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Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee—Budget estimates 2022-23—Report, dated May 2022


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May 2022

The Senate

Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee

Budget Estimates 2022-23

© Commonwealth of Australia

ISBN 978-1-76093-406-4

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License.

The details of this licence are available on the Creative Commons website: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

Printed by the Senate Printing Unit, Parliament House, Canberra.

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Members

Chair Senator Claire Chandler LP, TAS

Deputy Chair Senator Tim Ayres ALP, NSW

Members Senator James Paterson LP, VIC

Senator Matt O'Sullivan LP, WA

Senator Malcolm Roberts PHON, QLD

Senator Marielle Smith ALP, SA

Senators in attendance Senators Antic, Ayres, Chandler, Gallagher, Lines, McAllister, McCarthy [by video link], McKim [by video link], Molan, O’Sullivan, Paterson, Patrick, Roberts, Small, Marielle Smith, Thorpe [by video link], Watt, Wong

Senate Finance and Administration Committee Secretariat: Sarah Redden, Acting Committee Secretary Kate Campbell, Principal Research Officer Trish Carling, Senior Research Officer Jason See, Acting Research Officer Brooke Gay, Acting Research Officer

PO Box 6100 Email: fpa.sen@aph.gov.au

Parliament House Ph: 02 3277 3846

Canberra ACT 2600 Fax: 02 6277 5809

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Contents

Members ............................................................................................................................................. iii

Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................... vii

Chapter 1—Budget Estimates 2022-23 ............................................................................................. 1

Chapter 2—Public hearings .............................................................................................................. 5

Appendix 1—Departments and agencies under the committee's oversight .......................... 15

Appendix 2—Tabled documents .................................................................................................... 17

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Abbreviations

AEC Australian Electoral Commission

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANI Australian Naval Infrastructure Pty Ltd

APH Australian Parliament House

APS Australian Public Service

APSC Australian Public Service Commission

committee Senate Finance and Public Administration

Legislation Committee

DPS Department of Parliamentary Services

DTA Digital Transformation Agency

FFMA Future Fund Management Agency

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1991

IPEA Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority

MoPS Act Members of Parliament (Staff) Act 1984

NIAA National Indigenous Australians Agency

NRRA National Recovery and Resilience Agency

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PEMS Parliamentary Expenses Management System

PM&C Prime Minister and Cabinet

PMO Prime Minister’s Office

SSTP Sovereign Shipbuilding Talent Pool

Treasury Amendment Bill Treasury Amendment (Cost of Living Support and Other Measures) Bill 2022

WGEA Act Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012

1

Chapter 1

Budget Estimates 2022-23

1.1 On 29 March 2022, the Senate referred the following to the Senate Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee (the committee) for examination and report:

 particulars of proposed expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 2023;  particulars of certain proposed expenditure in respect of the year ending on 30 June 2023; and the  particulars of proposed expenditure in relation to the parliamentary

departments in respect of the year ending on 30 June 2023.1

1.2 The committee has responsibility for examining the expenditure and outcomes of the following departments and agencies:

 Parliamentary departments;2  Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) portfolio;  Finance portfolio; and  cross-portfolio on Indigenous matters.3

1.3 Departments and agencies under the committee’s oversight are listed in Appendix 1 of this report.

Portfolio Budget Statements 2022-23 1.4 The Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS) 2022-23 for the PM&C portfolio, the Finance portfolio and the Parliamentary departments were tabled in the Senate on 29 March 2022.4

Hearings 1.5 The committee held public hearings on the following dates as part of Budget Estimates 2022-23:

 Thursday 31 March 2022 - PM&C portfolio;  Monday 4 April 2022 - Parliamentary departments and the PM&C  portfolio;

1 Journals of the Senate, No. 138, 29 March 2022, p. 4609.

2 As a matter of comity between the Houses, neither House inquires into the operations of the other

House. For this reason, neither the annual report of, nor the proposed expenditure for, the Department of the House of Representatives is referred to a Senate committee for review.

