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Australian Institute of Family Studies—Report for 2020-21


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ANNUAL REPORT 2020/21

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Visit the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) website at aifs.gov.au to explore our work, publications and events, and to discover our research agenda in more detail.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Annual Report 2020/21

Discovering what works for families

aifs.gov.au

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Annual report 2020/21

Australian Institute of Family Studies

Contact officer for Annual Report: Deputy Director (Corporate Services) Australian Institute of Family Studies Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006 Australia

Telephone (03) 9214 7888 Facsimile (03) 9214 7839 Website aifs.gov.au

Annual reports are available at: aifs.gov.au/annual-reports

© Commonwealth of Australia 2021

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ISSN 0819-2588 (Print) ISSN 2206-0936 (Online)

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Level 4

40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006 Australia

Telephone (03) 9214 7888 Facsimile (03) 9214 7839 Website aifs.gov.au

ABN 64 001 053 079

14 September 2021 Senator The Hon Anne Ruston MP Minister for Families and Social Services Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600

Dear Minister

It is with pleasure that I present to you the forty-first Annual Report of the Australian Institute of Family Studies, for presentation to Parliament in accordance with section 46 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 .

This report has been prepared pursuant to the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit.

The report relates to the period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021.

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies

iii

Who we are and what we do

The Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) is a statutory agency of the Australian Government that conducts, facilitates and communicates research about issues affecting families in Australia.

We aim to increase understanding of factors affecting Australian families by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report iv

Contents One - Director’s review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Research highlights 2020/21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Communicating our research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Finances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Outlook for 2021/22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Two - Agency overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Role and functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Organisational structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Outcome and program structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Three - Report on performance . . . . . . . . . 19

AIFS Strategic Directions 2016-21: Key achievements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Performance statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Performance framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

AIFS’ performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Impact case studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Performance against 2020/21 strategic initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Report on performance - financial activities . . .38

Balance sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Four - Management and accountability . . 41

Corporate governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Senior executive members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Senior management groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Corporate and statutory reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Risk management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Ethical standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

External scrutiny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Management of human resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Assets management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Commissioning bodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Australian National Audit Office access clauses . . 54

Exempt contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Procurement initiatives to support small business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Five - Financial statements . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Six - Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Appendix A: Other mandatory information . . . .94

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Appendix C: AIFS publications, events, webinars, presentations and submissions 2020/21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

Appendix D: Acronyms and abbreviations . . . .106

Appendix E: List of requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

Seven - Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

v

List of tables

Table 3.1: Output performance 2020/21 . . . . . .26

Table 3.2: Outcomes performance 2020/21 . . . 28

Table 3.3: Impact measures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Table 3.4: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2020/21, and budgeted expenses, 2021/22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Table 4.1: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Table 4.2: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff, by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

Table 4.3: Diversity and inclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

Table 4.5: Reportable consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Table 4.6: Reportable non-consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Table 4.7: Additional information for consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . .53

Table 4.8: Additional information for non-consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021 . . 53

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2020/21 . . 96

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2020/21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

Table D1: Acronyms and abbreviations . . . . . .106

Table E1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

List of figures

Figure 2.1: AIFS' organisational structure as at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Figure 3.1: AIFS’ achievements against AIFS’ performance measures 2016-21 . . . . . . . . . 21

Figure 3.2: AIFS’ theory of change . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Figure 3.3: AIFS’ performance framework: program logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Figure 3.4: Strategic initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Figure 4.1: Employee qualifications, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications, at 30 June 2021 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report vi

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One —

Director’s review

Director’s review 1

Director’s review

It was an honour to take over the reins from the outgoing Director, Anne Hollonds, in October 2020. My priority has been making progress on our next five-year strategy, commencing work on developing a new research agenda, and building on Anne’s work to create a stronger Institute to meet future challenges.

The challenges presented by the global coronavirus pandemic that emerged early in 2020 have continued into 2020/21. The pandemic has continued pressure on families - whether it be an increase in working from home, challenges to mental health, disruptions to education and other aspects of child development, the emergence of new patterns of potentially harmful behaviours, families access to services and supports, continued separation due to restrictions on interstate and international travel, or ongoing uncertainty in employment or financial security. More than ever, it is important for policy, practice and research to be seen through a family lens, so that the rich and varied ways families organise their lives are taken into account.

Families are the cornerstone on which our sense of safety, identity and success are built. Most of us can turn to our families for support but we recognise that not all families are the same. We work hard every day to expand our understanding of the most important questions related to families' lives, so that we can build the evidence for what works for every type of family to thrive.

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 2

© GettyImages/VioletaStoimenova

Families in Australia Survey

ƒ We conducted the second Families in Australia Survey in November- December 2020. The survey asked Australian families to tell us how their lives had changed since the COVID-19 pandemic; what challenges they faced; what support would have helped; and how they adapted to different ways of living. A total of 3,743 participants responded. Four publications were released drawing on the findings of the survey.

ƒ The third Families in Australia Survey was conducted in May-June 2021, with the focus shifting away from COVID-19 to cover more varied issues such as family wellbeing and characteristics. A total of 5,064 participants responded.

Research highlights 2020/21

During the past year we worked on 31 research projects and continued to extend our expertise and experience to make a significant contribution to practice and policy development in a wide range of family wellbeing areas. Notable highlights include:

31

3 Director’s review

Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC)

The AGRC conducted several significant research projects in the past year, including:

ƒ A pilot study for a National Gambling Reporting System (NGRS) was run in NSW, Victoria and the ACT. The NGRS aims to identify and monitor trends in gambling participation (e.g. the types of products people gamble on, how often people gamble, and how much people spend) and the impacts on health and wellbeing.

ƒ The Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Study sought to improve understanding of the types of products people gambled on before and during the COVID-19 restrictions, and how people’s gambling participation, alcohol consumption and health and wellbeing changed with the restrictions in place.

ƒ The Relationship Between Gambling and Domestic Violence Against Women Study was a national study investigating the nature of the relationship between gambling and domestic violence, funded by Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety (ANROWS).

ƒ The Gambling in Victoria Study examined gambling participation and at-risk behaviour in problem gambling among Victorian adults.

ƒ The Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers Study was a national study exploring the relationship between alcohol consumption and sports betting among young Australians.

Child Care Package Evaluation

ƒ AIFS is leading a consortium to evaluate the Australian Government’s Child Care Package, introduced in 2018.

ƒ In 2020/21 the evaluation consortium focused on data analysis and finalising the evaluation. COVID-related disruptions meant the planned data collections for the evaluation did not proceed in 2020. Instead, the analysis and reporting refocused to make use of the available data, and accessed the Department of Education, Skills and Employment’s administrative data to answer the evaluation questions.

ƒ The Inclusion Support Program evaluation had separate data collection and reporting requirements, and a substantial amount of this work, including the submission of a draft report, was completed in 2020/21.

National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study

ƒ One of the most extensive research projects on elder abuse in the world, the final report of this study was completed in 2020/21.

ƒ It involved two main elements. The first was a survey of 7,000 Australians aged 65 and over living in the community examined experiences of elder abuse among participants.

ƒ The second element of this study was a survey of 3,400 people aged 18-64 years, who were asked about their attitudes to older people, knowledge about elder abuse and concerns about whether someone they knew was experiencing elder abuse.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 4

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

ƒ In response to the disruption to undertaking fieldwork caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the planned 9th wave of data collection for 2020/21 was split into two surveys. The first Wave 9 survey (9C1) was completed in 2020/21. At the time of writing, the second smaller survey to make up Wave 9 (survey 9C2) was in the field (June-September 2021).

ƒ Preparation for Wave 10 data collection commenced.

ƒ The first publication for the Growing Up in Australia Snapshot Series, Teenagers’ Experiences of Discrimination , was released in March 2021.

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

ƒ In 2020, in response to the pandemic, the study team revised the survey content and methodology to enable contactless interviewing for Wave 3. The online survey went live at the end of July 2020. Data collection, including Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) and paper survey options, concluded in February 2021, with a final response rate of 49.4%. The revised survey will also collect information on the impacts of COVID-19 and the effects of recent natural disasters.

ƒ Study participants were offered the opportunity to donate their incentive for completing the survey to one of a selection of trusted charities. Over 20% of participants did this, leading to donations totalling just under $63,000 to Australian health charities.

ƒ The first Insights report, using data from Waves 1 and 2, was released over September- November 2020. The report included chapters on mental health, alcohol use, overweight and obesity and health service use among Australian men.

Australian Military and Veterans’ Families Study

ƒ Work on this significant study commenced in May 2021 and will build on our body of work about the wellbeing of military families and veterans.

Further information on these projects and others can be found in our Research activities section in the ‘Agency overview’ (page 12).

Director’s review 5

Communicating our research

Expanding the reach of our research findings to a wider range of audiences, including policy makers, practitioners and other researchers, has again been a key focus for AIFS.

Communicating our research is a key AIFS function. We do this through releasing research publications, both in short and long form, by researchers presenting at conferences and events, and in our webinars. The Institute’s research is widely reported in the media and promoted through our websites, newsletters and social media.

Events

A major part of our knowledge translation activities is to host events, including online webinars and our biennial conference. Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, we were unable to host a planned AIFS Conference in 2020/21. Significant planning has been undertaken for a new conference in 2022, with new dates secured for 15-17 June 2022 at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC). The Communications team will continue to plan for the event in 2021/22. Pleasingly, the vast majority of our 2020 sponsors have confirmed their participation in the 2022 event. Our revised theme is: Putting Families at the Centre.

Online webinars were an important part of communicating our research in the 2020/21 pandemic year, as this was one of the only ways to present new findings to a large audience. Our regular webinar series for Child Family Community Australia (CFCA), Emerging Minds and the Families and Children Expert Panel was again extremely popular, with more than 21,800 participants tuning in throughout the year.

Publications

We continued to publish high quality research into the wellbeing of Australian families, with 77 papers produced, and more than 3.59 million publications viewed or downloaded from our websites. We also produced a host of short articles, news pieces, infographics, fact sheets, social media posts and practice resources. In the past year, publishing highlights included reports on:

ƒ Families Then and Now report series

ƒ Ten to Men Insights #1 Report

ƒ Families in Australia: Life during COVID-19 report series

ƒ Gambling in Australia during COVID-19.

Child Family Community Australia

The Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange helps to communicate our research by synthesising and translating knowledge for child, family and community welfare professionals. Highlights in 2020/21:

ƒ Professional development provided for around 18,000 professionals (a 22% increase on 2019/20).

ƒ Over 32,000 subscribers now receive the fortnightly CFCA News , a 40% increase on 2019/20.

ƒ The CFCA website received around 2.4 million page views.

ƒ An average of 91% of professionals rated the CFCA resources as good or excellent, and 95% indicated the resources would support them to use evidence in their work.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 6

Finances

In the 2020/21 financial year, AIFS operated with $4.466 million of government appropriation and $10.979 million of other revenue (primarily from contracted research), as detailed in the ‘Financial statements’ (page 55). The Institute incurred a budget deficit of $530,124. This reported loss (deficit) is due to AIFS’ asset depreciation expense, costs associated with the impacts of COVID-19, and the negative impact of movements in employee provisions such as Long Service Leave and Annual Leave provisions.

Without depreciation and amortisation of $948,676, AIFS would have reported a surplus of $418,552.

Director’s review 7

Outlook for 2021/22

In 2020/21 the coronavirus pandemic gave AIFS the impetus to ask how we could be even more of a trusted voice for families.

We responded to the challenges we faced not only in our operating environment but also in how we were able to engage with stakeholders when traditional means were unavailable.

We will be launching our new AIFS Strategic Plan 2021-26 . The new strategy will focus on telling the stories of families and putting that knowledge in the hands of those who make decisions that improve families’ lives. It will require us to deepen and reinvigorate our collaboration with families in all their diversity. Putting families at the centre of our work means we will be able to amplify what matters to them, and the evidence we produce will have greater impact.

In line with the new AIFS Strategy 2021-26, the major priorities for the year ahead are:

ƒ defining our research agenda to articulate the themes, priorities and research questions that will shape our work for the next five years

ƒ developing a research model that considers the frameworks, capabilities, policies, resources and standards to deliver on our strategy

ƒ planning and delivery of the AIFS Conference in June 2022

ƒ implementing two rounds of the Families in Australia Survey for insights and analysis about what matters to families in the way they care for each other, work, learn and participate in their communities

ƒ preparing for the Wave 10 data collection for Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

ƒ finalising the evaluations of two pilot studies in the family law system funded under the Australian Government’s Women’s Economic Security Package

ƒ completing the pilot study for a National Gambling Reporting System to identify and monitor emerging trends in gambling participation and related harms in Australia

ƒ developing an options paper for the future of Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

ƒ building capability among our staff in knowledge translation and impact to equip them with the skills to better tell the stories that matter most to families and increase the uptake of evidence

ƒ finalising the redevelopment of our website in early 2022: to make evidence easier to find and easier to apply in practice.

Since I was appointed as the Institute’s Acting Director, I have been impressed by the rigour of our research and communication activities. I have also been impressed by the genuine commitment staff have for our work at the Institute, which drives our vision of discovering what works for every kind of family to thrive. I look forward to working with our staff, stakeholders, funders, advisory bodies and collaborators to help make this vision a reality. I am confident that the opportunities that will be unlocked by the new AIFS Strategy 2021-26 will build on the proud 40-year history of impactful research about the lives of Australian families.

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies 14 September 2021

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 8

© GettyImages/Tzido

Two —

Agency overview

Agency overview 9

Agency overview

AIFS is a Melbourne based statutory agency of the Australian Government, established in February 1980 under the Australian Family Law Act 1975 .

A non-corporate entity, AIFS is an agency within the Department of Social Services (DSS) portfolio. We also have links with a range of Australian Government departments and agencies, including the Attorney-General’s Department (AGD), the Department of Health (DoH), the Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE), the Department of

Defence, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (DVA), the Treasury, the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). Our staff are employed under the Public Service Act 1999 . At 30 June 2021, 92 people were employed at the Institute.

Role and functions

We aim to increase understanding of factors affecting the welfare of Australian families by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, researchers and the broader community. We evaluate policies and programs, and we provide advice to inform the design and implementation of policy and services.

The Institute’s What Works for Families Research Framework (Families Framework), which was highlighted in the AIFS Corporate Plan 2020/21 to 2023/24, guides our research agenda including commissioned projects. The Framework outlines four key research areas:

ƒ Life stages and transitions

ƒ Family relationships

ƒ Social and economic participation

ƒ Challenges for families.

We communicate our research findings to make evidence accessible and useful for decision makers, practitioners and the general public. We do this through our research publications, conferences, websites, information exchanges, information services, presentations, seminars and webinars, representation and through mass media.

The AIFS Corporate Plan 2020/21 to 2023/24 outlined our roles and functions for this annual reporting period. The four strategic priorities outlined in the plan are:

ƒ Create knowledge

ƒ Communicate knowledge

ƒ Connect and collaborate

ƒ Activate our future sustainability.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 10

Organisational structure

The Director is responsible for providing the overall leadership of the Institute and is supported by two Deputy Directors: the Deputy Director Research and Deputy Director Corporate Services (see Figure 2.1). This group works together to lead a team of managers responsible for the day-to-day work of AIFS in meeting our strategic objectives.

The Deputy Director Research is responsible for our research program, which includes a wide range of research, evaluation and dissemination projects focusing on policy and practice relevant issues affecting families in Australia.

The Deputy Director Corporate Services is responsible for the management of services to support our research activities, including human,

financial and physical resources, information management and communications technology, communication services and corporate governance.

Research managers oversee teams of research staff who work on a range of commissioned and internally initiated projects. The Research area includes the Australian Gambling Research Centre, established under the Gambling Measures Act 2012.

The Corporate Services area supports our research activities by providing administrative and specialist functions such as library, publishing, finance, information management and technology, communications, human resources and business capability services.

Figure 2.1:  AIFS' organisational structure as at 30 June 2021

Research

Kelly Hand Deputy Director (Research)

Michael Alexander Deputy Director (Corporate Services)

 Research Development

 Family Law, Family Violence and Elder Abuse

 Family Policy and

Practice Research

 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

 Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

 Data Governance and Management

 Linkage and Analytics

 Longitudinal Research and Analysis

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director

Corporate Corporate

 Communications

 Finance

 Information Management and Technology

 Strategy and Business Development

 Human Resources

Research

 Knowledge Translation and Impact

 Australian Gambling Research Centre

 Families and Society

Agency overview 11

Outcome and program structure

In this reporting period, we operated within the Australian Government’s outcome and output framework published in the Portfolio Budget Statements 2020-21 (PBS) and the AIFS Corporate Plan 2020/21 to 2023/24. The Institute has a single planned outcome:

Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community .

All our activities have been directed to achieving this outcome. Key performance criteria, detailed in the ‘Report on performance’ chapter (page 19), measure the Institute’s core outputs and deliverables. The Institute’s management accountability performance is described in the ‘Management and accountability’ chapter (page 41), and its finances in the ‘Financial statements’ chapter (page 55).

Key research activities

The research at AIFS is divided into six program areas:

ƒ Families and Society

ƒ Family Law and Family Violence

ƒ Family Policy and Service Systems

ƒ Child and Family Evidence

ƒ Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC)

ƒ Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies.

All our programs use a variety of methods and lenses to explore cross -cutting themes.

Families and Society

The Families and Society program area focuses on the major factors that shape and influence family life and wellbeing. The key project developments in 2020/21 are described below.

Families in Australia Survey

The Families in Australia Survey is AIFS’ own comprehensive survey that explores the current contexts of family life in Australia. Its scope is every person in every type of family, and it was launched in May 2020. The second Families in Australia Survey was conducted in November- December 2020. We asked Australian families to tell us how their lives had changed since the COVID-19 pandemic; what challenges they faced; what support would have helped; and how they adapted to different ways of living. This survey achieved a total of 3,743 participants. A third Families in Australia survey was conducted in May-June 2021, with the survey focus shifting away from the COVID focus, to cover more varied issues impacting families. This survey achieved a total of 5,064 completed surveys. Planning for the fourth survey is underway.

Findings from Families in Australia Surveys have been used in more than 10 published papers and reports, with other papers currently being drafted. Research findings have also been shared through conference presentations, policy briefings to government departments and webinars.

Child Care Package Evaluation

The Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) introduced the Child Care Package on 2 July 2018. In December 2017, AIFS was commissioned by the DESE to lead an evaluation of the Child Care Package, with consortium partners the Centre for Social Research and Methods at the Australian National University; the Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales; and the Social Research Centre.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 12

In 2020/21 the evaluation consortium focused on analysis and reporting for the evaluation. With COVID-related disruptions meaning planned data collections for the evaluation did not proceed in 2020, the analysis and reporting was refocused to make use of the available data and, in particular, finalising issues related to the use of the Department’s administrative data to answer the evaluation questions. The administrative data analysis work, along with drafting the evaluation report, were the key areas of focus for the evaluation in 2020/21.

Coinciding with the overall Child Care Package evaluation, the Inclusion Support Program evaluation had separate data collection and reporting requirements, and a substantial amount of this work, including the submission of a draft report, was completed in 2020/2021.

Family Law and Family Violence

The Family Law and Family Violence program undertakes research in the areas of family law, family violence and elder abuse. The aim of this research program is to produce a rigorous evidence base that will inform the development of policy, programs and practice in these areas. Key project developments in 2020/21 are described below.

National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study

A landmark project - the National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study (NEAPS) - was completed in 2020/21. One of the most extensive research projects on elder abuse in the world, NEAPS involved two main elements. Its core was a survey of 7,000 community-dwelling Australians aged 65 and over. This survey examined experiences of elder abuse among participants, together with risk and protective factors and whether participants told a third party about the abuse or took action to stop the abuse. An important additional element of this study was a survey of 3,400 people aged 18-64, who were surveyed about their attitudes to older people, knowledge about elder abuse and concerns about whether someone they knew was experiencing elder abuse. The final report - the first to examine elder abuse prevalence in Australia - was delivered to the commissioning agency, the Australian Attorney-General’s Department in April 2021.

Compliance with and Enforcement of Family Law Parenting Orders

Work continued on the examination of Compliance with and Enforcement of Family Law Parenting Orders. Funded by Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS), this project will provide evidence on the factors that influence compliance with parenting orders made by the family law courts and how the legislative regime for enforcing orders under the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) operates. It involves four elements: a survey of professionals who work with separated families and interviews with judicial officers; a survey of parents and carers with parenting orders made in the past five years; an analysis of data from between 450 and 500 family court files; and a desktop review of enforcement approaches in three international jurisdictions.

The research team has worked with stakeholders across the family law system - including the Family Court of Australia and the Federal Circuit Court of Australia - to implement the project methodology. A stage one report based on the findings from the professionals’ survey and judicial interviews was provided to ANROWS in August. The final project report will be completed in the second half of 2021.

Post-separation property division

Two other projects entail a focus on post-separation property matters. The Institute was commissioned by the Australian Attorney -General’s Department to evaluate two pilot programs intended to provide greater access to support for post-separation property division to people with small property pools ($500,000 or under, excluding superannuation) who might otherwise be unable to access a cost -effective process. One evaluation is of the Small Claims Property Pilot being implemented in the Federal Circuit Court of Australia and the other is of the Lawyer-Assisted Property Mediation: Legal Aid Commission Trial being implemented in legal aid commissions. The final evaluation report will be provided to the Attorney-General’s Department in the first half of 2022.

Agency overview 13

Family Policy and Service Systems

The Family Policy and Service Systems program area researches and evaluates policies and services for families and children, as well as providing capability -building supports to the child and family service sector to develop their own evidence base. Key project developments in 2020/21 are provided below.

Families and Children Expert Panel

The Families and Children Expert Panel aims to help service providers funded by Department of Social Services’ Families and Children (FaC) Activity to better articulate the evidence underpinning their programs and to build their capability for program monitoring and evaluation. In 2020/21, the team focused on the continued support and assessment of evidence-based programs for Communities for Children service providers, one-on-one support for FaC Activity service providers to undertake program planning activities, the trialling of extended helpdesk support and the publication of a range of resources on project planning and evaluation. The team also continued their work with the Centre for Evidence and Implementation to produce and publish videos on program implementation, and with SNAICC on the sub -project Building effective partnerships between mainstream service providers and Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations (ACCOs).

In 2021/22 the team will continue to support FaC-funded providers to plan and evaluate their programs and has planned a new suite of publications on program evaluation basics. The team will also continue the work with DSS - begun in late 2020/21 - to draft and refine an outcomes framework for the FaC sector and to develop templates and guidance to help the FaC sector with new requirements for producing program logic models.

