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Misconduct in the banking, superannuation and financial services industry—Royal Commission—Final report—Volume 3: Appendices


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Final Report

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

VOLUME 3: APPENDICES

© Commonwealth of Australia 2019

ISBN:

978-1-920838-64-5 (print)

978-1-920838-65-2 (online)

With the exception of the Coat of Arms and where otherwise stated, all material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (www.creativecommons.org/licenses).

For the avoidance of doubt, this means this licence only applies to material as set out in this document.

© Commonwealth of Australia 2019

ISBN:

978-1-920838-64-5 (print)

978-1-920838-65-2 (online)

With the exception of the Coat of Arms and where otherwise stated, all material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence (www.creativecommons.org/licenses).

For the avoidance of doubt, this means this licence only applies to material as set out in this document.

The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website as is the full legal code for the CC BY 4.0 licence (www.creativecommons.org/licenses).

Use of the Coat of Arms

The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are detailed on the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet website (www.dpmc.gov.au/government/commonwealth-coat-arms).

The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website as is the full legal code for the CC BY 4.0 licence

(www.creativecommons.org/licenses).

Use of the Coat of Arms

The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are detailed on the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet website (www.dpmc.gov.au/government/commonwealth-coat-arms).

Contents

Volume 3: Appendices

Appendix 1: Letters Patent 1

Appendix 2: Hearing dates 9

Appendix 3: Public engagement 11

Appendix 4: The Commission team 55

Appendix 5: Witnesses 57

Appendix 6: Submissions 89

Appendix 7: Background Papers and Research Paper 117

Appendix 1:

Letters Patent

1

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ELIZABETH THE SECOND, by the Grace of God Queen of Australia and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth:

TO

The Honourable Kenneth Madison Hayne AC QC

GREETING

WHEREAS Australia has one of the strongest and most stable banking, superannuation and financial services industries in the world, which performs a critical role in underpinning the Australian economy.

AND Australia’s banking system is systemically strong with internationally recognised and world’s best prudential regulation and oversight.

AND most Australians are consumers of banking, superannuation and other financial services. The superannuation system alone in Australia has created more than a $2 trillion retirement savings pool, which continues to grow rapidly and which compels all working Australians to defer income today for their retirement.

AND all Australians have the right to be treated honestly and fairly in their dealings with banking, superannuation and financial services providers. The highest standards of conduct are critical to the good governance and corporate culture of those providers.

AND these standards should continue to be complemented by strong regulatory and supervisory frameworks that ensure that all Australian consumers, including business, have confidence and trust in the financial system.

NOW THEREFORE We do, by Our Letters Patent issued in Our name by Our Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia on the advice of the Federal Executive Council and under the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Australia, the Royal Commissions Act 1902 and every other enabling power, appoint you to be a Commission of inquiry, and require and authorise you, to inquire into the following matters:

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(a) whether any conduct by financial services entities (including by directors, officers or employees of, or by anyone acting on behalf of, those entities) might have amounted to misconduct and, if so, whether the question of criminal or other legal proceedings should be referred to the relevant Commonwealth, State or Territory agency;

(b) whether any conduct, practices, behaviour or business activities by financial services entities fall below community standards and expectations;

(c) whether the use by financial services entities of superannuation members’ retirement savings, for any purpose, does not meet community standards and expectations or is otherwise not in the best interests of those members;

(d) whether any findings in respect of the matters mentioned in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c):

(i) are attributable to the particular culture and governance practices of a financial services entity or broader cultural or governance practices in the relevant industry or relevant subsector; or

(ii) result from other practices, including risk management, recruitment and remuneration practices, of a financial services entity, or in the relevant industry or relevant subsector;

(e) the effectiveness of mechanisms for redress for consumers of financial services who suffer detriment as a result of misconduct by financial services entities;

(f) the adequacy of:

(i) existing laws and policies of the Commonwealth (taking into account law reforms announced by the Commonwealth Government) relating to the provision of banking, superannuation and financial services; and

(ii) the internal systems of financial services entities; and

(iii) forms of industry self-regulation, including industry codes of conduct;

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to identify, regulate and address misconduct in the relevant industry, to meet community standards and expectations and to provide appropriate redress to consumers;

(g) the effectiveness and ability of regulators of financial services entities to identify and address misconduct by those entities;

(h) whether any further changes to any of the following are necessary to minimise the likelihood of misconduct by financial services entities in future (taking into account any law reforms announced by the Commonwealth Government):

(i) the legal framework;

(ii) practices within financial services entities;

(iii) the financial regulators;

(i) any matter that has occurred or is occurring overseas, to the extent the matter is relevant to a matter mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (h);

(j) any matter reasonably incidental to a matter mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (i).

AND, without limiting the scope of your inquiry or the scope of any recommendations arising out of your inquiry that you may consider appropriate, for the purpose of your inquiry and recommendations in relation to the matter mentioned in paragraph (f):

(k) We direct you to have regard to the implications of any changes to laws, that you propose to recommend, for the economy generally, for access to and the cost of financial services for consumers, for competition in the financial sector and for financial system stability; and

(l) We authorise you to have regard to comparable international experience, practices and reforms.

AND We further declare that you are not required by these Our Letters Patent to inquire, or to continue to inquire, into a particular matter to the extent that you are satisfied that the matter has been, is being, or will be, sufficiently and appropriately dealt with by another inquiry or investigation or a criminal or civil proceeding.

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AND We further declare that you are not required by these Our Letters Patent to inquire, or to continue to inquire, into a particular matter to the extent that the matter relates to macro-prudential policy and regulation.

AND We direct you to give priority to matters that in your opinion, have greater potential for harm if not addressed expeditiously.

AND We further declare that you may decide not to inquire into a particular matter falling within the scope of paragraphs (a) to (j), but any such decision is yours alone.

AND We further declare that you may inquire into any matter mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (j) to the extent that the matter relates to or is connected with the peace, order and good government of the Commonwealth and any public purpose or any power of the Commonwealth.

AND We direct you to make any recommendations arising out of your inquiry that you consider appropriate.

AND We declare that you are a relevant Commission for the purposes of sections 4 and 5 of the Royal Commissions Act 1902.

AND We declare that, in exercising your powers under Part 2 of the Royal Commissions Act 1902, you are to inquire into the matters falling within the scope of paragraphs (a) to (j) only to the extent that Commonwealth constitutional power extends to those subjects of inquiry.

AND We declare that you are a Royal Commission to which item 5 of the table in subsection 355-70(1) in Schedule 1 to the Taxation Administration Act 1953 applies.

AND We declare that in these Our Letters Patent:

financial services entity means:

(a) an ADI (authorised deposit-taking institution) within the meaning of the Banking Act 1959; or

(b) an entity that carries on a business of undertaking liability, by way of insurance (including reinsurance), in respect of any loss or damage, including liability to pay damages or compensation, contingent upon the happening of a specified event, including:

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(i) a general insurer (within the meaning of the Insurance Act 1973); and

(ii) an entity that carries on life insurance business

(within the meaning of the Life Insurance Act 1995); or

(c) a person or entity required by section 91lA of the

Corporations Act 2001 to hold an Australian financial services licence, or who is exempt from the requirement to hold such a licence by virtue of being an authorised representative; or

(d) a person or entity that:

(i) is an RSE licensee of a registrable superannuation

entity (within the meaning of the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993); or

(ii) has any connection (other than an incidental

connection) to such an RSE licensee; or

(e) a person or entity that acts or holds itself out as acting as an intermediary between borrowers and lenders;

but does not include an entity that is a Commonwealth company or Commonwealth entity (both within the meaning of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013).

macro-prudential policy and regulation means policy and regulation, including as to the structure, role and purpose of financial regulators, that is concerned with containing systemic risk, which can have widespread implications for the financial system as a whole.

misconduct includes conduct that:

(a) constitutes an offence against a Commonwealth, State or Territory law, as in force at the time of the alleged misconduct; or

(b) is misleading, deceptive, or both; or

(c) is a breach of trust, breach of duty or unconscionable conduct; or

(d) breaches a professional standard or a recognised and widely adopted benchmark for conduct.

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AND We:

(m) require you to begin your inquiry as soon as practicable; and

(n) require you to make your inquiry as expeditiously as possible; and

(o) authorise you to submit to Our Governor-General an interim report, that you consider appropriate, not later than 30 September 2018; and

(p) require you to submit to Our Governor-General a final report of the results of your inquiry, and your recommendations, not later than 1 February 2019.

IN WITNESS, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent

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(b) is misleading, deceptive, or both; or

(c) is a breach of trust, breach of duty or unconscionable conduct; or

(d) breaches a professional standard or a recognised and widely adopted benchmark for conduct.

AND We:

(m) require you to begin your inquiry as soon as practicable; and

(n) require you to make your inquiry as expeditiously as possible; and

(o) authorise you to submit to Our Governor-General an interim report, that you consider appropriate, not later than 30 September 2018; and

(p) require you to submit to Our Governor-General a final report of the results of your inquiry, and your

recommendations, not later than 1 February 2019.

IN WITNESS, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

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Appendix 2:

Hearing dates

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Round Dates Location

Consumer lending 13-Mar-2018 - 23-Mar-2018 Commonwealth Law Courts Building, 305 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Financial advice 16-Apr-2018 - 27-Apr-2018 Commonwealth Law Courts Building, 305 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Small and medium enterprises 21-May-2018 - 01-Jun-2018

Commonwealth Law Courts Building, 305 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Regional and remote communities 25-Jun-2018 - 29-Jun-2018

Brisbane Magistrates Court, 363 George St, Brisbane QLD 4000

02-Jul-2018 - 06-Jul-2018 Supreme Court Building, State Square, Darwin NT 0800

Superannuation 06-Aug-2018 - 17-Aug-2018 Commonwealth Law Courts Building, 305 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Insurance 10-Sep-2018 - 21-Sep-2018

Commonwealth Law Courts Building, 305 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000

Policy questions 19-Nov-2018 - 23-Nov-2018 Lionel Bowen Building, 97-99 Goulburn St, Sydney NSW 2000

26-Nov-2018 - 30-Nov-2018 Commonwealth Law Courts Building, 305 William St, Melbourne VIC 3000

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Appendix 3:

Public engagement

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Introduction

The Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry was established on 14 December 2017.

From the outset, the Commission was committed to ensuring the public had easy access to information about the Commission and its work through a dedicated information line (phone and email), a website and email distribution services.

The Commission encouraged members of the public to contribute to its work by inviting submissions in relation to past conduct by financial services entities. The Commission received over 10,000 submissions from members of the public. These submissions played an important role in informing the Commission about the nature, magnitude and prevalence of misconduct and conduct falling below community standards in the financial services industry.

Following the closure of submissions on past conduct in late September, the Commission shifted its attention from past experiences to proposals on what should be done in response to the issues raised or conduct uncovered within the banking, superannuation and financial services industry.

To that end, the Commission invited submissions from the public in response to policy issues identified by Counsel Assisting during its fifth round of hearings on superannuation, its sixth round of hearings on insurance, and subsequently in response to issues identified in the Interim Report.

The Commission received almost 2,000 submissions in relation to policy issues, including 621 in relation to superannuation, 222 relating to insurance, and 1,114 in response to the Interim Report. Individuals making a submission were asked if the Commission could publish their submission. Where permission was given, these submissions have been published on the Commission’s website except where matters were subject to a non-publication order or where there were concerns about privacy or fairness.

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Information line and enquiries

The Commission operated an information line throughout the terms of its inquiry. The phone line was available during business hours, five days a week, while the email address for enquiries was available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The information line provided a range of services to support those with questions about the Commission, those needing assistance with making a submission, and those wishing to talk further about their concerns or share their stories of past conduct, and its impact.

As at 30 November 2018, the Commission’s information line had taken over 4,600 phone calls and responded to over 8,200 emails. Throughout the year, the Commission received many calls and emails which provided additional information or raised concerns about conduct, including real-time responses from the public about issues being examined in the public hearings. These ongoing contributions assisted the Commission in its inquiry.

Website

For the period 18 December 2017 to 30 November 2018, the Financial Services Royal Commission website had over 4,373,000 page views.

