for Tiwi landowners.

The Land Council continued to respond to community requests for landscaping and regular monitoring of sea erosion; weed infestation and training and awareness workshops. Land rangers visited schools in awareness discussions of environmental risks and constraints and the requirements of good land management practices and took on work experience students.

The Land Council increased its extended support to landowners at Wurrumiyanga in economic development within their community including motel, Government Business Centre, Shopping Complex, take away restaurant, vehicle hire and other accommodation projects. This also includes support for their Consultative Forum, now a key plank in Lease arrangements and development of the Wurrumiyanga Township.

Township Leases in Milikapiti, Ranku, Pirlangimpi, and Wurrumiyanga are currently in place between the respective Traditional Owners and the Federal Government.

Details of consultants engaged

Advocacy Services Consultancies 2018/19: $ 54,025

• Colliers International (NT) Pty Ltd $ 4,600

• Herron Todd White $ 2,500

• View Axis $ 46,925

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

Administer and Distribute Payments

Outcomes remain consistent with our endorsed framework. Outputs include the administration of payments to landowners and to Land Council clients.

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Grants for Funeral and Ceremonial purposes require applications and approval processes in both the access and distribution of these payments. Funds from the ABA have been applied for these purposes.

Land use payments that include lease payments, payments under Mining agreements, payments under permit and fishing agreements accrue to specific landowner accounts now exceeding 70 family groups. These accounts are managed and audited through private accountants retained by the landowners for this purpose. Fund Managers are able to certify expenditure through these accounts following group policies detailed at Group Meetings. Monthly income and expenditure statements are tabled at group meetings and also through the Audit Committee. These accounts are also available through security codes on-line.

Administer the Land Trust

The legal structure of the Land Council within which it can achieve the outcomes sought by members is primarily the establishment of a Land Trust to hold title to land. The Tiwi Aboriginal Land Trust is established under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. The only body with authority and capacity to direct and administer this Trust is the Tiwi Land Council.

Administration of the Trust also includes work to maintain traditional owner registers and respond to queries and certification of Aboriginality and/or Tiwi recognition. The Land Council traditional registers are assisted by data now sourced from the Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

Assist in resolution of land disputes

Tiwi land ownership is a dynamic entitlement with various alliances and structures changing boundaries over time. The advantage of there being only one title to Tiwi land requires continuing Tiwi consensus over various internal clan or “country” issues. Traditional processes continue to demand consensus over these issues and effectively prevent these matters becoming disputes.

Details of consultants engaged

Administration and Support Service Consultancies 2018/19: $ 49,105

• Casuarina Bookkeeping $ 890

• Calytrix Communications $ 2,880

• DJMI Accounting & Consulting $12,451

• G&M Works $28,788

• KPMG $ 3,741

• Sol Media - web site management $ 355

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE ACCOUNTABLE AUTHORITY

Accountable Authority Profiles

Chair - Executive member

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni was born on 23rd June 1958 at Milikapiti on Melville Island and educated at schools in Darwin and Mackay, Queensland. He returned to the Tiwi Islands to take up apprentice forester employment in the plantations being developed on Melville Island during the 1970s.

Mr. Illortaminni is a senior elder of the Mantiyupwi people and was an early supporter of the formation of the Tiwi Land Council in 1978. He has represented their interests on the Land Council for the past decade. During that time Mr. Illortaminni has been a strong advocate for education and training and the creation and security of Tiwi jobs.

Since being elected to the Chairmanship in February 2012, Mr. Illortaminni has been tireless in promoting Tiwi interests on the Tiwi Islands, on the mainland and overseas.

Mr. Illortaminni leads by example in all facets of his life and has recently celebrated his 30th wedding anniversary with his wife Linda. They have two children and thirteen grandchildren.

Mr. Illortaminni was first elected in 2012, then again on 11th February 2015 and re-appointed Chairman for a further 3 years on 14th February 2018.

Chief Executive Officer

Andrew Tipungwuti was born on 10th February 1974. He has undertaken studies at Charles Darwin University focusing on Strategic leadership and Leadership and team building.

Mr. Tipungwuti has been an active Committee member of Aboriginals Benefit Account from 2009 and is currently chair of the Aboriginals Benefit Account Advisory Committee.

In his time as a Board member with Tiwi Plantations Corporation Trust, his role was to review decisions of the Tiwi Plantations Corporation Board and ensure that they were in keeping with the objectives of the Trust Deed and in the general interests of beneficiaries. The Tiwi Plantations, Project is a 30,000-ha plantation development which provides jobs and income for Tiwi people. In 2016 it provided wages of $1.8 million to Tiwi Island-based employees; $2.4 million in 2017 and $2.5 million in 2018. The forestry project now has Australia's largest exporter of woodchip as a partner for Tiwi forestry.

He was a Director in 2003 and then the Chairman from 2014-2018 for Port Melville.

Port Melville is a deepwater port on Melville Island from which Tiwi have exported 16 shipments of woodchip to date, to Japan and China, and 1 shipment of pine logs to China. It is approved by the Australian Government to operate as a marine supply base and was built with over $100 million investment from Singaporean investors. The Tiwi port project is partnered with Northern Territory Port and Marine, a subsidiary of AusGroup, a major ASX listed company involved in the oil and gas industry.

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Mr. Tipungwuti's involvement has made major contribution to the economic development of the Tiwi Land.

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ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE AND LOCATION

OUTLINE OF ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

Determining remuneration

The position of Chair and Deputy Chair are remunerated in accordance with budget, with determinations as and when made by the Remuneration Tribunal (an independent statutory body that determines the remuneration of key Commonwealth officeholders). These positions are considered part-time public officeholders and are remunerated in accordance with determinations made by the Remuneration Tribunal for part-time public officeholders. Superannuation of 9.5% is paid in addition to the Remuneration Tribunal’s determination.

Members of the Management Committee are remunerated consistent with determinations made by the Remuneration Tribunal. These positions are considered part-time public officeholders and are remunerated in accordance with determinations made by the Remuneration Tribunal for part-time public officeholders. Superannuation of 9.5% is paid in addition to the Remuneration Tribunal’s determination.

The Chief Executive Officer, General Manager, and CFO/Principal Legal Officer are engaged on term-based employment contracts which detail the terms and conditions of employment

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including remuneration. Terms and conditions for all other staff are in the Australian Government Industry Award 2016. Superannuation of 10.0% is paid on staff contracts.