Evaluation of Northern Territory Child and Family Centres

AIFS is reviewing and evaluating six existing and three newly established Child and Family Centres (CFCs) in the Northern Territory for the Northern Territory Department of Education and the Reform Management Office (RMO). The aim is to review the establishment, implementation and operation of the CFCs and to gauge the extent to which they have enabled service integration. The evaluation also looks at the degree to which CFCs enable Aboriginal leadership and decision-making.

Work in 2020/21 was affected by COVID-19 related travel restrictions, and fieldwork was frequently delayed or postponed. Nonetheless, the project team interviewed CFC managers, stakeholders and staff. Interviews focused on how the sites were established, their initial aims, staff and stakeholder understanding of the CFCs’ purpose, and the ways in which they have worked with local services and community stakeholders. The research interviews build on the research team’s previous in-person consultations with CFC managers, Aboriginal coordinators and NT Government stakeholders.

Interviews with CFC staff and stakeholders will continue in 2021/22 and the team will continue to work with community researchers. The project team will report on project findings and develop a new evaluation plan for the CFCs in late 2021. Results will also be shared with key stakeholders.

Early Intervention Evidence and Evaluation Fund

The Early Intervention Evidence and Evaluation Fund project was a pilot for testing support for service providers funded by the NSW Government’s Department of Communities and Justice (DCJ) Targeted Early Intervention (TEI). The support was to assist TEI providers to build their ability to use and collect evidence in support of their work (and ultimately improve outcomes for children and families using the services).

For this project, AIFS collaborated with the Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC) at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) to provide the evidence and evaluation capability -building support for seven TEI service providers. AIFS’ role in this project was to help

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 14

assess service provider needs for evaluation and to help two TEI-funded providers to build their own evaluation, monitoring and data collection capability. This support included consultation with the service providers, working with them on selecting appropriate outcomes measures and locating and using appropriate evidence. This project finished in early 2021.

Identifying Strategies to Better Support Foster, Kinship and Permanent Carers

AIFS and Murawin Professional Services are collaborating on a project on how to best support foster, kinships and permanent carers as well as adoptive parents. The study focuses on what is known about carers in Australia, the supports they receive and best practice in supporting carers (and the children and young people in their care). Because Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are over -represented in out-of-home care (and among kinship carers), the study has a particular focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in care.

In 2020/21 AIFS undertook an evidence review of what is known about carers and the evidence for best practice in carer support. Murawin and AIFS began consultation with key stakeholders from federal and jurisdictional agencies, peak bodies and carers across Australia. This work was affected by COVID-19 related restrictions on travel and movement and the project has been extended into 2021/22.

The consultation phase of the research is planned for completion in the first quarter of 2021/22. The Murawin-AIFS project team are also analysing the consultation data and will be reporting on the project to the project’s funders and key stakeholders in late 2021.

Nationally Consistent Guidelines for Schools and Principals on the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse

The Department of Education, Skills and Employment commissioned AIFS to develop guidance for schools and principals on the prevention of child sexual abuse. This work supports the implementation of Recommendation 13.7 from the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

AIFS held a series of consultations and workshops with key experts and representatives from jurisdictional and Commonwealth agencies and professional associations in November 2020 and March 2021. These were supported by AIFS-authored briefing and discussion papers. Based on these consultations and workshops, AIFS wrote a guidance framework and then draft guidance. The key expert group commented on the draft final guidance in July 2021. A final version of the guidance, as well as some recommendations for next steps and future resources, was submitted in July 2021.

Australian Military and Veterans’ Families Study

The Australian Military and Veterans’ Family Study is a qualitative research study of the families of current serving Australian Defence Force (ADF) members and of former ADF members who have transitioned into civilian life in the past five years. The study looks at how family experiences and perspectives influence continued service in the ADF and how member and family experiences of transition from service can be improved. The study focuses on young families with children (including single parents). The project began in May 2021. Work in 2020/21 included project planning and a workshop with key Department of Defence and DVA stakeholders to refine the project parameters and focus.

Project activities in 2021/22 will include completion of an evidence review, application for ethics approval and commencement of interviews with young ADF and ex-serving families in several locations across Australia. The project is scheduled to run until November 2022.

Agency overview 15

Child and Family Evidence

The Child and Family Evidence program delivers funded projects focused on building the capability and capacity of service providers and policy makers to use evidence in their decision making when working with children and families. The key project developments in 2020/21 are described below.

Child Family Community Australia

The Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange, funded by the Department of Social Services (DSS), synthesises and translates knowledge to create resources for child, family and community welfare professionals. CFCA builds the sector’s capacity and capability for evidence-informed decision making.

In 2020/21, CFCA focused on understanding professionals’ experiences and the questions they need evidence to answer. This improved the teams’ ability to provide resources to professionals in a way that they can use to create positive outcomes for families. CFCA’s impact measurement has indicated that improvements to the quality and usefulness of CFCA resources have increased their use by professionals in policy and practice.

Over 32,000 subscribers now receive the fortnightly CFCA News , a 40% increase on 2019/20; with ongoing increases in subscriber engagement. CFCA produced 28 new publications and updated four existing resources this financial year, and its website received around 2.4 million page views. CFCA’s webinar program provided professional development for around 18,000 professionals (a 22% increase on 2019/20). Across CFCA’s products, an average of 91% of professionals rated the resources accessed as good or excellent, and 95% indicated the resources would support them to use evidence in their work.

Emerging Minds: National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

The National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health (NWC) supports professionals in the health, social and community sectors to assist children at risk of developing mental health conditions, with a focus on promoting a holistic, integrated approach to early intervention and prevention. In 2020/21, AIFS has been a leading partner in the strategic translation and dissemination of research evidence about child mental health (CMH) into practice.

In 2020/21, AIFS has produced practice resources on family separation and early childhood social, emotional and behavioural wellbeing based on systematic reviews of the evidence. AIFS’ approach to developing resources has included continuous engagement with the NWC’s key stakeholders. AIFS has identified stakeholders’ capability needs and topics of interest, and has used their stories and practice experience to enhance these resources.

AIFS’ systematic review of CMH indicators, measures and databases is a major contribution to the program. The review will present a comprehensive overview of Australia’s CMH data ecosystem at the local, state and national levels, and will provide insights into how children at all stages of the mental health and wellbeing continuum engage with a range of services, as well as where service provision could be enhanced to better meet their needs. AIFS is a key contributor to the evaluation of the NWC and has examined the effectiveness of the Learning Pathways approach.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 16

Australian Gambling Research Centre

The Australian Gambling Research Centre performs policy -relevant research that enhances our understanding of the nature and extent of gambling participation and related harms, and advances the knowledge of ways to prevent and reduce harm among at -risk populations, their families and communities. Key project developments are described below.

Restrictions related to the global COVID-19 pandemic led to changes in the availability of gambling in Australia, with land-based gambling (‘pokies’ or electronic gambling machine/EGM) venues temporarily closed and major sporting codes (national and international) suspended. The AGRC has responded to the changing gambling environment and conducted several significant research projects in the past year, including:

ƒ a pilot study for a National Gambling Reporting System (NGRS) . The NGRS aims to identify and monitor trends in gambling participation (e.g. the types of products people gamble on, how often people gamble, and how much people spend) and impacts on health and wellbeing. The pilot study is being conducted in three Australian jurisdictions (Victoria, NSW, and the ACT) and involves surveys of people who gamble, interviews with key experts who work in the gambling sector, and analysis of secondary data sources (such as treatment and expenditure data).

ƒ the Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Study . This study sought to improve understanding of the types of products people gambled on before and during the COVID-19 restrictions, and how people’s gambling participation, alcohol consumption, and health and wellbeing changed with the restrictions in place.

ƒ the Relationship Between Gambling and Domestic Violence Against Women Study . A national study to investigate the nature of the relationship between gambling and domestic violence, funded by ANROWS.

ƒ the Gambling in Victoria Study . This study examined gambling participation and at -risk behaviour in problem gambling among Victorian adults and was funded by the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

ƒ the Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers Stud y. A national study that explored the relationship between alcohol consumption and sports betting among young Australians.

Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies

Following a large group of people over a long period of time is a powerful way to learn about people at different ages and stages. It provides a level of research and statistical insight not available from one -off or repeated cross -sectional studies. Key project developments are described below.

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC)

Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) follows the development of 10,000 children and their families in urban and rural areas, and continues to provide insights into the developmental pathways of Australian children and their families. Data collection began in 2003 with two cohorts, aged either 0-1 or 4-5 years. Participants are now aged between 17 and 22 years. The study is funded by the Department of Social Services.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the planned 9th wave of data collection was split into two surveys. Data from the first Wave 9 survey (9C1) were released on 1 July 2021. The second smaller survey to make up Wave 9 (survey 9C2) is currently in the field (June-September 2021). These data are planned for release in June 2022. Combined, these two smaller surveys will allow Wave 9 to provide valuable insights into the impacts of both the pandemic as well as natural disasters such as bushfires and floods, while continuing to track the development of the young people and their families.

Preparation for Wave 10 is underway with the Growing Up in Australia team working closely with stakeholders to scope and design the methodology for this wave. Data collection for Wave 10 will be undertaken in 2023.

In 2020, the traditional Annual Statistical Report format used to highlight LSAC data was updated to become the Growing Up in Australia Snapshot Series. Issue 1, exploring teenagers’ experiences of discrimination, was published in March 2021 and further issues are planned for release in the second half of 2021.

Agency overview 17

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (TTM) is the first national longitudinal study in Australia to focus exclusively on male health and wellbeing. The study, funded by the Department of Health (DoH), aims to fill the gaps in knowledge about male health and wellbeing across the life course.

In 2020, in response to the pandemic, the study team re-evaluated and revised the survey content and methodology to enable contactless interviewing for Wave 3. New items designed to collect information on the impacts of COVID-19 and the effects of recent natural disasters were also incorporated into the revised survey. The online survey went live at the end of July 2020, with data collection, including CATI and paper survey options, concluding in February 2021. The final response rate was 49.4%, and the Wave 3 data release is scheduled for September 2021. Data products, data linkage work and data release workshop activities are expected to accompany the TTM Release 3.0.

The team also sought new ways to engage with participants during Wave 3 to encourage their continuing involvement in the study. This included offering the sample the opportunity to donate their incentive for completing the survey to one of a selection of trusted charities. Over 20% of participants did this, leading to donations totalling just under $63,000 to Australian health charities.

The first TTM Insights report using data from both Waves 1 and 2, was released over September-November 2020. The report included chapters on mental health, alcohol use, overweight and obesity and health service use among Australian men.

In 2021/22 we will be focusing on developing options for future waves of the study, including innovations in methodology and sampling.

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants

Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA) is a long-term research project examining how humanitarian migrants settle into a new life in Australia. The study has followed 1,509 principal applicants of humanitarian visas and their families (2,399 in total) since 2013/14. DSS is currently considering future directions for the BNLA study.

Data linkage and integration

The Institute is an Accredited Integrating Authority authorised to undertake high -risk data linkage projects for statistical and research purposes. Data linkage and integration provides a unified view with valuable insights for researchers and policy makers.

The AIFS’ data linkage and integration team has worked across a diverse range of projects, including AIFS’ longitudinal studies and projects for external research clients. The team maintains strong relationships with its stakeholders from universities, research organisations, education authorities (from states and jurisdictions), state government departments and Australian Commonwealth departments.

Among other multiple linkage projects, AIFS is currently collaborating with the Australian National University on Coordinated Access for Data, Research and Environments (CADRE). The CADRE project aims to improve access and sensitive data sharing by Australian researchers in operationalising the Five Safes framework. The project enables data owners and data users to address sensitive data governance, creation, and management for research purposes.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 18

© GettyImages/JLco - Julia Amaral

Three —

Report on performance

Report on performance 19

© GettyImages/xavierarnau

Report on performance

AIFS Strategic Directions 2016-21: Key achievements

2020/21 is the final year of AIFS Strategic Directions 2016-21 . This section provides an overview of our key achievements over the previous five years. The new strategic plan (2021-26) will build on these achievements. The AIFS Strategic Directions 2016-21 focused on four key pillars to achieve our purpose:

ƒ Knowledge creation : Conducting high quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding the wellbeing of Australian families

ƒ Knowledge communication: Increasing the effectiveness of communications to foster greater understanding about factors that affect families

ƒ Collaboration: Expanding the national knowledge base of factors affecting families through collaborative partnerships

ƒ Organisational activation: Building organisational capability to achieve research and communication objectives.

Through actions implemented under the Strategic Directions we:

ƒ Improved integration of AIFS’ knowledge creation and knowledge translation capabilities: Our core purpose is to create and communicate knowledge to policy makers, service providers and the broader community to improve the wellbeing of children, families and communities. Through the Strategic Directions, we enhanced our ability to do this by creating a more integrated approach to research, knowledge translation and communication, and impact.

ƒ Developed a Families Framework , which provides a conceptual grounding for how AIFS thinks about the role and functions of family in contemporary Australia, and the factors that support families in caring for each other.

ƒ Developed an impact pathway that mapped out the connections between what AIFS does (i.e. create and communicate research), who the beneficiaries of our work are, and how this results in positive impacts for families.

ƒ Redeveloped diverse performance measures into a performance framework aligned to our strategic goals, the impact pathway, and representing a shift from output measurement to outcomes assessment.

ƒ Strengthened organisational culture : An

engaged and high-performing organisational culture committed to achieving our purpose was a key focus area in the Strategic Directions. This resulted in the development of AIFS-specific values to complement APS values; comprehensive leadership training; a refreshed Performance, Development and Review (PDR) program; and a comprehensive induction program for new starters.

The AIFS Strategic Directions 2016-21 also resulted in key learnings and improved organisational capability in strategy development, execution and performance monitoring, which we have drawn on in formulating AIFS Strategy 2021-26. These achievements have resulted in demonstrated gains across our performance measures over the five-year period.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 20

Figure 3.1:  AIFS’ achievements against AIFS’ performance measures 2016-21

Access to research products

ƒ Number of webinars delivered increased by 64% between 2016/17 and 2020/21.

ƒ An average of 8 in 10 stakeholders surveyed find AIFS’ resources easy to find ; almost 9 in 10 say our products are easy to understand .

Research and engagement

ƒ The number of webinar attendees more than quadrupled between 2016/17 and 2020/21, from 4,691 to 23,075.

ƒ The number of e-News subscribers increased by almost 20,000 between 2018/19 and 2020/21, from 24,137 to 42,832.

ƒ The 15th biennial AIFS 2018 Conference attracted 650 participants and 245 speakers across a diverse program:

- 2018 Conference registrations were 28% higher than 2016

- 92% of respondents said they would attend an AIFS Conference in 2020, based on their experience in 2018

- 98% of respondents said they would recommend the conference to others.

Relevance

ƒ Since measuring relevance, an average of 84% of stakeholders surveyed said they found AIFS’ resources relevant to their work .

ƒ 94% of the 2018 conference survey respondents said they found the conference relevant to their everyday work .

Impact

ƒ Since measuring these in 2018/19, we have increased the numbers of stakeholders who say that AIFS’ resources:

- expand their knowledge of issues facing families - increased by 25%

- are incorporated into their work practice - increased by 43%

- are used to make evidence-based decisions - increased by 33%

- are used to debate and discuss different options for action - increased by 25% .

Organisational culture

ƒ In 2017/18, AIFS made significant gains from the previous year across all three APS Census measures, which we maintained over the following years.

APS measure

Sta* engagement

Sta* wellbeing

Innovation

2016/17

73%

70%

51%

2017/18

79%

79%

70%

2018/19

77%

78%

72%

2019/20

77%

76%

N/A*

2020/21

74%

76%

68%

ƒ In 2018/19 we ran seven learning and development opportunities to staff; this has almost tripled in the last two years. In 2020/21 staff were provided with 18 learning and development opportunities.

ƒ AIFS was shortlisted as a finalist in the Institute of Public Administration Australia (IPAA) ‘Public Sector Innovation’ Awards 2019 in the category of Culture and Capability , in recognition of our internal culture transformation.

Note: The planned AIFS 2020 Conference was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic . * Innovation was not asked in the 2020 Census .

Report on performance 21

Performance statement

We have a single planned outcome:

Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers and the broader community.

To demonstrate performance against this outcome, we use:

ƒ a theory of change describing our impact pathway; that is, mapping how what we do and produce leads to positive outcomes for children and families (impact)

ƒ a performance measurement framework that demonstrates AIFS’ performance along this impact pathway.

AIFS’ performance framework considers not only activities and outputs but also: what outcomes these activities and outputs have resulted in; and how these have benefited our key stakeholders.

AIFS’ pathway to impact

AIFS’ pathway to impact is premised on the following:

ƒ By conducting and communicating research, and bringing policy and practice actors together to engage with this knowledge, AIFS provides:

- access to high quality, timely and relevant research, information and resources

- deeper understanding into the trends, issues and challenges facing families

- capacity building across policy and practice communities to strengthen research use and evaluation practice.

ƒ Policy makers use our research and resources to enact systemic change through policy development and implementation. Service providers use our research to develop their workforce, deliver direct action, and enhance their programs and practices for children and families.

ƒ Consequently, as a result of accessing and using research and building evaluation capability, governments and services are more able to design policies, legislation, programs and practices that meet the needs of families.

AIFS’ theory of change is shown in Figure 3.2.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 22

Figure 3.2: AIFS’ theory of change

GOALS: OUR LONG-TERM AIMS

PURPOSE: WHY WE EXIST

To create and communicate knowledge that accelerates positive outcomes for children and families

BENEFICIARIES: WHO BENEFITS FROM OUR WORK?

BENEFITS: THE VALUE AIFS PROVIDES

PILLARS: WHAT WE DO

IMPACT ON BENEFICIARIES Governments and services use AIFS’ research to design e*ective policies and programs for children and families

IMPACT ON FAMILIES

Laws, policies, systems, services and practices support the wellbeing of children and families

• Better understanding of issues • Potential policy solutions to consider • Enhanced capacity to use research • Trusted research partner

Policy makers and Government

Service Sector

Limited influence Indirect influence Direct influence

• Access to relevant research •€Evidence to support service development •€Evaluation capacity building

Strategic directions

1. National research leadership

2. Leading source of relevant, timely and accessible knowledge and resources 3. Influence national conversations and action on child and family wellbeing 4. Sustainability as an independent research institute

PILLAR 01

CREATE KNOWLEDGE

PILLAR 02

COMMUNICATE KNOWLEDGE

PILLAR 03

CONNECT & COLLABORATE

PILLAR 04

ACTIVATE

STRATEGIC INITIATIVES

Theory of Change/impact pathways

Report on performance 23

Performance framework

Our performance framework focuses on AIFS’ direct and indirect spheres of influence.

Direct influence refers to those things AIFS can directly control or manage such as:

ƒ Inputs: resources, staff and assets

ƒ Activities: what we do on a day-to-day basis

ƒ Outputs: the products, resources and organisational processes produced from these activities.

Indirect influence refers to the results, outcomes and impacts that should occur as a consequence of our work:

ƒ Outcomes: our research is sought out by our stakeholders; our research is seen as relevant by our stakeholders; and our organisational capabilities support our research activities.

ƒ Impacts: better understanding among stakeholders of issues affecting families; improved capacity to use research and deeper insights about what works in policy and practice to support families, resulting in improvements in policy and practice.

We use a program logic model to link inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes and impacts against the strategic goals and impact pathway. Quantitative and qualitative data are used to monitor and measure performance. Qualitative data are drawn from stakeholder feedback and from case studies. Figure 3.3 provides a high-level representation of AIFS’ performance framework.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 24

Figure 3.3: AIFS’ performance framework: program logic

Performance indicator

Inputs

Action measures

AIFS’ impact pathway

Results measures

Resources and infrastructure

Sta*: skills, experience, qualifications

Revenue: commissioned, appropriations, other

Capital and technical assets: IMT, data lab

Research and evaluation projects Research and resources dissemination Outreach and stakeholder engagement Research and evaluation capacity building Organisational management and capability development

Robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families Access to high quality research and information Platforms for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration Practices and processes that ensure sustainability

Better understanding about issues facing families Improved capacity to use research to inform policy and service design Deeper insight into outcomes and impacts of policy and service design on children and families

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise End users find AIFS’ research and resources relevant Organisational capability enables AIFS to achieve impact

Number and types of activities

Number and types of outputs and products

Access and reach of research and resources

Research uptake and use

Outcomes

What we do (activities)

What we produce (outputs)

Impacts for policy and practice communities

What we measure

PILLARS & GOALS Create knowledge, Communicate knowledge, Connect & collaborate, Activate

Report on performance 25

AIFS’ performance

This section provides an overall assessment of the Institute’s performance in terms of outputs, outcomes and impacts.

AIFS’ outputs

AIFS produces robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families and provides access to high quality research and information, and platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration. We also deliver practices, processes and culture that ensure sustainability.

Table 3.1 details AIFS’ outputs for 2020/21. Output measures for the previous year are provided for comparison. Overall, there is very little change in the quantum of outputs, except for the number of external presentations (45 compared to 55). This is due to the more limited opportunities for external presentation formats due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Table 3.1: Output performance 2020/21

Measure and metric 2019/20 2020/21

Robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families

Total number of projects (total) 31 31

Number of commissioned 29 24

Number of commissioning bodies 14 14

Access to high quality research and information

Number of publications and products released 58 59

Number of external presentations 55 45

Number of AIFS webinars 18 19

Platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration

Number of AIFS events 1 0a

Number of event attendees 70 0a

Number of partnerships 24 32

Number of advisory group representation 39 37

Practices, processes and culture that ensure sustainability

Learning and development sessions 17 18

Wellbeing sessions 7 5

Number of APS new starter induction training 9 15

Note: a No face-to-face events were held over 2020/21 due to COVID-19 restrictions .

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 26

Robust, credible research on issues facing Australian families: In 2020/21 researchers were working on a total of 31 research projects. Of these, 24 were commissioned projects and seven were own-initiated research.

Access to high quality research and information: The number of publications and products released remains steady at 59. We delivered 19 webinars over the reporting period, covering issues such as child mental wellbeing; working with fathers who use violence; supporting families where a parent uses alcohol and/or other drugs; and coercive control.

Platforms and opportunities for cross-sector dialogue and collaboration: Partnerships and collaborations are important mechanisms to foster and leverage cross-sector expertise and skills. AIFS’ partnerships include Memoranda of Understanding, formal project consortia and less formal collaborations. The number of partnerships AIFS entered into in 2020/21 was 32, slightly up on last year. Participation in advisory groups is another key mechanism through which cross-sector dialogue occurs. AIFS was represented on 37 advisory groups convened by other organisations.