3 Journals of the Senate, No. 42, 13 February 2020, pp. 1368-1369.

4 Journals of the Senate, No. 138, 29 March 2022, p. 4610.

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 Tuesday 5 April 2022 - Finance portfolio; and  Friday 8 April 2022 - cross-portfolio on Indigenous matters.

1.6 The committee took evidence from the President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Slade Brockman, and the following ministers accompanied by officers of relevant departments and agencies:

 Senator the Hon Jonathon Duniam, Assistant Minister for Industry Development and, Forestry and Fisheries;  Senator the Hon Marise Payne, Minister for Foreign Affairs and, Minister for Women;  Senator the Hon Bridget McKenzie, Minister for Emergency Management

and National Recovery and Resilience and, Regionalisation, Regional Communications, and Regional Education;  Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham, Minister for Finance; and  Senator the Hon Amanda Stoker, Assistant Minister to the Attorney

General, Women and, Industrial Relations.

1.7 The committee expresses its appreciation for the assistance of the President, ministers and officers who appeared.

1.8 Over the course of the hearings, the committee took evidence from the following departments, agencies, and statutory officers:

Parliamentary departments  Parliamentary Budget Office  Department of Parliamentary Services

PM&C portfolio  Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet  National Recovery and Resilience Agency  Workplace Gender Equality Agency  Office for Women  Australian Public Service Commission  Office of National Intelligence  Digital Transformation Agency  Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor-General  Australian National Audit Office

Finance portfolio  ASC Pty Ltd  Australian Naval Infrastructure Pty Ltd  Department of Finance  Future Fund Management Agency  Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority  Australian Electoral Commission

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Cross-portfolio on Indigenous Matters  Indigenous Land and Sea Corporation  Outback Stores Pty Ltd  Northern Land Council  Central Land Council  Aboriginal Hostels Limited  National Indigenous Australians Agency  Department of Health

1.9 Documents tabled during the hearings are listed in Appendix 2.

Questions on notice and Hansard transcripts 1.10 The committee set Friday 20 May 2022 as the date for the return of answers to questions on notice arising from the hearings for Budget Estimates 2022-23.

1.11 Answers to questions on notice are published on the committee’s estimates webpage as they are received, along with the Hansard transcripts of the proceedings of the hearings.

Answers to questions on notice - Additional Estimates 2021-22 1.12 The committee held public hearings on the following dates as part of Additional Estimates 2021-22:

 Monday 14 February 2022 - Parliamentary departments and the PM&C  portfolio;  Tuesday 15 February 2022 - Finance portfolio; and  Friday 18 February 2022 - cross-portfolio on Indigenous matters.

1.13 The committee set 25 March 2022 as the date for the return of answers to questions on notice.

Timeliness of answers to questions on notice 1.14 The committee placed a total of 423 questions on notice, with 289 answered by the due date.

1.15 The parliamentary departments took 16 questions on notice, all of which were provided by the due date.

1.16 The PM&C portfolio (including cross-portfolio on Indigenous Matters) took 340 questions on notice. 206 answers were provided by the due date. As at the time of this report, 134 answers remain outstanding.

1.17 The committee notes that the following answers remain outstanding for the PM&C portfolio:

 38 answers to questions on notice outstanding from Supplementary Budget Estimates 2021-22, which were due by 10 December 2021;

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 32 answers to questions on notice outstanding from Budget Estimates 2021-22;  60 answers to questions on notice outstanding from Additional Estimates 2020-21;  79 answers to questions on notice outstanding from Budget Estimates

2020-21;  20 answers to questions on notice outstanding from Supplementary Estimates 2019-20; and  six answers to questions on notice outstanding from Additional Estimates

2019-20.

1.18 The Finance portfolio took 67 questions on notice, all of which were provided by the due date.

1.19 The Department of Health did not take any questions on notice during this estimates round. However the committee notes that the following answers remain outstanding for the Department of Health:

 four answers to questions on notice outstanding from Supplementary Budget Estimates 2021-22; and  three answers to questions on notice outstanding from Budget Estimates 2021-22.