General wage increases are made in line with the approved remuneration proposal of the Tiwi Land Council under the Workplace Bargaining Policy (2018) and recorded with the Australian Public Service Commissioner.

Location of Activities and Facilities

The map provided below locates facilities developed by the Land Council for the conduct of required major activities. These include: Headquarters office, meeting hall and ceremonial grounds at Pickataramoor adjacent to the Tiwi College. This facility is the centre for meetings of the Land Council and the Management Committee and is so situated to draw upon students from the College to participate at meetings and develop an understanding of the leadership challenges facing Tiwi society. Offices at all three Townships where Managers and members of the Management Committee also reside. Secretariat (leased) office in Darwin that monitors legal, natural resource management, environmental audit, and financial compliance and provides support to our staff on the Islands.

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STATEMENT ON GOVERNANCE

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The Land Council discarded a line-management structure 20 years ago in favour of more traditional responsibility and decision-making processes through a Management Committee. The Management Committee was approved by the Minister pursuant to section 29A of the Land Rights Act on 21st March 1995.

Land council

Six land council meetings were held in 2018-2019:

Meeting Number

Date Location

304 1st August 2018 Wurrumiyanga

305 12th December 2018 Pirlangimipi

306 6th February 2019 Wurrumiyanga

307 13th March 2019 Wurrumiyanga

308 1st May 2019 Wurrumiyanga

309 10th May 2019 Darwin

The names of each person who held the role as a member of the Land Council during the financial year are:

Name Position Of 6 Land

Council Meetings

Fernando, Ivan Trustee 6

Kerinaiua, Walter Jnr. Trustee 6

Molaminni (Burak), Damien Trustee 6

Munkara, Simon Peter Trustee 0

Puruntatameri, Kim Trustee 6

Tipiloura, Stanley Trustee 5

Tipungwuti, Brian Trustee 4

Wilson, John Trustee 5

Illortaminni, Gibson Farmer Chair 6

Tungatulum, Leslie Deputy Chair 5

Babui, Francisco (Cisco) Member 5

Bush, Andrew Member 6

Guy, David Jnr. Member 5

Kanitilla, Stephen Member 6

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Kantilla, Dominic Member 6

Kerinaiua, Wesley Member 6

Molaminni, Christopher Member 0

Mungatopi, Gerry Member 3

Mungatopi, Vincent Member 5

Pilakui, Nathan James Member 6

Puantulura, Joseph Member 6

Puautimi, Valentine Member 4

Puruntatameri, Patrick Member 4

Puruntatameri, Richard Member 6

Timaepatua, Bonaventure Member 6

Tipakalippa, Dennis Member 6

Tipiloura, Connell Member 6

Tipunguwti, Andrew Member 6

Tipunguwti, Charles Member 6

Wonaeamirri, Pedro Member 4

Wommatakimmi (Brooks), Kim Member 0

Wommatakimmi, Adonis Member 6

Mungatopi, Fredrick Deceased 0

Munkara, Jonathon Retired 4

Tipungwuti, Baylon Retired 0

Tipungwuti, Emmanuel Retired 0

Governance Practices

Tiwi traditional governance and risk management sustained their people through 6,000 -8,000 years upon the Tiwi Islands. Processes and decisions were developed containing strict codes to manage resources, relationships, and uncertainty. Governance itself required the presentation of arguments, debate, and verdicts that validated claims and enforced compliance. This experience continues to influence Land Council governance for 21st century Tiwi, now seeking the sustainable purpose of modern governance requirements.

The Land Council must not only demonstrate its own compliance but provide convincing participatory opportunities to its members and landowners of the purpose now required to demonstrate their own. This work has been the focus of leadership through the life of the Land Council - a Tiwi purpose and convictions to sustainably manage them. Participation in a private economy is now illustrating a purpose. It requires gathering accurate information and testing that information for sustainable decision making. This work is assisted and informed by Committee structures developed by the Land Council.

As a Statutory Authority, the Land Council aims to promote and manage the efficient and effective use of the financial and human resources of the Land Council in undertaking the directions and policy of the Land Council and to monitor that use consistent with the commitment of the Land Council to responsible development and the ambitions of the Tiwi people. Committees assist to achieve these aspirations:

· The Executive Management Committee sits also as an Internal Finance Committee which operates in conjunction with the Independent Audit Committee to control the expenditure of the Land Council, reporting to the Land Council. Its members are the Land Council

Management Committee and also include the CEO; Land Council Finance Officer and external Auditors. The Finance Committee monitors progress against the budget at regular meetings and makes recommendations to the Independent Audit Committee.

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· Independent Audit Committee (IAC) completed the required four meetings for the year. The IAC, now in its eleventh year, is obliged to review its charter each year and has done so during 2018/19. The Committee comprises Mr. Hugh Bradley (Chief Magistrate retired), Mr. Deven Patel (Auditor and Accountant) and Mr. Ross Connolly (Architect and Businessman) attended all meetings of the IAC during the year. The Land Council CEO, Accounts Manager/External Accountant, and Executive Officer are ex-officio members and attend meetings as required. The committee`s responsibilities and rights are outlined in its charter that has been adopted and is contained in the Land Council website www.tiwilandcouncil.com. The IAC monitors financial progress and systems of the Land Council but has a much broader role in identifying risk and advising on management and processes to better manage those risks. Members are required to assess their own performance each year and to also review the Audit Committee Charter annually. Members complied with these requirements held in the 2018/19 period. The Committee is also required to meet with our Auditors during the process of our audit from February through September 2019. These meetings and exchanges have taken place. The Committee has also invited two Tiwi members of the Land Council Management Committee to attend IAC meetings on a regular basis.

Risk Management Register

The Land Council worked during the year to further develop our Risk Management protocols, Registers, and Manuals. Work was completed in 2014/15 and aligned systems, codes and responses to the Security Frameworks of Government and the particular interests and difficulties of managing Tiwi risk in particular. The Land Council maintains a comprehensive Risk Management Register.

Compliance is a continuing focus discussed during the year.

Our Code of Conduct policy applies to all representatives and members, providing the framework of principles for conducting business, dealing with other representatives, members and suppliers. The Code of Conduct does not replace legislation and if any part of it is in conflict, then legislation takes precedence. This policy is based on the following principles:

· Act and maintain a high standard of integrity and professionalism.

· Be culturally aware and sensitive.

· Respect Tiwi Culture at all times.