With the exception of the home page, the top five pages based on number of page views were:

1 Public hearings

2 Webcast

3 Transcripts

4 Public Submissions/Submissions

5 Publications

The website provided easy access to a range of materials including over 20,500 exhibits, 30 background papers and over 1,600 submissions.

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Public submissions - Past conduct

On 22 January 2018 the Commission invited submissions from the public in relation to past conduct by financial services entities. This invitation remained open until 28 September 2018.

The Commission’s online web form asked people to complete a series of questions about the nature of their dealings with a financial services entity, the entity involved, and the nature and timing of the conduct.

The Commission received 10,323 submissions from individual consumers and business owners, former employees within the financial services industry, academics, and industry and consumer advocacy bodies. In addition to submissions received through the online form, the Commission also received submissions either by email or in hard copy where the submitter was not able to use the online form.

Each submission was analysed by the Commission and information was collected on the nature of the conduct identified, how the financial services entity or any other relevant body responded to reports of misconduct, and what the outcome had been for the submitter. This information and the submissions were provided to Counsel and Solicitors Assisting the Commission for further review and analysis alongside other information and consultations that were undertaken.

Information received in public submissions assisted the Commission with lines of inquiry in each of the rounds of public hearings, as well as informing the Commission’s understanding of the extent of misconduct or conduct falling below community standards within the banking, superannuation and financial services industry.

The Commission continued to receive submissions in relation to the topics explored in its public hearings after those hearings had concluded. For example, issues in relation to consumer lending and personal finance continued to be the most frequent topics raised in submissions on past misconduct. The Commission continued to review and analyse those submissions, and used them to inform its understanding of issues throughout the year.

The following summaries provide detailed analysis of the issues and types of misconduct that were commonly raised in the public submissions. Discrepancies between totals and sums of components are due to rounding.

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The Commission acknowledges that submissions on past conduct provided by members of the public often took significant time and effort to prepare, and in many cases involved revisiting difficult experiences. These submissions also often contained highly sensitive personal information, including financial and medical information. For that reason, the Commission has not published submissions on past conduct on its website.

Submissions by state/territory

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The Commission acknowledges that submissions on past conduct provided by members of the public often took significant time and effort to prepare, and in many cases involved revisiting difficult experiences. These submissions also often contained highly sensitive personal information, including financial and medical information. For that reason, the Commission has not published submissions on past conduct on its website.

Submissions by state/territory

Figure 1: Number of submissions received from each state/territory

Submissions were received from all states and territories of Australia. The largest proportion of submissions came from New South Wales (31%), followed by Victoria (24%), Queensland (23%) and Western Australia (12%).

Figure 1: Number of submissions received from each state/territory

Submissions were received from all states and territories of Australia. The largest proportion of submissions came from New South Wales (31%), followed by Victoria (24%), Queensland (23%) and Western Australia (12%). A small number of submissions did not identify the State or Territory.

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Submissions by industry

As part of the public submission process, people were asked to indicate the part of the financial services industry to which their matter related. Of all the submissions received, the largest proportion were received in relation to banking (61%), superannuation (12%) and financial advice (9%).

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Submissions by industry As part of the public submission process, people were asked to indicate the part of the financial services industry to which their matter related. Of all the submissions received, the largest proportion were received in relation to banking (61%), superannuation (12%) and financial advice (9%).

Figure 2: Submissions by industry

Submissions by nature of dealing People were also asked to indicate in their submissions the nature of their dealings with an entity. The majority of people making submissions selected ‘personal financial’ as the relevant dealing (35%).

Figure 2: Submissions by industry

Submissions by nature of dealing

People were also asked to indicate in their submissions the nature of their dealings with an entity. The majority of people making submissions selected ‘personal financial’ as the relevant dealing (35%).

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Figure 3: Submissions by nature of dealing

Submissions by complaint type The Commission also invited information about experiences in dealing with complaints and dispute resolution mechanisms, including satisfaction with the outcome of any complaint they had made. Of the 10,323 submissions received from the public:

• 7,552 (74%) indicated that they had made a complaint in relation to their concerns; and

• 6,564 (87%) of those indicated that they were not satisfied with the outcome of the complaint.

Figure 3: Submissions by nature of dealing

Submissions by complaint type

The Commission also invited information about experiences in dealing with complaints and dispute resolution mechanisms, including satisfaction with the outcome of any complaint they had made. Of the 10,323 submissions received from the public:

• 7,552 (73% ) indicated that they had made a complaint in relation to their concerns; and

• Of those, 6,564 (87%) in dicated that they were not satisfied with the outcome of the complaint.

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Consumer lending and personal finance

Issues relating to consumer lending were examined in the Commission’s first round of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 13 March-23 March 2018.

The Commission inquired into aspects of the treatment of consumers by banking and financial services providers in connection with a number of credit products, including residential mortgages, car finance and credit cards. It also considered insurance sold in conjunction with a credit product and the arrangements and practices of banking and financial services providers and their intermediaries.

Total submissions

The Commission received a total of 5,099 submissions that identified consumer lending and personal finance as a relevant issue in their dealings with a financial services entity. This made up approximately 50% of the total of 10,323 submissions received by the Commission.

Submissions by state/territory

Submissions identifying consumer lending and personal finance as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to consumer lending and personal finance came from New South Wales (1,498 submissions), then Victoria (1,189 submissions), Queensland (1,131 submissions) and Western Australia (710 submissions).

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Consumer lending and personal finance Issues relating to consumer lending were examined in the Commission’s first round of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 12 February- 23 February 2018.

The Commission inquired into aspects of the treatment of consumers by banking and financial services providers in connection with a number of credit products, including residential mortgages, car finance and credit cards. It also considered insurance sold in conjunction with a credit product and the arrangements and practices of banking and financial services providers and their intermediaries.

Total submissions The Commission received a total of 5,099 submissions that identified consumer lending and personal finance as a relevant issue in their dealings with a financial services entity. This made up approximately 50% of the total of 10,323 submissions received by the Commission.

Submissions by state/territory Submissions identifying consumer lending and personal finance as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to consumer lending and personal finance came from New South Wales (1,498 submissions), then Victoria (1,189 submissions), Queensland (1,131 submissions) and Western Australia (710 submissions).

Figure 4: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Consumer lending and personal finance Figure 4: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Consumer lending and personal finance

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Overview

From the outset, consumer-related lending was a focus of concerns raised with the Commission about potential misconduct or conduct falling below community standards. This was reflected in the information received from members of the public, regulators, external dispute resolution bodies, consumer advocacy groups (notably CHOICE, the Consumer Action Law Centre and Financial Rights Legal Centre) and by the financial services entities.

These concerns were reflected in the Commission’s decision to make consumer lending the subject of the first round of public hearings, with particular focus on:

• home loans;

• car loans;

• credit cards;

• offers of pre-approved overdrafts and credit cards;

• processsing and administrative errors; and

• add-on insurance products.

In addition to these products, the Commission received many submissions relating to other personal finance issues, including transaction and savings accounts and associated fees, ATM fees and availability, and other general personal banking and finance services.

Many of the submissions that related to consumer lending and personal finance involved dealings with the big four banks. However, a wide range of smaller authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs), brokers and intermediaries were also mentioned.

These submissions ranged from people’s experiences with making an application for a first home loan or a large personal loan through to experiences relating to everyday banking. The submissions included concerns about fees and charges, and the terms and conditions for consumer products, including changes made to these after a person had signed up to a product. The volume of submissions received highlighted not only the frequency of consumer enagement with financial services entities but also the impact of dealings where a consumer felt they had not been treated honestly or fairly.

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The submissions included stories of the significant emotional toll of disputes with financial services entities where people had loans approved for which they were ultimately not able to meet the repayments. This often resulted in the loss of a family home, breakdowns in relationships, and ongoing debts arising from penalty interest rates, legal processes and other costs associated with pursuing redress. Some consumers reflected that they had been offered additional credit without asking for those funds, and regretted taking on larger loans than they could afford. Others spoke of being loyal customers for many years, and that such trust and loyalty was not reciprocated in their dealings with their bank.

Submission themes

The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

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but also the impact of dealings where a consumer felt they had not been treated honestly or fairly.

The submissions included stories of the significant emotional toll of disputes with financial services entities where people had loans approved for which they were ultimately not able to meet the repayments. This often resulted in the loss of a family home, breakdowns in relationships, and ongoing debts arising from penalty interest rates, legal processes and other costs associated with pursuing redress. Some consumers reflected that they had been offered additional credit without asking for those funds, and regretted taking on larger loans than they could afford. Others spoke of being loyal customers for many years, and that such trust and loyalty was not reciprocated in their dealings with their bank.

Submission themes The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

Figure 5: Consumer lending and personal finance submissions: Key themes

Figure 5: Consumer lending and personal finance submissions: Key themes

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Responsible lending

The Commission received over 990 submissions relating to consumer lending issues which identified unfair or irresponsible lending practices by lenders. The primary concerns raised included:

• failure by lenders to take into account the financial or other cirumstances of a borrower when approving a home or car loan, particularly where the borrower was a low income earner, on an aged or disability pension, or otherwise unlikely to be able to service the loan;

• failure by lenders to apply any criteria for suitability when offering credit products or increases to credit limits, including offering high-limit products to individuals who had disclosed gambling problems, or to students or other low income earners who had not demonstrated capacity that they would be able to meet repayments;

• recommending the sale of products to consumers that were not suitable for their needs and attracted additional fees, charges or risks, including offers of overdrafts, personal loans or credit products when applying for a home loan; and

• targeted marketing by lenders to vulnerable markets, including advertising reverse mortgages to elderly consumers.

Improper conduct

More than 870 submissions relating to consumer lending and personal finance primarily raised concerns about improper conduct by a financial services entity. Common types of improper conduct identified in public submissions included:

• falsification of loan application documents by bank employees, including inflation of income or asset values, forgery of signatures, and backdating of documents;

• intimidating or inappropriate behaviour by bank employees, often following the default of a loan, including consumers being harassed about repayments, or being coerced into signing a settlement agreement;

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• unauthorised disclosure of a consumer’s personal information to a third party, including disclosure to abusive parties in the context of family violence; and

• facilitation of unauthorised transactions by staff members, or failure to respond to reports of unauthorised or fraudulent transactions.

Poor administration

Over 650 submissions referred to poor administration or processing errors by financial services entities in relation to consumer lending and personal finance functions. Issues included:

• lenders setting up incorrect facilities for consumers, including approving a business loan when a consumer has sought to take out a domestic mortgage, or approval of a credit facility instead of a personal loan;

• incorrect calculation of interest or fees charged;

• loss of documents or records relating to a consumer’s banking arrangements;

• closure of accounts without instruction from the account-holder, and in many cases this was said to have occurred without notification;

• general concerns about the training and expertise of staff involved in sales and approval of loans and credit products; and

• delays in responses from a financial services entity to address the consumer’s concerns.

Excessive fees

The Commission received over 590 submissions that primarily related to excessive fees charged for consumer products. Issues related to fees and charges that often featured in submissions included:

• unreasonable discharge or break fees charged by lenders that submissions suggested had been used to dissuade the consumer from refinancing their loan;

• excessive fees charged for routine transactions, including foreign currency and international transaction fees;

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• high interest rates being charged on loans or credit products despite lower interest rates being available to new customers or when requested;

• difficulties with finding information about fees and charges for a financial product within the product disclosure statement or the financial services entity’s website;

• application of default interest rates, overdraw fees or other penalty charges without notification to the consumer; and

• failure by lenders to diclose adequately fees, charges and interest during the sale of a credit product or approval of a loan.

Redress and dispute resolution

Over 410 submissions were primarily about the experience of consumers with redress and dispute resolution processes. The issues raised included:

• difficulties arising from the jurisdiction of external dispute resolution bodies, including monetary limits or time limitations;

• lack of enforcement of determinations made by external dispute resolution bodies, including the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS), often resulting in lenders failing to take any action in relation to redress;

• lenders failing to consider a complaint properly unless legal proceedings had been commenced;

• the ongoing costs for a consumer of pursuing legal action against a lender, and the disparity in legal resources available to consumers when compared to financial services entities; and

• lenders continuing to charge default or penalty rates while a matter was under consideration by an external dispute resolution body.