Practices, processes and culture that ensure sustainability: This measure focuses on AIFS’ investment in the capability and wellbeing of its people. We do this through learning and development training, wellbeing sessions and comprehensive inductions for incoming staff. In 2020/21, we ran 18 learning and development sessions, five wellbeing sessions and 15 induction programs for new staff.

Outcomes

The outcomes we want to achieve as a consequence of our activities and outputs are: our research is sought out by our stakeholders; our research is seen as relevant by our stakeholders; and our organisational capabilities support our research activities.

Table 3.2 provides details of outcome metrics across three measures:

ƒ End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise.

ƒ End users and stakeholders find AIFS’ research and resources relevant to their work.

ƒ We maintain the organisational capability that enables us to achieve impact.

Report on performance 27

Table 3.2: Outcomes performance 2020/21

The results we wish to see (outcomes) Previous Target Actual Targets

Measure and metric 19/20 20/21 20/21 21/22 22/23 23/24

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise

Number of e-News subscribers 31,840 40,000 42,832 ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Accessing publications (number of page views) 3.4M 4.5M 3.4M ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Number of webinar attendees 11,447 13,000 23,075 ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Number of media citations 3,661 3,600 3,150 ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Number of media comments sought 107 50 81 ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Stakeholder survey - Frequency of engagement - minimum monthly 78% 70% 74% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

End users and stakeholders find AIFS’ research and resources relevant to their work

Stakeholder feedback survey

AIFS’ resources are easy to find 79% 70% 79% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

AIFS’ resources are accessible & easy to understand 86% 80% 87% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Whether used AIFS’ resources in work practice 86% 80% 77% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Case study 1 1 1 1 1

Organisational capability enables AIFS to achieve impact

APS employee census scores a

Staff engagement 77% 77% 74% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Staff wellbeing 76% 76% 76% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Innovation N/A b 70% 68% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Case study 2 1 2 ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Notes: a Due to COVID-19, the APS Census was postponed to October 2020 . b Innovation was not asked in the 2020 Census .

End users seek out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise: We consider a range of metrics that indicate reach (number of e-News subscribers); end users actively seeking out AIFS’ research, resources and expertise (seeking out publications, attending webinars, and access by media); and frequency of engagement with AIFS’ research and resources.

In 2020/21 the number of e-News subscribers increased by 35%, with the majority of these being CFCA News subscribers followed by

AIFS News subscribers. The intended target for 2020/21 was 40,000, which we exceeded by almost 3,000 new subscribers.

The number of webinar attendees continues to increase from 11,447 in 2019/20 to 23,075, more than doubling our engagement of the previous year and significantly exceeding our target. This increase, along with delivering more webinars, signals that AIFS webinars are a valued product for a wide range of stakeholders. Results from the stakeholder feedback survey support this

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 28

interpretation: 84% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that AIFS webinars were relevant and targeted to their work, compared to 63% in 2019/20.

The number of AIFS publications accessed in 2020/21 is comparable with 2019/20 but lower than the target. This discrepancy can be attributed to how the target was set, which was based on year-on-year trends since 2016 but did not take into account changes in how publications could be viewed on the AIFS website. 1 This will be accounted for in future target setting.

Media citations of AIFS’ research and direct approaches for comment (e.g. media interviews) in 2020/21 were slightly lower than the previous year. This was likely due to a number of factors, including personnel changes, the dominance of the pandemic in the news cycle, the cancellation of the AIFS 2020 Conference and delays to the planned release of research reports (e.g. funder not yet ready to release report).

The stakeholder survey asks respondents how frequently they engage with our research and resources (daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, other). Almost three-quarters of respondents (74%) reported seeking out AIFS’ research and resources on at least a monthly basis. A quarter reported engaging with our research and resources on a weekly basis.

End users and stakeholders find AIFS’ research and resources relevant to their work. This measure tracks AIFS’ performance in ensuring products are:

ƒ easy to find

ƒ accessible and relevant to end users’ work

ƒ useful to end users in their work.

The stakeholder survey is used to capture this information.

1 Prior to 2019/20, most AIFS publications spanned more than one webpage; a user had to click through multiple pages to read a publication. In 2019/20, we converted publications from a multi-page to a single-page format, making it easier to read publications online. The resulting decline in page views is due to that conversion, not to fewer publications being viewed.

The 2020/21 survey results are largely consistent with those of the previous years. Almost 80% of respondents agreed with the statement that ‘It is easy to locate the information, research or resources I am looking for on AIFS websites.’

Almost 90% of respondents agreed that ‘ AIFS’ publications and resources are written in plain, accessible language.’

Respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the following products were useful and relevant to their work:

ƒ AIFS website: 85%

ƒ In-depth reports: 71%

ƒ Research summaries: 84%

ƒ Fact sheets: 90%

ƒ e-News: 74%.

Compared to 2019/20 a slightly lower proportion of respondents stated that they had used AIFS’ research and resources in the last 12 months (77% in 2020/21 compared to 86% in the previous year). This year’s sample was a considerably larger one than 2019/20 survey (531 respondents compared to 125 in 2019/20). This means that despite the percentage fall, the number of organisations that report using AIFS’ research and resources has increased in the last 12 months.

Organisational capability to enable AIFS to achieve impact: This measure tracks our performance in building organisational capability to achieve research and communication objectives. We use the results from the APS Employee Census regarding staff engagement, staff wellbeing and innovation as our key metrics. In 2020/21, we have maintained similar results to 2019/20 on staff engagement and wellbeing. Questions on innovation were not included in the 2019/20 census.

Report on performance 29

Impacts

Impacts are what occur as a consequence of end users and stakeholders seeking out and using our research and resources. The identified consequences are:

ƒ better understanding among stakeholders of issues affecting families

ƒ improved capacity to use research

ƒ deeper insights about what works in policy and practice to support families.

Two sources are used to demonstrate AIFS’ impact: data from the Stakeholder Feedback Survey and the impact case studies.

Table 3.3: Impact measures

Measure and metric

Previous Target Actual Targets

19/20 20/21 20/21 21/22 22/23 23/24

Better understanding among stakeholders about issues facing Australian families

Stakeholder feedback survey

AIFS’ resources expand my knowledge 95% 80% 90% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Case study 1 1 1 1 1 1

Improved capacity of stakeholders to use research to inform policy and service design

AIFS’ resources are incorporated into work practice 84% 75% 83% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

AIFS’ resources are used to make evidence -based decisions

85% 75% 80% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Case study 2 1 1 1 1 1

Deeper insight into outcomes and impacts of policy and service design on children and families

AIFS’ resources are used to debate and discuss different options for action 84% 70% 75% ≥20/21 ≥21/22 ≥22/23

Case study 2 1 2 1 1 1

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 30

Better understanding among stakeholders about issues facing Australian families:

Stakeholder responses indicate that a very high proportion (90%) agreed or strongly agreed that AIFS’ resources had helped them to know what was happening in their field of work or to expand their knowledge base.

Improved capacity of stakeholders to use research to inform policy and service design: Survey respondents indicated that AIFS’ research and resources had improved their capacity to use evidence to inform policy and service design:

ƒ 83% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that they incorporated AIFS’ resources into their work practice

ƒ 80% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that AIFS’ resources were used to help make evidence-based decisions.

Deeper insight into outcomes and impacts of policy and service design on children and families: AIFS’ research and resources aim to provide policy and service sectors with greater insight and understanding about how different policy and program decisions might impact children and families. Ultimately, this should result in improvements in policy and practice. Stakeholder survey respondents were asked about the extent to which they agreed with the following: ‘AIFS’ resources are used to debate and discuss different options for action.’ Three-quarters of respondents agreed or strongly agreed with this statement.

The two case studies following provide greater detail about how AIFS’ research achieves these impacts.

Report on performance 31

Impact case studies

Gambling in Australia during COVID-19

Background

The global COVID-19 pandemic and related government restrictions led to changes in the availability of gambling in Australia, with land-based gambling venues temporarily closed and major national and international sporting codes suspended. We wanted to learn more about how people's gambling participation and health and wellbeing were affected, with the aim of informing future research and policy and practice responses.

The research

The Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Study involved two phases of data collection:

ƒ an online survey of over 2,000 people who gamble from across Australia (conducted 10 June - 31 July 2020)

ƒ interviews with 10 key experts who work in gambling research, regulation, policy and treatment (conducted 15 July - 13 August 2020).

Key findings

Our research found:

ƒ Horse racing, greyhound racing, sports betting and lotto were the main products that participants gambled on before and during COVID-19.

ƒ Even with limited access to venues, participants gambled more often during COVID-19 overall. The proportion who gambled four or more times a week increased from 23% to 32%.

ƒ Almost one in three survey participants signed up for a new online betting account during COVID-19, and one in 20 started gambling online.

ƒ Of the participants, 79% were classified as being at risk of, or already experiencing, gambling-related problems.

ƒ Young men (aged 18-34 years) were the subpopulation most likely to sign up for new online accounts, to increase their frequency and monthly spending on gambling (from $687 to $1,075), and to be at risk of gambling-related problems.

Survey participants and key experts recommended a range of initiatives to minimise gambling-related harm in the community, including a reduction in the availability and marketing of gambling products, and the implementation of stronger consumer protection measures.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 32

Outputs and impacts

We prepared a Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Research Summary (released October 2020) that described who we surveyed, what people told us about their gambling and the impacts it had on them, how they were feeling, and their views on the gambling environment in Australia.

The findings from our study generated extensive and ongoing media interest, across print, radio, TV, social media and podcasts. There was strong coverage in national online outlets including ABC Online, SBS News, msn.com, InDaily, Daily Mail, Yahoo 7 and triple j Hack, radio spots across ABC and commercial channels including the Triple M, Hit and Smooth networks, and a TV broadcast on ABC News Breakfast.

In addition to reaching a large and diverse audience through our media presence, we’ve received invitations and opportunities to present at conferences and webinars, and our findings have been discussed at inter -government meetings and Senate estimates hearings, informing wider policy discourse in the Australian gambling sector.

The study has strengthened our relationships and dialogue with key stakeholders across the gambling and allied sectors and provided an opportunity for research and translation capability building.

Next steps

The Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Study has identified the need for further research and data monitoring to improve the understanding of gambling participation and related harms in Australia, both during and beyond COVID-19. Project learnings have also informed the development of AIFS National Gambling Reporting System (NGRS) pilot study, which aims to identify and monitor state/territory and national trends in gambling participation and impacts on health and wellbeing.

Further dissemination of the Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 project findings and recommendations is planned during 2021. We hope the study will continue to inform the development and implementation of policy and practice responses to prevent and reduce gambling-related harms among affected individuals, their families and communities.

Report on performance 33

CFCA stakeholder improvement

Funded by the Department of Social Services, the Child Family Community Australia (CFCA) information exchange supports child, family and community welfare professionals to use evidence in their decision making.

CFCA aims to make it easier for professionals to find, understand and use evidence to answer practice questions and solve problems that arise in their work with families. CFCA builds the capability of professionals to influence positive outcomes for Australian children and families.

In 2020/21, CFCA synthesised, translated and disseminated evidence for professionals through practice papers, resource sheets, short articles and webinars via a fortnightly e-newsletter to approximately 35,000 subscribers. Across the 12 months, CFCA sought to:

ƒ Strengthen its understanding of the evidence needs and behaviours of its audience

CFCA engaged with professionals through one-on-one and group-based consultations and the CFCA Needs and Impact survey. Insights from these engagements were used to determine priority areas of focus and inform resource customisation to increase their use by professionals.

‘In the last 6 months, CFCA resources have been increasingly useful in facilitating an evidence-based approach, broadening my practice, allowing me to share learnings with colleagues and generally improve our services.’ (Program Manager, New South Wales)

ƒ Enhance impact measurement and respond to the needs of the sector

CFCA routinely analysed their web metrics and engagement data to understand patterns of resource use and ratings of quality. Consultations with key organisations were also used to gather additional feedback about how evidence was being used in decision making and work. CFCA used these insights to inform continuous quality improvement aimed at enhancing the usefulness of their resources to create impact.

‘CFCA resources have been helpful in putting forward ideas and discussing policy and practices in our senior leadership team. I have shared resources with other senior colleagues also to inform others as well.’ (Project Manager, Western Australia)

As a result of this focus, CFCA achieved improved rates of resource use and satisfaction. Almost 22,000 professionals attended one of the 13 CFCA webinars in 2020/21, up 12,396 (132%) from 9,416 in 2019/20. A similar increase was seen in the number of publication downloads from 4,515 to 9,922 (120%). Recipients of CFCA News also grew by 51% to nearly 35,000 subscribers, and the CFCA website attracted 1.9 million users. Across the project, an average of 85% of professionals rated the resources they accessed as good or excellent, and 90% advised the resources would support the use of evidence in their work.

‘The CFCA resources have added to the body of work that is used to make policy decisions in the families and children sector.’ (Policy Advisor, Victoria)

CFCA will continue to strengthen how stakeholders are engaged in decision making, planning and development, and evaluation efforts. This will enable the production of resources that explore timely policy and practice questions in a way that meets our audience’s learning needs and preferences. It will also enhance how impact is understood and can be increased to promote positive outcomes for Australian children and families.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 34

Performance against 2020/21 strategic initiatives

The key initiatives under the Strategic Directions 2020/21 were to:

ƒ Develop AIFS Strategic Directions 2021-26

ƒ Implement multiple waves of the Families in Australia Survey

ƒ Implement a knowledge translation capability -building program for our stakeholders

ƒ Deliver the AIFS Conference

ƒ Redesign the AIFS website

ƒ Implement the ‘Doing My Best Work’ Performance Development Program.

Table 3.4 provides a summary of achievements against these initiatives.

Report on performance 35

Figure 3.4: Strategic initiatives

Initiative Description Achievement and/or comment

Pillar 1: Creating knowledge

Implement multiple waves of the Families in Australia Survey

For insights and analysis about how families are coping with and adjusting to the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond, the survey touched on areas of everyday life including family relationships, work, education, finances and caring responsibilities.

Two additional waves of Families in Australia implemented:

ƒ Towards COVID Normal ran from 17 November to 22 December 2020, with 4,479 participants.

ƒ The third survey in the series ran from 8 May to 30 June 2021, with 5,081 participants.

Seven Families in Australia research products published:

ƒ Research Snapshot - April 2021. A year in review: How we experienced 2020: Some early findings from the Towards COVID Normal survey

ƒ Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 Report no. 1: Early findings

ƒ Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 Report no. 2: Staying connected when we’re apart

ƒ Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 Report no. 3: Help and support

ƒ Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 Report no. 4: Dads spend more quality time with kids

ƒ Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 Report no. 5: What we did during lockdown

ƒ Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 Report no. 6: Financial wellbeing and COVID-19

Pillar 2: Communicating knowledge

Redesign AIFS website

Redesign website to ensure AIFS' research and resources are discoverable, relevant and timely for our users, and support practitioners and policy makers who wish to apply evidence to their work with families.

Completed:

ƒ Information architecture: site maps, hierarchies, categorisations, navigation and metadata to create structure of AIFS’ websites

ƒ User experience research

ƒ Website design prototype

In progress:

ƒ Website redesign, content management system and content migration

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 36

Initiative Description Achievement and/or comment

Implement a knowledge translation capability-building program for our stakeholders

Build on last year's knowledge translation and impact initiatives to deliver a capability-building program that will provide training and support to organisations to increase their ability to integrate research and evidence into their decision-making processes. The program aims to:

ƒ lift the relevance and use of research evidence about what works for families

ƒ build the skills of practitioners and policy makers to better understand how they can incorporate research evidence into their decision making.

ƒ Significant capability transformation of KTI team in first half of 2020/21

ƒ Consultations with Executive Managers and Corporate Managers to understand the needs of Institute

ƒ Development of a capability framework regarding knowledge areas, skills and competencies in KTI

ƒ Needs assessment survey to inform training components. Sent to research and communication staff members.

ƒ Review of current approaches to assessing research impact

Pillar 3: Connect and collaborate

Deliver AIFS Conference

Bring together the collective expertise and commitment of policy, civil society, researchers, services and communities to reflect on the social and economic impacts of COVID on families, and the challenges and opportunities it presents for families in Australia into the future.

Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, we were unable to host a rescheduled AIFS Conference in June 2021 (originally planned for July 2020). Significant planning was made for a new conference scheduled for June 2022. The new theme is Putting Families at the Centre. The majority of our 2020 sponsors have confirmed their sponsorship in 2022.

Pillar 4: Activate organisational sustainability

Implement the ‘Doing My Best Work’ Performance Development Program

To enable all staff to do their best work, develop their potential, and to contribute collectively to AIFS’ purpose through a high-performance culture.

ƒ New program launched in August 2020 comprising a pathway plan, relationship compact, setting of performance, career and development, and performance review

ƒ Evaluation scheduled for August 2021

Develop AIFS Strategic Directions 2021-26

Develop the next five-year plan for 2021-26 to ensure AIFS continues to be a national voice on the factors affecting families in a rapidly changing world.

ƒ Strategic vision, statement, goals and initiatives confirmed

ƒ 2-3 year roadmap in progress

ƒ Draft of Year 1 action plan complete

Report on performance 37

Report on performance - financial activities

Operating results

In accordance with the Australian Government net cash appropriation arrangements, AIFS incurred a deficit of $530,124. This deficit is primarily due to depreciation and amortisation expense, the impacts of COVID-19 and the adverse impact of movements in employee provisions due to discount factors.

Without depreciation and amortisation of $948,676, AIFS would have reported a surplus of $418,552.

See Table 3.4 for a summary of budgeted and actual expenses for 2020/21.

Operating revenue

The total operating revenue was $15,445,238 and consisted of the following:

ƒ government appropriations of $4,466,000

ƒ sale of goods and rendering of services of $10,388,912

ƒ other revenue of $590,326.

Operating expenses

Total operating expenses were $15,975,362 and consisted of:

ƒ employee benefits of $10,351,772

ƒ supplier expenses of $4,586,673

ƒ depreciation and amortisation of $948,676

ƒ other expenses of $88,241.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 38

Table 3.4: Budgeted and actual expenses for Outcome 1, 2020/21, and budgeted expenses, 2021/22

Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, and the broader community

Budget 2020/21 $’000

Actual 2020/21 $’000

Variation (column 2 - column 1) $’000

Budget 2021/22 $’000

Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 17,701 15,026 2,675 17,091

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 1,058 949 109 1,240

Total for Program 1.1 18,759 15,975 2,784 18,331

Outcome 1 totals by appropriation type

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation 17,701 15,026 2,675 17,091

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year 1,058 949 109 1,240

Total expenses for Outcome 1 18,759 15,975 2,784 18,331

2020/21 2020/21 2020/21 2021/22

Average staffing level 1 82 82 0 82

Note: 1 . The headcount and average staffing level are not the same measure . The headcount is the total number of employees at 30 June 2021 . The average staffing level is an average over the financial year that takes account of full-time equivalent staffing levels .

Balance sheet

Net asset position

The net asset position at 30 June 2021 was $1,145,485 (2020: $1,485,609).

Total assets

Total assets at 30 June 2021 were $12,828,862 (2019: $15,651,889). Financial assets declined by $2,465,882 mainly due to the improved payment terms by debtors. Non-financial assets have decreased by $357,145 primarily due to depreciation and amortisation.

Total liabilities

Total liabilities at 30 June 2021 were $11,683,377 (2020: $14,166,280). Liabilities decreased by $2,482,903, which was primarily due to the reduction of AIFS’ payables and unearned revenue.

Report on performance 39

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 40

Four —

Management and accountability

Management and accountability 41

Management and accountability

Management accountability is achieved with the support of the Corporate Services area of the Institute.

Corporate Services provides a range of enabling functions to assist us to meet our goals, through the ongoing improvement and application of financial, administrative, human resources, communications and information management and technology policies and practices.

Accountability is met through our internal management committee, advisory and governance committees, staff and management committees, including the Senior Leadership Group, robust reporting processes, internal and external audits, the Business Continuity Plan and policies and guidelines under the Protective Security Policy Framework.

Corporate governance

We operate under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act). The corporate focus throughout 2020/21 was the effective maintenance of high standards of governance, accountability and reporting in order to fulfil all PGPA requirements and build organisational capacity to achieve our research and communication objectives. This corporate oversight is conducted through senior management committees detailed below.

The Family Law Act 1975 sets out our role, functions and governance arrangements. Additional responsibilities are set out in the Gambling Measures Act 2012. During 2020/21, the responsible minister for AIFS was Senator the Hon Anne Ruston.

During the 2020/21 financial year, Anne Hollonds was the appointed Director and Accountable Authority from 1 July to 18 October 2020 before taking up the role of National Children’s

Commissioner at the Australian Human Rights Commission. Andrew Whitecross has been Acting Director from 19 October 2020 to 30 June 2021, apart from 1-31 January 2021 when Dr Michael Alexander was the Acting Director.

Fraud control

During the financial year 2020/21, two fraud cases were identified and appropriately managed. The resulting loss was minor and associated with credit card fraud. The next fraud risk assessment is scheduled to be conducted in 2021/22.

Annual Report 2020/21 Fraud Control Certification

In accordance with section 10 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Rule 2014, I, Andrew Whitecross, Director, Australian Institute of Family Studies, hereby certify that I am satisfied that the Institute has:

ƒ undertaken a fraud risk assessment and updated the fraud control plan

ƒ put in place appropriate fraud prevention, detection, investigation, and reporting mechanisms that meet the specific needs of the Institute

ƒ taken all reasonable measures to appropriately deal with fraud relating to the Institute.

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director Australian Institute of Family Studies 10 September 2021

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 42

Senior executive members

Mr Andrew Whitecross is the Acting Director of the Institute reporting to the Minister for Families and Social Services. Two Deputy Directors assist the Director in leading and managing AIFS. Dr Michael Alexander has been the Deputy Director (Corporate Services) since January 2016. Ms Kelly Hand has been the Deputy Director (Research) since February 2017.

Senior management groups

The Director has overall responsibility for the leadership and management of the Institute. A number of groups are in place to support this function.

Executive Group

The Executive Group leads and coordinates all aspects of the research and corporate functions of the Institute. It comprises the Director and the two Deputy Directors.

Senior Leadership Group

The Senior Leadership Group comprises the Executive and Senior Managers from the corporate and research areas. The group is a strategic leadership forum providing advice to the Director and Deputy Directors.

Governance committees and advisory groups

We support sound management of our accountability and ethical and legislative responsibilities through the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee and the Human Research Ethics Committee. We also have numerous research advisory groups providing advice on the research projects.