· Be responsible and scrupulous in the proper use of Company information, funds, equipment and facilities.

· Be considerate and respectful of the environment and others.

· Exercise fairness, equality, courtesy, consideration, and sensitivity in dealing with other representatives, directors, members, and suppliers.

· Avoid apparent conflict of interests, promptly disclosing to a TLC senior manager any interest which may constitute a conflict of interest.

· Promote the interests of TLC.

· Perform duties with skill, honesty, care, and diligence.

· Abide by policies, procedures and lawful directions that relate to your employment with the TLC and/or our members.

· Avoid the perception that any business transaction may be influenced by offering or accepting gifts.

· Under no circumstances may representatives offer or accept money.

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· Any representative, who in good faith, raises a complaint or discloses an alleged breach of the Code, whilst following correct reporting procedures, will not be disadvantaged or prejudiced. All reports will be dealt with in a timely and confidential manner.

TLC expects co-operation from all representatives in conducting themselves in a professional, ethical and socially acceptable manner of the highest standards.

Executive Management Committee

Members of the Executive Management Committee are drawn from members of the full land council membership. At the conclusion of the year, the Executive Management Committee consisted of 9 members.

Name of Executive Management Committee Full Year or Commencement Date

Farmer, Gibson - Chairman Full Year

Tungatulum, Leslie - Deputy Chairman Full Year

Guy Jnr, David Full Year

Kerinaiua, Wesley Full Year

Puruntatameri, Richard Full Year

Tipakalippa, Dennis Full Year

Tipiloura, Stanley - Chairman of Trustees Full Year

Tipungwuti, Brian - Trustee Full Year

Wilson, John - Trustee Full Year

The Executive Management Committee is required to meet regularly to:

• Monitor the Budget and control the expenditure of the Land Council, as an internal Finance Committee, reporting to the Land Council and seeking advice from the Independent Audit Committee.

• Assess and advise upon various development and land use proposals, referring matters requiring decisions to the Land Council.

• Monitor environmental and another development impact on land and land use.

• Monitor the Budget and control the expenditure of the Land Council, as a Finance Committee.

• Develop those strategies to ensure financial controls are adequate and consistent with Government regulations and provide advice and respond to the independent Audit Committee.

• Monitor environmental impact upon the land and land use and develop strategies for effective land management for the consideration of the Land Council.

• Assess and monitor community responses to the impact of development and to develop strategies to further the harmonious development of Tiwi society.

• Assess the impact and make such recommendations to the Land Council in regard to Commonwealth and State legislation and policy affecting the Tiwi people.

• Coordinate and monitor the opinions and policies of various Boards, Corporations, and Committees established by the Tiwi people for assessment by the Land Council in undertaking its functions.

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• Assess and respond to those requirements of visitors seeking discussions with the Land Council and owners of Tiwi land.

Eight Executive Management Committee meetings were held in 2018-2019

Meeting Number Date Location

462 2nd July 2018 Darwin

463 15th August 2018 Darwin

464 5th September 2018 Milikapiti

465 13th August 2018 Darwin

466 6 November 2018 Wurrumiyanga

467 24th January 2019 Darwin

468 1st March 2019 Darwin

469 4th April 2019 Darwin

Land council members attendance at Executive Management Committee meetings were;

Land Council Member Of 8 Executive

Meetings

Illortaminni Farmer, Gibson - Chair 8

Guy, David - Executive 8

Puruntatameri, Richard - Executive 8

Tipiloura, Stanley - Chair of Trustee - Executive 7

Wilson, John - Trustee - Executive 7

Tungutulum, Leslie - Deputy Chair 6

Tipungwuti, Brian - Trustee - Executive 6

Tipakalippa, Dennis - Executive 6

Kerinaiua, Wesley - Executive 5

Timaepatua, Bonaventure - Proxy 3

Fernando, Ivan - Trustee 3

Kerinaiua, Walter - Trustee 3

Molaminni, Damien - Trustee 3

Munkara, Jonathon - Trustee 3

Puruntatameri, Kim - Trustee 3

Kantilla, Dominic - Land Council Delegate 1

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RELATED ENTITY TRANSACTIONS

Pecuniary Interests Registers

The Land Council has adopted the advice of the Minister and maintains Pecuniary Interest Registers for all members from January 2010. All Land Council members annually update their details in the Pecuniary Interests Register. This has been complied with for the 2018-19 year. Of our 128 suppliers, there are eleven in which one or more of our members are directors.

Related Parties Registers

All members have signed a Related Parties register to enable the Land Council to guard against potential conflicts of interest beyond conflicts of pecuniary interest. All members declare any relevant pecuniary interests before each meeting. Some Land Council Members are Directors of eleven suppliers.

Payments to related parties require that the following conditions have been met;

1. you have the authority to approve the payment;

2. the goods or services have been provided and meet requirements;

3. the supplier's invoice:

a. provides the details needed for accounting and taxation purposes;

b. reflects the terms of the arrangement which was entered into; and

c. has credited any previous payment that was made to them if such payments were made.

During the year the Land Council conducted business of varying amounts with these suppliers. They are:

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Related Party Payment 2018-2019 2017-2018

$ $

Purchases of goods and services from related parties:

Jilamara Arts And Crafts Association 1,873 -

Milikapiti Community Indigenous Corporation 790 2,507

Milikapiti Sports & Social Club Inc 291 -

Ngaruwanajirri Inc - 235

Nguiu Club Association Incorporated 1,114 -

Nguiu Ullintjinni Association Inc 50,961 79,527

Pillyamanyirra Supermarket - 248

Pirlangimpi Indigenous Corporation For Community Developement 10,117 4,919

Ranku General Store - 2,045

The Trustee For For The Munupi Family Trust 545 12,200

The Trustee For Tiwi Islands Adventures Charitable Trust 3,659 25,986

The Trustee For Tiwi Plantations Corporation Trust 95 47,133

Tiwi Design Aboriginal Corporation - 658

Tiwi Education Board Incorporated 26,455 527

Tiwi Enterprises Pty Ltd 96,813 169,753

Tiwi Islands Regional Council 40,517 70,208

Tiwi Resources Pty Ltd 4,738 183,660

Tiwi Training & Employment Pty Ltd 313 -

TOTAL 238,281 599,606

Payment of grants to related parties:

Jilamara Arts And Crafts Association 24,930 -

Munupi Arts & Crafts Assn Inc 25,617 -

Tiwi Education Board Incorporated 50,454 -

Tiwi Enterprises Pty Ltd 756,216 812,928

Tiwi Resources Pty Ltd 957,192 135,874

TOTAL 1,814,409 948,802

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JUDICIAL DECISIONS AND REVIEWS BY OUTSIDE BODIES

Judicial Decisions, Ministerial Directions And Legislative Impact

The Minister made no directions to us during the year. Consultations with the Minister and his office are regular and provide thoughtful advice and comment to the Land Council across a range of portfolio issues - Township Leasing; Trust and Land Management; Rights and Entitlements; Health and Disability; Education; Economic and Social issues and Income Management.