Changes to terms of lending

The Commission received more than 205 submissions that related to a lender making unilateral changes to the terms of a loan. Key themes included:

• withdrawal of pre-approval or in-principle approval of a loan without explanation, often causing the loss of deposits or other financial hardship;

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• substantial reductions in timeframes for repayment of a loan where there had been no breach of terms, in some cases requiring consumers to repay large amounts in under a month;

• lenders giving assurances about the rollover or continuation of loans that were then called in; and

• banks defaulting loans without giving any prior notification to the borrower, and subsequent concerns about the sale of property and enforcement of guarantees following default.

Brokers and intermediaries

In addition to submissions relating to conduct by ADIs, the Commission received over 130 submissions that focused specifically on conduct by intermediaries such as mortgage brokers, aggregators, and introducers. Many of these issues reflected concerns raised about conduct by lenders, but emphasised that the consumer had thought the broker or intermediary was acting on their behalf and in their best interests. Issues raised included:

• brokers encouraging consumers to take out loans they were not able to service;

• falsification of loan application information by mortgage brokers, including inflated income and asset valuations and forgery of signatures;

• conflicts of interest involving brokers only offering products from specific lenders, often seen to be related to commissions received; and

• the sale of credit products or loans by third party vendors such as car sales staff or staff of retail outlets.

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Financial advice

The Commission explored issues relating to the financial advice industry in Round 2 of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 16 April-27 April 2018.

The Commission’s consideration of the financial advice industry focused on the conduct of financial services entities that provide financial advice to consumers, including the treatment of consumers, compliance with the law and community standards and expectations, and the sufficiency of the current legal and regulatory structure.

Total submissions

The Commission received a total of 1,139 submissions that identified financial advice as a relevant issue in the consumer’s dealings with a financial services entity. This equated to approximately 11% of the total of 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory

Submissions identifying financial advice as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to Financial Advice came from New South Wales (360 submissions), followed by Queensland (284 submissions), Victoria (266 submissions) and Western Australia (115 submissions).

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Financial advice

The Commission explored issues relating to the financial advice industry in Round 2 of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 16 April-23 April 2018.

The Commission’s consideration of the financial advice industry focused on the conduct of financial services entities that provide financial advice to consumers, including the treatment of consumers, compliance with the law and community standards and expectations, and the sufficiency of the current legal and regulatory structure.

Total submissions The Commission received a total of 1,139 submissions that identified financial advice as a relevant issue in the consumer’s dealings with a financial services entity. This equated to approximately 11% of the total of 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory Submissions identifying financial advice as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to Financial Advice came from New South Wales (360 submissions), followed by Queensland (284 submissions), Victoria (266 submissions) and Western Australia (115 submissions).

Figure 6: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Financial advice

Figure 6: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Financial advice

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Overview

Submissions highlighted a range of concerns about the conduct of major banks or other large financial services entities as well as conduct by smaller financial planning or advice services. Over 300 different financial services entities were mentioned in the 1,139 submissions received.

Prior to the public hearings in relation to financial advice, the Commission received information from regulators and external dispute resolution bodies in relation to their experiences in dealing with the financial advice industry.

Submissions received by the Commission raised concerns about the type and extent of fees charged for financial advice. Many were charged fees despite never having met or spoken with a financial adviser, or were unable to identify what service was provided for the fee. Many wrote in frustration and shock that they discovered they had been charged ‘fees for no service’ for many years.

Of particular note were submissions recording the impact of poor financial advice on individuals, especially for older Australians relying on advice to support retirement plans. Many wrote about the financial hardship they experienced and a sense that they had misplaced trust in advisers who claimed to be experts and said they would act in the client’s best interest.

Others spoke about the lack of transparency around the role of financial advisers and their remuneration, as well as concerns that advisers recommended in-house or commissioned products without proper consideration of a client’s personal circumstances.

Submission themes

The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

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Figure 7: Financial advice submissions: Key themes

Inappropriate financial advice Over 250 submissions related to financial losses or poor performance of investments that had been made based on financial advice that was not appropriate in the circumstances. Issues raised included:

• financial advice given without any reasonable basis and which resulted in poor outcomes

• failure by financial advisers to consider appropriately a person’s financial or other personal circumstances when providing advice or structuring investments; and

• complex or high risk advice given to low-income earners, elderly people or people with a disability.

Excessive fees including fees for no service The Commission received over 150 submissions where the key focus was unreasonably high fees for ongoing advice or management of investments.

Key themes raised in submissions about excessive fees, including fees for no service, mentioned:

• unreasonably high fees for ongoing advice or management of investments;

Figure 7: Financial advice submissions: Key themes

Inappropriate financial advice

Over 250 submissions related to financial losses or poor performance of investments that had been made based on financial advice that was not appropriate in the circumstances. Issues raised included:

• financial ad vice given without any reasonable basis and which resulted in poor outcomes

• failure by fi nancial advisers to consider appropriately a person’s financial or other personal circumstances when providing advice or structuring investments; and

• complex o r high risk advice given to low-income earners, elderly people or people with a disability.

Excessive fees including fees for no service

The Commission received over 150 submissions where the key focus was unreasonably high fees for ongoing advice or management of investments.

Key themes raised in submissions about excessive fees, including fees for no service, mentioned:

• unreasona bly high fees for ongoing advice or management of investments;

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• fees being charged where no service was provided and consumers were unaware that fees were being charged at all;

• meeting with a financial adviser at the commencement or purchase of a new product, but never receiving any further statements, advice or contact from the adviser despite annual review charges; and

• consumers deciding they no longer needed financial advice and then being charged fees for exiting or rolling over into a new product.

Improper conduct

Improper conduct by financial services entities was raised in over 130 submissions. Within these submissions, there were claims that:

• financial advisers had engaged in falsification of documents or fraudulent conduct;

• financial advisers had acted without the consumer’s authority in investing or handling money, or failed to act on clear instructions of the consumer;

• financial advisers being involved in using a consumer’s assets as part of fraudulent activity;

• financial advisers targeting vulnerable members of the community, including low-income individuals receiving government benefits, elderly individuals or couples, or people with a disability; and

• consumers being signed up to high-risk investments that they were unable to understand or afford.

Conflicts of interest

The Commission received over 110 submissions detailing conflicts of interest involving financial advisers as a concern. These submissions detailed:

• conflicts of interest arising between financial advisers and the manufacturers of investment products they sell;

• financial advisers failing to act in the best interests of the consumer due to conflicted remuneration practices or due to relationships between providers and manufacturers of investment products;

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• consumers being sold investment products that performed poorly or did not meet their needs; and

• consumers being unaware of commissions being paid to financial advisers who are integrated with the manufacturer of the product.

Managed investment schemes

The Commission received over 70 submissions specifically referring to financial advice relating to managed investment schemes which later failed. These submissions raised concerns about the:

• lack of information or communication provided in advance, or before the scheme collapsed; and

• limited redress options for investors in failed managed investments schemes.

Submissions from current and former financial advisers

Over 50 submissions were received from current or former financial advisers about practices and behaviour within the sector. These submissions referred to:

• a culture within the financial advice industry that is focused on sales targets and products that deliver higher commissions, without consideration for the best interests of the consumer;

• financial advisers being encouraged to transition consumers to products that generate higher commissions;

• restrictions being placed on advisers to ensure that they only recommend products on an approved product list which is limited to in-house or vertically integrated products; and

• financial advisers being forced to resign or being terminated if they refused to engage in certain practices.

General advice given by financial services entities

General advice given by financial services entities, as opposed to formal financial (or personal) advice, was the primary concern raised in over 120 submissions received. Of those, 80 related to mortgages and 40 to business loans. Key themes included:

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• consumers suffering a loss following advice given by a person other than a licensed financial adviser or authorised representative (such as a bank manager or a broker);

• failure to e xplain properly the risks associated with certain products; and

• inadequate explanations given about the operation and costs associated with certain products.

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs)

The Commission explored issues relating to small and medium enterprises (SMEs) during Round 3 of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 21 May-1 June 2018.

Round 3 focused on issues relating to the provision of loans and whether the legal frameworks governing SMEs were sufficient to protect small business owners, and in particular, whether any lending to SMEs should have similiar protections to those afforded to individual consumers.

Total submissions

The Commission has received a total of 1,211 submissions that identified small business finance as a relevant nature of dealing, making up approximately 12% of the total 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory

Submissions identifying small business finance as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to small business finance came from New South Wales (357 submissions), followed by Victoria (281 submissions), Queensland (272 submissions) and Western Australia (169 submissions).

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• consumers suffering a loss following advice given by a person other than a licensed financial adviser or authorised representative (such as a bank manager or a broker);

• failure to explain properly the risks associated with certain products; and

• inadequate explanations given about the operation and costs associated with certain products.

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) The Commission explored issues relating to small and medium enterprises (SMEs) during Round 3 of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 21 May-1 June 2018.

Round 3 focused on issues relating to the provision of loans and whether the legal frameworks governing SMEs were sufficient to protect small business owners, and in particular, whether any lending to SMEs should have similiar protections to those afforded to individual consumers.

Total submissions The Commission has received a total of 1,211 submissions that identified small business finance as a relevant nature of dealing, making up approximately 12% of the total 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory Submissions identifying small business finance as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to small business finance came from New South Wales (357 submissions), followed by Victoria (281 submissions), Queensland (272 submissions) and Western Australia (169 submissions).

Figure 8: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: SMEs

Figure 8: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: SMEs

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Overview

The Commission received 1,211 public submissions identifying small business finance as part of their dealings with financial services. These submissions also included issues with larger lenders, smaller ADIs and intermediaries.

Issues raised in submissions were similar in nature to issues raised in relation to consumer lending and personal finance (including the issues examined in Round 1). This included concerns about the failure of banks (or other entities) to consider properly the borrower’s circumstances or longer-term viability of a loan, inflating valuations and income to secure approval of a business loan, and the over-reliance on personal properties as security for lending.

Submissions were varied and included stories from individuals who ran, or had been seeking to start up a small family-owned business involving modest financial dealings through to businesses with multi-million dollar loans and other financial dealings and investments. While these stories emphasised the variation in both the size and scale of those who considered their businesses to be SMEs, submissions consistently highlighted concerns regarding dealings with banks and the impact of these dealings on the viability of a business, as well as the subsequent emotional stress on personal and professional relationships.

Many submissions detailed the financial and emotional impact of pursuing redress, either through external dispute resolution channels or taking legal action. Submissions referred to SME owners abandoning their efforts to seek redress as they could not afford to commence legal proceedings or could no longer afford ongoing legal action, which often compounded existing financial hardship and highlighted an imbalance in resources between the business and the financial services entity.

Prior to Round 3 of public hearings, the Commission engaged with a wide range of interested stakeholders, including the Financial Ombudsman Service, Phil Khoury, who had undertaken the Independent Review of the Code of Banking Practice during 2016 and 2017, the Council of Small Business Organisations Australia; Financial Counselling Australia; the Legal Advice for Small Business Clinic, which is a joint initiative of the University of Canberra and ACT Legal Aid; Legal Aid New South Wales; Legal Aid Queensland; and the Consumer Action Law Centre.

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In addition, the Commission spoke to a range of statutory and government bodies about policy and regulation in relation to small business lending, including the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC), the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA), the Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, and Treasury. These consultations informed the lines of inquiry taken during the public hearings.

Submission themes

The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

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Commission spoke to a range of statutory and government bodies about policy and regulation in relation to small business lending, including the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC), the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA), the Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman, and Treasury. These consultations informed the lines of inquiry taken during the public hearings.

Submission themes The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

Figure 9: SMEs submissions: Key themes

Responsible lending The Commission received over 315 submissions that focused on unfair or irresponsible small business lending practices. While these submissions raised similar concerns regarding responsible lending to those raised by individual consumers, there were some distinct themes. These included:

• the lender proceeding with approval of a small business loan where it should have been clear that the business would not succeed, either due to limited profitability or the borrower’s capacity to manage a business;

• the lender or broker inflating figures relating to the borrower’s financial circumstances in order to secure lending; and

Figure 9: SMEs submissions: Key themes

Responsible lending

The Commission received over 315 submissions that focused on unfair or irresponsible small business lending practices. While these submissions raised similar concerns regarding responsible lending to those raised by individual consumers, there were some distinct themes. These included:

• the lender proceeding with approval of a small business loan where it should have been clear that the business would not succeed, either due to limited profitability or the borrower’s capacity to manage a business;

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• the lender or broker inflating figures relating to the borrower’s financial circumstances in order to secure lending; and

• the lender offering extensions to existing small business loans where there was no evidence the business was able to service the loan.