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee

The Risk Assessment and Audit Committee reports to the Director and plays a key role in our corporate governance. It helps ensure effective

and efficient use of resources by reviewing the performance and operations of internal controls and performance management systems. It approves our internal audit program and advises the Director on risk, fraud, compliance and performance. It also provides assurance to the Director on preparing and reviewing financial statements. An external member chairs the committee. Membership includes the two Deputy Directors and three independent members external to the Institute. The committee met four times during 2020/21, addressing a range of issues including a review of our risk management framework.

In 2020/21 there were two paid committee members: Dennis Mihelyi received $4,448 and Kylie Maher (Moore Australia Pty Ltd) received $2,758.

The charter determining the function of the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee is available at: aifs.gov.au/risk-assessment-and-audit-committee

Risk Assessment and Audit Committee members, 2020/21

ƒ Dennis Mihelyi (Chair), Chief Financial Officer, Australian Building and Construction Commission

ƒ Heather Hausler (Member), General Manager, Corporate Operations Transport Certification Australia

ƒ Matthew Zappulla (Member), Technical Director, Auditing and Assurance Standards Board (until September 2020)

ƒ Kylie Maher (Member), Director, Governance & Risk Advisory, Moore Australia Pty Ltd (from December 2020)

ƒ Michael Alexander (Member), Deputy Director Corporate Services

ƒ Kelly Hand (Member), Deputy Director Research.

Human Research Ethics Committee

The role of our Human Research Ethics Committee is to ensure the ethical standards outlined in the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans, and elaborated in our ethics statement, Ethical Issues

Management and accountability 43

in the Research Process (1996), are met in all research projects undertaken by us.

In particular, the committee must ensure projects meet the three key principles of: respect for persons, beneficence and justice, as set down in the National Statement. The committee is registered with the Australian Health Ethics Committee, a subcommittee of the National Health and Medical Research Council.

The Ethics Committee meets to consider new project proposals, receive brief oral and written reports on ongoing projects, consider any complaints or problems that may have arisen regarding ethical issues in our research, and review the complaints procedures, as required.

The committee met four times in 2020/21 and undertook expedited considerations on two occasions, assessing 10 ethics applications for new, revised or extended research projects. The committee has an expedited review process in place for projects that need approval between meetings of the committee.

Members of the Ethics Committee are appointed for three-year terms. The longstanding Chair Duncan Ironmonger stepped down from the Committee in June 2020 and seven new members joined the Committee early in 2021.

Human Research Ethics Committee members, 2020/21

ƒ Dr Sarah Wise (Chair), BA (Hons), MA, PhD (Melb.); Good Childhood Fellow, Social Work, Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne/Berry Street

ƒ Dr Richard Ingleby , MA, DPhil (Oxford); LLM (Cambridge); Visiting Professor, North China University of Technology

ƒ Lorraine Parsons , BA (La Trobe); BSW (La Trobe); Grad. Cert. Management (Curtin)

ƒ Rev. John Lamont , BA (La Trobe); BTheol (United Faculty of Theology, Ormond College)

ƒ Victoria Triggs , BA (Melb.), Grad. Dip. Ed. Admin. (Melb.), Williamson Fellow (Leadership Victoria), Grad. Dip. Australian Institute of Company Directors

ƒ Carol Soloff , BSc (Hons) Australian National University

ƒ Karena Jessup , BA (UTas), BTeach (Hons) (UTas), PhD (UTas), Senior Manager, Survey Research, The Australian Institute of Family Studies (until February 2021)

ƒ Dr Joel Anderson , BA Communication (Monash), BA Psychology (ACU), Post. Grad. of Psychology (ACU), Doctorate of Philosophy (ACU). Teaching and research at ACU and Research Fellow at La Trobe University (appointed April 2021)

ƒ Tim Calabria , BA (UTas), Honours (La Trobe), PhD Candidate (La Trobe) (appointed April 2021)

ƒ Sonia Martin , Dip. of Applied Science, BA Nursing (La Trobe), Caseworker with Department of Communities and Justice (Child Protection) (appointed April 2021)

ƒ James McCarthy , Masters of Social Work (RMIT) (appointed April 2021)

ƒ Jinny McGrath, BA Social Work (Monash), Master of Social Work (Monash), Decision Making for Tribunal Members unit (Monash), Community Business Management Program, Masters of Research at RMIT (Current Scholarship) (appointed April 2021)

Corporate and statutory reporting

During 2020/21 we continued to refine and strengthen our planning processes to make our reporting outputs more robust, including ongoing improvements to our budget development and review and monitoring processes. These initiatives continue to bring together a range of corporate and communications priorities, and have contributed to robust compliance standards and reporting performance against outcomes.

In August 2020 we published our sixth Corporate (Agency) Plan for 2020/21 to 2023/24, as required under the PGPA Act. We spent much of 2020/21 implementing the plan’s strategic priorities.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 44

Risk management

During 2020/21 we continued our successful approach to reviewing and managing our strategic risks, continuing to revise and revisit them on a rotating schedule in accordance with their priority and criticality. These reviews were considered by the Senior Leadership Group, then reviewed by our Risk Assessment and Audit Committee.

We had planned to refresh our Risk Management Framework, unfortunately due to strain on our resourcing resulting from the COVID pandemic in Victoria we were unable to start this work last year.

This financial year, instead of just refreshing our Risk Management Framework we undertook a process of reviewing our risk management in its entirety to ensure our risk management aligns with current and emerging best practice. We engaged Comcover who assisted us to consult industry experts, giving us an outside perspective on how fit for purpose our risk management is, and the steps we could take to achieve an ongoing positive risk culture. This project will enhance our ability to capture and report risks across the various levels of governance across AIFS, refresh our Risk Management and Policy and Framework, and afford us a fresh outside perspective on our key strategic and emerging risks. It will also afford us the opportunity to align our risk framework with our new AIFS Strategy, which is commencing in 2021/22. The project is now under way, and we expect to start realising the benefits by the end of 2021.

Internal audit

During 2020/21, in recognition of the impact of the COVID pandemic on our usual operations, just the one review was undertaken by the internal auditors, namely AIFS compliance to the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 and related legislation. The review confirmed that AIFS has maintained, in all material respects, effective control procedures. During 2020/21 AIFS engaged BDO East Coast Partnership to provide internal audit services.

Business continuity

Our strength in this area continues and is evident through our handling of the COVID-19 pandemic last year and our need to support our staff working from home during multiple periods of lockdown. While our Business Continuity Plan (BCP) wasn’t enacted as the pandemic didn’t result in a business interruption for us, we were able to take learnings from our previous scenario tests and use parts of the BCP to great effect in keeping staff safe and productive within the challenging environment.

The modernisation of our BCP to a mobile solution last year continues to pay dividends, allowing us to access emergency BCP information instantly, any time team members have their mobile phones with them.

Following the internal audit of our Business Continuity Plan last year, we’ve made some minor changes to further our maturity in this area by clarifying some of the language in our Business Continuity Framework and scheduling additional Business Continuity training.

Protective Security Policy Framework

2020 was the second reporting period for the new Protective Security Policy Framework (PSPF). We recorded a solid increase in our maturity across the PSPF year over year, in line with our work plan. We recorded increased results, particularly in the areas of physical and personnel security. Our successful programs of annual security training and annual security checks continued, and we look forward to reporting a greater maturity result in the next report.

Management and accountability 45

Privacy

The Privacy Team progressed its infrastructure rollout to enable a culture at AIFS that respects privacy and to support stakeholders’ trust and confidence. Some of the achievements include:

ƒ A privacy impact assessment for the transfer of Ten to Men study assets from the University of Melbourne to AIFS. This risk assessment and management approach assesses how personal data have been and can be managed during and after asset transfers.

ƒ An update of privacy management policies to ensure active privacy management practices at AIFS when dealing with personal information.

ƒ ‘Privacy Awareness Week’ activities, which featured the importance of privacy training and a privacy-by-design culture.

ƒ Establishment of a register of personal information holdings for the AIFS corporate area to provide a unified view of how personal information is handled, managed and shared.

We were not subject to any privacy or Freedom of Information decisions by the Australian Information Commissioner in 2020/21.

Ethical standards

We continue to take actions designed to integrate the APS Values into the organisational culture and the day-to-day work of all employees. The obligations of employees to uphold the APS Values and abide by the APS Code of Conduct are:

ƒ promoted in staff induction and training

ƒ applied to human resource management processes, including individual performance plans

ƒ reflected in human resource policies and procedures, which are made available to all employees on our intranet.

External scrutiny

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) performs an annual statutory audit of our financial statements. In addition, an independent contractor conducts a program of internal audit reviews (BDO East Coast Partnership). The outcomes of all audits are presented to the Risk Assessment and Audit Committee and plans developed for the implementation of recommendations and the ongoing monitoring of resultant actions for improved processes.

In 2020/21, we were not subject to reports by the Auditor-General, parliamentary committees or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

We do not have statutory administrative decision-making powers and were not subject to any judicial decisions or decisions of administrative tribunals in 2020/21.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 46

Management of human resources

Employee skills and qualifications

We are fortunate to have employees with a great diversity of skills, knowledge and experience. This ranges from research knowledge in multiple disciplines - including social science, psychology, family law, child and adolescent development, criminology, demography, economics, statistics and survey design - to management skills such as financial and human resource management, information technology and communications.

This diversity of knowledge and expertise exemplifies one of the benefits of working in a small organisation. These skills are known and, as such, can be used across a number of facets of our operations.

Figures 4.1 and 4.2 show, respectively, the highest qualifications gained by our employees overall and by those employed in the research area.

Figure 4.1:  Employee qualifications, at 30 June 2021

Note: All sta*: excludes Director and casuals.

Year 10 1.1%

Doctorate 32.6%

Masters 18.5%

Postgraduate diploma 9.8%

Bachelor degree including honours 27.2%

Undergraduate diploma or equivalent 1.1%

Associate diploma or equivalent 5.4%

Year 12 4.3%

Figure 4.2: Research employee qualifications, at 30 June 2021

Note: All research sta*: includes Director, excludes casuals.

Doctorate 45.0%

Masters 23.3%

Postgraduate diploma 3.3%

Bachelor degree including honours 28.3%

Year 12 1.7%

Workforce planning

In 2020/21, we continued to develop our capacity to plan and respond to changing workforce needs. Building our workforce planning processes will be an area of focus in 2021/22 to support our new strategic objectives.

Learning and development

The primary focus of learning and development activities is to ensure that we have the organisational capability to meet operational objectives, both now and in the future.

During the year, staff development covered a range of topics including written research communication, leadership, compliance topics, interpersonal skills and wellbeing. The effectiveness of the training provided was evaluated after each course and in performance

Management and accountability 47

reviews conducted between managers and staff. More online and remote delivery methods were used to meet the needs of the workforce in the pandemic environment.

We also continue to provide professional development opportunities for employees via professional memberships and attendance at conferences and webinars, many of which have moved to online or remote formats during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recruitment

Our recruitment in 2020/21 focused on recruiting to ongoing research positions. Our vacancies were advertised via online channels including the APS Jobs site and our social media pages.

Staff engagement, participation and development

We recognise the vital contribution our people make to the achievement of our purpose and the importance of staff being engaged with their work, participating in the workplace, and developing professionally.

Our comprehensive induction program for new staff and our ongoing activities that embed the AIFS Values and Behaviours ensure our workforce has a strong foundation.

In 2020/21 we continued to rely on our strong culture of innovation, engagement and wellbeing to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Melbourne, followed by the gradual transition back to the workplace. Our leaders and staff have retained the flexibilities of remote working and increased use of video and collaboration technologies.

AIFS Values

In 2020/21 we worked to further embed our AIFS Values and Behaviours, which along with the APS Values, help to shape our culture and guide us towards achieving our purpose. AIFS’ five values and behaviours are:

Champions of our work and each other

We want everyone’s boat to rise: We take collective pride in each other’s work and success.

Excellence for impact

We are committed to producing excellent work that makes a difference for families.

Fearless and curious explorers

We value experimentation, creativity and ongoing learnings.

Honest and respectful conversations

We are authentic and have meaningful conversations including the tough ones.

Seeing the lighter side

We value collegiality, humour and fun.

Workplace Relations Committee

The Workplace Relations Committee provides a forum for management and employees to discuss matters relating to the Enterprise Agreement as well as the workplace in general. The committee comprises management and employee representatives. The Committee’s work in 2020/21 focused on staff consultation related to refreshed policies on remote working arrangements, bullying and harassment, and domestic and family violence.

Health and Safety Committee

The Health and Safety Committee was established to represent staff and facilitate consultation and discussion between management and employees regarding health and safety matters in the workplace. Committee meetings are held at least quarterly and provide an effective forum for staff to raise particular health and safety issues, as well as the planning and promotion of health and safety practices and principles in the workplace.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 48

Statistics on staffing

As at 30 June 2021, there were 92 staff - 21 males and 71 females - employed at the Institute under the Public Service Act 1999 , excluding the Director and employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/ intermittent (casual) basis.

Table 4.1 resents the profile of our staff by gender and type of employment at 30 June 2021. As Table 4.1 indicates, at 30 June 2021 we had 35% of staff in ongoing positions and 65% of staff in non-ongoing positions. Table 4.2 describes staff by classification level, gender and type of employment as at 30 June 2021.

Table 4.1: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing full-time and part-time staff, by gender, at 30 June 2021

Ongoing Non-ongoing Totals

Full-time Part-time Full-time Part-time

Male 6 0 10 5 21

Female 15 8 22 26 71

Total number 21 8 32 31 92

% of all staff 23 9 35 33 100

Note: Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Table 4.2: Staffing overview - Actual ongoing and non-ongoing staff, by classification level and gender, at 30 June 2021

Classification AIFS

classification

Ongoing Non-ongoing Total % of all

staff

Male Female Male Female

SES Band 1 SES Band 1 1 1 0 0 2 2

Executive Level 2 AIFS EL2 2 8 3 5 18 20

Executive Level 1 AIFS EL1 3 5 7 11 26 28

APS6 AIFS Band 5-6 0 7 1 21 29 32

APS5 AIFS Band 5-6 0 2 3 5 10 11

APS4 AIFS Band 3-4 0 0 1 5 6 7

APS3 AIFS Band 3-4 0 0 0 1 1 1

APS2 AIFS Band 1-2 0 0 0 0 0 0

APS1 AIFS Band 1-2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total 6 23 15 48 92 100

% of all staff 6 28 17 48 100

Note: Eighteen employees on higher duties were counted at the higher duties level . Excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis .

Management and accountability 49

Staff location

As at 30 June 2021, 100% of AIFS’ ongoing and non-ongoing employees operated from our single office in Melbourne, Victoria, the same as at 30 June 2020. A number of staff have remote working agreements that allow them to be located in other states but they may travel to the Melbourne office from time to time as required.

Diversity and inclusion

Details of diversity and inclusion at AIFS are shown in Table 4.3.

Table 4.3: Diversity and inclusion

(%)

Indigenous 0

Born outside Australia 32

First language non- English 20

Disability* 4

Carer* 39

LGBTIQ+* 19

Note: Figures include ongoing and non-ongoing employees. *Data from the 2021 APS Employee Census.

Individual and collective agreements

Details of the number of staff covered by our Enterprise Agreement or a Section 24(1) determination at 30 June 2021 are shown in Table 4.4.

Table 4.4: Number of staff covered by different employment agreements, at 30 June 2021

SES Non-SES Total

Enterprise Agreement

0 90 90

Section 24(1) determination

2 0 2

Total 2 90 92

Note: The two SES employees on Section 24(1) determinations are also covered by the Enterprise Agreement at their substantive level. The number of staff excludes employees engaged to provide services to us on an irregular/intermittent (casual) basis.

Performance pay

Zero employees were eligible for performance pay in 2020/21.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 50

© GettyImages/PeopleImages

Management and accountability 51

Assets management

We maintain a detailed and effective assets register. Assets management is not a significant aspect of our strategic business.

Purchasing

All purchasing is carried out in line with the requirements of the Commonwealth Procurement Rules, as detailed in the Accountable Authority’s Instructions and Financial Guidelines, and in keeping with the core principles of ethical, efficient, effective and economical conduct. Templates covering all aspects of purchasing and approval have been developed and are used consistently.

All procurements in excess of $10,000 are reported in AusTender, and contracts in excess of $100,000 are included in Senate Order 192 reporting.

Reportable consultancy contracts

During 2020/21, six new reportable consultancy contracts were entered into with total actual expenditure of $216,102. Thirteen ongoing reportable consultancy contracts were active during 2020-21. This is summarised in Table 4.5.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website at: www.tenders.gov.au

AIFS engages consultants where it requires specialist expertise.

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

During 2020-21, seven new reportable non-consultancy contracts were entered into with total actual expenditure of $309,560. In addition, 35 ongoing reportable non-consultancy contracts were active during 2020/21 with a total actual expenditure of $3,764,489. This is summarised in Table 4.6.

Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts for consultancies. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts and consultancies is available on the AusTender website at: www.tenders.gov.au

Table 4.5: Reportable consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021

Number of new contracts

Expenditure (incl. GST) $

Number of ongoing contracts

Expenditure (incl. GST) $

Total number of contracts Total expenditure (incl. GST)

$

6 216,102 13 1,632,983 19 1,849,084

Table 4.6: Reportable non-consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021

Number of new contracts

Expenditure (incl. GST) $

Number of ongoing contracts

Expenditure (incl. GST) $

Total number of contracts Total expenditure (incl. GST)

$

7 309,560 35 3,764,489 42 4,074,049

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 52

Additional information about organisations receiving amounts for reportable consultancy contracts and reportable non-consultancy contracts

Table 4.7 lists the names of the organisations who received the five largest shares of the entity’s total expenditure on consultancy contracts during the period, and the name of any organisation that, during the period, received one or more amounts under one or more consultancy contracts equal in total to at least 5% of AIFS’ total expenditure on consultancy contracts during the period, and the total amount the organisation received.

Table 4.7: Additional information for consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021

Name of organisation Amount

received $

Total

expenditure

%

Australian National University

575,250 42

University of New South Wales

366,000 27

Salsa Digital 200,303 15

Think HQ 129,801 10

Right Lane Consulting Pty Ltd 92,714 7

Table 4.8 lists the names of the organisations who received the five largest shares of the entity’s total expenditure on non-consultancy contracts during the period, and the name of any organisation that, during the period, received one or more amounts under one or more non-consultancy contracts equal in total to at least 6% of AIFS’ total expenditure on non-consultancy contracts during the period, and the total amount the organisation received.

Table 4.8: Additional information for non-consultancy contracts, at 30 June 2021

Name of organisation Amount

received $

Total

expenditure

%

Social Research Centre 1,732,939 53

CBRE (V) Pty Ltd 952,474 29

HP PPS Australia Pty Ltd 216,941 7

Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources 205,523 6

Roy Morgan Research Ltd 185,749 6

Management and accountability 53

Commissioning bodies

During the 2020/21 financial year, the following organisations commissioned projects from the Institute:

ƒ Attorney-General’s Department

ƒ Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety Ltd

ƒ Department of Defence

ƒ Department of Veterans’ Affairs

ƒ Department of Education, Northern Territory

ƒ Department of Education, Skills and Employment

ƒ Department of Health

ƒ Department of Social Services

ƒ Family & Relationship Services Australia

ƒ Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

ƒ National Centre for Vocational Education Research

ƒ National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

ƒ Singapore Ministry of Social and Family Development

ƒ University of New South Wales

Australian National Audit Office access clauses

Our contract templates contain standard clauses to provide for the Auditor-General to have access to the contractor’s premises. All contracts let during the reporting period contained these standard clauses.

Exempt contracts

We have not entered into any contracts or standing offers above the reporting threshold value of $10,000 that have been exempted from publication in AusTender.

Procurement initiatives to support small business

We support small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Our procurement practices support small and medium enterprises (SMEs) by using the following:

ƒ the Commonwealth Contracting Suite for low -risk procurements valued under $200,000

ƒ Australian Industry Participation Plans in whole-of-government procurement where applicable

ƒ the Small Business Engagement Principles (outlined in the government’s Industry Innovation and Competitiveness Agenda), such as communicating in clear, simple language and presenting information in an accessible format

ƒ electronic systems or other processes used to facilitate on-time payment performance, including the use of payment cards.

SME and small enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website: www.finance.gov.au/ procurement/statistics-on-commonwealth-purchasing-contracts/

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 54

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Financial statements 57

Statement by the Director and Chief Financial Officer

In our opinion, the attached financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2021 comply with subsection 42(2) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (PGPA Act), and are based on properly maintained financial records as per subsection 41(2) of the PGPA Act.

In our opinion, at the date of this statement, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Australian Institute of Family Studies will be able to pay its debts as and when they fall due.

Andrew Whitecross John Stamoulis

Acting Director Chief Financial Officer

10 September 2021 10 September 2021

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 58

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original

Budget 2021 $

NET COST OF SERVICES

Expenses

Employee benefits 3A 10,351,772 10,240,264 10,964,000

Suppliers 3B 4,586,673 4,734,857 6,657,000

Depreciation and amortisation 6A 948,676 920,930 1,058,000

Finance costs 3C 59,709 108,405 80,000

Losses from asset sales 28,532 4,399 -

Total expenses 15,975,362 16,008,855 18,759,000

Own-source income

Own-source revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers 4A 10,388,912 9,984,711 12,466,000

Royalties 37,982 34,516 -

Other revenue 4B 552,344 33,916 736,000

Total own-source revenue 10,979,238 10,053,143 13,202,000

Gains

Gains from sale of assets - 15,383 33,000

Total gains - 15,383 33,000

Total own-source income 10,979,238 10,068,526 13,235,000

Net cost of services (4,996,124) (5,940,329) (5,524,000)

Revenue from Government 4C 4,466,000 4,452,000 4,466,000

Deficit on continuing operations (530,124) (1,488,329) (1,058,000)

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Items not subject to subsequent reclassification to net cost of services

Changes in asset revaluation reserve - - -

Total other comprehensive income - - -

Total comprehensive loss (530,124) (1,488,329) (1,058,000)

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 59

Statement of comprehensive income for the period ended 30 June 2021

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2020/21 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2020/21 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $600,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

Employee benefits are lower than budget due to delays in commencement of project research in 2020/21 and is partly impacted by COVID-19. There were also several unfilled budget positions during the year.

Employee benefits

Supplier expenses are lower than budget due to delays in commencement of project research and corporate initiatives. This is partly impacted by COVID-19.

Suppliers

The Institute's estimated revenue as published in the 2020/21 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on anticipated new contracts.