The Land Council has reviewed and discussed Bills, Amendments, and Draft Legislation notified at various meetings. New (Commonwealth and Territory) legislation introduced, enacted or amended during the year that directly affected Tiwi people and the Land Council includes:

Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976

Certification:

This report of operations and related activity is made in accordance with a resolution of the Tiwi Land Council at Meeting 311 held at Wurrumiyanga on 2nd September 2019, for the preparation and content of this Report of Operations in accordance with Finance Minister`s Orders.

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni Chairman

2nd September 2019

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INDEMNITIES AND INSURANCE PREMIUMS

Indemnities and insurance premiums for officers

In 2004 the Land Council was obliged to adopt Comcover as insurer. Policy Terms and Conditions do include Management Committee Members’ and Officers` Liability. The limit of liability is $100m. A premium of $5,725 was paid for this cover for the 2018-19 year and a certificate of currency has been issued.

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OTHER STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS

Asset Value

A revaluation of our assets is undertaken every three years. The most recent required valuation was completed by the Herron Todd White in 2019, with the next valuation due for the year ending 30 June 2022.

Approved ABA Budget

Our approved budget at 1st July 2018 was increased with approval of a supplementary budget estimate. Our attached financial statements record our performance against this income.

Corporate Governance and Planning

Basic Corporate Governance training for Tiwi members began in 2013/14, with some members undertaking courses provided by the Tiwi Training and Employment Board. Our Land Council specific corporate governance training program was formulated with manuals and course structures designed by KPMG. These include a board evaluation and performance review protocols of our Members and Management Committee.

The Land Council is committed to ensuring that the Land Council has an effective corporate governance system which adds value and assists the Land Council in achieving its functions. The Land Council ensures that an effective and efficient approach to corporate governance is developed and implemented and to ensure that the Accountable Authority is comprised of individuals with skill and expertise that are necessary for, and of assistance to, the Land Council.

The Tiwi Land Council has established an independent external Audit Committee of distinguished and reputable members and value their assessment and opinion on the systems, operations and risks of the Tiwi Land Council.

Section 35 Payments

Following recent amendments to the Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act 1976, section 37 of the amending Act 93 of 2006 requires a statement and certification in regard to any payments made by the Tiwi Land Council under Section 35 of the Act.

61 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 67

Tiwi Land Council made a payment of $169,000 under section 35(4), to Munupi Pty Ltd, relating to full and final payment of five-year intervention lease money, with notification of the fact that this is accountable money.

Tiwi Land Council made payments totaling $54,050.88 under section 35(4), to Tiwi Resources Pty Ltd on behalf of the traditional owners, relating to mining rents received from the Department of Primary Industry and Resources.

Tiwi Land Council made payments totaling $1,061,565.31, $543,807.52 on 15th August 2018 and $517,668.44 plus interest of $89.35 on 1st March 2019, under section 35(4B), to Mantiyupwi Aboriginal Corporation pertaining to 99-year township lease of Wurrumiyanga.

Tiwi Land Council received no funds under section 64(3) of the aforementioned act during 2018- 2019 financial year.

Fraud Control

The Land Council is satisfied that it has in place appropriate fraud control mechanisms to meet the needs and integrity of the Land Council. There were no detected or reported incidents during the year. The Land Council has adopted a Code of Conduct and Terms and Conditions that are supported by the Members. Introduction of a Pecuniary Interests Register during 2010 continues to be formally confirmed each year and members obliged to formally declare interest at every meeting.

Compliance Report - Finance

In addition to Management, Directors, and Solicitor representation letters required by the Australian National Audit Office as part of audit procedures, the Finance Minister requires a report of compliance with the provisions and requirements of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). A summary in the annual report of significant non-compliance notified during the reporting period, and action taken in response, is also required (refer section 17BE(h) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014), There were no instances of significant non-compliance during the financial year.

Protective Security Policy Framework

Transition to the new Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF) required our auditors enquire of security clearances applicable to contract personnel retained for the audit of the Tiwi Land Council. Access arrangements under Sub-Section 56(2) of the Archives Act 1983 were supported by the Land Council Audit Committee for the purposes of fieldwork and testing required by our external auditors. Further detail and the compliance regimes required have recently been discussed by the Land Council in August 2013. An exemption has been sought as permitted by the legislation

62 2018-2019 Annual Report

68 2018-2019 Annual Report

Compliance with Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014

Appendix B: List of Requirements - corporate Commonwealth entities refers to matters required to be contained and reported herein. Those matters relevant to our Authority are listed. Those outside the authority or legislative powers and functions of the Tiwi Land Council are not included and are expressly noted.

Compliance Report - Legal

The Attorney General requires a statement each year of legal expenses incurred by the authority including in-house legal costs and fees. This report has been completed for the 2018/19 financial year.

Compliance with Legal Service Directions 2005 requires Legal Service Expenditure Reports to the Office of Legal Services Coordination by 5th September 2019. The Tiwi Land Council has completed and forwarded this Report.

Legal Service Multi-Use List

The Legal Services Amendment Direction 2012 (No.1) was made 31st May 2012 and commenced at 1 June 2012, effectively requiring the Land Council utilise only approved providers of legal services endorsed by the Commonwealth. The Tiwi Land Council has endorsed the listing of our major law firm Bowden McCormack for continuing legal services, for the period July 2018 to February 2019, Bowden McCormack complies with the listing requirements.

Australian National Archives

Transition to digital record-keeping is well underway with plans to implement a cloud-based system during the 2019-20 financial year. All records held in the secure Land Council cloud system will be accessible to select Land Council staff in various locations in both Darwin and some Tiwi Island locations.

Ecologically Sustainable Development and Environmental Performance

Discussions continued with the University of Melbourne through the Scientific Reference Committee to work up a project that develops optimal management strategies for biodiversity, ecosystem services, and economic development.