Changes in terms of lending

The Commission received more than 230 submissions referring to lenders changing the terms of SME loans unilaterally or without giving adequate notification to the borrower. These submissions often referred to a power imbalance between SME borrowers and lenders, with lenders able to decide the terms on which a loan may continue or should be terminated.

Issues in relation to changes in terms of lending included:

• lenders giving verbal approval for a loan and subsequently rejecting a formal loan application, in some circumstances after the borrower had already entered into contracts with service providers;

• lenders altering repayment or review timeframes, often involving unreasonable timeframes for repayment of a loan;

• false assurances made to borrowers about the rollover or renewal of their loans; and

• substantial increases to interest rates, merchant fees or other fees and charges without notice to the small business owner.

The Commission also received 68 submissions from former customers of Bankwest, which substantially related to decisions to call in loans following the acquisition of Bankwest by CBA. These, along with other submissions and information received by the Commission, informed the lines of inquiry considered and undertaken by the Commission in relation to changed terms of lending. At the commencement of the fourth round of hearings, Bankwest complainants were invited to lodge further submissions.

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Hardship assistance and enforcement of defaults

The Commission received over 160 submissions in relation to SME lending that related to the lack of available assistance for SMEs experiencing financial difficulties, and the approach taken by banks to taking enforcement action on defaulted loans. The following issues arose in relation to hardship assistance and default:

• lenders failing to respond to early requests for assistance from small business lenders experiencing financial difficulties prior to default;

• lack of notice prior to enforcement action being taken to appoint receivers or to require the sale of a business;

• refusal of offers to refinance or pay down debt once a loan had been defaulted; and

• sale of property by lenders or receivers at substantially below perceived market value, sometimes involving refusal to accept offers from a borrower to refinance with another lender.

Improper conduct and poor administration

The Commission received more than 90 submissions which identified concerns about improper conduct or poor administrative practices that arose in relation to SME lending. Issues raised in relation to improper conduct and poor administration included:

• falsification of documents, including loan application information, valuations, or other documents required to secure approval of a business loan;

• failure by lenders to obtain appropriate authority from all business owners in relation to significant transactions, particularly in the context of failing businesses;

• alleged breaches of the borrower’s privacy by lenders, including disclosure of personal information to joint account holders; and

• errors or delays in processing of deposits, payments and settlements, in many cases affecting relationships with contractors and service providers of SMEs.

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Guarantors

Over 80 submissions about SME lending primarily raised concerns about third party guarantees. Submissions often referred to SME loans that were guaranteed by family members of the small business owner using their primary residence. Key issues raised included:

• defects with the guarantor’s consent, such as where guarantor agreements were signed without the guarantor fully understanding the effect of the agreement or where there was pressure placed on the guarantor to sign;

• falsification of guarantor documents or failure to provide complete documents to a guarantor for consideration before signing; and

• the consequences of enforcement of a guarantee over a primary residence of a third party, particularly where they were elderly or a low income earner and the financial and personal impact on guarantors and their families.

Experiences with financial services entities in regional and remote communities

Round 4 of the Commission’s public hearings explored issues affecting Australians living in remote and regional communities, including agricultural lending and issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The hearings were held in Brisbane (25-29 June 2018) and Darwin (2-6 July 2018).

These topics were selected on the basis that they are significant issues within regional and remote communities with the potential to affect the financial wellbeing of Australians who live in those communities disproportionately.

Issues relating to natural disaster insurance, originally proposed for Round 4, were moved to Round 6 of the hearings, which focused on the insurance industry.

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Agricultural lending

Total submissions

The Commission received a total of 410 submissions that identified agricultural lending as a relevant nature of dealing, making up 4% of the total of 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory

Submissions identifying agricultural lending as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to agricultural lending came from Queensland (125 submissions), followed by New South Wales (107 submissions) and Western Australia (75 submissions).

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Agricultural lending

Total submissions The Commission received a total of 410 submissions that identified agricultural lending as a relevant nature of dealing, making up 4% of the total of 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory Submissions identifying agricultural lending as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to agricultural lending came from Queensland (125 submissions), followed by New South Wales (107 submissions) and Western Australia (75 submissions).

Figure 10: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Agricultural lending

Overview In addition to submissions received by the Commission, the Commission also consulted broadly with a number of industry participants, rural financial counsellors, legal aid commissions, regulators and affected consumers to inform its lines of inquiry. Based on this information, the Commission identified significant concerns about the conduct of the major banks and medium-sized financial services entities that specialised in agricultural lending.

In reviewing the public submissions, the Commission noted that a number of submissions raised issues that were relevant to other hearing rounds including issues already explored about responsible lending and poor administration of loans and accounts in earlier rounds (consumer lending, Round 1, and small and medium enterprises, Round 3).

* 10 or fewer submissions were received from jurisdictions marked with an asterisk

Figure 10: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Agricultural lending

Overview

In addition to submissions received by the Commission, the Commission also consulted broadly with a number of industry participants, rural financial counsellors, legal aid commissions, regulators and affected consumers to inform its lines of inquiry. Based on this information, the Commission identified significant concerns about the conduct of the major banks and medium-sized financial services entities that specialised in agricultural lending.

In reviewing the public submissions, the Commission noted that a number of submissions raised issues that were relevant to other hearing rounds including issues already explored about responsible lending and poor administration of loans and accounts in earlier rounds (consumer lending, Round 1, and small and medium enterprises, Round 3).

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Many public submissions highlighted the emotional and reputational impact of the financial difficulties faced by farmers, and in the worst case scenarios, the impact of losing the family farm.

Submission themes

The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

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Many public submissions highlighted the emotional and reputational impact of the financial difficulties faced by farmers, and in the worst case scenarios, the impact of losing the family farm.

Submission themes The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

Figure 11: Agricultural lending submissions: Key themes

Valuations and enforcement of defaults Over 85 submissions raised concerns about practices involving the valuation of properties, including primary residences and security properties associated with loans, and enforcement action taken following default of loans. Key themes raised in submissions referring to valuations included:

• banks inflating the value of security properties to facilitate the approval of loans, sometimes where properties were subsequently revalued at substantially lower values following loan approval;

• borrowers being encouraged to take out additional loans or overdrafts to fund expansion, equipment or stock only to be defaulted shortly after doing so;

Figure 11: Agricultural lending submissions: Key themes

Valuations and enforcement of defaults

Over 85 submissions raised concerns about practices involving the valuation of properties, including primary residences and security properties associated with loans, and enforcement action taken following default of loans. Key themes raised in submissions referring to valuations included:

• banks infla ting the value of security properties to facilitate the approval of loans, sometimes where properties were subsequently revalued at substantially lower values following loan approval;

• borrowers being encour aged to take out additional loans or overdrafts to fund expansion, equipment or stock only to be defaulted shortly after doing so;

• banks revaluing security properties at substantially lower values, resulting in a breach of loan-to-value ratio (LVR) terms of a loan;

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• in-house valuations performed by bank staff who did not have sufficient expertise about the agricultural industry;

• failure to discuss alternative options with borrowers who were unable to service agricultural loans leading up to default, and refusal to negotiate once the bank had ordered that assets be sold; and

• sale of assets or properties at values below what the farmer considered to be the market value of the property, often supported by independent valuations obtained by the farmer.

Changes to conditions of lending

Over 65 submissions received in relation to agricultural finance claimed lenders unilaterally made changes to the terms on which a loan was offered. Key concerns raised included:

• changes to the expiry period for loans, the amount of the loan and the types of facilities offered (such as overdrafts, trading facilities and lines of credit) which were seen as unfair, or meant the borrower was unable to meet the repayments required;

• significant changes to guarantees of finance for new or existing agricultural businesses, or refusing to renew or allow such guarantees to the detriment of the borrower; and

• withdrawal of verbal offers of finance after the borrower had entered into funding agreements with suppliers or buyers.

Improper conduct

At least 60 submissions claimed that actions by a financial services entity were misleading, fraudulent or otherwise inappropriate. Key themes raised in submissions referring to improper conduct included:

• allegations that financial services entities falsified documents, including loan application information, valuations, and documents relating to the disposal or sale of properties following default;

• allegations of intimidating or threatening behaviour once a loan had been placed in default; and

• financial services entities requiring borrowers to sign documentation while they were seriously ill or receiving medical treatment which impaired the borrower’s ability to understand any risks involved.

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Difficulty in obtaining access to banking services and appropriate support

Over 55 submissions referred to issues with obtaining appropriate access to banking services, failure to respond to requests for hardship assistance, or inadequate support from lenders following default. These issues included:

• failure to respond to contact from borrowers in a timely manner, including requests for assistance, provision of documents, or delays in settling finance;

• claims that financial services entities lacked understanding of the seasonal nature of farming operations, and the impact of drought on cashflows;

• enforcement of default where borrowers considered they would be able to trade out of debt had the bank supported their operation over the short-term, based on projected income;

• failure by lenders to give any advance notification that a loan was considered to be impaired; and

• banks enforcing unreasonable timeframes for repayment of loans or sale of assets following default, and in some cases requiring repayment of several million dollars in less than 30 days.

Receivers and administrators

Individuals also raised issues about receivers and administrators. As noted in the Interim Report, receivers and administrators are not financial services entities as defined in the Letters Patent and so their conduct does not fall directly within the scope of the Commission’s inquiries. However, issues relating to the appointment of receivers by banks were considered by the Commission in its Round 4 public hearings on the basis that they concerned the conduct of financial services entities and so fell within the Terms of Reference.

While a number of people included comments about the conduct of an administrator or receiver as part of their submission, there were 20 submissions that primarily focused on the appointment and subsequent conduct of receivers and administrators. Many of these submissions raised concerns about the conduct of receivers and administrators both in their dealings with borrowers, as well as their management of properties and stock.

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Farm debt mediation

In addition to the themes above, over 45 submissions referred to the farmer’s participation in farm debt mediation. These submissions generally raised concerns about the process, suggesting that the process favoured the financial services entity or did not lead to satisfactory outcomes from the farmer involved, or that the financial services entity had not agreed to participate in voluntary farm debt mediation processes when requested.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Overview

While the Commission received a relatively small number of submissions from individuals identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, the Commission consulted widely in order to identify and understand the issues that arise for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their dealings with financial services entities.

These consultations included financial counsellors and lawyers from organisations across Australia who work closely with this group including staff from various regional offices of the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency (NAAJA); Financial Counselling Australia; representatives of Save The Children in Katherine; the Indigenous Consumer Assistance Network (ICAN), including with financial counsellors who work with consumers on Palm Island; the First Nations Foundation; the Consumer Action Law Centre; the Financial Rights Legal Centre and NSW Legal Aid.

The Commission also sought information from ASIC’s Indigenous Outreach Program about what it considered to be issues of particular concern affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in their dealings with financial services entities.

The concerns that were consistently raised included aggressive sales tactics, complexity of product disclosure statements and cancellation of policies or products and excessive fees for services in rural and regional areas.

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As Senior Counsel Assisting noted in her opening address, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is as diverse as the broader Australian population, and not all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in these communities will experience the same obstacles as outlined in the case studies.

Consumer themes

Concerns were consistently raised in relation to funeral insurance products, access to superannuation benefits and entitlements, consumer lending and banking fees and practices. Another primary issue of concern was access to financial products and services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including the complexity and language barriers associated with product design and disclosure statements.

Issues about superannuation products for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were explored during Round 5 of the Commission’s hearings.

Redress

Language and cultural barriers, including increased difficulty in navigating complaints and dispute resolution processes, are some of the issues that were identified by submissions as arising from remoteness. Of the small number of submissions received by the Commission in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander consumers, very few indicated that they had made a complaint about the conduct or that any action was taken in response to the matter.

During the Commission’s public hearings, Senior Counsel Assisting referred to complaints received by ASIC in relation to issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, with many made by stakeholder networks of indigenous consumer advocates, financial counsellors, community legal centres, and other government agencies. Primary areas of concern raised in complaints referred to by ASIC included:

• inappropriate sale of funeral insurance policies;

• difficulty accessing superannuation;

• access to ADIs; and

• excessive bank fees and charges, including ATM fees.