1.20 The committee highlights its preference for outstanding responses to be provided before the next estimates round.

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Chapter 2 Public hearings

2.1 This chapter lists the key topics discussed for each department and agency examined during the committee's hearings for Budget Estimates 2022-23. Page numbers of the Proof Hansard transcript for that day's hearing are indicated in brackets as a reference.

Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio—Thursday 31 March 2022

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet 2.2 Ms Stephanie Foster PSM, Deputy Secretary, Governance and APS Reform, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, made a brief opening statement regarding changes to the department's executive since Additional

Estimates 2021-22.

2.3 Topics discussed for the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) included:

 breakdown of the allotment of funds for the Clean Energy Supply Chain Forum (p. 5);  cost of living measures in the budget including the low- and middle-income tax offset and relief for fuel costs (pp. 7-8 & 34);  updates on the current situation between Russia and Ukraine including: its

affect upon cost-of-living pressures for Australians and supply disruptions; what humanitarian, military and consular assistance Australia has provided to Ukraine; and what correspondence the Prime Minister has had with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (pp. 8, 15 & 25-29);  the department’s understanding of the Solomon Islands bilateral security

treaty with the People’s Republic of China and Australia’s bilateral engagement as a participant in the Pacific Islands Forum (pp. 9-13);  the Prime Minister’s correspondence with the Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands, Manasseh Sogavare (p. 15);  the role of the department in, the timeliness of, and the Prime Minister’s

prior briefings to, the national emergency declaration for the Queensland and New South Wales floods of March and April 2022 (pp. 16-19);  application of the Freedom of Information Act 1991 (the FOI Act) with regard to a freedom of information request to the South Australian Police

(pp. 22-25);  Commonwealth Cabinet committees and the status and operation of the National Cabinet (p. 25);  the Prime Minister’s knowledge and actions concerning the following:

− constituents signed into APH by Mr Craig Kelly MP;

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− comments made by Senator Gerard Rennick concerning Russia; and − social media comments made by Mr George Christensen MP (pp. 29-32).

 corporate productivity and productivity elements of the budget including tax relief that has been provided to small businesses and the Small Business Technology Investment Boost (p. 33);

 measures to acquire more skilled workers including the Australian apprenticeship incentive scheme and the JobTrainer program (p. 34);  funds allocated to additional port infrastructure in Darwin (pp. 35-36);  ownership of the port of Darwin (p. 37);  potential locations for an east coast submarine base and the expansion of

existing facilities in Henderson in West Australia (WA) and Osborne in South Australia (SA) (pp. 39-40);  progress of AUKUS’ 18-month review period and consultations with the USA and the UK (pp. 41-42);  COVID deaths in aged care facilities (pp. 42-44);  the Commonwealth’s intervention in the New South Wales (NSW) Liberal

Party factional dispute (pp. 45-48);  international economic trends and challenges over the forward six months and potential impacts on international trade (pp. 48-50);  administrative support provided by the department to the Prime Minister’s

Office (PMO) regarding FOI requests (pp. 51-53);  status of the review of the Members of Parliament (Staff) Act 1984 (MoPS Act), specifically to the call for submissions, staffing and resources of the review’s secretariat and the terms of reference (pp. 53-55);  resourcing for the development and establishment of the Office of

Parliamentary Standards and Culture and the Independent Parliamentary Standards Commission (pp. 55-56);  National Cabinet solidarity (pp. 56 & 60);  fund allocation for claims processing within the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (pp. 56-58);  declarations of private interests and consistency with ministerial standards (pp. 59-60); and  actions taken at a whole-of-government level for a review into Australia’s COVID-19 response (pp. 61-62).

National Recovery and Resilience Agency 2.4 The Hon Shane Stone AC, QC, Coordinator-General of the National Recovery and Resilience Agency, made an opening statement updating the committee on the agency's work supporting the recovery efforts following the 2022

Eastern Australia floods.