63 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 69

The Land Use Request process was maintained throughout the year, with a review to be undertaken in the 2020 financial year, with increasing acceptance by external organisations of their obligations to assess the impact of their operations on the natural resources of the islands.

Environmental Performance

The Land Council Secretariat owns maintains a 560 sq. metre premises in Darwin. Members have investigated the use of tidal; wind and solar power and undertaken detailed studies since 1999. The Land Council HQ Office at Pickataramoor has now implemented solar energy generation.

Waste

Tiwi Land Council has required the Tiwi Islands Regional Council to progress leasing of Wurrumiyanga waste management facility in accordance with environmental legislation and supported their efforts to apply the same management standards to all waste management facility across the Tiwi Islands.

Water

The Water Resource Strategy for the Tiwi Islands, developed by the Tiwi Islands Water Advisory Committee, made up of an NT Government Water Planner and three Tiwi Land Rangers, was signed off by the Minister and the full Tiwi Land Council in 2013. The Strategy identifies the freshwater resource on the Tiwi Islands and sets out a framework for its sustainable management. Results to date continue to show that the freshwater resource is being used well within sustainable limits.

During 2017/18 a safer and more sustainable water supply was identified for Pirlangimpi community, with plans to develop three bore sites in 2019 financial year.

Work Health and Safety

Information is required to be reported pursuant to Schedule 2 of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. This report is required to comment upon:

· The health and safety management arrangements of the Tiwi Land Council.

• Our Land and Marine Rangers are required to comply with Risk and Obligations Registers maintained by Tiwi Plantations Corporation.

• A detail that is relevant for other staff and Land Council facilities includes:

§ Australian Workplace Safety Standards Act 2005 incident reporting procedures.

§ Transport Safety Investigations Act 2003 incident reporting procedures.

64 2018-2019 Annual Report

70 2018-2019 Annual Report

§ Work Health and Safety Act 2011 incident reporting procedures

§ Dangerous Goods and Transport Regulations Precautions and incident reporting procedures.

§ Poisonous and Dangerous Drugs Act and Regulations. Storage and fumigation procedures.

§ Coroners Act 1993 incident reporting procedures.

§ Fire and Emergency Act and Regulations.

Initiatives are taken during the year to ensure the health, safety, and welfare at work of employees and contractors of the Entity or authority.

The Tiwi Land Council has taken particular interest through initiatives of staff since 2013. These steps were taken to assure Land Council compliance with Australian Federal Legislation and to promote a risk-averse approach to Work Health and Safety and the legislation promoting these requirements.

• Other measures are taken to adhere to relevant legislation:

• UHF Radio and satellite phone at Pickataramoor HQ.

• Provided appropriate First Aid Kits in all TLC Vehicles, offices and accommodation.

• Emergency equipment such as Spinal board, Neck braces, Trauma Bag, Inflatable splints, Equipment for taking patient ‘obs’ is kept in stock.

• Displayed appropriate First Aid signs around Land Council buildings

• Implemented evacuation procedure - on display in prominent locations throughout Land Council buildings.

• ‘Slippery when wet’ signs.

• Non-slip strips on tiled steps.

• Reporting procedures in place.

• WH&S issues are now a permanent agenda item at all meetings.

• Muster point sign in a fixed position on the TLC Darwin property.

• Fire/Emergency drills carried out every six months and a full report, including recommendations, reported to the CEO and filed.

• Fire extinguishers in place.

• Emergency procedure directions displayed for staff/visitors to view.

• Fully stocked St Johns first aid kit on-site and checked annually by St Johns.

Health and safety outcomes (including the impact on injury rates of employees and contractors of the Entity or authority) achieved as a result of initiatives mentioned under paragraph (d) or previous initiatives.

• No reported injuries at any Land Council locations.

· Statistics of any accidents or dangerous occurrences during the year that arose out of the conduct of undertakings by the Entity or authority and that required the giving of notice under section 68;

• No accidents or dangerous occurrences.

· Any investigations conducted during the year that relate to undertakings carried on by the employer, including details of all notices given to the employer under section 29, 46 or 47 during the year;

65 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 71

• No investigations

· Such other matters as are required by guidelines approved on behalf of the Parliament by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit.

• None

· Where an annual report of the activities of the Commonwealth authority is not required, under the Act or other law by or in accordance with which the authority is established or incorporated, to be prepared with a view to its being laid before each House of the Parliament, a report concerning details, in relation to the authority in relation to a particular financial year, of the matters referred to in subsection (1), must be attached.

• Not applicable.

· if a controlling interest in the Commonwealth authority is held, either directly or indirectly, by another Commonwealth authority in respect of the activities of which an annual report is so required to be prepared—to that annual report;

• Not applicable

or

· if a controlling interest in the Commonwealth authority is not so held—to the annual report of the Entity or an Entity, administered by the responsible Minister for the first-mentioned authority.

• Not applicable

Audit Committee Required Assessments

The Chair of the committee, in consultation with the Chair of the Land Council, will initiate a review of the performance of the committee at least once every two years. The review will be conducted on a self-assessment basis (unless otherwise determined by the Land Council) with appropriate input sought from the Land Council, the Chief Executive Officer, the internal and external auditors, management and any other relevant stakeholders, as determined by the Land Council.

The IAC performed the required self-assessment this year. The performance was agreed within acceptable performance benchmarks.

Review of the Audit Committee Charter is also required annually. This review will include consultation with the Land Council. This has occurred for the 2018/19 year and is contained with the minutes of the Committee. Substantive changes to the charter as are required to be recommended by the Committee are formally approved by the Land Council. No substantive changes advised during 2018- 2019.