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Superannuation

The Commission explored issues relating to the superannuation industry in Round 5 of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 6 August-17 August 2018.

The Commission’s consideration of the superannuation industry focused on how registerable superannuation entity (RSE) licensees fulfil their duties to members of regulated superannuation funds, structural and governance issues, sales practices, the relationship between trustees and financial advisers, the current legal regime and the effectiveness of regulators.

Total submissions

The Commission received a total of 1,626 submissions that identified superannuation as a relevant issue in their dealings with a financial services entity, which equated to approximately 16% of the total of 10,323 submissions received.

Submissions by state/territory

Submissions identifying superannuation as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to superannuation came from New South Wales (536 submissions), followed by Victoria (380 submissions), Queensland (357 submissions) and Western Australia (159 submissions).

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Figure 12: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Superannuation

Overview Submissions highlighted a range of concerns about the conduct of RSEs, banks, and financial advisers with which they had dealings relating to their superannuation. Over 150 different financial services entities were mentioned in the 1,626 submissions that were received.

Notably, a number of public submissions on superannuation also indicated other related dealings with the financial services entity. Of the 1,626 submissions on superannuation, 346 also related to financial advice, and 277 related to life insurance associated with a superannuation account.

In addition to individual submissions, the Commission also received submissions from interested groups such as the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia; the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors; the Australian Institute of Superannuation Trustees; the Financial Services Council; the Financial Services Institute of Australasia; and the Responsible Investment Association of Australia. The Commission also received information from consumer bodies which assist consumers in relation to their dealings with superannuation entities, including the Consumer Action Law Centre and CHOICE. The Commission

Figure 12: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Superannuation

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Overview

Submissions highlighted a range of concerns about the conduct of RSEs, banks, and financial advisers with which they had dealings relating to their superannuation. Over 150 different financial services entities were mentioned in the 1,626 submissions that were received.

Notably, a number of public submissions on superannuation also indicated other related dealings with the financial services entity. Of the 1,626 submissions on superannuation, over 340 also related to financial advice, and over 270 related to life insurance associated with a superannuation account.

In addition to individual submissions, the Commission also received submissions from interested groups such as the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia; the Australian Council of Superannuation Investors; the Australian Institute of Superannuation Trustees; the Financial Services Council; the Financial Services Institute of Australasia; and the Responsible Investment Association of Australia. The Commission also received information from consumer bodies which assist consumers in relation to their dealings with superannuation entities, including the Consumer Action Law Centre and CHOICE. The Commission also consulted with officers from ASIC, APRA and the Productivity Commission.

Submissions raised concerns about the impact of fees for add-on financial services such as life insurance or financial advice, which had reduced the balance of their superannuation, or in some cases left the person with a zero balance in their account. A number of submissions mentioned the fund member’s frustration with contacting their superannuation fund (and delays which often followed) if they sought to switch funds; tried to obtain additional information; or queried fees associated with their fund.

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Fund members often raised concerns about the complexity of their superannuation accounts, and in many cases, indicated that they were unaware they were subject to additional fees or were being charged fees without receiving any service in return. Many submissions received were from individuals who had retired, or were close to retirement and who were concerned about their financial security. Others felt embarrassed that they lacked the financial literacy skills and/or had misplaced their trust in a particular superannuation fund.

A number of submissions also raised concerns about conduct by Commonwealth, state or territory superannuation entities. These entities either did not fall within the definition of a financial services entity under the Commission’s Terms of Reference, or were not entities of focus for the Commission.

Submission themes

The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

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Figure 13: Superannuation submissions: Key themes

Excessive fees The Commission received over 250 submissions focused on unreasonably high fees being charged for financial products or services associated with a superannuation account. Key themes included:

• excessive fees being charged (when compared to the balance of a superannuation account) for:

- contributions into the fund

- roll-over into another fund

- termination or exit of an account;

• management, administration, or advice fees being charged without the knowledge of the consumer, or any ongoing service having been provided; and

• failure to disclose fee structures to fund members, or disclosure of fee structures through complex product disclosure statements.

Inappropriate financial advice Over 235 of the submissions on superannuation received by the Commission related to conduct by a financial adviser in relation to investment of superannuation. Issues raised in these submissions included:

Figure 13: Superannuation submissions: Key themes

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Excessive fees

The Commission received over 250 submissions focused on unreasonably high fees being charged for financial products or services associated with a superannuation account. Key themes included:

• excessive fees being charged (when compared to the balance of a superannuation account) for:

- contributions into the fund

- roll-over into another fund

- termination or exit of an account;

• management, administration, or advice fees being charged without the knowledge of the consumer, or any ongoing service having been provided; and

• failure to disclose fee structures to fund members, or disclosure of fee structures through complex product disclosure statements.

Inappropriate financial advice

Over 235 of the submissions on superannuation received by the Commission related to conduct by a financial adviser in relation to investment of superannuation. Issues raised in these submissions included:

• failure by financial advisers to explain risk or fees associated with investment of superannuation;

• provision of poor or misleading advice, including advice about investment of superannuation in vertically integrated products;

• failure by financial advisers to follow instructions of the account holder on how to invest superannuation; and

• investing superannuation of consumers with low income or a relatively low superannuation balance in high risk investments.

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Default insurance products

More than 220 submissions related to superannuation funds providing life insurance products to members on a default or opt-out basis. These submissions detailed:

• fees for life insurance products substantially or entirely depleting the balance of superannuation accounts, in some cases without the knowledge of the account holder;

• duplication of life insurance products for individuals who hold accounts with multiple superannuation funds, including duplicate income protection insurance; and

• inclusion of life insurance products that the account holder was not eligible to claim under.

Poor administration

Poor administration of superannuation was raised in at least 220 submissions. These submissions detailed:

• delays in processing disbursements, transfer of pensions from other jurisdictions, or release of balances on roll-over into another fund;

• delays by superannuation funds in processing claims against life insurance policies;

• failure by superannuation funds to respond to requests to cancel life insurance products or financial advice options; and

• delays and administrative errors involved in release of superannuation as part of deceased estate dealings.

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

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Governance and culture

Over 150 submissions referred to issues with governance and regulatory frameworks relating to the superannuation sector, or the sales culture within superannuation funds. Issues raised in these submissions included:

• general submissions highlighting a lack of regulation or enforcement of breaches in the superannuation industry by ASIC and APRA;

• lack of transparency about how member funds are used by superannuation trustees, including using funding for corporate entertainment and advertising; and

• submissions from former staff in the financial services industry highlighting sales focus in relation to advice and insurance products within superannuation accounts.

Poor performance

Over 85 submissions were received in relation to the poor financial performance of superannuation accounts. These submissions referred to:

• consumers being encouraged to invest superannuation in products that achieved very low or nil returns across long periods of time, despite assurances of high percentage returns;

• returns for ‘premium’ products being less than the fees paid for management and advice; and

• failure by superannuation funds to explain adequately poor performance or losses on specific products.

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47

Insurance

The Commission explored issues relating to the insurance industry in Round 6 of its public hearings, held in Melbourne from 10 September-21 September 2018.

In particular, this round of hearings focused on issues associated with the sale and design of life insurance and general insurance products, the handling of claims under life insurance and general insurance policies, the administration of life insurance by superannuation trustees, and the appropriateness of the current regulatory regime for the insurance industry.

The issue of natural disaster insurance, which was initially scheduled to be considered as part of the Commission’s hearings into regional and remote consumer issues, was also considered during Round 6.

Total submissions

The Commission received a total of 1,527 submissions that identified insurance as a relevant issue in their dealings with a financial services entity, which equated to approximately 15% of the total of 10,323 submissions received. Of those, over 840 submissions indicated that they were concerned with life insurance, and over 820 submissions identified that they were concerned with general insurance (with some identifying both).

Submissions by state/territory Submissions identifying insurance as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to insurance came from New South Wales (442 submissions), followed by Queensland (385 submissions), Victoria (369 submissions) and Western Australia (141 submissions).

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In particular, this round of hearings focused on issues associated with the sale and design of life insurance and general insurance products, the handling of claims under life insurance and general insurance policies, the administration of life insurance by superannuation trustees, and the appropriateness of the current regulatory regime for the insurance industry.

The issue of natural disaster insurance, which was initially scheduled to be considered as part of the Commission’s hearings into regional and remote consumer issues, was also considered during Round 6.

Total submissions The Commission received a total of 1,527 submissions that identified insurance as a relevant issue in their dealings with a financial services entity, which equated to approximately 15% of the total of 10,323 submissions received. Of those, 846 submissions indicated that they were concerned with life insurance, and 824 submissions identified that they were concerned with general insurance (with some identifying both).

Submissions by state/territory Submissions identifying insurance as a relevant issue were received from all states and territories. The largest proportion of submissions relating to insurance came from New South Wales (442 submissions), followed by Queensland (385 submissions), Victoria (369 submissions) and Western Australia (141 submissions).

Figure 14: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Insurance

Overview The Commission received 1,527 submissions identifying insurance as part of their dealings with financial services. Submissions referred to insurance

Figure 14: Number of submissions received from each state/territory: Insurance

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

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Overview

The Commission received 1,527 submissions identifying insurance as part of their dealings with financial services. Submissions referred to insurance products offered by insurers ranging from small to very large companies, products sold by the big four banks and other ADIs, and financial advisers and superannuation funds that acted as sales channels for life insurance.

The submissions received were varied and raised concerns across a spectrum of insurance products, including income protection, total and permanent disability (TPD) insurance, trauma and accident insurance, home and contents insurance, travel insurance, and comprehensive and compulsory third party motor vehicle insurance.

The Commission also received a number of submissions in relation to claims under state and territory workers compensation schemes. Issues relating to these schemes were not an area of focus for the Commission.

Submissions emphasised the impact of insurance claims being rejected, or of ongoing disputes with insurance companies, at times when the consumer was already vulnerable due to illness, injury, the death of a family member, or, in the context of general insurance, when a home was uninhabitable. Submissions also spoke about being unable to afford mounting costs for life insurance, particularly for older Australians reliant on their superannuation to support them.

Prior to the Round 6 public hearings, the Commission consulted with a number of community organisations, financial services entities, regulators and dispute resolution bodies in relation to consumer experiences with the life insurance and general insurance industry. This included consultations with, or information provided by ASIC; the Financial Ombudsman Service; the General Insurance Code Compliance Committee; Legal Aid NSW; Legal Aid QLD; the Financial Rights Legal Centre; the Consumer Law Action Centre; the Public Interest Advocacy Centre; beyondblue; and CHOICE. Information provided by these bodies assisted the Commission in identifying key issues and lines of inquiry.

Final Report

49

Submission themes

The following summaries provide further analysis of the key themes or conduct that was raised in public submissions received by the Commission.

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Figure 15: Insurance submissions: Key themes

Claims handling The Commission received over 430 submissions that primarily focused on issues relating to claims handling and administration in relation to a number of insurance product types. Key themes raised in these submissions included:

• substantial delays to processing and payment of claims under life policies, resulting in significant financial hardship for consumers whose incomes were affected by illness or injury;

• delays in arranging critical repairs under home and contents insurance policies, often leaving consumers without a safe or secure place to live and the stress of finding and maintaining temporary accommodation;

• reliance by an insurer on evidence that was unfavourable to the consumer’s claim, particularly where the independent expert evidence supported the claim. This included medical evidence in relation to life insurance claims, and evidence from engineers and builders in relation to general insurance claims; and

• failure by insurers to provide adequate explanation of why a claim had been rejected. A number of stories raised concerns that consumers had felt intimidated by the process, with a number saying that they were left to feel that they were responsible for the damage.

Figure 15: Insurance submissions: Key themes

Claims handling

The Commission received over 430 submissions that primarily focused on issues relating to claims handling and administration in relation to a number of insurance product types. Key themes raised in these submissions included:

• substantia l delays to processing and payment of claims under life policies, resulting in significant financial hardship for consumers whose incomes were affected by illness or injury;

• delays in a rranging critical repairs under home and contents insurance policies, often leaving consumers without a safe or secure place to live and the stress of finding and maintaining temporary accommodation;

• reliance by an insurer on evidence that was unfavourable to the consumer’s claim, particularly where the independent expert evidence supported the claim. This included medical evidence in relation to life insurance claims, and evidence from engineers and builders in relation to general insurance claims; and

• failure by i nsurers to provide adequate explanation of why a claim had been rejected. A number of stories raised concerns that consumers had felt intimidated by the process, with a number saying that they were left to feel that they were responsible for the damage.