Revenue from contracts with customers

Lower revenue was earned due to the cancellation of the AIFS Conference impacted by COVID-19. Other revenue

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 60

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2021

Notes 2021

$

2020 $

Original

Budget 2021 $

ASSETS

Financial assets

Cash and cash equivalents 5A 1,167,348 1,359,941 296,000

Trade and other receivables 5B 4,860,106 7,133,395 6,816,000

Total financial assets 6,027,454 8,493,336 7,112,000

Non-financial assets 1

Leasehold improvements 6A 5,179,048 5,937,035 3,748,000

Plant and equipment 6A 823,684 841,899 2,067,000

Computer software 6A 423,798 28,000 810,000

Other non-financial assets 6B 374,878 351,619 531,000

Total non-financial assets 6,801,408 7,158,553 7,156,000

Total assets 12,828,862 15,651,889 14,268,000

LIABILITIES

Payables

Suppliers 7A 223,567 573,746 499,000

Contract liabilities 7B 4,342,650 6,080,933 7,017,000

Other payables 7B 497,852 347,427 -

Total payables 5,064,069 7,002,106 7,516,000

Interest bearing liabilities

Leases 8A 3,978,891 4,427,000 3,979,000

Total interest bearing liabilities 3,978,891 4,427,000 3,979,000

Provisions

Employee provisions 9A 2,291,817 2,367,474 1,785,000

Other provisions 9B 348,600 369,700 370,000

Total provisions 2,640,417 2,737,174 2,155,000

Total liabilities 11,683,377 14,166,280 13,650,000

Net assets 1,145,485 1,485,609 618,000

EQUITY

Contributed equity 4,741,511 4,551,511 4,742,000

Reserves 296,630 296,630 296,000

Retained surplus/(Accumulated deficit) (3,892,656) (3,362,532) (4,420,000)

Total equity 1,145,485 1,485,609 618,000

1 Right-of-use assets are included in the following line item: Leasehold improvements .

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 61

Statement of financial position as at 30 June 2021

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2020/21 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2020/21 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $600,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

The Insitute manages cash on an as-needs basis and the balance at year end reflects the circumstances of each particular financial year end.

Cash and cash equivalents

During 20/21 the value of research that the Institute was commissioned to deliver and what has been historically delivered is lower due to the direct impact of COVID 19, thus the variance is attributable to the change in the balance of unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2020 and 30 June 2021.

Trade and other receivables

Value of leasehold improvement accounts for Right of Use assets, originally classified in Plant and Equipment for PBS. Leasehold improvements

The value of Depreciation expense and disposals exceed planned capital purchases for the financial year. Plant and equipment

The value of Computer Software has increased in line with the Institute’s development of its website. Computer software

Contract liabilities represent cash receipts received in advance for work yet to be performed. The Institute’s estimated revenue as published in the 2020/21 PBS was based on an assumption of revenue to be earned from long-term continuing projects along with an assumption of the value of work the Institute would be contracted to deliver in the financial year, based on historical trends. The balance of contract liabilities at 30 June is difficult to estimate and can vary from year to year as it is impacted by the timing of payments received for contracted research projects and the timing of deliverables of those projects as these may not necessarily fall in the same financial year. Timing of payments and project deliverables are also subject to change after the publication of the PBS.

Contract liabilities

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 62

Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original

Budget 2021 $

CONTRIBUTED EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 4,551,511 4,362,511 4,552,000

Adjusted opening balance 4,551,511 4,362,511 4,552,000

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Departmental capital budget 190,000 189,000 190,000

Total transactions with owners 190,000 189,000 190,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 4,741,511 4,551,511 4,742,000

RETAINED EARNINGS

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period (3,362,532) (2,404,203) (3,362,000)

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 - 530,000 -

Adjusted opening balance (3,362,532) (1,874,203) (3,362,000)

Comprehensive income

Deficit for the period (530,124) (1,488,329) (1,058,000)

Other comprehensive income - - -

Total comprehensive income (530,124) (1,488,329) (1,058,000)

Closing balance as at 30 June (3,892,656) (3,362,532) (4,420,000)

ASSET REVALUATION RESERVE

Balance carried forward from previous period 296,630 296,630 296,000

Adjusted opening balance 296,630 296,630 296,000

Comprehensive income

Other comprehensive income - - -

Total comprehensive income - - -

Closing balance as at 30 June 296,630 296,630 296,000

TOTAL EQUITY

Opening balance

Balance carried forward from previous period 1,485,609 2,254,938 1,486,000

Adjustment on initial application of AASB 16 - 530,000 -

Adjusted opening balance 1,485,609 2,784,938 1,486,000

Comprehensive income

Surplus/(Deficit) for the period (530,124) (1,488,329) (1,058,000)

Other comprehensive income - - -

Total comprehensive income (530,124) (1,488,329) (1,058,000)

Transactions with owners

Contributions by owners

Departmental capital budget 190,000 189,000 190,000

Total transactions with owners 190,000 189,000 190,000

Closing balance as at 30 June 1,145,485 1,485,609 618,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 63

Statement of changes in equity for the period ended 30 June 2021

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2020/21 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2020/21 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $600,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

The result for the year was a deficit less than planned due to additional revenue recognised for the period. Deficit for the period

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 64

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

Notes

2021 $

2020 $

Original

Budget 2021 $

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Appropriations 17,923,855 16,152,322 6,739,000

Sales of goods and rendering of services 9,417,024 11,071,290 11,559,000

GST received 565,739 407,205 (146,000)

Other 33,000 33,000 312,000

Total cash received 27,939,618 27,663,817 18,464,000

Cash used

Employees (10,421,324) (10,207,347) (11,438,000)

Suppliers (5,489,855) (4,727,562) (6,822,000)

Interest payments on lease liabilities (80,809) (89,000) (80,000)

GST paid (695,040) (967,829) -

Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA (10,773,118) (11,456,220) -

Total cash used (27,460,146) (27,447,958) (18,340,000)

Net cash from/(used by) operating activities 479,472 215,859 124,000

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash used

Purchase of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (617,609) (131,616) (930,000)

Total cash used (617,609) (131,616) (930,000)

Net cash from/(used by) investing activities (617,609) (131,616) (930,000)

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash received

Contributed equity 372,848 31,978 190,000

Total cash received 372,848 31,978 190,000

Cash used

Principal payments of lease liability (427,304) (417,000) (448,000)

Total cash used (427,304) (417,000) (448,000)

Net cash from/(used by) financing activities (54,456) (385,022) (258,000)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash held (192,593) (300,779) (1,064,000)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period 1,359,941 1,660,720 1,360,000

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 5A 1,167,348 1,359,941 296,000

The above statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes .

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 65

Cash flow statement for the period ended 30 June 2021

Budget variances commentary

Australian Institute of Family Studies ‘the Institute’ original budgeted financial statement was first presented to Parliament in respect of the reporting period in the 2020/21 Portfolio Budget Statements (PBS).

Explanations of major variance between actual and original budgeted amounts for 2020/21 are provided where the variance is greater than 10% for a line item or greater than $600,000 unless the variance is a trivial amount.

Explanations of major variances Affected line items (and statement)

The presentation of the Cash Flow Statement in the PBS does not require entities to account for the return of Section 74 receipts to the OPA and the redrawing of these funds from the relevant Appropriation Item. Subsequently, the Cash Flow Statement presented in the 2020/21 Financial Statements identifies significantly higher amounts of ‘Cash received’ and ‘Cash used’ than in the PBS.

Appropriation, Section 74 receipts transferred to OPA

Most of the Institute’s revenue is earned from commissioned research and/or evaluation projects. Lower than expected cash was received due to the cancellation of the AIFS Conference and delays to new research projects impacted by COVID-19.

Sale of goods and rendering of services

Cash used for Employees are lower than budget due to delays in commencement of project research in 2020/21 impacted by COVID-19. There were also several unfilled budget positions during the year.

Employee benefits

Cash paid for Suppliers was less than planned due to delays in contract and consultant payments associated largely with fieldwork. Suppliers

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 66

Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 1: Overview and summary of significant accounting policies 68

Note 2: Events after the reporting period 69

Note 3: Expenses 70

Note 4: Own-source income 72

Note 5: Financial assets 74

Note 6: Non-financial assets 75

Note 7: Payables 78

Note 8: Interest bearing liabilities 79

Note 9: Provisions 80

Note 10: Appropriations 81

Note 11: Net cash appropriation arrangements 83

Note 12: Key Management Personnel remuneration 84

Note 13: Related party disclosures 85

Note 14: Contingent assets and liabilities 86

Note 15: Financial instruments 87

Note 16: Fair value measurements 90

Note 17: Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities 92

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Financial statements 67

Note 1: Overview and summary of significant accounting policies

1.1 Objectives of the Entity

The Institute is an Australian Government controlled entity. It is a not-for-profit entity. The objective of the Institute is to conduct research to increase the understanding of Australian families and the issues that affect them.

1.2 The basis of preparation of the financial statements

The financial statements are general purpose financial statements and are required by section 42 of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 .

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with:

a) Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Financial Reporting) Rule 2015 (FRR); and

b) Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations - Reduced Disclosure Requirements issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) that apply for the reporting period.

The financial statements have been prepared on an accrual basis and in accordance with the historical cost convention, except for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Except where stated, no allowance is made for the effect of changing prices on the results or the financial position.

The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars and values are rounded to the nearest dollar unless otherwise specified.

1.3 Significant accounting judgements and estimates

Refer to Note 16 for explanation of assumptions used in estimating the fair value of assets.

The liability for long service leave has been estimated using present value techniques. This takes into account expected salary growth, attrition and future discounting using Commonwealth bond rates.

No other accounting assumptions or estimates have been identified that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next reporting period.

1.4 New Australian accounting standards

Adoption of New Australian Accounting Standard Requirements

All new standards, amendments to standards and interpretations that were issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) prior to the signoff date and are applicable to the current reporting period did not have a material effect on the Institute's financial statements.

1.5 Taxation

The Institute is exempt from all forms of taxation except Fringe Benefits Tax (FBT) and the Goods and Services Tax (GST).

68

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 2: Events after the reporting period

There are no known events occurring after the reporting period that could impact on the financial statements.

69

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 3: Expenses

2021 $

2020 $

Note 3A: Employee benefits

Wages and salaries 7,645,035 7,419,932

Superannuation

Defined contribution plans 1,113,088 1,110,662

Defined benefit plans 277,969 267,977

Leave and other entitlements 1,195,258 1,309,150

Other employee benefits 120,422 132,543

Total employee benefits 10,351,772 10,240,264

Note 3B: Suppliers

Goods and services supplied or rendered

Consultants 2,705,179 2,513,457

Contractors 1,156,887 1,449,995

Travel 83,006 266,784

IT Services 538,327 356,838

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 4,483,399 4,587,074

Goods supplied 120,589 48,580

Services rendered 4,362,810 4,538,494

Total goods and services supplied or rendered 4,483,399 4,587,074

Other suppliers

Workers compensation expenses 103,274 147,783

Total other suppliers 103,274 147,783

Total supplier expenses 4,586,673 4,734,857

Note 3C: Finance costs

Interest on lease liabilities 80,809 89,000

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate (21,100) 19,405

Total finance costs 59,709 108,405

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 6A and 8A.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Accounting Policy: Employee benefits

Superannuation

The majority of the staff of the Institute are members of the Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme (CSS), the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) or the PSS accumulation plan (PSSap).

The CSS and PSS are defined benefit schemes for the Australian Government. The PSSap is a defined contribution scheme.

The liability for defined benefits is recognised in the financial statements of the Australian Government and is settled by the Australian Government in due course. This liability is reported in the Department of Finance and Deregulations administered schedules and notes.

The Institute makes employer contributions to the employees' superannuation scheme at rates determined by an actuary to be sufficient to meet the current cost to the Government. The Institute accounts for the contributions as if they were contributions to defined contribution plans.

The liability for superannuation recognised as at 30 June each year represents pro-rata outstanding contributions for the final fortnight of the year.

Refer also to note 8 for accounting policy with respect to leave provisions.

Accounting Policy: Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The Institute has elected not to recognise right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases of assets that have a lease term of 12 months or less and leases of low-value assets (less than $10,000). The Institute recognises the lease payments associated with these leases as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The Institute has no such leases.

Note 3: Expenses continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 4: Own-source income

2021 $

2020 $

Note 4A: Revenue from contracts with customers

Sale of goods 182 11

Revenue from contracts with customers 10,388,730 9,984,700

Total revenue from contracts with customers 10,388,912 9,984,711

Own sourced income for AIFS is derived from research activities recognised over time.

Type of customer:

Australian Government entities (related parties) 10,084,746 8,956,747

State and Territory Governments 151,589 723,616

Non-government entities 652,577 304,348

Total 10,388,912 9,984,711

Note 4B: Other revenue

Cost recovery 19,344 916

ANAO audit services received free of charge 33,000 33,000

Other revenue 500,000 -

Total other revenue 552,344 33,916

Note 4C: Revenue from Government

Departmental appropriations 4,466,000 4,452,000

Total revenue from Government 4,466,000 4,452,000

Accounting Policy: Revenue

Revenue from contracts with customers

The Institute receives contract revenue by conducting high-quality research relevant to policy and practice on a broad range of issues regarding families in Australia for various stakeholders. The key stakeholders comprise mainly other Commonwealth agencies, State Government agencies as well as non-government entities.

Revenue from rendering of contract services is recognised by reference to the stage of completion of contracts over time and is measured at the reporting date. AIFS Revenue policies relating to when a contract is in scope of AASB 15 and if the performance obligations are required by an enforceable contract and they are sufficiently specific to enable the Institute to determine when they have been satisfied.

The stage of completion of contracts at the reporting date is determined by reference to either:

a) services performed to date as a percentage of total services to be performed; or

b) the proportion that costs incurred to date bear to the estimated total costs of the transaction; or

c) milestones achieved against provision in the contract.

72

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Accounting Policy: Revenue (continued)

Copyright royalty revenue for the use of the Institute’s publications and bibliographic databases is recognised on an accrual basis. The Institute has no control over the amount of royalties and a provisional amount is accrued based on historical receipts.

Cost recovery, which relates mainly to Comcare receipts and sponsorships of travel expenses, is recognised on an accrual basis.

Receivables for goods and services, which have 30-day terms, are recognised at the nominal amounts due less any impairment allowance account. Collectability of debts is reviewed at the end of the reporting period. Allowances are made when collectability of the debt is no longer probable.

Revenue from Government

Amounts appropriated for departmental appropriations for the year (adjusted for any formal additions and reductions) are recognised as Revenue from Government when the Institute gains control of the appropriation, except for certain amounts that relate to activities that are reciprocal in nature, in which case revenue is recognised only when it has been earned. Appropriations receivable are recognised at their nominal amounts.

Resources received free of charge

Resources received free of charge are recognised as gains when, and only when, a fair value can be reliably determined and the services would have been purchased if they had not been donated. Use of those resources is recognised as an expense. Resources received free of charge are recorded as either revenue or gains depending on their nature.

Accounting Policy: Gains

Contributions of assets at no cost of acquisition or for nominal consideration are recognised as gains at their fair value when the asset qualifies for recognition, unless received from another Government entity as a consequence of a restructuring of administrative arrangements. The Institute did not receive any contribution of assets in 2020/21 or 2019/20.

Sale of assets

Gains from disposal of assets are recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer.

Note 4: Own-source income continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 5: Financial assets

2021 $

2020 $

Note 5A: Cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,167,348 1,359,941

Total cash and cash equivalents 1,167,348 1,359,941

Note 5B: Trade and other receivables

Goods and services receivables

Goods and services 1,106,557 504,947

Other receivables 13,827 21,141

Total goods and services receivables 1,120,384 526,088

Appropriation receivables

Appropriation receivable (existing programs) 3,739,722 6,607,307

Total appropriation receivables 3,739,722 6,607,307

Total trade and other receivables 4,860,106 7,133,395

Credit terms for goods and services were within 30 days (2020: 30 days) .

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for receivables .

Accounting Policy

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash is recognised at its nominal amount. Cash and cash equivalents include:

a) cash on hand; and

b) demand deposits in bank accounts with an original maturity of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

Financial assets

Trade receivables, loans and other receivables that are held for the purpose of collecting the contractual cash flows where the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest, that are not provided at below-market interest rates, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method adjusted for any loss allowance.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 6: Non-financial assets

Note 6A: Reconciliation of the opening and closing balances of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment and intangibles

Leasehold improvements $

Plant and equipment $

Computer software

$

Total $

As at 1 July 2020

Gross book value 6,690,136 995,728 42,000 7,727,864

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (753,101) (153,829) (14,000) (920,930)

Total as at 1 July 2020 5,937,035 841,899 28,000 6,806,934

Additions:

Purchase 28,604 188,312 409,798 626,714

Purchase - ICT equipment/WIP - 1,493 - 1,493

Depreciation and amortisation (173,575) (176,304) (14,000) (363,879)

Depreciation on right-of-use assets (584,797) - - (584,797)

Disposals - (39,130) - (39,130)

Other movements (28,219) 7,414 - (20,805)

Total as at 30 June 2021 5,179,048 823,684 423,798 6,426,530

Total as at 30 June 2021 represented by:

Gross book value 6,718,740 1,146,403 451,798 8,316,941

Accumulated depreciation, amortisation and impairment (1,539,692) (322,719) (28,000) (1,890,411)

Total as at 30 June 2021 5,179,048 823,684 423,798 6,426,530

Carrying amount of right-of-use assets 3,710,609 - - 3,710,609

Note: No plant and equipment, leasehold improvements and computer software are expected to be sold within the next 12 months .

Accounting Policy

Assets are recorded at cost on acquisition except as stated below. The cost of acquisition includes the fair value of assets transferred in exchange and liabilities undertaken. Financial assets are initially measured at their fair value plus transaction costs where appropriate.

Assets acquired at no cost, or for nominal consideration, are initially recognised as assets and income at their fair value at the date of acquisition, unless acquired as a consequence of restructuring of administrative arrangements. In the latter case, assets are initially recognised as contributions by owners at the amounts at which they were recognised in the transferor’s accounts immediately prior to the restructuring.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Accounting Policy (continued)

Asset Recognition Threshold

Purchases of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $1,000 and for leasehold improvements and computer software for purchases costing less than $10,000 which are expensed in the year of acquisition (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are significant in total).

The initial cost of an asset includes an estimate of the cost of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located. This is particularly relevant to ‘make good’ provisions in property leases taken up by AIFS where there exists an obligation to restore property to its original condition. These costs are included in the value of leasehold improvements with a corresponding provision for ‘make good’ recognised.

Lease Right of Use (ROU) Assets

Leased ROU assets are capitalised at the commencement date of the lease and comprise of the initial lease liability amount, initial direct costs incurred when entering into the lease less any lease incentives received. These assets are accounted for by Commonwealth lessees as separate asset classes to corresponding assets owned outright, but included in the same column as where the corresponding underlying assets would be presented if they were owned.

On initial adoption of AASB 16 the Institute has adjusted the ROU assets at the date of initial application by the amount of any provision for onerous leases recognised immediately before the date of initial application. Following initial application, an impairment review is undertaken for any right of use lease asset that shows indicators of impairment and an impairment loss is recognised against any right of use lease asset that is impaired. Lease ROU assets continue to be measured at cost after initial recognition in Commonwealth agency, General Government Sector (GGS) and Whole of Government financial statements.

Revaluations

Fair values for each class of asset are determined as shown below:

Asset class Fair value measurement

Leasehold improvements Depreciated replacement cost

Plant and equipment Market selling price

Following initial recognition at cost, leasehold improvements, plant and equipment (excluding ROU assets) are carried at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Valuations were conducted with sufficient frequency to ensure that the carrying amounts of assets did not differ materially from the assets’ fair values as at the reporting date. The regularity of independent valuations depended upon the volatility of movements in market values for the relevant assets.

Revaluation adjustments are made on a class basis. Any revaluation increment is credited to equity under the heading of asset revaluation reserve except to the extent that it reversed a previous revaluation decrement of the same asset class that was previously recognised in the surplus/deficit. Revaluation decrements for a class of assets are recognised directly in the surplus/deficit except to the extent that they reversed a previous revaluation increment for that class.

Any accumulated depreciation as at the revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the asset restated to the revalued carrying amount of the asset after revaluation equals its revalued amount.

Note 6: Non-financial assets continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Accounting Policy (continued)

Depreciation

Depreciable leasehold improvements, plant and equipment assets are written-off to their estimated residual values over their estimated useful lives to the Institute using, in all cases, the straight-line method of depreciation.

Depreciation rates (useful lives), residual values and methods are reviewed at each reporting date and necessary adjustments are recognised in the current, or current and future, reporting periods, as appropriate.

Depreciation rates applying to each class of depreciable asset are based on the following useful lives:

2021 2020

Leasehold improvements 10 years 10 years

Plant and equipment 3 to 15 years 3 to 15 years

The depreciation rates for ROU assets are based on the commencement date to the earlier of the end of the useful life of the ROU asset or the end of the lease term.

Impairment

All assets were assessed for impairment at 30 June 2021. As no indications of impairment were identified, it was determined that there was no impairment.

The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Where the future economic benefit of an asset is not primarily dependent on the asset’s ability to generate future cash flows, and the asset would be replaced if the Institute were deprived of the asset, its value in use is taken to be its depreciated replacement cost.

Derecognition

An item of leasehold improvements, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal.

Intangibles

The Institute’s intangibles comprise commercially purchased software and internally developed website costs. Intangibles are recognised initially at cost in the statement of financial position, except for purchases costing less than $10,000, which are expensed on acquisition. Intangibles are carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment losses.

Software is amortised on a straight-line basis over its anticipated useful life. The useful lives of the Institute’s software are 3 to 5 years (2019/20: 3 to 5 years). All software assets were assessed for indications of impairment as at 30 June 2021.

2021 $

2020 $

Note 6B: Other non-financial assets

Prepayments 374,878 351,619

Total other non-financial assets 374,878 351,619

Note: No indicators of impairment were found for prepayments .

Note 6: Non-financial assets continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 7: Payables

2021 $

2020 $

Note 7A: Suppliers

Trade creditors and accruals 223,567 573,746

Contract liabilities 4,342,650 6,080,933

Total suppliers 4,566,217 6,654,679

Suppliers are expected to be settled in no more than 12 months. Settlement was usually made within 30 days. Contract liabilities are associated with unearned income.

Note 7B: Other payables

Salaries and wages 135,131 129,319

Superannuation 27,759 20,629

GST payable 334,962 194,319

Other - 3,160

Total other payables 497,852 347,427

78

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 8: Interest bearing liabilities

2021 $

2020 $

Note 8A: Leases

Lease liabilities 3,978,891 4,427,000

Total leases 3,978,891 4,427,000

Total cash outflow for leases for the year ended 30 June 2021 was $508,113 (2020: $506,000).