66 2018-2019 Annual Report

72 2018-2019 Annual Report

Advertising and Market Research section 311 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918

During 2018-19, Tiwi Land Council did not conduct any advertising or market research within the meaning of section 311 of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

67 2018-2019 Annual Report

Entity Resource Statement Source

Grant Identity

Funds Carried Forward from prior

Years

Transfer between sources

Actual Income 2018-2019

Actual Expenses 2018-2019

Capital

Acquisition

s

for 2018-2019

Balance of funds for 2018-2019

ABA beneficial payments under

section 64(1)

ABA s64(1)

455,287

-

4,521,000

3,058,540

263,921

1,653,826

Other Income

Combined with S64(1)

-

1,010

7,985

8,995

-

-

ABA

ABA

- Tiwi Funeral Fund

156

-

226,007

226,

163

-

-

ABA ABA- Land & Sea - - 807,012 807,012 - - ABA ABA- Boat - - 236,565 - - 236,565 Commonwealth Indigenous Carbon Farming Fund

Fire Management for GHG

2

-

-

2

-

-

Department of Environment and Natural Resources

IPA

5,215

-

9,285

14,500

-

-

Depa

rtment of Environment and Natural Resources

Outiers

123,109

-

143,763

217,592

-

49,280

Department of Environment and Natural Resources

Capital

- 1

368

-

-

368

-

-

Department of Environment and Natural Resources

Capital

- 2

397

-

-

397

-

-

Department of Local Government and Community Services Business Plan - - 81,818 - 81,818 Department of Infrastructure Reg Development & Cities

ORG

- BBRF

-

-

647,053

647,053

-

-

NT Fisheries

Blue Mud Bay Settlement

-

-

137,498

137,498

-

-

OTL

Insurance

122,551

-

-

122

,551

-

-

Self

- Generated

Griffith University

6,495

-

-

896

-

5,599

ABA beneficial payments under section 64(4)

Property

- Office

889,348

- 1,010

448

20

642,086

246,679

1,602,928

-

6,818,434

5,241,587

906,007

2,273,768

68 2018-2019 Annual Report

74 2018-2019 Annual Report

MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

Developing Human Resources

Human Resource Management is defined as the integrated use of procedures, policies, and practices to recruit, maintain, and develop employees in order for the organization to meet its desired goals. We have identified six broad areas: human resources capacity, human resources planning, personnel policy and practice, human resources data, performance management, and training.

Throughout the year we have seen the development of personal policies and procedures, incorporating a focus on the digital technologies storage and retention of human resource details. Planning has been undertaken in developing the framework a staff skills matrix, scheduled to be populated with pertinent data in 2018/19. Performance management is assessed on both specific skills basis and the workflows within our integrated team. Continuing professional development has been undertaken in 2018/19, and further training is scheduled for 2018/19.

The Executive Management Committee have been exposed to on the job training with regards to policies and procedures, the applicability of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, understanding is assessed on the basis of peer review.

Statistics on Staffing

Staff Gender Years in Service

on 30 June 2019

Expiry date Employment of contract status Location

1 Female 19 Ongoing Full time Darwin

2 Female 3 18/02/2020 Full time Darwin

3 Female 1 17/09/2019 Full time Tiwi Islands

4 Female 1 16/10/2021 Full time Darwin

5 Female 1 28/04/2020 Full time Darwin

6 Male 6 5/07/2021 Full time Darwin

7 Male 3 2/08/2021 Full time Tiwi Islands

8 Male 1 2/08/2021 Full time Darwin

9 Male 1 16/10/2021 Full time Darwin

69 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 75

Statistics on Employees who identify as Indigenous

Gender Number Indigenous

Participation % of Staff

Female 5 2 40.00%

Male 4 1 25.00%

Total 9 3 33.33%

70 2018-2019 Annual Report

76 2018-2019 Annual Report

Employment Benefits and Categorisation

Tiwi Land Council has engaged their staff under common law contracts or under Australian Government Industry Award 2016. Contracts for are for a stated salary, with an expectation that staff applies themselves diligently, properly and with skill, care, and attention in the best interest of the Tiwi Land Council. The Land Council does not make performance payments or post-employment payments.

When employment contracts expire, employee agreements must be based on the Australian Government Public Sector Workplace Bargaining Policy (Bargaining Policy), consistent with the Bargaining Policy, that all proposed remuneration increases are submitted to the Australian Public Service Commission (APSC) for assessment as affordable and offset by productivity gains.

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GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30TH JUNE 2019

Audited Accounts Contents

72 2018-2019 Annual Report

78 2018-2019 Annual Report

73 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 79

Certification

2018-2019 Annual Report 79

Certification

74 2018-2019 Annual Report

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2018-2019 Annual Report 81

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82 2018-2019 Annual Report

Primary financial statements

82 2018-2019 Annual Report

Primary financial statements

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2018-2019 Annual Report 83

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84 2018-2019 Annual Report

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2018-2019 Annual Report 85

80 2018-2019 Annual Report

86 2018-2019 Annual Report

Overview

86 2018-2019 Annual Report

Overview

81 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 87

Departmental Financial Performance

2018-2019 Annual Report 87

Departmental Financial Performance

82 2018-2019 Annual Report

88 2018-2019 Annual Report

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2018-2019 Annual Report 89

84 2018-2019 Annual Report

90 2018-2019 Annual Report

Departmental Financial Position

90 2018-2019 Annual Report

Departmental Financial Position

85 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 91

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2018-2019 Annual Report 93

88 2018-2019 Annual Report

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89 2018-2019 Annual Report

2018-2019 Annual Report 95

People and relationships

2018-2019 Annual Report 95

People and relationships

90 2018-2019 Annual Report

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2018-2019 Annual Report 97

92 2018-2019 Annual Report

98 2018-2019 Annual Report

Managing uncertainties

98 2018-2019 Annual Report

Managing uncertainties

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2018-2019 Annual Report 99

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2018-2019 Annual Report 101

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Other information

102 2018-2019 Annual Report

Other information

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2018-2019 Annual Report 103

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104

2018-2019 Annual Report

DATA TEMPLATES Appendix B: List of Requirements - corporate Commonwealth entities PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report

Description

Requirement

17BE

Contents of annual report

17BE(a)

Enabling legislation

Details of the

legislation establishing the body

Mandatory

17BE(b)(i) ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT A summary of the objects and functions of the entity as set out in legislation Mandatory 17BE(b)(ii)

Error! Reference source not found.

The purposes of the entity as included in the entity’s corporate plan for the reporting period Mandatory

17BE(c)

Responsible Minister

The names of the persons holding the position of responsible Minister or respo

nsible Ministers during the reporting period, and

the titles of those responsible Ministers

Mandatory

17BE(d)

N/A

Directions given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(e)

N/A

A ny government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(f) N/A Particulars of non

- compliance with:

(a) a direction given to the entity by the Minister under an Act or instrument during the reporting period; or

(b) a government policy order that applied in relation to the entity during the reporting period under section 22 of the Act

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(g)

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT

Annual performance statements in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the rule

Mandatory

99 2018-2019 Annual Report

17BE(h), 17BE(i)

N/A

A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non

- compliance with

finance law and action taken to remedy non

- compliance

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(j)

Accountable Authority Profiles

Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(k) OUTLINE OF ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE Outline of the organisational structure

of the entity (including any

subsidiaries of the entity)

Mandatory

17BE(ka) Statistics on Staffing Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and

non

- ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees;

(b) statistics on part-time employees;

(c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

17BE(l)

Location of Activities and Facilities

Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity

Mandatory

17BE(m)

Error!