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Insurance premiums and fees

More than 190 submissions related primarily to issues around insurance premiums, fees and charges. Concerns raised in these submissions included:

• default life insurance products depleting the balance of superannuation accounts, often without the consumer knowing they were paying for life insurance;

• sharp increases in premiums for life insurance policies without notice or explanation to consumers, particularly for elderly consumers on stepped premium life insurance policies. A particular concern related to consumers who were unable to change provider due to pre-existing conditions; and

• concerns about lack of transparency in relation to the calculation of premium increases on motor vehicle and home and contents policies, including the application of no-claim bonuses.

Exclusions and definitions

Over 185 submissions dealt primarily with issues relating to exclusions or definitions in insurance policies. While these largely related to life insurance policies, issues with definitions also arose in relation to home and contents policies. Some of these issues included:

• concerns about automatic exclusions in life insurance policies for mental health issues such as anxiety, depression and fatigue where those conditions are being successfully managed by the consumer or occurred a long time ago;

• cessation of coverage or denial of insurance claims on the basis that the insured had a pre-existing mental health condition where there has been no previous diagnosis of that condition;

• rejection of claims against life insurance policies based on medically inaccurate or outdated definitions around medical conditions, including cardiac arrest; and

• rejection of general insurance claims following natural disasters due to disputes about definitions and causes of damage, particularly in relation to water damage and flooding.

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Sale of inappropriate products

The Commission received over 160 submissions which identified concerns about the sale of insurance products that were not appropriate for the needs of the consumer, including issues with default insurance products under superannuation funds. This made up 10% of submissions received relating to insurance. Issues highlighted in these submissions included:

• sale of income protection insurance to students, casual workers and retirees who would be ineligible to claim under those policies;

• inclusion of default life insurance products in superannuation accounts of low income earners or those with low superannuation balances, causing depletion of superannuation balances; and

• sale of high premium products that offered unsuitable coverage by financial advisers, raising concerns about conflicts of interest.

Changes to coverage

The Commission received over 75 submissions that focused on changes to a consumer’s insurance coverage without their authority or knowledge. The following issues arose in these submissions:

• cancellation of general and life insurance policies without notification to the consumer until they sought to make a claim;

• insurers unilaterally altering coverage on general and life insurance policies, often without notification to the customer, including removal of specific types of damage from home and contents insurance, or changes in type of life insurance policy;

• insurers or superannuation funds reinstating cancelled insurance policies without authorisation from the consumer; and

• changes to the extent of coverage offered when an insurance company was acquired by another financial services entity.

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Improper conduct

Over 65 submissions identified inappropriate or improper conduct by insurers or other financial services entities involved in handling insurance issues. Types of conduct that were raised included:

• disclosure of personal information including medical records and financial information to third parties without authorisation;

• falsification of documents by insurers, including insurance contracts and independent expert reports; and

• intimidating behaviour or harassment by investigators contracted to conduct surveillance on insurance claimants, particularly where the claim related to a mental health condition.

Final Report

53

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

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Appendix 4:

The Commission team

Final Report

55

Counsel Assisting the Royal Commission

Rowena Orr QC Michael Hodge QC Albert Dinelli Eloise Dias Mark Costello

Other Counsel

Mark Hosking Claire Schneider Sarah Zeleznikow Tim Farhall

Special Advisor to Commissioner

David Borthwick AO

Office of the Royal Commission

Toni Pirani Elizabeth Brayshaw Eva Logan Jamie Collins Owen Lodge Janice Nand Tara Philip Alicia Da Costa Daniel Weight Angus Chan Sophie Vasenszky Tracey Grobbelaar Anatoli Shapiro Rhiannon Scully

Alexandra Ashcroft Alana Brennan Corinne Adams Jennifer Garbode Erica Weatherly Matthew Hume Cecilia Barber Mary Fleming Anna Dearman Myriam Amiet-Knottenbelt Stephanie Haim Vicki Koroneos Samuel Brigg

Solicitors Assisting the Royal Commission

Simon Daley PSM Simon Sherwood Sonja Marsic Matthew Crowley Paulina Fusitua Anna Garsia Kathryn Gordon Catherine Kelso Amelia Telec Katie Amanatidis Sahrah Hogan Zoe Kent Anya Poukchanski Sarah Dickins Jacqui Fumberger Christian Habla Samuel Nitschke

Benjamin Norman George Priestley Lewis Winter Jessica Zarkovic Virginia Holdenson Lynley Waring

Specialist consultants

Michael Kingston Stephen Spargo AM

Officers of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department provided enabling services to the Royal Commission

External providers

Court technology provider

Law in Order

Transcription services

Auscript

Editorial, design and printing

Information Access Group Rothfield Print & Image Management (with assistance from Fluid)

The following provided assistance during some or all of the term of the inquiry.

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

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Appendix 5:

Witnesses

Final Report

57

Consumer lending

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

1. Karen Cox 1.2

Statement of Karen Cox - 10-Mar-2018 13-Mar-2018 P-49

2. Anthony Waldron

1.4

Statement of Anthony Waldron - 02-Mar-2018 13, 14-Mar-2018

P-63

1.18

Exhibits to the statement of Anthony Waldron - 02-Mar-2018

3. Angus Gilfillan 1.20 Statement of Angus Gilfillan - 05-Mar-2018 14-Mar-2018 P-196

4. Mark Harris 1.24

Statement of Mark Harris - 07-Mar-2018 14-Mar-2018 P-215

1.25

Supplementary statement of Mark Harris - 12-Mar-2018

5. Daniel Huggins 1.27 Statement of Daniel Huggins - 02-Mar-2018 15-Mar-2018 P-228

1.28

Supplementary statement of Daniel Huggins - 07-Mar-2018

6. Lynda Harris 1.41 Statement of Lynda Harris - 07-Mar-2018 15, 16-

Mar-2018

P-309

7. Giles Boddy 1.73 Statement of Giles Boddy - 05-Mar-2018 16-Mar-2018 P-390

8. David Smith 1.78 Statement of David Smith - 06-Mar-2018 N/A

9. Robert Regan 1.82 Statement of Robert Regan - 08-Mar-2018 16-Mar-2018 P-434

10. William Ranken

1.86

Statement of William Ranken - 04-Mar-2018 19-Mar-2018 P-453

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Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

11. Irene Savidis 1.92 Statement of Irene Savidis - 09-Mar-2018 19-Mar-2018 P-491

12. Clive van Horen

1.95

Statement of Clive van Horen - 09-Mar-2018 19, 20, 22-Mar-2018

P-499

1.96

Statement of Clive van Horen - 09-Mar-2018

1.97

Supplementary statement of Clive van Horen - 05-Mar-2018

1.113

Statement of Clive van Horen - 09-Mar-2018

1.161

Statement of Clive van Horen - 22-Mar-2018

13. Heang Forbes

1.122

Statement of Heang Forbes - 01-Mar-2018 20-Mar-2018 P-623

14. Sarah Stubbings

1.126

Statement of Sarah Stubbings - 05-Mar-2018 20, 21- Mar-2018

P-647

15. Nalini Thiruvang-adam

1.138

Statement of Nalini Thiruvangadam - 15-Mar-2018

21-Mar-2018 P-716

16. Phillip Godkin 1.141 Statement of Phillip Godkin - 05-Mar-2018 21-Mar-2018 P-731

1.142

Statement of Phillip Godkin - 05-Mar-2018

17. Guy Mendelson

1.149

Statement of Guy Mendelson - 04-Mar-2018 22-Mar-2018 P-795

18. Michael Saadat

1.158

Statement of Michael Saadat - 05-Mar-2018 01-Jun-2018 P-2965

19. David Harris 1.160 Statement of David Harris - 18-Mar-2018 22-Mar-2018 P-861

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Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

20. William Malcolm

1.164

Statement of William Malcolm - 19-Mar-2018 23-Mar-2018 P-904

1.165

Further statement of William Malcolm - 21-Mar-2018

21. Carol Separovich 1.178 Statement of Carol

Separovich - 12-Mar-2018 23-May-2018 P-2264

1.179

Further statement of Carol Separovich - 22-Mar-2018

22. Gareth Russell

1.181

Statement of Gareth Russell - 22-Mar-2018 N/A

23. Alan Machet 1.183 Witness statement of Alan Machet - 28-Feb-2018 N/A

1.184

Further statement of Alan Machet - 22-Mar-2018 N/A

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Financial advice

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

24. Peter Kell 2.1

Statement of Peter Kell - 12-Apr-2018 16-Apr-2018 P-1029

25. Donald Sillar 2.3 Statement of Donald Sillar - 11-Apr-2018 N/A

26. Bradley Green

2.4

Statement of Bradley Green - 12-Apr-2018 N/A

27. Hugh Humphrey

2.5

Statement of Hugh Humphrey - 13-Apr-2018 N/A

28. Mark Ballantyne

2.6

Statement of Mark Ballantyne - 13-Apr-2018 N/A

29. Linda Elkins 2.7 Statement of Linda Elkins - 13-Apr-2018 18-Apr-2018 P-1240

2.71

Witness statement of Linda Elkins - 05-Apr-2018

30. Ross Barnwell

2.8

Statement of Ross Barnwell - 13-Apr-2018 N/A

31. Matthew Lawrance

2.9

Statement of Matthew Lawrance - 15-Apr-2018 N/A

32. Michael Wright

2.10

Statement of Michael Wright - 16-Apr-2018 19, 20- Apr-2018

P-1375

2.101

Statement of Michael Wright - 05-Apr-2018

2.102

Second statement of Michael Wright - 05-Apr-2018

33. Constandina Kotsopoulos 2.11 Statement of Constandina

Kotsopoulos - 16-Apr-2018 N/A

Final Report

61

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

34. Anthony Regan

2.13

Statement of Anthony Regan - 11-Apr-2018 16, 17- Apr-2018

P-1103

2.171

Statement of Anthony Regan - 11-Apr-2018

35. John Keating 2.69 Statement of John Keating - 09-Apr-2018 18-Apr-2018 P-1209

36. Marianne Perkovic

2.73

Statement of Marianne Perkovic - 03-Apr-2018 18, 19- Apr-2018

P-1264

2.74

Supplementary statement of Marianne Perkovic - 04-Apr-2018

2.75

Further statement of Marianne Perkovic - 03-Apr-2018

2.76

Further statement of Marianne Perkovic - 04-Apr-2018

2.77

Further statement of Marianne Perkovic - 03-Apr-2018

2.78

Further statement of Marianne Perkovic - 09-Apr-2018

2.79

Further statement of Marianne Perkovic - 05-Apr-2018

2.172

Statement of Marianne Perkovic - 13-Apr-2018

2.196

Statement of Marianne Perkovic - 13-Apr-2018

37. Darren Williams

2.92

Statement of Darren Williams - 13-Apr-2018 N/A

38. Adrian Kwa 2.93 Statement of Adrian Kwa - 10-Apr-2018 N/A

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Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