2.5 Topics discussed for the National Recovery and Resilience Agency (NRRA) included:

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 the level of readiness and immediate response of the agency to the 2022 Eastern Australia floods (pp. 65-66);  categories of emergency relief assistance for individuals and communities (p. 68);  Emergency Response Fund and Disaster Recovery Funding Agreements,

and progress of associated projects (pp. 69-70);  sequence of events leading up to the declaration of a national emergency on 11 March 2022 (p. 72);  public statements made by Mr Stone (pp. 74-77);  Commonwealth record-keeping requirements regarding Mr Stone’s diary

(pp. 77-78 & 80-81);  recovery coordination measures in the aftermath of Cyclone Seroja in WA (p. 79);  matters relating to the Emergency Response Fund including the

announcement of the second round of successful applicants and the progress of the distribution of funds to first-round applicants (pp. 81-83); and  the status of flood relief and mitigation projects in NSW and QLD (pp. 84-87).

Workplace Gender Equality Agency 2.6 Topics discussed for the Workplace Gender Equality Agency included:

 key contributors to the gender pay gap (p. 88);  implementation of the recommendations for the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 (WGEA Act) review and company reporting (pp. 89-90); and  timeline for and, corporate measures that may assist in closing the gender

pay gap (p. 90).

Office for Women (Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet) 2.7 Topics discussed for the Office for Women included:

 updates on implementation of the recommendations of the Respect@Work: Sexual Harassment National Inquiry Report 2020 undertaken by Ms Kate Jenkins, Sex Discrimination Commissioner (p. 92); and

 updates on the implementation of measures in the 2021-22 Women's Budget Statement (pp. 92-95).

Parliamentary departments—Monday 4 April 2022

Parliamentary Budget Office 2.8 Topics discussed for the Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) included:

 resourcing and the capacity of the PBO to meet its performance targets (p. 3); and  the PBO’s role during caretaker period (p. 4).

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Department of Parliamentary Services 2.9 Topics discussed for the Department of Parliamentary Services (DPS) included:

 the need for the enhanced security budget and the outcome of the new security policy proposal put forward by DPS (pp. 5-7);  threats to Australian Parliament House (APH) and its occupants in recent years and the need for physical and cyber security upgrades (pp. 9-10);  application of the Hansard corrections and alterations policy, specifically

regarding the alteration of a second reading speech of Senator the Hon Jane Hume for the Treasury Amendment (Cost of Living Support and Other Measures) Bill 2022 (Treasury Amendment Bill) (pp. 10-15);  comity between the Houses of Parliament and questions around the alteration of a House of Representatives Hansard transcript (pp. 10-12);  update on the implementation of the recommendations in the Review of the Parliamentary Workplace: Responding to Serious Incidents report and after-hours access to APH (pp. 15 & 17-18);  update on the online survey run by DPS for APH occupants to gauge the department’s performance (p. 16);  further matters regarding the alteration of a second reading speech of Senator the Hon Jane Hume for the Treasury Amendment Bill (pp. 18-19 & 21-22); and  email and other IT disruptions experienced by Senators in APH (pp. 22-23).

Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio—Monday 4 April 2022

Australian Public Service Commission 2.10 Mr Peter Woolcott AO, Australian Public Service Commissioner gave an opening statement that provided an update on the Australian Public Service Commission’s (APSC) implementation of the Thodey review and other current

APS support measures.

2.11 Topics discussed for the APSC included:

 breakdown and allocation of extra budget funding for the regionalisation budget measure (pp. 28-30);  expenditure and capacity of the APS Academy (p. 32);  use of labour hire in engaging casual and non-ongoing employees in the

Australian Public Service (APS) (pp. 33-34);  casual conversion uptake and eligibility within the APS (pp. 34-35); and  visibility of the APSC on the use of labour hire and associated expenditure

(p. 36).

Office of National Intelligence 2.12 Topics discussed for the Office of National Intelligence (ONI) included:

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 the ONI’s involvement in the establishment and subsequent operation of the cyber and intelligence centre (pp. 37-38).