Maturity analysis - contractual undiscounted cash flows

Within 1 year 550,866 528,472

Between 1 to 5 years 2,443,494 2,345,802

More than 5 years 1,238,231 1,886,789

Total leases 4,232,591 4,761,063

The above lease disclosures should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes 3C and 6A.

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities

Unearned income is commissioned research revenue payments received but which cannot be recognised as revenue because the tasks or deliverables are not completed at the time payments were received.

The Institute classifies its financial liabilities as ‘other financial liabilities’. This comprises suppliers and other payables that are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Accounting Policy: Leases

For all new contracts entered into, the Institute considers whether the contract is, or contains, a lease. A lease is defined as ‘a contract, or part of a contract, that conveys the right to use an asset (the underlying asset) for a period of time in exchange for consideration’.

Once it has been determined that a contract is, or contains a lease, the lease liability is initially measured at the present value of the lease payments unpaid at the commencement date, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease, if that rate is readily determinable, or the department’s incremental borrowing rate.

Subsequent to initial measurement, the liability will be reduced for payments made and increased for interest. It is remeasured to reflect any reassessment or modification to the lease. When the lease liability is remeasured, the corresponding adjustment is reflected in the right-of-use asset or profit and loss depending on the nature of the reassessment or modification.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 9: Provisions

2021 $

2020 $

Note 9A: Employee provisions

Leave 2,291,817 2,367,474

Total employee provisions 2,291,817 2,367,474

No liability existed for separation and redundancy in 2021.

Note 9B: Other provisions

Provision for restoration

As at 1 July 369,700 350,295

Unwinding of discount or change in discount rate (21,100) 19,405

Total other provisions 348,600 369,700

The Institute currently has an agreement for leasing of premises which has a provision requiring the Institute to restore the premises to their original condition at the conclusion of the lease. The Institute has made a provision to reflect the present value of this obligation.

Accounting Policy: Employee provisions

Liabilities for ‘short-term employee benefits’ (as defined in AASB 119 Employee Benefits ) and termination benefits due within twelve months of the end of reporting period are measured at their nominal amounts.

Other long-term employee benefits are measured as net total of the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period minus the fair value at the end of the reporting period of plan assets (if any) out of which the obligations are to be settled directly.

Leave

The liability for employee benefits includes provision for annual leave and long service leave.

The leave liabilities are calculated on the basis of employees’ remuneration at the estimated salary rates that will be applied at the time the leave is taken, including the Institute’s employer superannuation contribution rates to the extent that the leave is likely to be taken during service rather than paid out on termination.

The liability for long service leave has been determined by the use of the Department of Finance’s shorthand method using the Standard Commonwealth sector probability profile. The estimate of the present value of the liability takes into account attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation.

80

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 10: Appropriations

Note 10A: Annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

Annual appropriations for 2021

Annual

appropriation 1 $

Adjustments to appropriation 2 $

Total

appropriation $

Appropriation applied in 2021 (current and

prior years)

$

Variance 3 $

Departmental Ordinary annual services

4,466,000 10,773,118 15,239,118 17,923,855 (2,684,737)

Capital budget 4 190,000 - 190,000 372,848 (182,848)

Other services

Equity injections - - - - -

Total departmental 4,656,000 10,773,118 15,429,118 18,296,703 (2,867,585)

Notes: 1 . In 2020/21, there were no appropriations which have been withheld (Section 51 of PGPA Act) and quarantined for administration purposes . 2 . In 2020/21, adjustments to appropriation were mostly PGPA Act Section 74 receipts . 3 . The variance is attributable to the change in the balance of unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2020 and 30 June 2021

(see note 10B) . This is due to delays in revenue being recognised on contracted research and timing of capital expenditure . 4 . Departmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No . 1, 3, 5) . They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts .

Annual appropriations for 2020

Annual

appropriation1 $

Adjustments to appropriation2 $

Total

appropriation $

Appropriation applied in 2020 (current and prior years)

$

Variance3 $

Departmental Ordinary annual services

4,452,000 11,456,220 15,908,220 16,152,322 (244,102)

Capital budget 4 189,000 - 189,000 31,978 157,022

Other services

Equity injections - - - - -

Total departmental 4,641,000 11,456,220 16,097,220 16,184,300 (87,080)

Notes: 1 . In 2019/20, there were no appropriations which have been withheld (Section 51 of PGPA Act) and quarantined for administration purposes . 2 . In 2019/20, adjustments to appropriation were mostly PGPA Act Section 74 receipts . 3 . The variance is attributable to the change in the balance of unspent Annual Appropriation between 30 June 2019 and 30 June 2020

(see note 10B) . This is due to delays in revenue being recognised on contracted research and timing of capital expenditure . 4 . Departmental Capital Budgets are appropriated through Appropriation Acts (No . 1, 3, 5) . They form part of ordinary annual services and are not separately identified in the Appropriation Acts .

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 10B: Unspent annual appropriations (‘recoverable GST exclusive’)

2021 $

2020 $

Departmental

Appropriation Act 1 2019/20 - 6,607,307

Appropriation Act 1 2019/20 cash at bank - 1,359,941

Appropriation Act 1 2020/21 3,739,722 -

Appropriation Act 1 2020/21 cash at bank 1,167,348 -

Total departmental 4,907,070 7,967,248

Accounting Policy: Transactions with the Government as owner

Equity injections

Amounts appropriated which are designated as ‘equity injections’ for a year (less any formal reductions) and Departmental Capital Budgets (DCBs) are recognised directly in contributed equity in that year.

Other distributions to owners

The FRR require that distributions to owners be debited to contributed equity unless it is in the nature of a dividend. There was no distribution to owners in 2020/21 or 2019/20.

Note 10: Appropriations continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 11: Net cash appropriation arrangements

2021 $

2020 $

Total comprehensive income/(loss) - as per the Statement of Comprehensive Income

(530,124) (1,488,329)

Plus: depreciation/amortisation of assets funded through appropriations (departmental capital budget funding and/or equity injections) 1 363,879 372,336

Plus: depreciation of right-of-use assets 2 584,797 548,594

Less: lease principal repayments 2 (448,092) (417,000)

Net Cash Operating Deficit (29,540) (984,399)

Notes: 1 . From 2010-11, the Government introduced net cash appropriation arrangements where revenue appropriations for depreciation/ amortisation expenses ceased . Entities now receive a separate capital budget provided through equity appropriations . Capital budgets are to be appropriated in the period when cash payment for capital expenditure is required .

2 . The inclusion of depreciation/amortisation expenses related to ROU leased assets and the lease liability principle repayment amount reflects the cash impact on implementation of AASB 16 Leases, it does not directly reflect a change in appropriation arrangements .

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 12: Key Management Personnel remuneration

During the reporting period ended 30 June 2021, the Institute had four executives who meet the definition of Key Management Personnel (KMP). KMP are those persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of AIFS directly or indirectly. AIFS determined the KMP to be the Director, Deputy Director Corporate Services, and Deputy Director Research.

Their names and length of terms as KMP are summarised below:

Name Position Term as KMP

Anne Hollonds Director Part year - Terminated 18 October 2020

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director Part year - Appointed 19 October to 31 December 2020

Michael Alexander Acting Director Part year - Appointed 1 to 31 January 2021

Andrew Whitecross Acting Director Part year - Appointed 1 February 2021

Michael Alexander Deputy Director Full year (apart from 1 to 31 January 2021)

Kelly Hand Deputy Director Full year

2021 $

2020 $

Short-term employee benefits 718,547 742,814

Post-employment benefits 108,498 112,710

Other long-term employee benefits 25,218 19,602

Total Key Management Personnel remuneration expenses 852,263 875,126

KMP remuneration was prepared on an accrual basis. The total number of KMP that are included in the above table is four (2020: Three).

The above KMP remuneration excludes the remuneration and other benefits of the Portfolio Minister. The Portfolio Minister’s remuneration and other benefits are set by the Remuneration Tribunal and are not paid by the Institute.

84

Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 13: Related party disclosures

Related party relationships:

The Institute is an Australian Government controlled entity. Related parties of the Institute include but are not limited to:

ƒ KMP as outlined in Note 12;

ƒ Close family members of KMP outlined in Note 12; and

ƒ Organisations controlled by these KMP and their close family members.

Related parties to the Institute also included the Portfolio Minister, Cabinet Ministers and other Australian Government entities.

Transaction with related parties:

Given the breadth of Government activities, related parties may transact with the government sector in the same capacity as ordinary citizens. These transactions have not been separately disclosed in this note.

Giving consideration to relationships with related entities, and transactions entered into during the reporting period by the Institute, it has been determined that there are no related party transactions to be separately disclosed.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 14: Contingent assets and liabilities

Note 14: Contingent assets

2021 $

2020 $

Claims for damages and costs 369,908 -

Total contingent assets 369,908 -

Quantifiable Contingencies:

The above table contains $369,908 of contingent assets disclosed in respect to costs incurred by the Institute due to the cancellation of the AIFS Conference during the financial year (2020: nil). The Institute has submitted a claim for the full amount to Comcover. The claim has been acknowledged by Comcover who will investigate and advise an outcome in due course.

The Institute had no unquantifiable contingent assets and no quantifiable or unquantifiable contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2021.

Accounting Policy

Contingent liabilities and contingent assets are not recognised in the statement of financial position but are reported in the notes. They may arise from uncertainty as to the existence of a liability or asset or represent an asset or liability in respect of which the amount cannot be reliably measured. Contingent assets are disclosed when settlement is probable but not virtually certain and contingent liabilities are disclosed when settlement is greater than remote.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 15: Financial instruments

2021 $

2020 $

Note 15A: Categories of financial instruments

Financial assets at amortised cost

Cash on hand or on deposit 1,167,348 1,359,941

Goods and services 1,106,557 504,947

Other receivables 13,827 21,141

Total financial assets at amortised cost 2,287,732 1,886,029

Total financial assets 2,287,732 1,886,029

The net fair values of cash and cash equivalents and trade receivables approximates their carrying amounts.

Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade creditors and accruals 223,567 573,746

Total financial liabilities measured at amortised cost 223,567 573,746

Total financial liabilities 223,567 573,746

The net fair values of trade creditors and accruals approximates their carrying amounts.

Accounting Policy: Financial assets

In accordance with AASB 9 Financial Instruments , the Institute classifies its financial assets in the following categories:

a) financial assets at fair value through profit or loss;

b) financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income; and

c) financial assets measured at amortised cost.

The classification depends on both the Institute’s business model for managing the financial assets and contractual cash flow characteristics at the time of initial recognition. Financial assets are recognised when the Institute becomes a party to the contract and, as a consequence, has a legal right to receive or a legal obligation to pay cash and derecognised when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial asset expire or are transferred upon trade date.

Comparatives have not been restated on initial application.

Financial assets at amortised cost

Financial assets included in this category need to meet two criteria:

1. the financial asset is held in order to collect the contractual cash flows; and

2. the cash flows are solely payments of principal and interest (SPPI) on the principal outstanding amount.

Amortised cost is determined using the effective interest method.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Accounting Policy: Financial assets (continued)

Effective interest method

Income is recognised on an effective interest rate basis for financial assets that are recognised at amortised cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI)

Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income are held with the objective of both collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets, and the cash flows meet the SPPI test.

Any gains or losses as a result of fair value measurement or the recognition of an impairment loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income.

Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets are classified as financial assets at fair value through profit or loss where the financial asset either doesn't meet the criteria of financial assets held at amortised cost or at FVOCI (i.e. mandatorily held at FVTPL) or may be designated.

Financial assets at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any resultant gain or loss recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest earned on the financial asset.

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets are assessed for impairment at the end of each reporting period based on Expected Credit Losses, using the general approach which measures the loss allowance based on an amount equal to lifetime expected credit losses where risk has significantly increased, or an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses if risk has not increased.

The simplified approach for trade, contract and lease receivables is used. This approach always measures the loss allowance as the amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

A write-off constitutes a derecognition event where the write-off directly reduces the gross carrying amount of the financial asset.

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities. Financial liabilities are recognised and derecognised upon ‘trade date’.

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss

Financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are initially measured at fair value. Subsequent fair value adjustments are recognised in profit or loss. The net gain or loss recognised in profit or loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Financial liabilities at amortised cost

Financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs. These liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective interest basis.

Supplier and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. Liabilities are recognised to the extent that the goods or services have been received (and irrespective of having been invoiced).

Note 15: Financial instruments continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 15: Financial instruments continued

Note 15B: Net gains or losses on financial assets

There was no gain or losses from financial assets - loans and receivables - at amortised cost in the financial year ended 30 June 2021 (2020: nil).

Accounting Policy: Financial liabilities and financial assets

Financial liabilities and financial assets that are not contractual (such as GST, created as a result of statutory requirements imposed by governments) are not financial instruments.

Receivables

Receivables consist of contractual receivables, such as accounts payable and accruals.

Payables

Payables consist of contractual payables, such as accounts payable and accruals.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 16: Fair value measurements

The following tables provide an analysis of assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value. The remaining assets and liabilities disclosed in the statement of financial position do not apply the fair value hierarchy.

The different levels of the fair value hierarchy are defined below.

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the Institute can access at measurement date.

Level 2: Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

Accounting Policy

The Institute engaged the services of Jones Lang Lasalle (JLL) to conduct a detailed external valuation of all non-financial assets at 30 June 2019 and has relied upon those outcomes to establish carrying amounts. An annual assessment is undertaken to determine whether the carrying amount of the assets is materially different from the fair value. Comprehensive valuations are carried out at least once every three years. JLL has provided written assurance to AIFS that the models developed are in compliance with AASB 13.

The methods utilised to determine and substantiate the unobservable inputs are derived and evaluated as follows:

Physical Depreciation and Obsolescence - assets that do not transact with enough frequency or transparency to develop objective opinions of value from observable market evidence have been measured utilising the Depreciated Replacement Cost approach. Under the Depreciated Replacement Cost approach, the estimated cost to replace the asset is calculated and then adjusted to take in physical depreciation and obsolescence. Physical depreciation and obsolescence have been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the asset under consideration. For all Leasehold Improvement assets, the consumed economic benefit/asset obsolescence deduction is determined based on the term of the associated lease.

AIFS’ policy is to recognise transfers into and transfers out of fair value hierarchy levels as at the end of the reporting period.

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Fair value measurement

Fair value measurements at the end of the reporting period

2021 $

2020 $

Fair value measurements at the

end of the reporting period

Non-financial assets 2 Plant and equipment 1 - - Market Approach: This approach seeks to estimate the

current value of an asset with reference to recent market transactions involving identical or comparable assets.

Inputs: Prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving plant and equipment assets were considered.

Plant and equipment 1 823,684 841,899 Depreciated replacement cost: The amount a market participant would be prepared to pay to acquire or construct a substitute asset of comparable utility, adjusted for physical depreciation and obsolescence.

Inputs: Current prices for substitute assets. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on professional judgement regarding physical, economic and external obsolescence factors relevant to the assets under consideration.

Leasehold improvements 1 1,468,439 1,641,629 Depreciated replacement cost: The amount a market participant would be prepared to pay to acquire or construct a substitute asset of comparable utility, adjusted for physical depreciation and obsolescence.

Inputs: Current costs per square metre of floor area relevant to the location of the asset. Physical depreciation and obsolescence has been determined based on the term of the associated lease.

Total non-financial assets 2,292,123 2,483,528

Notes: 1 . No non-financial assets were measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis as at 30 June 2021 (2020: nil) . 2 . AIFS’ assets are held for operational purposes and not held for the purposes of deriving a profit . The current use of all non-financial assets is considered their highest and best use .

3 . There were no transfers between Levels 1 and 2 for recurring fair value measurements during the year .

Note 16: Fair value measurements continued

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

Note 17: Current/non-current distinction for assets and liabilities

2021 $

2020 $

Assets expected to be recovered in:

No more than 12 months

Cash and cash equivalents 1,167,348 1,359,941

Trade and other receivables 4,860,106 7,133,395

Total no more than 12 months 6,027,454 8,493,336

More than 12 months

Leasehold improvements 5,179,048 5,937,035

Plant and equipment 823,684 841,899

Computer software 423,798 28,000

Other non-financial assets 374,878 351,619

Total more than 12 months 6,801,408 7,158,553

Total assets 12,828,862 15,651,889

Liabilities expected to be settled in:

No more than 12 months

Contract liabilities 4,342,650 6,080,933

Trade creditors and accruals 223,567 573,746

Other payables 497,852 347,427

Leases 480,186 448,092

Employee provisions 1,157,971 733,417

Total no more than 12 months 6,702,226 9,508,186

More than 12 months

Leases 3,498,705 3,978,908

Employee provisions 1,133,846 1,634,057

Other provisions 348,600 369,700

Total more than 12 months 4,981,151 4,658,094

Total liabilities 11,683,377 14,166,280

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Australian Institute of Family Studies Notes to and forming part of the financial statements for the period ended 30 June 2021

© GettyImages/Nikola Stojadinovic

Six —

Appendices

Appendices 93

Appendix A: Other mandatory information

Work health and safety

We are committed to providing and maintaining a safe and healthy workplace and meeting our responsibilities under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 . See 'Management and accountability' (page 42) for our workplace health and safety policies, processes and performance.

Advertising and market research

No payments of $14,000 or greater (inclusive of GST) were made for the purposes of advertising and market research expenditure, as described in section 321A of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 .

Ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance

We are committed to the principles of ecologically sustainable development.

The HWT Tower in which we are located has a 4.5 star NABERS energy rating. Lighting throughout our office is sensitive to movement, meaning it will automatically turn off after a set period of no activity and only turn back on when movement is detected to reduce energy usage on unnecessary lighting. We’ve installed block-out blinds on all north and west facing windows to reduce our electricity consumption in the warmer months.

Our transition to a mobile workforce means our staff all use laptops, which consume less power than their desktop counterparts. All our office equipment and appliances either have aggressive standby timers or are low power.

Adverse effects due to transport (causing emissions to the air and use of resources) continue to be mostly due to domestic airline flights. While as a small agency we are not a major user of flights, this has been dramatically reduced in 2020/21 due to COVID-19. The proximity of our office to train and tram networks enables the majority of staff to take public transport to and from the office. Our webinars

continue to be very popular and regularly replace face-to-face seminar presentations, extending their reach and reducing the need for people to travel to the Institute to hear them. Our state -of-the-art video -conferencing equipment means reduced travel for both staff and key stakeholders as it is now very easy to participate in meetings from our office and will be a stronger feature of our working arrangements into the future.

Paper consumption (use of natural resources) is minimised by using recycled paper and ensuring that the office printers default to black and white, double-sided printing. Two new Konica Minolta printers were installed in February 2019, providing updated technology, reduced consumption of resources during use and more granular reporting of print usage.

Paper use in 2020/21 (number of printer/copier impressions) decreased by 79.88% compared to the previous year. While this continues the decreased usage reported over the previous three years, it’s important to note that due to COVID-19, staff were working from home for most of this financial year. It’s estimated that paper usage will increase next financial year with staff returning to the office on a more regular basis.

Waste generation is reduced by the separation of paper, cardboard, glass, plastics and organic waste at waste stations throughout the tenancy.

Disability reporting

Since 1994, Commonwealth departments and agencies have reported on their performance as policy adviser, purchaser, employer, regulator and provider under the Commonwealth Disability Strategy. In 2007/08, reporting on the employer role was transferred to the Australian Public Service Commission’s State of the Service Report and the APS Statistical Bulletin. These reports are available from the Commission’s website (see  apsc.gov.au ). Since 2010/11, departments and agencies have not been required to report on these functions.

The Australian Public Service Disability Employment Strategy 2020-25 was launched in

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 94

December 2020 and builds on the achievements of the former strategy As One: Making it Happen, APS Disability Employment Strategy 2016-19 and its evaluation. The Strategy represents the Australian Government’s continued commitment as an employer to increasing the employment of people with disability across the Australian Public Service (APS) to 7% by 2025.

It sets the direction for all public service agencies as employers and focuses on the attraction, recruitment and retention of more people with disability (at all levels within the APS), in addition to creating more accessible and inclusive workplace cultures and environments. There are two main focus areas:

ƒ attract, recruit and retain more people with disability

ƒ accessible and inclusive workplace cultures and environments.

AIFS is working towards improvements within both these areas, in the context of what is possible for a small agency.

Information Publication Scheme

Agencies subject to the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (FOI Act) are required to publish information to the public as part of the Information Publication Scheme (IPS). This requirement is in Part II of the FOI Act and has replaced the former requirement to publish a Section 8 statement in an annual report. Each agency must display on its website a plan showing what information it publishes in accordance with the IPS requirements.

No new requests were received in 2020/21.

Contact details

FOI Contact Officer Australian Institute of Family Studies Level 4, 40 City Road Southbank VIC 3006

Telephone (03) 9214 7888 Facsimile (03) 9214 7839 Email aifs-foi@aifs.gov.au

Appendices 95

Appendix B: Agency resource statements and resources for outcomes

Table B1: Agency resource statement 2020/21

Actual available appropriation for 2020/21 $ (a)

Payments made 2020/21 $ (b)

Balance remaining 2020/21 $ (a) - (b)

Ordinary annual services 1

Departmental appropriation2 23,396,365 18,489,295 4,907,070

Total 23,396,365 18,489,295 4,907,070

Total ordinary annual services A 23,396,365 18,489,295 4,907,070

Other services 3

Departmental non-operating

Equity injections 4

Total

Total other services B

Total available annual appropriations and payments

Special appropriations

Total special appropriations C

Special accounts 5

Total special accounts D

Total resourcing and payments A+B+C+D 23,396,365 18,489,295 4,907,070

Less appropriations drawn from annual or special appropriations above and credited to special accounts through annual appropriations

Total net resourcing and payments for AIFS 23,396,365 18,489,295 4,907,070

Notes: 1 . Appropriation Act (No . 1) 2020/21 and Appropriation Act (No . 2) 2020/21 (and Appropriation Act (No . 5) 2020/21 if necessary) . This may also include prior year departmental appropriation and Section 74 Retained Revenue Receipts . 2 . Includes an amount of $0 . 190 million in 2020/21 for the Departmental Capital Budget . For accounting purposes this amount has been

designated as ‘contributions by owners’ . 3 . Appropriation Act (No . 2) 2020/21 and Appropriation Act (No . 4) 2020/21 (and Appropriation Act (No . 6) 2020/21 if necessary) . 4 . Includes appropriation equity provided through Appropriation Bill (No . 2) 2020/21 . 5 . Does not include ‘Special Public Money’ held in accounts like Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts (SOETM) .