39. Sarah Britt 2.94 Statement of Sarah Britt - 10-Apr-2018 23-Apr-2018 P-1591

2.161

Statement of Sarah Britt - 10-Apr-2018

40. Mark Pankhurst

2.95

Statement of Mark Pankhurst - 13-Apr-2018 N/A

41. Cameron Garrett

2.96

Statement of Cameron Garrett - 14-Apr-2018 N/A

42. Michelle Weber

2.97

Statement of Michelle Weber - 16-Apr-2018 N/A

2.174

Statement of Michelle Weber - 13-Apr-2018

2.175

Second statement of Michelle Weber - 13-Apr-2018

43. Jacqueline McDowall 2.98 Statement of Jacqueline

McDowall - 04-Apr-2018 19-Apr-2018 P-1353

45. Darren Whereat

2.129

Statement of Darren Whereat - 05-Apr-2018 20-Apr-2018 P-1484

46. Kylie Rixon 2.152 Statement of Kylie Rixon - 05-Apr-2018 23-Apr-2018 P-1555

2.153

Supplementary statement of Kylie Rixon - 18-Apr-2018

47. Renato Mota 2.173 Statement of Renato Mota - 12-Apr-2018 N/A

49. Marti Crane 2.176 Statement of Marti Carne - 13-Apr-2018 N/A P-1651

50. Andrew Hagger

2.178

Statement of Andrew Hagger - 05-Apr-2018 23, 24- Apr-2018

P-1652

2.179

Statement of Andrew Hagger - 13-Apr-2018

P-1654

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63

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

51. Kieran Forde 2.194 Statement of Kieran Forde - 12-Apr-2018 24-Apr-2018 P-1709

2.195

Supplementary statement of Kieran Forde - 23-Apr-2018

52. Donna McKenna

2.197

Statement of Donna McKenna - 16-Apr-2018 24-Apr-2018 P-1725

53. Sam Henderson 2.200 Statement of Sam

Henderson - 29-Mar-2018 24-Apr-2018 P-1743

2.201

Second statement of Sam Henderson - 05-Apr-2018

2.202

Corrections to statements of Sam Henderson (Exhibits 2.200 and 2.201) - 29-Mar-2018

54. Dante De Gori 2.219 Statement of Dante

De Gori - 20-Apr-2018 26-Apr-2018 P-1787

55. Philip Kewin 2.230 Statement of Philip Kewin - 04-Apr-2018 26-Apr-2018 P-1825

56. Terrence McMaster

2.236

Statement of Terrence McMaster - 10-Apr-2018 26-Apr-2018 P-1843

57. Louise Macaulay

2.247

Statement of Louise Macaulay - 25-Apr-2018 27-Apr-2018 P-1902

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64

Small and medium enterprises

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

58. Philip Khoury 3.4 Statement of Philip Khoury - 18-May-2018 21-May-2018 P-2020

59. Carolyn Flanagan

3.6

Statement of Carolyn Flanagan - 14-May-2018 21-May-2018 P-2041

60. Dana Beiglari 3.8 Statement of Dana Beiglari - 16-May-2018 21-May-2018 P-2050

61. Alastair Welsh

3.10

Statement of Alastair Welsh (Rubric 3-12) - 15-May-2018

21, 22-May-2018

P-2059

3.22

Statement of Alastair Welsh (Rubric 3-11) - 19-May-2018

3.59

Statement of Alastair Welsh (Rubric 3-10) - 17-May-2018

3.132

Statement of Alastair Welsh (Rubric 3-3) - 08-May-2018

62. Kate Gibson 3.15 Statement of Kate Gibson (Rubric 3-7) - 17-May-2018

22, 23- May-2018

P-2146

3.148

Statement of Kate Gibson (Rubric 3-2) - 17-May-2018

63. Marion Messih

3.17

Statement of Marion Messih - 16-May-2018 22-May-2018 P-2173

64. Carol Separovich 3.27

Statement of Carol Separovich (Rubric 3-10) - 21-May-2018 23-May-2018 P-2264

3.28

Statement of Carol Separovich (Rubric 3-11) - 21-May-2018

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65

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

65. Suzanne Riches

3.30

Statement of Suzanne Riches - 18-May-2018 23-May-2018 P-2275

66. Douglas Snell 3.34 Statement of Douglas Snell (Rubric 3-8) - 15-May-2018 24-May-2018 P-2302

3.133

Statement of Douglas Snell (Rubric 3-6) - 08-May-2018

67. Clive van Horen

3.42

Statement of Clive van Horen (Rubric 3-15) - 15-May-2018 24-May-2018 P-2356

3.43

Statement of Clive van Horen (Rubric 3-16) - 14-May-2018

68. Bradley Wallis

3.54

Statement of Bradley Wallis - 22-May-2018 24-May-2018 P-2398

69. Rien Low 3.73

Statement of Rien Low - 23-May-2018 25-May-2018 P-2469

70. David Carter 3.75 Statement of David Carter (Rubric 3-21) - 21-May-2018

25-May-2018 P-2493

71. Philip Field 3.84 Witness statement of Philip Field (Part A) - 18-May-2018

28-May-2018 P-2538

3.85

Witness statement of Philip Field (Part B) - 18-May-2018

72. Michael Kelly 3.88 Statement of Michael Kelly - 24-May-2018 28-May-2018 P-2554

73. Brett Perry 3.93 Statement of Brett Perry (Rubric 3-26) - 18-May-2018

28-May-2018 P-2584

74. Stephen Weller

3.97

Statement of Stephen Weller - 21-May-2018 28-May-2018 P-2617

75. Michael Doherty

3.99

Statement of Michael Doherty - 24-May-2018 28, 29-May-2018

P-2631

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Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

76. Peter Clark 3.101 Statement of Peter Clark (Rubric 3-24) - 27-May-2018

29-May-2018 P-2664

3.102

Statement of Peter Clark (Rubric 3-25) - 27-May-2018

77. Sinead Taylor 3.104 Statement of Sinead Taylor (Rubric 3-13) - 17-May-2018

28, 29-May-2018

P-2699

3.134

Statement of Sinead Taylor (Rubric 3-1) - 08-May-2018

78. Brendan Stanford

3.106

Statement of Brendan Stanford - 24-May-2018 29-May-2018 P-2701

79. David Cohen 3.111 Statement of David Cohen (Rubric 3-13) - 17-May-2018

29-May-2018 P-2723

3.112

Statement of David Cohen (Rubric 3-13) - 17-May-2018

80. Issac Rankin 3.129 Statement of Isaac Rankin (Rubric 3-2) - 08-May-2018 N/A

81. Joanna White 3.130 Statement of Joanna White (Rubric 3-1) - 08-May-2018 N/A

82. Howard Silby 3.131 Statement of Howard Silby (Rubric 3-4) - 23-May-2018 N/A

3.184

Statement of Howard Silby (Rubric 3-19) - 22-May-2018

83. Ross Dillion 3.136 Statement of Ross Dillon - 28-May-2018 30, 31-

May-2018

P-2826

84. Shaun Bassett

3.137

Statutory declaration of Shaun Bassett - 18-May-2018 31-May-2018 P-2878

85. Ross McNaughton 3.140

Statement of Ross McNaughton - 22-May-2018

31-May-2018 P-2885

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Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

86. Anna Bligh 3.144 Statement of Anna Bligh - 17-May-2018 31-May-2018 P-2910

87. Brian Zacharias

3.145

Statement of Brian Zacharias (Rubric 3-6) - 15-May-2018 N/A

88. Sean Cash 3.146 Statement of Sean Cash (Rubric 3-4) - 16-May-2018 N/A

89. Chris Williams

3.147

Statement of Chris Williams (Rubric 3-1) - 16-May-2018 N/A

90. Ivan Mardjetko

3.149

Statement of Ivan Mardjetko (Rubric 3-4) - 16-May-2018 N/A

91. Kristen O’Donoghue 3.151 Statement of Kirsten

O’Donoghue - 18-May-2018 31-May-2018 P-2930

92. Steven Kluss 3.157 Statement of Steven Kluss - 28-May-2018 31-May-2018 P-2935

93. Scott Gregson

3.160

Statement of Scott Gregson - 23-May-2018 31-May-2018 P-2948

94. Michael Saadat

3.162

Statement of Michael Saadat - 18-May-2018 01-Jun-2018 P-2965

3.163

Further statement of Michael Saadat - 24-May-2018

95. Timothy Mullaly

3.171

Statement of Timothy Mullaly - 30-May-2018 01-Jun-2018 P-3008

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Regional and remote communities

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

96. Dennis McMahon

4.2

Statement of Dennis McMahon - 19-Jun-2018 25-Jun-2018 P-3086

97. Chris Wheatcroft

4.4

Statement of Chris Wheatcroft - 15-Jun-2018 25-Jun-2018 P-3086

98. Warren Day 4.6 Statement of Warren Day - 08-Jun-2018 25-Jun-2018 P-3087

99. Benjamin Steinberg

4.8

Statement of Benjamin Steinberg (Rubric 4-1) - 18-Jun-2018

25, 26, 27-Jun-2018 P-3123

4.9

Statement of Benjamin Steinberg (Rubric 4-20) - 20-Jun-2018

4.9A

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure A - 20-Jun-2018

4.9B

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure B - 20-Jun-2018

4.9C

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure C - 20-Jun-2018

4.9D

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure D - 20-Jun-2018

4.9E

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure E - 20-Jun-2018

4.10

Statement of Benjamin Steinberg (Rubric 4-38) - 21-Jun-2018

4.10F

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure F - 21-Jun-2018

4.10G

Benjamin Steinberg Annexure G - 21-Jun-2018

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Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