Digital Transformation Agency 2.13 Topics discussed for the Digital Transformation Agency (DTA) included:

 the purpose, rollout, associated expenditure, size, and adoption rate of the ‘trusted digital identity’ (pp. 38-40); and  risk assessment measures taken by the DTA to ensure privacy and security of individuals regarding digital identities (p. 41).

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet 2.14 Topics discussed for the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet included:

 PM&C's knowledge of the alteration of a second reading speech of Senator the Hon Jane Hume for the Treasury Amendment Bill (pp. 41-48);  Mr Alan Tudge MP standing aside as Minister for Education, and when Mr Tudge's ministerial entitlements ceased (pp. 48-50);  what support and associated costs the Government provided to Mr Clive

Palmer in his bid to challenge the Western Australian and Queensland border arrangements (pp. 51 & 59-62);  the department’s role in relation to the Hon Mr Andrew Gee MP , Minister for Veterans Affairs’ bid for additional budget funding (pp. 52-53);  rural and regional budget outcomes (pp. 53-54);  the design and development of the Australian Future Leaders Program, and

the ongoing work of the government on deliverables of the program (pp. 55-59);  PM&C's knowledge of meetings between Mr Brian Houston and Prime Minister the Hon Scott Morrison MP during Mr Morrison's tenure as Prime

Minister (pp. 62-63);  legal advice sought on the Statement of Acknowledgement and the apology issued in the House of Representatives to Ms Brittany Higgins regarding the

alleged sexual assault that occurred in APH in March 2019 (pp. 64-65);  matters relating to Mr Phil Gaetjens, Secretary of PM&C, and his review of the PMO (pp. 65-66);  national opinion surveys conducted by Painted Dog (pp. 66-67);  an open letter from Mr Gaetjens and Mr Woolcott to the APS workforce

(p. 70); and  compliance of PM&C in answering questions on notice from previous estimates rounds (pp. 71-72).

Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor-General 2.15 Official Secretary to the Governor-General, Mr Peter Singer MVO, made an opening statement detailing recent activities of the office.

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2.16 Topics discussed for the Office of the Official Secretary to the

Governor-General included:

 matters relating to the Australian Future Leaders Program (pp. 78-80); and  revocation of honours previously awarded to Mr Dyson Heydon (pp. 80-81).

Australian National Audit Office 2.17 Topics discussed for the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) included:

 inclusion of the Urban Congestion Fund in a future audit program (p. 82); and  what steps have been taken to audit and report on the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic (p. 83).

Finance Portfolio - Tuesday 5 April 2022

ASC Pty Ltd 2.18 Topics discussed for ASC Pty Ltd included:

 matters relating to the Sovereign Shipbuilding Talent Pool (SSTP) including:

− the number of applications and success rate for individuals applying; − the budget provisions for the program over the forward estimates; − allocation of staff to the five workstreams of the SSTP; and − workforce capacity and retention (pp. 4-9).

 how the ASC has been affected by COVID-19 (pp. 11-12);  expansion of the Osborne shipyard (pp. 12-14); and  full-cycle docking locations (p. 15).

Australian Naval Infrastructure Pty Ltd 2.19 Topics discussed for Australian Naval Infrastructure (ANI) included:

 selection of locations for a new east coast submarine port (p. 16);  lease negotiations with the South Australian government (pp. 16, 19 & 26-27);  implications of submarine building strategies on new submarine port

infrastructure and land acquisition (p. 18);  plans for new facilities at Henderson SA and Captain Cook Graving Dock NSW (pp. 20-24 & 26);  specifics about the new large-vessel dry berth infrastructure in WA (p. 27);  updates on staffing levels (p. 27); and  the financial impact of the shutdown of the attack class project (p. 27).

Department of Finance (Outcomes 1 & 2) 2.20 The committee chair, Senator Claire Chandler, Minister Birmingham, and Senator Katy Gallagher all offered their commendations to Ms Rosemary

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Huxtable PSM, Secretary of the Department of Finance, congratulating her on her long and successful APS career, in light of her upcoming retirement.