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 96

Table B2: Budgeted expenses and resources for Outcome 1, 2020/21

Outcome 1: Increased understanding of factors affecting how families function by conducting research and communicating findings to policy makers, service providers, and the broader community

Budget 1 2020/21 $’000

Actual expenses 2020/21 $’000 (b)

Variation 2020/21

$’000 (a) - (b)

Program 1.1: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Departmental expenses

Departmental appropriation2 17,668 14,993 2,675

Expenses not requiring appropriation in the Budget year

1,091 982 109

Total for Program 1.1 18,759 15,975 2,784

2020/21 2020/21 2020/21

Average staffing level (number) 82 82 -

Notes: 1 . Full year budget, including any subsequent adjustment made to the 2020-21 Budget at Additional Estimates . 2 . Departmental Appropriation combines Ordinary annual services (Appropriation Acts Nos . 1, 3 and 5) and Retained Revenue Receipts under section 74 of the PGPA Act 2013 .

Appendices 97

Appendix C: AIFS publications, events, webinars, presentations and submissions 2020/21

The following are the research publications, presentations and other outputs prepared by AIFS staff during 2020/21.

Publications

Alla, K., & Joss, N. (2021). What is an evidence-informed approach to practice and why is it important? CFCA short article.

Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2021). The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children - an Australian Government initiative: Data issues Waves 1 to 9. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2020). AIFS corporate plan 2020/21 to 2023/24. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2020). Annual report 2019/20. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2020). Growing Up in Australia, the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: Rationale report - release 8.0. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2020). The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children - an Australian Government initiative: Data user guide [Release 8.0] (November 2020 edition.). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2020). NDS and NDIS Outcomes Frameworks Consultation submission from the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2021). Growing Up in Australia, the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: Rationale report [release 9C1]. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2021). The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children - an Australian Government initiative: Data user guide [Release 9C1] (June 2021 edition). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies. (2021). A year in review: How we experienced 2020. Some early findings from the Towards COVID Normal survey (FIA Fast Facts 1). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bandara, D. K., Gasser, C., Jessup, K., Renda, J., Warren, D., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Factors associated with non-response in ‘Growing Up in Australia : The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children’ (LSAC Technical Paper No. 23). Canberra, ACT: Department of Social Services.

Baxter, J. (2021). Families in Australia Survey: Towards COVID Normal. Report no. 3: Child care in 2020. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J., Budinski, M., Carroll, M., & Hand, K. (2020). Families in Australia Survey: Life During COVID-19. Report no. 5: What we did during lockdown. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Baxter, J., & Warren, D. (2021). Families in Australia Survey: Towards COVID Normal. Report no. 2: Employment and work-family balance in 2020. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bowden, M. (2020). Identifying and responding to food insecurity in Australia (CFCA Practice Guide). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bowden, M. (2020). Understanding food insecurity in Australia (CFCA Paper No. 55). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Bowden, M., & Johnson, S. (2020). Support during COVID-19 survey: What you told us . CFCA short article.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 98

Bowden, M., & Johnson, S. (2021). Understanding common approaches to working with clients, communities and other stakeholders. CFCA short article.

Budinski, M., Baxter, J., Carroll, M., & Hand, K. (2020). Families in Australia Survey: Life During COVID-19. Report no. 3: Help and support. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Budinski, M., Baxter, J., Carroll, M., & Hand, K. (2020). Families in Australia Survey: Life During COVID-19. Report no. 4: Dads spend more quality time with kids . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Carroll, M., Budinski, M., Warren, D., Baxter, J., & Harvey, J. (2021). Families in Australia Survey: Towards COVID Normal. Report no. 1: Connection to family, friends and the community . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Carroll, M., Hand, K., Budinski, M., & Baxter, J. (2020). Families in Australia Survey: Life During COVID-19. Report no. 2: Staying connected when we’re apart . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Carroll, M., Warren, D., Baxter, J. A., & Hand, K. (2020). The good, the bad and the lonely: How coronavirus changed Australian family life. The Conversation .

Carson, R. (2020). What is effective professional practice from the perspective of children and young people? (Children's Participation in Decisions That Affect Them). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Child Family Community Australia. (2020). CFCA in 2020: Supporting the sector through a year like no other. CFCA short article.

Chung, D., Humphreys, C., Campbell, A., Diemer, K., Gallant, D., & Spiteri-Staines, A. (2020). Fathering programs in the context of domestic and family violence (CFCA Paper No. 56). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Daraganova, G., & Quinn, B. (2020). Insights no. 1: Findings from Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 2013-16 . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

El-Murr, A. (2021). Building a positive evaluation culture: Key considerations for managers in the families and children services sector. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Evans-Whipp, T. (2021). Promoting adequate sleep in young people . CFCA short article.

Evans-Whipp, T. (2021). Teenagers’ experiences of discrimination (Growing Up in Australia Snapshot Series No. 1). Melbourne: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Families and Children Expert Panel Project. (2021). Evaluation of the second phase of the Families and Children Expert Panel Project . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Goldsworthy, K. (2020). What is evaluation? Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Hand, K., Baxter, J., Carroll, M., & Budinski, M. (2020). Families in Australia Survey: Life During COVID-19. Report no. 1: Early findings . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Herbert, J. (2021). Factors influencing therapy use following a disclosure of child sexual abuse (CFCA Paper No. 59). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Herbert, J. (2021). Rates of therapy use following a disclosure of child sexual abuse (CFCA Paper No. 58). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Hervatin, M. (2020). Practical strategies for engaging children in a practice setting (Children's Participation in Decisions That Affect Them). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Hervatin, M. (2020). Supporting children's participation through shared decision-making in child mental health care (Children's Participation in Decisions That Affect Them). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Higgins, D. J., & Dean, A. (2020). Ensuring all children get the best start in life: A population approach to early intervention and prevention . CFCA short article.

Hing, N., O'Mullan, C., Nuske, E., Breen, H., Mainey, L., Taylor, A. et al. (2020). The relationship between gambling and intimate partner violence against women (Research Report No. 21). Sydney: ANROWS.

Appendices 99

Jenkinson, R., Sakata, K., Khokhar, T., Tajin, R., & Jatkar, U. (2020). Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 (AGRC Research Summary). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Gambling Research Centre Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Johnson, S. (2021). Evaluation design . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Joshi, A. (2021). Creating environments to support young children's development . CFCA short article.

Joshi, A. (2021). Responding to increasing and changing client needs in crises. CFCA short article.

Joshi, A., Alla, K., & Joss, N. (2021). Using research to answer practice questions. CFCA short article.

Joshi, A., & Joss, N. (2021). Creating an organisational culture for evidence-informed practice. CFCA short article.

Joshi, A., Paterson, N., Hinkley, T., & Joss, N. (2021). The use of telepractice in the family and relationship services sector (CFCA Paper No. 57). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

MacKenzie, D., Hand, T., & Dean, A. (2020). Early intervention strategies to prevent youth homelessness. CFCA short article.

Merkouris, S. S., Greenwood, C. J., Youssef, G. J., Letcher, P., Vassallo, S., Dowling, N. A. et al. (2021). Adult gambling problems and histories of mental health and substance use: Findings from a prospective multi-wave Australian cohort study. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 10 (7), 1406.

O’Connor, M., Romaniuk, H., Gray, S., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Do risk factors for adolescent internalising difficulties differ depending on childhood internalising experiences? Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology , Advance online publication.

Paterson, N. (2020). Children's participation in decision-making processes in the child protection system: Key considerations for organisations and practitioners (Children’s Participation in Decisions That Affect Them). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Paterson, N., & Farrugia, C. (2020). Experiences of food insecurity for Australian women and children affected by domestic and family violence. CFCA short article.

Paterson, N., & Hunter, C. (2020). An overview of child participation key issues for organisations and practitioners (Children’s Participation in Decisions That Affect Them). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Paterson, N., Price-Robertson, R., & Hervatin, M. (2021). Working with separating parents to support children’s wellbeing what can we learn from evidence-based programs (Practice paper / Emerging Minds). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Qu, L. (2020). Couple relationships (Australian Families Then & Now). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L. (2020). Having children (Australian Families Then & Now). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L. (2020). Households and families (Australian Families Then & Now). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Qu, L., & Weston, R. (2021). Financial journeys of Australian parents after separation: Transitions into and out of poverty. Australian Journal of Social Issues, 56(1), 54-77.

Quinn, B. (2021). Alcohol use and related harm among adolescent males. CFCA short article.

Quinn, B., Swami, N., Terhaag, S., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Alcohol use among Australian males. In G. Daraganova & B. Quinn (Eds.), Insights no. 1: Findings from Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 2013-16 (pp. 29-46). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Quinn, B., Ward, B., Agius, P. A., Jenkinson, R., Hickman, M., Sutton, K. et al. (2020). A prospective cohort of people who use methamphetamine in Melbourne and non-metropolitan Victoria, Australia: Baseline characteristics and correlates of methamphetamine dependence. Drug and Alcohol Review, Advance online publication.

Smart, J. (2020). How to review the evidence: A simple guide to conducting a literature review . Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 100

Smart, J. (2020). Providing care and support to individuals with a forced adoption experience: Key considerations . Canberra, ACT: Australian Dept. of Social Services.

Swami, N. (2021). S ervice use and health outcomes among parents with children or a partner with disability . CFCA short article.

Swami, N., Quinn, B., Terhaag, S., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Overweight and obesity among Australian males. In G. Daraganova & B. Quinn (Eds.), Insights no. 1: Findings from Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health , 2013-16 (pp. 47-62). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Swami, N., Terhaag, S., Quinn, B., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Health literacy and health service use among Australian men. In G. Daraganova & B. Quinn (Eds.), Insights no. 1: Findings from Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 2013-16 (pp. 63-82). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Tajin, R., Sakata, K., Khokhar, T., & Jenkinson, R. (2021). Gambling participation and at-risk behaviour in problem gambling among Victorian adults (AGRC Research Summary). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Gambling Research Centre, Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Terhaag, S. (2020). Suicidality and help seeking in Australian young people . CFCA short article.

Terhaag, S., Fitzsimons, E., Daraganova, G., & Patalay, P. (2021). Sex, ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities and trajectories in child and adolescent mental health in Australia and the UK: Findings from national prospective longitudinal studies. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry , Advanced online publication.

Terhaag, S., Quinn, B., Swami, N., & Daraganova, G. (2020). Mental health of Australian males: Depression, suicidality and loneliness. In G. Daraganova & B. Quinn (Eds.), Insights no. 1: Findings from Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health , 2013-16 (pp. 1-28). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Tyndale, J., Amos, J., & Price-Robertson, R. (2020). Supporting children and families: How does co-design invite us to think differently? (Practice Paper). Hilton, SA: Emerging Minds.

Ward, B., Kippen, R., Reupert, A., Maybery, D., Agius, P. A., Quinn, B. et al. (2020). Parent and child co-resident status among an Australian community-based sample of methamphetamine smokers. Drug and Alcohol Review, Advance online publication.

Warren, D. (2020). Income and wealth (Australian Families Then & Now). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., Baxter, J., & Hand, K. (2020). Families in Australia Survey: Life During COVID-19. Report no. 6: Financial wellbeing and COVID-19. Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies

Warren, D., & Qu, L. (2020). Housing (Australian Families Then & Now). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Warren, D., Qu, L., & Baxter, J. (2020). How we worked (Australian Families Then & Now). Southbank, Vic.: Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Updated CFCA resource sheets

Age of consent laws (May 2021)

Helplines, telephone and online counselling services for children, young people and adults (April 2021)

Pre-employment screening: Working With Children Checks and police checks (June 2021)

Appendices 101

Events and webinars

Families in Focus webinar series

Kelly Hand, AIFS. Findings from the Families in Australia Survey: Life during COVID-19 , 2 July 2020.

Anne Hollonds and Rachel Carson, AIFS; Lesley Taylor, NAPCAN. Why is it important to hear the voices of children and young people in research? 15 September 2020.

CFCA webinar series

Cathy Humphreys, Monash University; Emma Rogers, Steven Lock and Jackie Wruck, Queensland Government Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women. Invisible practices: Working with fathers who use violence, 22 July 2020.

Frank Oberklaid, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute; Anthea Rhodes, Royal Children’s Hospital; Rhys Price-Robertson, AIFS. Words matter: Getting the language of child mental health right, 12 August 2020.

Nat Kendall-Taylor, Frameworks Institute; Annette Michaux, Parenting Research Centre; Vikki Leone, Centre for Community Child Health; Victoria Parker, Logan Together. Words matter: How to use frames effectively to advance child mental health, 26 August 2020.

Louise La Sala, Orygen; Emily Boubis, headspace. Working together to prevent youth suicide: The power of communication, 28 October 2020.

Debbie Scott, Turning Point; Shalini Arunogiri, Turning Point; Emma Bergwever, Queensland Government, Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women. Working together to support families where a parent uses alcohol and/or other drugs, 25 November 2020.

Sue Kleve, Monash University; Sarah Pennell, Foodbank Australia; Margaret Drivata, Gippsland Lakes Community Health. Families and food: Identifying and responding to food insecurity , 9 December 2020 and 27 January 2021.

Jo Barraket, Swinburne University; Annette Michaux, Parenting Research Centre; Kathryn Bannister, Red Cross. The digital divide and remote service delivery , 24 February 2021.

Lottie Turner, Health Justice Australia; Marika Maniodakis, Eastern Community Legal Centre. How to break down barriers to collaboration and create meaningful partnerships, 10 March 2021.

Helen Christensen, University of Technology Sydney; Deng Lual, Centre for Culture Ethnicity and Health; Emanuel Braz, North Richmond Community Health. Engaging with multicultural communities to understand and respond to their needs, 31 March 2021.

Nicole Scott; Vikki Ryall, headspace; Adam Bourne, Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society. The social and emotional wellbeing of LGBTIQA+ young people , 28 April 2021.

Michael Currie, Benevolent Society; Martin Greller, Kym Langill and Julie Nelson, Mercy Community; Glenda Jone-Terare and Kevin Maund, Kurbingi. Advancing partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, 16 June 2021.

Heather Nancarrow, ANROWS; Hayley Boxall, Australian Institute of Criminology; Emma Rogers and Jackie Wruck, Queensland Government, Department of Child Safety, Youth and Women. The power in understanding patterns of coercive control, 23 June 2021.

CFCA-Emerging Minds webinar series

Craig Rigney, Kornar Winmil Yunti; Rachel Abdulla; Tania Sansbury. (2020). Responding to family violence in First Nations families to support children’s social and emotional wellbeing , 9 September 2020.

Monya Murch, Relationships Australia; Rebecca Jenkinson, Australian Gambling Research Centre; Christine. (2020). Families and gambling: Helping parents and improving outcomes for children, 14 October 2020.

Trish Burden, Unity Housing; Leeann Lenane and Rowan Sweeney, Statewide Children’s Resource Program. (2020). Families and homelessness: Supporting parents and improving outcomes for children, 10 February 2021.

Sarah McLean, Emerging Minds; Chris (2020). What is the social model of disability and why is it important in child mental health? 12 May 2021.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 102

CFCA-Expert Panel webinar series

Stewart Muir, AIFS; Ilan Katz, UNSW; Delwyn Goodrick; Sulabha Pawar, The Smith Family. Working with evaluators: What do you need to know? 19 November, 2020.

Presentations

Andalon, M., & Swami, N. (2021, February). Wellbeing of parents living with family members with disability . Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies snack sized research showcase, for papers originally planned for presentation at the 2020 AIFS Conference, online.

Balvin, N. (2021, March). Evidence synthesis for practitioners working in child mental health in Australia. Paper presented at the Evidence and Implementation Summit, online.

Bandara, D. K. (2020, November). Consent to data linkage in LSAC. Paper presented at the International Population Data Linkage Network (IPDLN) Virtual Conference ‘Data Linkage: Information to Impact’, online.

Bowden, M., McNamara, D., & Arnold, S. (2020, November). Identifying and responding to food insecurity in local settings . Paper presented at the Australian Neighbourhood Houses and Centres Association ‘Sustainable Development Goals Webinar Series’, online.

Carson, R. (2020, November). ‘Give children a bigger voice, more of the time’: Findings from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Project. Paper presented at the Western Australian Family Law Pathways Network Conference, online.

Carson, R. (2021, March). Listening to children and young people in family law research . Paper presented at the Evidence and Implementation Summit, online.

Carson, R. (2021, May). ‘Give children a bigger voice, more of the time’: Findings from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Project. Paper presented at the Gippsland Doing Family Law Pathways Annual Network Event, Yinnar Vic.

Carson, R. (2021, June). What is effective professional practice from the perspective of children and young people? Findings from the Children and Young People in Separated Families Project. Paper presented at the Child Inclusive Practice Forum, online.

Carson, R., Rathus, Z., & Bots, C. (2021, March). Family law and children . Paper presented at the Panel discussion presented on the ABC Radio National Big Ideas program, as part of the Justice in Focus series.

Daraganova, G., & Jessup, K. (2020, October). Introducing Australian longitudinal studies of children, males and refugees. Paper presented at the Longitudinal Studies International Showcase, 10th Anniversary of the Society of Lifecourse and Longitudinal Studies, online.

Greer, N. (2020, November). Insights into esports. Youth/young adults webinar series. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Lunchtime Learning Series, online.

Hand, K. (2020, July). The impact of COVID-19 on relationships in Australian families. Paper presented at the Asian Families Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic Webinar, Singapore.

Hand, K. (2020, October). Understanding the impacts of COVID-19 on the lives of Australian families. Paper presented at the Australasian Human Development Association Conference ‘Breaking the isolation barrier: Reconnecting through research on human development across the lifespan’, online.

Hand, K. (2021, April). COVID impacts on Australian families’ life and wellbeing: Findings from the Families in Australia Survey . Paper presented at the Society for Research in Child Development 2021 Virtual Biennial Meeting, online.

Hateley-Browne, J. (2021, March). Implementation science has an implementation problem: Capacity-building in the child and family services sector. Paper presented at the Evidence and Implementation Summit, online.

Haynes, K. (2021, March). Families and Children Outcomes Framework review. Paper presented at the ‘What We Have Heard So Far’ Online Provider Forum, hosted by Family and Relationship Services Australia for the Australian Department of Social Services, online.

Appendices 103

Hervatin, M. (2021, March). Supporting practitioners to engage and include children through translating evidence into ‘practice ready’ resources. Paper presented at the Evidence and Implementation Summit, online.

Hervatin, M. (2021, June). Supporting practitioners to include children in decision making processes: Strategies and approaches for engaging children in a practice setting to support their participation. Paper presented at the Child Inclusive Practice Forum, online.

Hollonds, A., Lewis, N., Lawrie, A., Mohamed, J., & Pettit, C. (2020, September). Transforming outcomes for First Nations children. Paper presented at the National Child Protection Week webinar, co-hosted with the Australian and New Zealand Children's Commissioners and Guardians, online.

Jatkar, U., Jenkinson, R., Greer, N., & Hing, N. (2021, February). Practitioner experiences in working with clients affected by gambling -related intimate partner violence (IPV). Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies snack sized research showcase, for papers originally planned for presentation at the 2020 AIFS Conference, online.

Jenkinson, R. (2020, September). Gambling in Australia during COVID-19: Preliminary findings . Paper presented at the Australian Department of Social Services and the National Consumer Protection Framework Implementation Governance Committee, online.

Jenkinson, R. (2021, June). Gambling in Australia during COVID-19: Research findings and implications for practice. Paper presented at the Australian and New Zealand Addiction Conference, Gold Coast Qld.

Jenkinson, R., Sakata, K., Tajin, R., & Greer, N. (2021, March). Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on the gambling environment. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation webinar series, online.

Jenkinson, R., & Warren, D. (2020, September). Gambling activity among teens and young adults in Australia. Paper presented at the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation webinar series, online.

Kaspiew, R. (2020, October). Elder abuse: An introduction to the National Research Program and an overview of key insights from the international research. Paper presented at the COTA WA Vulnerable Seniors Webinar, online.

Mayes, A., Lawrie, A., Carson, R., Kaspiew, R., Rogers, M., & Kilpatrick, R. (2021, March). Raising the status of children as victims and survivors of domestic and family violence in their own right [Panel session]. Paper presented at the ANROWS National Conference ‘Evidence in Action’, online.

Muir, S., Vale, C., & Jones, S. (2021, June). Strategies to Better Support Foster, Kinship and Permanent Carers (STBSC): Early findings . Paper presented at the Paper presented to the Australian Government Department of Social Service, online.

Patalay, P., & Terhaag, S. (2021, March). Childhood mental health in Australia and the UK: Comparative findings from two national cohort studies. Paper presented at the Society for Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies seminar series, online.

Paterson, N. (2020, September). Working together to keep children and families safe: Strategies for developing collaborative competencies. Paper presented at the North Queensland Child Protection Symposium, online.

Qu, L. (2021, June). Parental separation and complex family needs . Paper presented at the 6th Consortium of Institutes on Families in the Asian Region (CIFA) Regional Symposium ‘Family First: Supporting Asian Families in the Era of Inclusive Growth’, online.

Quinn, B. (2021, February). Alcohol and other substance use among adult Australian males. Paper presented at the Presentation included in the Australian Institute of Family Studies snack sized research showcase, for papers originally planned for presentation at the 2020 AIFS Conference.

Quinn, B. (2021, May). What is men's health literacy and why does it matter? Paper presented at the Men's Health Connected Online Gathering, online.

Read, S., Georgatos, G., Ahmed, T., & Hand, K. (2020, September). Saving our kids: Preventing youth suicide . Paper presented at the Panel discussion hosted by the Australian Intercultural Society, online.

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 104

Renda, J., & Wild, M. (2020, December). Bringing life back into a longitudinal sample: Addressing issues with contact and engagement. Paper presented at the 7th Australian Consortium of Social and Political Research Incorporated (ACSPRI) Social Science Methodology Conference, online.

Slewa-Younan, S., Rioseco, P., Guajardo, M. G. U., & Mondr, J. (2021, February). Are former refugees getting the mental health help they need? Findings from the ‘Building a New Life in Australia’ survey . Paper presented at the Presentation included in the Australian Institute of Family Studies snack sized research showcase, for papers originally planned for presentation at the 2020 AIFS Conference, online.

Swami, N. (2021, May). Health literacy and health service use among Australian men. Paper presented at the Men's Health Connected Online Gathering, online.