Reference source not found.

Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(n), 17BE(o) N/A For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related

company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

If applicable, mandatory

100 2018-2019 Annual Report

17BE(h), 17BE(i)

N/A

A statement of significant issues reported to the Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with finance law and action taken to remedy non

- compliance

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(j)

Accountable Authority Profiles

Information on the accountable authority, or each member of the accountable authority, of the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(k)

OUTLINE OF ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

Outline of the organisational structure of the entity (including any subsidiaries of the entity)

Mandatory

17BE(ka)

Statistics on Staffing

Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees;

(b) statistics on part-time employees;

(c) statistics on gender;

(d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

17BE(l)

Location of Activities and Facilities

Outline of the location (whether or not in Australia) of major activities or facilities of the entity

Mandatory

17BE(m)

Error!

Reference source not found.

Information relating to the main corporate governance practices used by the entity during the reporting period

Mandatory

17BE(n), 17BE(o)

N/A

For transactions with a related Commonwealth entity or related company where the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the aggregate of those transactions, is more than $10,000 (inclusive of GST):

(a) the decision-making process undertaken by the accountable authority to approve the entity paying for a good or service from, or providing a grant to, the related Commonwealth entity or related company; and

If applicable, mandatory

(b) the value of the transaction, or if there is more than one transaction, the number of transactions and the aggregate of value

of the transactions

17BE(p) N/A Any significant activities and changes that affected the operation

or structure of the entity during the reporting period

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(q) N/A Particulars of judicial decisions or decisions of administrative

tribunals that may have a significant effect on the operations of

the entity

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(r)

N/A

Particulars of any reports on the entity given by: (a) the Auditor-General (other than a report under section 43 of the Act); or

(b) a Parliamentary Committee; or

(c) the Commonwealth Ombudsman; or

(d) the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(s)

N/A

An explanation of information not obtained from a subsidiary of the entity and the effect of not having the information on the annual report

If ap

plicable,

mandatory

17BE(t)

N/A

Details of any indemnity that applied during the reporting period to the accountable authority, any member of the accountable authority or officer of the entity against a liability (including premiums paid, or agreed to be paid, for insurance against the authority, member or officer’s liability for legal costs)

If applicable, mandatory

17BE(ta)

Information about remuneration for senior executives

Information about executive remuneration

Mandatory

17 BF

Disclosure requirements for government business enterprises

17BF(1)(a)(i) N/A An assessment of significant changes in the entity’s overall

financial structure and financial conditions

If applicable, mandatory

101 2018-2019 Annual Report

17BF(1)(a)(ii) N/A An assessment of any events or risks that could cause financial

information that is reported not to be indicative of future operations or financial conditions

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(1)(b) N/A Information on dividends paid or recommended If applicable,

mandatory

17BF(1)(c) N/A Details of any community service obligations the government

business enterprise has including:

(a) an outline of actions taken to fulfil those obligations; and

(b) an assessment of the cost of fulfilling those obligations

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(2) N/A A statement regarding the exclusion of information on the

grounds that the information is commercially sensitive and would be likely to result in unreasonable commercial prejudice to the

government business enterprise

If applicable, mandatory

102 2018-2019 Annual Report

17BF(1)(a)(ii)

N/A

An assessment of any events or risks that could cause financial information that is reported not to be indicative of future operations or financial conditions

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(1)(b)

N/A

Information on dividends paid or recommended

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(1)(c)

N/A

Details of any community service obligations the government business enterprise has including:

(a) an outline of actions taken to fulfil those obligations; and

(b) an assessment of the cost of fulfilling those obligations

If applicable, mandatory

17BF(2)

N/A

A statement regarding the exclusion of information on the grounds that the information is commercially sensitive and would be likely to result in unreasonable commercial prejudice to the

government business enterprise

If applicable, mandatory

Details of Accountable Authority during the reporting period Current Report

Period (2018-19)

Period as the accountable authority or member

Name

Qualifications of the Accountable Authority

Experience of the Accountable Authority

Position Title / Position held

Executive / Non-Executive

Date of Commencement

Date of cessation

Number of meetings of the board of the company

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Port Melville Pty Ltd - Chairmain; Tiwi Plantation Corporation Ltd - Deputy Chair; Tiwi Enterprises Pty Lt

d

- Director

Chair

February 2012

-

6

Andrew John Tipungwuti

Tiwi Islands Adventures Pty

Ltd -

Director; Tiwi Education Board- Deputy Chair; Aboriginals Benefit Account Advisory Committee

- Chair

Chief Executive Officer 1st August 2018 - 6

103 2018-2019 Annual Report

All Ongoing Employees Current Report Period (2018-19)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Fulltime

Part Time

Total Male

Fulltime

Part Time

Total Female

Fulltime

Part Time

Total Indeterminate

NSW

- - - - - - - - -

-

Qld

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ta s

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vic

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ACT

- - - - - - - - -

-

NT

4

-

4

5

-

5

-

-

-

9

External Territories

- - - - - - - - -

-

Overseas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total

4

-

4

5

-

5

-

-

-

9

104 2018-2019 Annual Report

All Ongoing Employees Previous Report Period (2017-18)

Male

Female

Indeterminate

Total

Fulltime

Part Time

Total Male

Fulltime

Part Time

Total Female

Fulltime

Part Time

Total Indeterminate

NSW - - - - - - - - -

-

Qld

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Tas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vic

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WA

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ACT

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NT

3 - 3 3 - 3 - - - 6

External Territories

- - - - - - - - -

-

Overseas

- - - - - - - - -

-

Total

3 - 3 3 - 3 - - - 6

105 2018-2019 Annual Report

Information about remuneration for key management personnel

Short

-term benefits

Post

-employment

benefits

Other long

-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Name Position title Base salary Bonuses Other

benefits and

allowances

Superannuation contributions Long service leave

Other long

-term

benefits

Gibson Farmer Illortaminni

Chair $112,352.63

$6,658.00 $10,658.97

$129,669.60

Andrew Tipungwuti Chief Executive

Officer

$170,337.25

$17,033.73 $3,920.34 $18,093.89

$209,385.21

Brian Clancy Chief

Executive

Officer

$15,854.58

$4,662.00 $1,585.45 $396.36 $1,829.37

$24,327.76

Caption

106 2018-2019 Annual Report

Information about remuneration for senior executives

Short

-term benefits

Post

-employment

benefits

Other

long

-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Total remuneration bands Number of senior executives