2.21 Topics discussed for the Department of Finance (Outcomes 1 & 2) included:

 budget savings, decisions taken but not yet announced and the allocation of funding over the forward estimates against funding already provided (or obtained from existing resources) (pp. 30-35);  key economic outcomes following the government’s COVID-19 response

(pp. 36-37);  expenditure on current government advertising campaigns, and reviews of campaigns by the Independent Communications Committee (pp. 37-40);  appropriate conduct during caretaker period (pp. 40-42); and  data and measurement of total government expenses (pp. 43-45).

Future Fund Management Agency 2.22 Chief Executive Officer of the Future Fund Management Agency (FFMA), Dr Raphael Arndt, made an opening statement updating the committee on the effect of recent significant global events on the status of the Commonwealth's

investment funds.

2.23 Topics discussed for the FFMA included:

 effect of the Ukrainian-Russian conflict and global sanctions on FFMA investments (p. 46);  consultation regarding an amendment proposed by the Investment Funds Legislation Amendment Bill 2021 (p. 47);  the FFMA’s response to US executive order 13959 regarding investments in

the Aviation Industry Corporation of China (pp. 47-48);  performance figures and release of upcoming updates (p. 48); and  diversification of the FFMA’s investment portfolio to address global economic shocks (p. 48).

Department of Finance (Outcome 3) 2.24 Topics discussed for the Department of Finance (Outcome 3) included:

 advice the department provided to the PMO in relation to a review undertaken by the Prime Minister’s Chief of Staff, Dr John Kunkel (p. 49);  timeline of entitlements payments to non-returning members (p. 50);  the Special Minister of State’s additional ministerial office (pp. 51-52);  the department’s role in the review of the MoPS Act (pp. 52-53);  staffing, funding, and the department’s role in developing and delivering

the Office for Parliamentary Standards and Culture and other recommendations from the Jenkins review into Commonwealth Parliamentary Workplaces (p. 53);

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 investigation into the Hon Michael Sukkar MP and the Hon Kevin Andrews MP and their use of commonwealth funds (pp. 56-57); and  expenditure and timeline of completion of the upgrades to the Parliamentary Expenses Management System (pp. 57-58).

Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority 2.25 Topics discussed for the Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority included:

 Mr Andrew Laming MP's use of commonwealth funds for travel purposes and the subsequent audit on this usage (pp. 58-59).

Australian Electoral Commission 2.26 Topics discussed for the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) included:

 outcomes of the AEC's February 2021 compliance review, and distinctions between loans and donations (pp. 59-60);  donations to registered significant third parties (pp. 61-62);  issue of multiple voting and voter fraud (pp. 62-63);  electoral roll auditing (p. 63);  lessons learnt from the recent SA election for managing voting waiting

times (p. 64);  public education campaigns that encourage people to vote in a COVID-safe environment (p. 64);  managing the volume of postal votes (p. 65);  stress testing of the AEC website to ensure ongoing capacity with high

traffic (p. 65);  impact of recent South Queensland and North NSW floods on regional polling booths (pp. 65-66 & 70-71);  the logistics of secure telephone voting (pp. 66-67); and  deregistration of the Liberal Democrat party (pp. 68-69).

Cross-portfolio on Indigenous Matters - Friday 8 April 2022

National Indigenous Australians Agency 2.27 Chief Executive Officer of the National Indigenous Australians Agency (NIAA), Ms Jody Broun made an opening statement that provided an update on some of the agency’s recent major accomplishments.

2.28 Topics discussed for the NIAA included:

 outcomes of the Indigenous Voice Co-design Final Report to the Australian Government and the establishment of Local and Regional Voices (pp. 7-9);  funding allocation for various programs and services within the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (pp. 10-11);

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 funding and application processes for regional infrastructure and facilities (p. 12);  Remote Engagement Program extension measures including trial sites and co-design processes (pp. 12-13);  funding allocation for strengthening the governance of prescribed bodies

corporate (p. 15);  NIAA support as required for voting enrolment with remote communities; (p. 15); and  updates on the McDonald vs Commonwealth Class Action (p. 16).