Swami, N., Warren, D., & Daraganova, G. (2021, February). Pornography viewing patterns among Australian adolescents and associations with engaging in unwanted sexual behaviours . Paper presented at the Australian Institute of Family Studies snack sized research showcase, for papers originally planned for presentation at the 2020 AIFS Conference, online.

Taylor, T., Duffy, J., Renda, J., Jessup, K., & Daraganova, G. (2020, December). Staying longitudinal in lockdown: How two large-scale, national panel studies are responding to COVID-19. Paper presented at the 7th Australian Consortium of Social and Political Research Incorporated (ACSPRI) Social Science Methodology Conference, online.

Vassallo, S., Warren, D., Daraganova, G., & Gasser, C. (2021, February). Adolescent delinquent behaviour: Are predictors different for males and females? Paper presented at the Presentation included in the Australian Institute of Family Studies snack sized research showcase, for papers originally planned for presentation at the 2020 AIFS Conference, online.

Wangmann, J., Kaspiew, R., Turner, T., Lynch, A., Carmichael, J., & Dragiewicz, M. (2021, May). Safety in the Family Court . Paper presented at the Expert panel session hosted by Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety (ANROWS), online.

Warren, D., Baxter, J., & Hand, K. (2020, December). How older Australians are coping with the financial impact of COVID-19: Evidence from the Families in Australia Survey . Paper presented at the 28th Colloquium on Pensions and Retirement Research, online.

Submissions

The Institute prepares submissions to inquiries and responds to requests for consultation. Such activity is an indication of the Institute’s involvement in the policy and research process.

In 2020/21, the Institute made the following submissions:

ƒ Submission to the Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs inquiry into family, domestic and sexual violence (July 2020)

ƒ Submission to the NDS and NDIS Outcomes Frameworks Public Consultation (December 2020)

ƒ Submission to the draft National Children's Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy (February 2021)

ƒ Submission to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee ‘Inquiry Interactive Gambling Amendment (Prohibition on Credit Card Use) Bill 2020’ (May 2021)

Appendices 105

Appendix D: Acronyms and abbreviations

Table D1: Acronyms and abbreviations

Acronym or abbreviation Description

AASB Australian Accounting Standards Board

ABS Australian Bureau of Statistics

ACCOs Aboriginal Controlled Community Organisations

ADF Australian Defence Force

AGD Attorney -General’s Department

AGRC Australian Gambling Research Centre

AIFS Australian Institute of Family Studies

AIHW Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

ANAO Australian National Audit Office

ANROWS Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety

APS Australian Public Service

BCP Business Continuity Plan

BNLA Building a New Life in Australia

CADRE Coordinated Access for Data, Research and Environments

CATI Computer Assisted Telephone Interview

CFCA Child Family Community Australia

CFC Child and Family Centre

CHM Child mental health

COVID-19 Coronavirus

CSS Commonwealth Superannuation Scheme

DCB Departmental Capital Budget

DCJ Department of Communities and Justice

DESE Department of Education, Skills and Employment

DoH Department of Health

DSS Department of Social Services

DVA Department of Veterans’ Affairs

EGM Electronic gambling machine

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 106

Acronym or abbreviation Description

FaC Families and Children

FBT Fringe Benefits Tax

FOI Act Freedom of Information Act 1982

FRR Financial Reporting Rule

FVOCI Fair Value Through Other Comprehensive Income

FVTPL Financial Assets at Fair Value Through Profit or Loss

GST Goods and Services Tax

GGS General Government Sector

HWT Herald and Weekly Times

IPAA Institute of Public Administration Australia

IPS Information Publication Scheme

KMP Key Management Personnel

KTI Knowledge Translation and Impact

LSAC Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

MCEC Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre

MP Member of Parliament

NABERS National Australian Built Environment Rating System

NEAPS National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study

NGRS National Gambling Reporting System

NWC National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health

OPA Official Public Account

PBS Portfolio Budget Statements

PDR Performance, Development and Review program

PGPA Act Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013

PSPF Protective Security Policy Framework

PSS Public Sector Superannuation Scheme

PSSap PSS accumulation plan

QFCC Queensland Family and Child Commission

RMO Reform Management Office

Continued on next page

Appendices 107

Acronym or abbreviation Description

ROU Right of Use

SES Senior Executive Service

SME Small and medium enterprises

SNAICC Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care

SOETM Services for Other Entities and Trust Moneys Special accounts

SPPI Solely payments of principal and interest

SPRC Social Policy Research Centre

TEI Targeted Early Intervention

TTM Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health

UK United Kingdom

UNSW University of New South Wales

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 108

Appendix E: List of requirements

The Annual Report is prepared in accordance with the Requirements for Annual Reports approved by the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit. This index refers to mandatory and suggested reporting items.

Table E1: Mandatory and suggested reporting items

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AD(g) Letter of transmittal

17AI iii A copy of the letter of transmittal signed and dated by

accountable authority on date final text approved, with statement that the report has been prepared in accordance with section 46 of the Act and any enabling legislation that specifies additional requirements in relation to the annual report.

Mandatory

17AD(h) Aids to access

17AJ(a) v Table of contents Mandatory

17AJ(b) 115 Alphabetical index Mandatory

17AJ(c) 106 Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms Mandatory

17AJ(d) 109 List of requirements Mandatory

17AJ(e) ii Details of contact officer Mandatory

17AJ(f) ii Entity’s website address Mandatory

17AJ(g) ii Electronic address of report Mandatory

17AD(a) Review by accountable authority

17AD(a) 2 A review by the accountable authority of the entity. Mandatory

17AD(b) Overview of the entity

17AE(1)(a)(i) 10 A description of the role and functions of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(ii) 11 A description of the organisational structure of the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iii) 12 A description of the outcomes and programmes administered by the entity. Mandatory

17AE(1)(a)(iv) iv A description of the purposes of the entity as included in corporate plan. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(i) 11 Name of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 109

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AE(1)(aa)(ii) 11 Position title of the accountable authority or each member of the accountable authority. Mandatory

17AE(1)(aa)(iii) 11 Period as the accountable authority or member of the accountable authority within the reporting period. Mandatory

17AE(1)(b) N/A An outline of the structure of the portfolio of the entity. Portfolio

departments - mandatory

17AE(2) N/A Where the outcomes and programs administered by the entity differ from any Portfolio Budget Statement, Portfolio Additional Estimates Statement or other portfolio estimates statement that was prepared for the entity for the period, include details of variation and reasons for change.

If applicable, mandatory

17AD(c) Report on the performance of the entity

Annual performance statements

17AD(c)(i); 16F 22 Annual performance statement in accordance with paragraph 39(1)(b) of the Act and section 16F of the Rule. Mandatory

17AD(c)(ii) Report on financial performance

17AF(1)(a) 38 A discussion and analysis of the entity’s financial performance. Mandatory

17AF(1)(b) 39 A table summarising the total resources and total payments of the entity. Mandatory

17AF(2) N/A If there may be significant changes in the financial results during or after the previous or current reporting period, information on those changes, including: the cause of any operating loss of the entity; how the entity has responded to the loss and the actions that have been taken in relation to the loss; and any matter or circumstances that it can reasonably be anticipated will have a significant impact on the entity’s future operation or financial results.

If applicable, mandatory

17AD(d) Management and accountability

Corporate governance

17AG(2)(a) 42 Information on compliance with section 10 (fraud systems). Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(i) 42 A certification by accountable authority that fraud risk assessments and fraud control plans have been prepared. Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(ii) 42 A certification by accountable authority that appropriate mechanisms for preventing, detecting incidents of, investigating or otherwise dealing with, and recording or reporting fraud that meet the specific needs of the entity are in place.

Mandatory

17AG(2)(b)(iii) 42 A certification by accountable authority that all reasonable measures have been taken to deal appropriately with fraud relating to the entity.

Mandatory

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 110

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(2)(c) 42 An outline of structures and processes in place for the entity to implement principles and objectives of corporate governance. Mandatory

17AG(2)(d)-(e) N/A A statement of significant issues reported to Minister under paragraph 19(1)(e) of the Act that relates to non-compliance with Finance law and action taken to remedy non-compliance.

If applicable, mandatory

Audit committee

17AG(2A)(a) 43 A direct electronic address of the charter determining the functions of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(b) 43 The name of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(c) 43 The qualifications, knowledge, skills or experience of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(d) 43 Information about the attendance of each member of the entity’s audit committee at committee meetings. Mandatory

17AG(2A)(e) 43 The remuneration of each member of the entity’s audit committee. Mandatory

External scrutiny

17AG(3) 46 Information on the most significant developments in external scrutiny and the entity's response to the scrutiny. Mandatory

17AG(3)(a) N/A Information on judicial decisions and decisions of administrative tribunals and by the Australian Information Commissioner that may have a significant effect on the operations of the entity.

If applicable, mandatory

17AG(3)(b) N/A Information on any reports on operations of the entity by the Auditor-General (other than report under section 43 of the Act), a Parliamentary Committee, or the Commonwealth Ombudsman.

If applicable, mandatory

17AG(3)(c) N/A Information on any capability reviews on the entity that were released during the period. If applicable, mandatory

Management of human resources

17AG(4)(a) 47 An assessment of the entity’s effectiveness in managing and developing employees to achieve entity objectives. Mandatory

17AG(4)(aa) 49-50 Statistics on the entity’s employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis, including the following:

(a) statistics on full-time employees

(b) statistics on part-time employees

(c) statistics on gender

(d) statistics on staff location

Mandatory

Continued on next page

Appendices 111

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(4)(b) 49-50 Statistics on the entity’s APS employees on an ongoing and non-ongoing basis; including the following:

ƒ statistics on staffing classification level

ƒ statistics on full-time employees

ƒ statistics on part-time employees

ƒ statistics on gender

ƒ statistics on staff location

ƒ statistics on employees who identify as Indigenous.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c) 50 Information on any enterprise agreements, individual flexibility arrangements, Australian workplace agreements, common law contracts and determinations under subsection 24(1) of the Public Service Act 1999.

Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(i) 50 Information on the number of SES and non-SES employees covered by agreements etc. identified in paragraph 17AG(4)(c). Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(ii) 50 The salary ranges available for APS employees by classification level. Mandatory

17AG(4)(c)(iii) 50 A description of non-salary benefits provided to employees. Mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(i) N/A Information on the number of employees at each classification level who received performance pay. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(ii) N/A Information on aggregate amounts of performance pay at each classification level. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iii) N/A Information on the average amount of performance payment, and range of such payments, at each classification level. If applicable, mandatory

17AG(4)(d)(iv) N/A Information on aggregate amount of performance payments. If applicable, mandatory

Assets management

17AG(5) N/A An assessment of effectiveness of assets management where asset management is a significant part of the entity’s activities. If applicable, mandatory

Purchasing

17AG(6) 52 An assessment of entity performance against the Commonwealth Procurement Rules. Mandatory

Reportable consultancy contracts

17AG(7)(a) 52 A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

Continued on next page

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 112

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

17AG(7)(b) 52 A statement that ‘During [reporting period], [specified number] new consultancy contracts were entered into involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]. In addition, [specified number] ongoing consultancy contracts were active during the period, involving total actual expenditure of $[specified million]’.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(c) 52 A summary of the policies and procedures for selecting and engaging consultants and the main categories of purposes for which consultants were selected and engaged.

Mandatory

17AG(7)(d) 52 A statement that ‘Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.’

Mandatory

Reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AG(7A)(a) 52 A summary statement detailing the number of new contracts engaging consultants entered into during the period; the total actual expenditure on all new consultancy contracts entered into during the period (inclusive of GST); the number of ongoing consultancy contracts that were entered into during a previous reporting period; and the total actual expenditure in the reporting year on the ongoing consultancy contracts (inclusive of GST).

Mandatory

17AG(7A)(b) 52 A statement that ‘Annual reports contain information about actual expenditure on reportable non-consultancy contracts. Information on the value of reportable non-consultancy contracts is available on the AusTender website.’

Mandatory

17AD(daa) Additional information about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts

17AGA 53 Additional information, in accordance with section 17AGA, about organisations receiving amounts under reportable consultancy contracts or reportable non-consultancy contracts.

Mandatory

Australian National Audit Office Access Clauses

17AG(8) N/A If an entity entered into a contract with a value of more than $100,000 (inclusive of GST) and the contract did not provide the Auditor-General with access to the contractor’s premises, the report must include the name of the contractor, purpose and value of the contract, and the reason why a clause allowing access was not included in the contract.

If applicable, mandatory

Exempt contracts

17AG(9) N/A If an entity entered into a contract or there is a standing offer with a value greater than $10,000 (inclusive of GST) which has been exempted from being published in AusTender because it would disclose exempt matters under the FOI Act, the annual report must include a statement that the contract or standing offer has been exempted, and the value of the contract or standing offer, to the extent that doing so does not disclose the exempt matters.

If applicable, mandatory

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Appendices 113

PGPA Rule Reference

Part of Report Description Requirement

Small business

17AG(10)(a) 54 A statement that ‘[Name of entity] supports small business participation in the Commonwealth Government procurement market. Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) and Small Enterprise participation statistics are available on the Department of Finance’s website.’

Mandatory

17AG(10)(b) 54 An outline of the ways in which the procurement practices of the entity support small and medium enterprises. Mandatory

17AG(10)(c) N/A If the entity is considered by the Department administered by the Finance Minister as material in nature - a statement that ‘[Name of entity] recognises the importance of ensuring that small businesses are paid on time. The results of the Survey of Australian Government Payments to Small Business are available on the Treasury’s website.’

If applicable, mandatory

Financial statements

17AD(e) 55 Inclusion of the annual financial statements in accordance with subsection 43(4) of the Act. Mandatory

Executive remuneration

17AD(da) 84 Information about executive remuneration in accordance with Subdivision C of Division 3A of Part 2-3 of the Rule Mandatory

17AD(f) Other mandatory information

17AH(1)(a)(i) N/A If the entity conducted advertising campaigns, a statement that ‘During [reporting period], the [name of entity] conducted the following advertising campaigns: [name of advertising campaigns undertaken]. Further information on those advertising campaigns is available at [address of entity’s website] and in the reports on Australian Government advertising prepared by the Department of Finance. Those reports are available on the Department of Finance’s website.’

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(a)(ii) 94 If the entity did not conduct advertising campaigns, a statement to that effect. If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(b) N/A A statement that ‘Information on grants awarded by [name of entity] during [reporting period] is available at [address of entity’s website].’

If applicable, mandatory

17AH(1)(c) 94 Outline of mechanisms of disability reporting, including reference to website for further information. Mandatory

17AH(1)(d) 95 Website reference to where the entity’s Information Publication Scheme statement pursuant to Part II of FOI Act can be found. Mandatory

17AH(1)(e) N/A Correction of material errors in previous annual report. If applicable, mandatory

17AH(2) 94 Information required by other legislation. Mandatory

Note: N/A = not applicable

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 114

© GettyImages/Lisa5201

Seven —

Index

Index 115

accountability, 41-54 achievements, 20-1 activities, 24-5 advertising and market research, 94 advisory groups, 43 agency overview, 9-18 agency resource statements, 96-7 agreements, employment, 50 assets management, 52-3 assets, 39, 74-7, 92 audit, internal, 45 Auditor’s Report, 56-7 Australian Gambling Research Centre (AGRC),

4, 11-12, 17 Australian Military and Veterans’ Families Study, 5, 15 Australian National Audit Office access clauses, 54 Australia’s National Research Organisation for

Women’s Safety (ANROWS), 4, 13, 17

balance sheet, 39 budgeted expenses, 39, 97 beneficiaries, 23 Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal

Study of Humanitarian Migrants (BNLA), 18 Building effective partnerships between mainstream providers and Aboriginal Controlled Community

Organisations (ACCOs), 14 business continuity, 42, 45

carers, 15 case studies, impact, 30-4 cash flow statement, 65-6 CFCA-Emerging Minds webinar series, 102 CFCA resource sheets, 34, 101 CFCA stakeholder improvement, 34 CFCA webinar series, 102 change, theory of, 22-3 Child and Family Evidence program, 12, 16 Child Care Package Evaluation, 4, 12-13 Child Family Community Australia (CFCA), 6, 16, 34 child mental health, 16 collaboration, 20, 26-7, 37 collective agreements, 50 commissioning bodies, 54 committees, 42-6, 48 communicating research, 6 Compliance with and Enforcement of Family Law

Parenting Orders, 13

conferences, 6, 8, 10, 12, 21, 29, 33, 35, 37, 48, 103-5 consultants, 52-3 contact details, ii, 95 contracts, 52-4 corporate and statutory reporting, 44 corporate governance, 42 Corporate Plan, 10, 12 Corporate Services, 11, 42 COVID-19 pandemic, 2-7, 12-15, 17-18, 26, 32-3,

36-8, 45, 48, 94

data linkage and integration, 18 deliverables, 12 direct influence, 24 Director’s review, 1-8 disability reporting, 94-5 diversity and inclusion, 50

ecologically sustainable development and environmental performance, 4, 94 Early Intervention Evidence and Evaluation Fund, 14-15 Elder Abuse Prevalence Study, National, 4, 13 Emerging Minds webinar series, 102 Emerging Minds: National Workforce Centre for

Child Mental Health, 16 employee skills and qualifications, 47 employees see management of human resources employment agreements, 50 e-News, 21, 28-9 environmental performance, 94 ethical standards, 43, 46 events, 6, 102-3 Executive Group, 43 exempt contracts, 54 expenses, 38-9, 70-1, 97 external scrutiny, 46

Families and Children Expert Panel, 14 Families and Society program, 12-13 Families Framework, 10, 20 Families in Australia Survey, 3, 8, 12, 35-6 Families in Focus webinar series, 102 Family Law Act 1975, 10, 13, 42 Family Law and Family Violence program, 12-13 Family Policy and Service Systems program, 12, 14 finances, 7 financial activities, report on performance, 38-9 financial statements, 55-92

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 116

fraud control, 42 Freedom of Information Act 1982, 95

Gambling in Australia during COVID-19 Study, 4, 17, 32-3 Gambling in Victoria Study, 4, 17 Gambling Measures Act 2012, 11 goals, 23, 25 governance committees, 43 governance, corporate, 42 Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of

Australian Children (LSAC), 5, 8, 17

health and safety, 48, 94 Health and Safety Committee, 48 Human Research Ethics Committee, 43-4 human resources, management of, 47-50 humanitarian migrants, 18

Identifying Strategies to Better Support Foster, Kinship and Permanent Carers, 15 impact case studies, 32-4 impacts, 8, 20-34 Independent Auditor’s Report, 56-7 indirect influence, 23-4 individual and collective agreements, 50 Information Publication Scheme, 95 initiatives, strategic, 35-7 inputs, 24-5 internal audit, 45

Key Management Personnel, 84 key performance criteria, 12 key research activities, 12 knowledge communication, 20, 26 knowledge creation, 20 knowledge translation, 6, 8, 30, 35, 37

learning and development, 21, 26-7, 47 liabilities, 39, 79, 92 lifecourse studies, 12, 17 list of requirements, 109-14 Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies, 12-17 Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC),

5, 8, 17

management and accountability, 41-54 management of human resources, 47-50 management, assets, 52-3

mandatory and suggested reporting items, 109-14 mandatory information, 94-5 market research, 94 media engagement, 10, 28-9, 33 mental health, child, 16

National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study, 4, 13 National Gambling Reporting System, 17 net asset position, 39 Northern Territory Child and Family Centres,

Evaluation of, 14 notes to and forming part of the financial statements, 67-92

operating expenses, 38 operating results, 38 operating revenue, 38 organisational activation, 20 organisational capability, 20, 21, 24-5, 27-9, 47 organisational culture, 20-1, 46 organisational structure, 11 Outcome 1, 22, 39, 97 outcome and program structure, 12-18 outcomes, 14-16, 20, 23-31, 34, 44, 96-7 outlook for 2021/22, 8 outputs, 24-6, 33 overview, agency, 9-18

partnerships, 20, 26-7 performance, output, 26 performance, report on, 19-39 performance against strategic initiatives, 35-7 performance criteria, 12 performance framework, 20, 22, 24-5 performance statement, 22-3 Pillars 1-4, 23, 25, 36-7 Pints, Punts ’n’ Peers Study, 4, 17 post-separation property division, 13 presentations, 103-5 privacy, 46 procurement initiatives to support small business,

54

Program 1.1, 39, 97 program structure, 12-18 Protective Security Policy Framework, 42, 45 Public Governance Performance and Accountability

Act 2013, ii, 42, 45, 58, 68, 109-14 Public Service Act 1999, 10, 49 publications, 3, 6, 29, 98-101

Index 117

purchasing, 52 purpose, 23

qualifications, employee, 47

recruitment, 48 Relationship Between Gambling and Domestic Violence against Women Study, 4, 17 Relevance, 21 report on performance, 19-39 reporting, corporate and statutory, 44 requirements, list of, 109-14 research activity areas, key, 12 Research Framework, 10 research highlights, 3-5 research, 3-5, 8, 13, 17, 20-2, 26-9, 32, 43-4 research, communicating, 6 resource statements, agency 96-7 results, operating, 38 revenue, 38, 72-3 Risk Assessment and Audit Committee, 43 risk management, 43, 45-6 role and functions, iv, 10

security, 45 seminars, 10, 94 senior executive members, 43 Senior Leadership Group, 43 senior management groups, 43-4 skills and qualifications, employee, 47 small business procurement initiatives, 54 social media, 6, 33, 48 staff engagement, participation and development,

48

staff location, 50 staffing overview, 49 staffing see management of human resources stakeholder surveys, 28-31 statement by the Director and Chief Financial

Officer, 58 statement of changes in equity, 63-4 statement of comprehensive income, 59-60 statement of financial position, 61-2 statutory reporting, 44 Strategic Directions, 20-1, 23, 35-7 strategic goals, 20, 24 strategic initiatives, 35-7 Strategic Plan 2021-2026, 20 strategic priorities, 10, 44

submissions, 105 sustainability, 27, 37

Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, 5-6, 8, 18 theory of change, 23 total assets, 39 total liabilities, 39

values and behaviours, 48

webinars, 6, 10, 12, 21, 26-9, 33-4, 48, 94, 48, 94, 102-3 websites, 6, 8, 10, 16, 29, 34-6, 94-5 What Works for Families research, 10 work health and safety, 94 Work Health and Safety Act 2011, 94 workforce planning, 47 Workplace Relations Committee, 48

Australian Institute of Family Studies | Annual report 118

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ANNUAL REPORT 2020/21

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Visit the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) website at aifs.gov.au to explore our work, publications and events, and to discover our research agenda in more detail.

AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY STUDIES

Annual Report 2020/21

Discovering what works for families

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