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other

benefits and allowances

Average superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

Average other long

-term

benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$0 - $220,000 $220,001

- $245,000

$245,001

- $270,000

$270,001

- $295,000

$295,0

01 -

$320,000

$320,001

- $345,000

$345,001

- $370,000

$370,001

- $395,000

$395,001 - $420,000 $420,001 - $445,000 $445,001

- $470,000

$470,001

- $495,000

$495,001

- $520,000

$520,001

- $545,000

107 2018-2019 Annual Report

Information about remuneration for other highly paid staff

Short-term benefits

Post-employment benefits

Other long-term benefits

Termination benefits

Total remuneration

Total remuneration bands Number of other highly paid staff

Average base salary Average bonuses

Average other benefits and allowances

Average superannuation contributions

Average long service leave

Average other long

- term

benefits

Average termination benefits

Average total remuneration

$220,001- $245,000 $245,001- $270,000 $270,001

- $295,000

$295,001

- $320,000

$320,001

- $345,000

$345,001

- $370,000

$370,001

- $395,000

$395,001

- $420,000

$420,001

- $445,000

$445,001- $470,000 $470,001- $495,000 $495,001- ….

108 2018-2019 Annual Report

Statement of Comprehensive Income Current Report Period (2018-19)

30 June 2019

30 June

2018

Budget

30 June 2019

$'000

$'000

$'000

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee Benefits Expense

1,659

1,425

-

Suppliers Expense

3,466

2,657

-

Losses from Asset Sales

-

69

Depre

ciation and Amortisation Expense

266

147

-

Write

- Down and Impairment of Assets

40

-

Total Expenses

5,431

4,298

-

Income

Total Own-Source Income 26 121 - Gains from Sale of Assets

6

-

Net cost of services

Net cost of services

- 5,400

- 4,177

-

Revenue from Government

Revenue

from Government

7,213

5,690

-

Surplus/(Deficit) after Tax

Surplus/(Deficit) after Tax

1,813

1,513

-

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Total comprehensive Income/(Loss)

1,907

1,507

-

109 2018-2019 Annual Report

Statement of Financial Position Current Report Period (2018-19)

30 June 2019

30 June 2018

Budget

30 June 2019

ASSETS

Total Financial Assets

2,389

2,036

-

Total Non

- Financial Assets

3,104

2,395

-

Total Assets 5,493 4,431 -

LIABILITIES

Total Payables 634 1,368

Total Provisions 156 267 - Total Liabilities

790

1,635

Net Assets

4,703

2,796

-

EQUITY

Total Equity

4,703

2,796

-

110 2018-2019 Annual Report

Statement of Financial Position Current Report Period (2018-19)

30 June 2019

30 June 2018

Budget

30 June 2019

ASSETS

Total Financial Assets

2,389

2,036

-

Total Non

- Financial Assets

3,104

2,395

-

Total Assets

5,493

4,431

-

LIABILITIES

Total Payables

634

1,368

Total Pr

ovisions

156

267

-

Total Liabilities

790

1,635

Net Assets

4,703

2,796

-

EQUITY

Total Equity

4,703

2,796

-

Statement of Changes in Equity Current Report Period (2018-19)

30 June 2019

30 June 2018

Budget

30 June 2019

Opening balance

Balance

Carried Forward from Previous Period

2,796

1,283

-

Adjusted Opening Balance

-

-

-

Comprehensive income

Total Comprehensive Income

1,907

1,513

-

Closing Balance as at 30 June

4,703

2,796

-

111 2018-2019 Annual Report

Cash flow Statement Current Report Period (2018-19)

30 Ju

ne 2019

30 June 2018

Budget

30 June 2019

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Total Cash Received (OPERATING ACTIVITIES)

7,654

5,701

-

Total Cash Used for (OPERATING ACTIVITIES)

6,363

4,719

-

Net Cash from OPERATING ACTIVITIES

1,290

982

-

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Total Cash Received (INVESTING ACTIVITIES)

48

-

-

Total Cash Used (INVESTING ACTIVITIES)

960

1,438

-

Net Cash from INVESTING ACTIVITIES

- 911

- 1,438

-

Purchase of Property, Plant and Equipment

960

1,438

-

Purchase of

Intangibles

-

-

-

FINANCING ACTIVIT

IES

Total Cash Received (FINANCING ACTIVITIES)

-

-

-

Total Cash Used (FINANCING ACTIVITIES)

- - -

Net Cash from FINANCING ACTIVITIES

-

-

-

Cash at the End of the Reporting Period

Cash at the End of the

Reporting Period

2,389

2,010

-

112 2018-2019 Annual Report

Cash flow Statement Current Report Period (2018-19)

30 Ju

ne 2019

30 June 2018

Budget

30 June 2019

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Total Cash Received (OPERATING ACTIVITIES)

7,654

5,701

-

Total Cash Used for (OPERATING ACTIVITIES)

6,363

4,719

-

Net Cash from OPERATING ACTIVITIES

1,290

982

-

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Total Cash Received (INVESTING ACTIVITIES)

48

-

-

Total Cash Used (INVESTING ACTIVITIES)

960

1,438

-

Net Cash from INVESTING ACTIVITIES

- 911

- 1,438

-

Purchase of Property, Plant and Equipment

960

1,438

-

Purchase of

Intangibles

-

-

-

FINANCING ACTIVIT

IES

Total Cash Received (FINANCING ACTIVITIES)

-

-

-

Total Cash Used (FINANCING ACTIVITIES)

-

-

-

Net Cash from FINANCING ACTIVITIES

-

-

-

Cash at the End of the Reporting Period

Cash at the End of the

Reporting Period

2,389

2,010

-

Notes to the Financial Statements (Departmental) (2018-19)

30 June 2019

30 June 2018

Budget

30 June 2019

Current Assets

2,395

2,038

-

Current Liabilities

756

1,615

-

113 2018-2019 Annual Report