Department of Health 2.29 Officials from the Department of Health joined officials from the NIAA to discuss Indigenous health issues. Topics discussed included:

 Application of the Biosecurity Act 2015 to implement restrictions on remote communities and Commonwealth biosecurity determinations in WA since 2020 (pp. 16-17).

Agencies released from the hearing 2.30 The following agencies were released from the hearing: Indigenous Land and Sea Corporation; Aboriginal Hostels Limited; Central Land Council; Northern Land Council; Outback Stores Pty Ltd; and Office of the Registrar of

Indigenous Corporations.

Senator Claire Chandler Chair

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Appendix 1

Departments and agencies under the committee's oversight

Parliamentary departments  Department of Parliamentary Services;  Department of the Senate; and the  Parliamentary Budget Office.

Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio  Australian National Audit Office;  Australian Public Service Commission;  Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet;  Digital Transformation Agency;  National Australia Day Council Limited;  National Recovery and Resilience Agency;  Old Parliament House;  Office of National Intelligence;  Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor-General;  Office for Women; and the  Workplace Gender Equality Agency.

Indigenous agencies  Aboriginal Hostels Limited;  Anindilyakwa Land Council;  Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies;  Central Land Council;  National Indigenous Australians Agency;  Indigenous Business Australia;  Indigenous Land and Sea Corporation;  Northern Land Council;  Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations;  Outback Stores Ltd;  Tiwi Land Council;  Torres Strait Regional Authority; and the  Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council.

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Finance portfolio  Australian Electoral Commission;  ASC Pty Ltd;  Australian Naval Infrastructure Pty Ltd;  Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation;  Department of Finance;  Future Fund Management Agency; and the  Independent Parliamentary Expenses Authority.

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Appendix 2 Tabled documents

Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio

Thursday 31 March 2022  Organisational chart, tabled by Ms Stephanie Foster PSM, Deputy Secretary Governance and Head APS Reform, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet;  External Review - Section 39 of the Freedom of Information Act 1991, tabled by

Senator Rex Patrick;  Correspondence from Senator Rex Patrick to Prime Minister Scott Morrison MP dated 19 January 2022, tabled by Senator Rex Patrick; and  Opening statement, tabled by Mr Shane Stone, Coordinator-General,

National Recovery and Resilience Agency.

Monday 4 April 2022  Opening statement, tabled by Mr Peter Woolcott AO, Australian Public Service Commissioner;  APS Reform progress to March 2022, tabled by Mr Peter Woolcott AO,

Australian Public Service Commissioner; and  Correspondence from Senator the Hon Penny Wong to the President of the Senate, Senator the Hon Slade Brockman regarding alterations to a Hansard

transcript, dated 4 April 2022, tabled by Senator the Hon Penny Wong.

Parliamentary departments - Monday 4 April 2022  Second reading speech of Senator the Hon Jane Hume for the Treasury Amendment (Cost of Living Support and Other Measures) Bill 2022; tabled copy and copy from Hansard, tabled by Senator Katy Gallagher; and  Two news articles: 'MPs U-turn on prescription fees' published 1 April 2022

by the Adelaide Advertiser, and; 'Ministers spruiked cancelled measures' published 1 April 2022 by the Courier Mail, tabled by Senator Katy Gallagher.

Finance portfolio - 5 April 2022  Members of Parliament (Staff) Act 1984 government staffing table, tabled by Ms Rosemary Huxtable PSM, Secretary, Department of Finance.

Cross-portfolio on Indigenous Matters - Friday 18 February 2022  Opening statement, tabled by Outback Stores Pty Ltd; and  Opening statement, tabled by Ms Jody Broun, Chief Executive Officer of the National Indigenous Australians Agency.

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