4.11

Supplementary statement of Benjamin Steinberg (Rubric 4-38) - 22-Jun-2018

4.20

Statement of Benjamin Steinberg (Rubric 4-17) - 18-Jun-2018

100. Michael Hirst

N/A N/A 27-Jun-2018 P-3314

101. Wendy Brauer

4.31

Statement of Wendy Brauer - 21-Jun-2018 27-Jun-2018 P-3319

102. Bradley James

4.33

Statement of Bradley James (Rubric 4-16) - 15-Jun-2018 27, 28-Jun-2018

P-3399

4.34

Supplementary statement of Bradley James (Rubric 4-16) - 22-Jun-2018

103. Melville Ruddy

4.90

Statement of Melville Ruddy - 21-Jun-2018 28-Jun-2018 P-3429

104. Sinead Taylor

4.92

Statement of Sinead Taylor - 24-Jun-2018 28, 29-May-2018

P-3452

105. Deborah Smith

4.110

Statement of Deborah Smith - 22-Jun-2018 29-Jun-2018 P-3537

106. Ross McNaughton 4.112 Statement of Ross

McNaughton - 18-Jun-2018 29-Jun-2018 P-3566

4.113

Supplementary statement of Ross McNaughton - 25-Jun-2018

107. Alexandra Gartmann 4.121

Statement of Alexandra Gartmann (Rubric 4-36) - 20-Jun-2018 02-Jul-2018 P-3611

108. Grant Cairns 4.133 Statement of Grant Cairns - 16-Jun-2018 N/A

109. Mark Wlossak

4.134

Statement of Mark Wlossak - 19-Jun-2018 N/A

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

70

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

110. Johanna White

4.135

Statement of Johanna White - 21-Jun-2018 N/A

4.136

Statement of Johanna White - 29-Jun-2018

111. Nathan Boyle

4.138

Statement of Nathan Boyle - 25-Jun-2018 03-Jul-2018 P-3712

112. Lynda Edwards

4.140

Statement of Lynda Edwards - 22-Jun-2018 03-Jul-2018 P-3712

113. Tracey Walsh

4.144

Statement of Tracey Walsh - 26-Jun-2018 03-Jul-2018 P-3764

114. Bryn Jones 4.146 Statement of Bryn Jones - 13-Jun-2018 03, 04-

Jul-2018

P-3784

4.147

Statement of Bryn Jones - 11-Jun-2018

115. Kathy Marika

4.171

Statement of Kathy Marika - 19-Jun-2018 04-Jul-2018 P-3879

116. Russell Howden

4.173

Statement of Russell Howden (Rubric 4-23) - 13-Jun-2018

04, 05-Jul-2018

P-3893

4.174

Statement of Russell Howden (Rubric 4-31) - 13-Jun-2018

4.175

Statement of Russell Howden (Rubric 4-42) - 28-Jun-2018

117. Thy Do 4.198

Statement of Thy Do - 30-Jun-2018

05-Jul-2018 P-3986

118. Philip Bowden

4.200

Statement of Phillip Bowden - 04-Jul-2018 05-Jul-2018 P-4012

119. Tony Tapsall

4.202

Statement of Tony Tapsall (Rubric 4-13) - 21-Jun-2018 05, 06-Jul-2018

P-4021

Final Report

71

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

4.204

Statement of Tony Tapsall (Rubric 4-41) - 25-Jun-2018

4.205

Supplementary statement of Tony Tapsall - 04-Jul-2018

120. Sian Lewis 4.220 Statement of Sian Lewis - 28-Jun-2018 N/A

121. Robert Musgrove 4.221 Statement of Robert

Musgrove - 15-Jun-2018 N/A

122. Anthony Hampton 4.222 Statement of Anthony

Hampton - 19-Jun-2018 N/A

123. Gavin Teichner

4.223

Statement of Gavin Teichner - 22-Jun-2018 N/A

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

72

Superannuation

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

124. Paul Carter 5.2 Statement of Paul Carter - 30-Jul-2018 06, 07-Aug-

2018

P-4178

125. Nicole Smith 5.43 Statement of Nicole Smith - 01-Aug-2018 07, 08, 09-

Aug-2018

P-4308

Statement of Nicole Smith - 03-Aug-2018

126. Jason Peasley

5.62

Statement of Jason Peasley - 01-Aug-2018 08-Aug-2018 P-4432

127. Peggy O’Neal

5.84

Statement of Peggy O’Neal - 19-Jul-2018 N/A

5.85

Statement of Peggy O’Neal - 23-Jul-2018

5.86

Statement of Peggy O’Neal - 03-Aug-2018

128. Ian Silk 5.88

Statement of Ian Silk - 30-Jul-2018 09-Aug-2018 P-4520

5.89

Further statement of Ian Silk - 31-Jul-2018

129. Paul Schroder

5.90

Statement of Paul Schroder - 01-Aug-2018 N/A

130. Mark Oliver 5.99 Statement of Mark Oliver - 26-Jul-2018 09,10-Aug-

2018

P-4557

131. Christopher Kelaher 5.115 Statement of Christopher

Kelaher - 26-Jul-2018 10-Aug-2018 P-4601

5.116

Statement of Christopher Kelaher - 26-Jul-2018

132. Scott Wilson 5.131 Statement of Scott Wilson - 26-Jul-2018 10-Aug-2018 P-4663

Final Report

73

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

5.132

Statement of Scott Wilson - 26-Jul-2018

133. Andrew Hagger

N/A N/A

13-Aug- 2018

P-4730

134. Lynette Melcer

5.139

Statement of Lynette Melcer - 30-Jul-2018 13-Aug- 2018

P-4710

135. Maurizio Pinto

5.164

Statement of Maurizio Pinto - 05-Aug-2018 13,14-Aug-2018

P-4804

5.165

Statement of Maurizio Pinto - 06-Aug-2018

136. David Elia 5.172 Statement of David Elia - 01-Aug-2018 14-Aug-

2018

P-4842

137. Linda Elkins 5.179 Statement of Linda Elkins - 26-Jul-2018 14,15-

Aug-2018

P-4876

5.180

Statement of Linda Elkins - 26-Jul-2018

5.181

Statement of Linda Elkins - 30-Jul-2018

5.182

Statement of Linda Elkins - 07-Aug-2018

138. Peter Chun 5.232 Statement of Peter Chun - 31-Jul-2018 15-Aug-

2018

P-4978

5.233

Statement of Peter Chun - 07-Aug-2018

5.234

Statement of Peter Chun - 12-Aug-2018

139. Peter Haysey

5.237

Statement of Peter Haysey - 24-Jul-2018 N/A P-4995

5.238

Second statement of Peter Haysey - 03-Aug-2018

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

74

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

140. David Hartley

5.248

Statement of David Hartley - 13-Aug-2018 N/A

141. Greg Cantor 5.249 Statement of Greg Cantor - 06-Aug-2018 N/A

142. Victoria Weekes

5.251

Statement of Victoria Weekes - 14-Aug-2018 15-Aug- 2018

P-5024

143. Mark Pankhurst

5.256

Statement of Mark Pankhurst - 01-Aug-2018 15,16-Aug-2018

P-5036

5.257

Statement of Mark Pankhurst - 14-Aug-2018

144. Richard Allert

5.265

Statement of Richard Allert - 25-Jul-2018 16-Aug- 2018

P-5068

5.266

Supplementary statement of Richard Allert - 15-Aug-2018

5.267

Statement of Richard Allert - 25-Jul-2018

5.268

Statement of Richard Allert - 01-Aug-2018

145. Rachel Sansom

5.277

Statement of Rachel Sansom - 09-Aug-2018 16-Aug- 2018

P-5107

146. Helen Rowell

5.298

Statement of Helen Rowell - 14-Aug-2018 17-Aug- 2018

P-5161

147. Stephen Glenfield

5.302

Statement of Stephen Glenfield - 14-Aug-2018 17-Aug- 2018

P-5199

148. Timothy Mullaly

5.310

Statement of Timothy Mullaly - 03-Aug-2018 17-Aug- 2018

P-5222

149. Peter Kell 5.318 Statement of Peter Kell - 13-Aug-2018 17-Aug-

2018

P-5246

150. Edward Cooley

5.320

Statement of Edward Cooley - 25-Jul-2018 N/A

Final Report

75

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

151. David Elmslie

5.321

Statement of David Elmslie - 26-Jul-2018 N/A

152. Umberto Mecchi

5.322

Statement of Umberto Mecchi - 31-Jul-2018 N/A

153. Sam Sicillia 5.323 Statement of Sam Sicillia - 01-Aug-2018 N/A

154. Scott Tully 5.324 Statement of Scott Tully - 26-Jul-2018 N/A

155. Gareth Russell

5.325

Statement of Gareth Russell - 26-Jul-2018 N/A

156. Hugh Humphrey 5.326 Statement of Hugh

Humphrey - 26-Jul-2018 N/A

157. Dr Lisa Butler Beatty 5.327 Statement of Lisa Beatty

- 26-Jul-2018

N/A

158. Tara Steyn 5.328 Statement of Tara Steyn - 26-Jul-2018 N/A

159. Peter Mullin 5.329 Statement of Peter Mullin (Rubric 5-28) - 25-Jul-2018 N/A

5.330

Statement of Peter Mullin (Rubric 5-29) - 25-Jul-2018

160. Andrew Fraser

5.331

Statement of Andrew Fraser - 30-Jul-2018 N/A

5.332

Statement of Andrew Fraser - 04-Aug-2018

161. Benjamin Walsh 5.333 Statement of Benjamin

Walsh - 25-Jul-2018

N/A

Statement of Benjamin Walsh - 30-Jul-2018

Statement of Benjamin Walsh - 03-Aug-2018

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

76

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

162. Stephen Bracks AC 5.336 Statement of Stephen

Bracks AC - 25-Jul-2018 N/A

5.337

Statement of Stephen Bracks AC - 03-Aug-2018

163. Jarrod Coysh

5.338

Statement of Jarrod Coysh - 31-Jul-2018 N/A

164. Kristian Fok 5.339 Statement of Kristian Fok - 31-Jul-2018 N/A

165. Robbie Campo

5.340

Statement of Robbie Campo - 03-Aug-2018 N/A

166. David Gallbally AM QC 5.341

Statement of David Gallbally AM QC - 25-Jul-2018 N/A

167. Geoff Lake 5.342 Statement of Geoff Lake - 24-Jul-2018 N/A

168. Melinda Howes

5.343

Statement of Melinda Howes - 18-Jul-2018 N/A

5.414

Statement of Melinda Howes - 22-Aug-2018

169. Mark Lennon

5.344

Statement of Mark Lennon - 17-Aug-2018 N/A

170. Jayson Walker

5.345

Statement of Jayson Walker - 26-Jul-2018 N/A

171. Adrian Rees 5.346 Statement of Adrian Rees - 15-Aug-2018 N/A

172. Jennifer Dean

5.392

Statement of Jennifer Dean - 03-Aug-2018 N/A

Final Report

77

Insurance

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

173. Timothy Thorne

6.7

Statement of Timothy Thorne - 22-Aug-2018 N/A

6.8

Supplementary statement of Timothy Thorne - 07-Sep-2018

6.10

Further statement of Timothy Thorne - 07-Sep-2018

174. Jennifer Oliver

6.9

Statement of Jennifer Oliver - 23-Aug-2018 N/A

175. Michael Thornton

6.11

Statement of Michael Thornton - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

6.12

Supplementary statement of Michael Thornton - 06-Sep-2018

6.124

Statement of Michael Thornton - 27-Aug-2018

176. Sean McCormack 6.13

Statement of Sean McCormack - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

6.105

Statement of Sean McCormack - 03-Sep-2018

6.125

Statement of Sean McCormack - 27-Aug-2018

177. Ross Barnwell

6.14

Statement of Ross Barnwell - 03-Sep-2018 N/A

178. Geoffrey Rogers

6.15

Statement of Geoffrey Rogers - 03-Sep-2018 N/A

179. Susan Houghton

6.16

Statement of Susan Houghton - 07-Sep-2018 N/A

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

78

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

6.109

Statement of Susan Houghton - 30-Aug-2018

6.128

Statement of Susan Houghton - 28-Aug-2018

6.260

Statement of Susan Houghton - 30-Aug-2018

6.326

Statement of Susan Houghton - 22-June-2018

6.411

Supplementary statement of Susan Houghton - 19-Sep-2018

6.420

Statement of Susan Houghton - 19-Sep-2018

180. Michael Wright

6.17

Statement of Michael Wright - 23-Aug-2018 N/A

6.410

Supplementary statement of Michael Wright - 21-Sep-2018

181. Tim Bailey 6.18 Statement of Tim Bailey - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

182. Chesne Stafford

6.19

Statement of Chesne Stafford - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

183. Helen Troup 6.20 Statement of Helen Troup - 21-Aug-2018 12, 13-

Sep-2018

P-5545

6.103

Statement of Helen Troup - 27-Aug-2018

6.137

Statement of Helen Troup - 07-Sep-2018

6.138

Statement of Helen Troup - 28-Aug-2018

Final Report

79

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

6.139

Statement of Helen Troup - 11-Sep-2018

6.322

Statement of Helen Troup - 12-Jun-2018

6.323

Second statement of Helen Troup - 12-Jun-2018

6.324

Supplementary statement of Helen Troup - 22-Jun-2018

184. Maria Lykouras

6.21

Statement of Maria Lykouras - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

185. Mark Ballantyne 6.22

Statement of Mark Ballantyne - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

186. Hugh Humphrey 6.23

Statement of Hugh Humphrey - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

187. Gavin Pearce

6.24

Statement of Gavin Pearce - 21-Aug-2018 N/A

6.107

Statement of Gavin Pearce - 27-Aug-2018 N/A

188. Christopher McHugh 6.25 Statement of Christopher

McHugh - 27-Aug-2018 N/A

6.108

Statement of Christopher McHugh - 04-Sep-2018

6.134

Statement of Christopher McHugh - 27-Aug-2018

189. Gregory Johnson

6.26

Statement of Gregory Johnson - 10-Sep-2018 N/A

190. Gregory Martin

6.28

Statement of Gregory Martin - 21-Aug-2018 10, 11-Sep-2018

P-5304

6.29

Statement of Gregory Martin - 27-Aug-2018

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

80

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

191. Allison Smith

6.62

Statement of Allison Smith - 27-Aug-2018 N/A

192. Bruce Stewart

6.64

Statement of Bruce Stewart - 04-Sep-2018 11-Sep-2018 P-5405

193. Craig Orton 6.66 Statement of Craig Orton - 24-Aug-2018 11, 12-

Sep-2018

P-5418

6.67

Statement of Craig Orton - 27-Aug-2018

194. Warren McAlpine

6.102

Statement of Warren McAlpine - 27-Aug-2018 N/A

195. Brenard Grobler

6.104

Statement of Brenard Grobler - 27-Aug-2018 N/A

196. Natalie Cameron

6.106

Statement of Natalie Cameron - 03-Sep-2018 N/A

6.126

Statement of Natalie Cameron - 28-Aug-2018

197. Timothy Howell

6.110

Statement of Timothy Howell - 03-Sep-2018 N/A

6.129

Statement of Timothy Howell - 23-Aug-2018

198. Luke Hyde 6.115 Statement of Luke Hyde - 28-Aug-2018 N/A

199. Malcolm Weir

6.118

Statement of Malcolm Weir - 28-Aug-2018 N/A

200. Justin Delaney

6.123

Statement of Justin Delaney - 27-Aug-2018 N/A

201. Russell Jansen

6.127

Statement of Russell Jansen - 06-Sep-2018 N/A

202. Sheriff Hamza

6.130

Statement of Sheriff Hamza - 23-Aug-2018 N/A

Final Report

81

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

203. Gary Bailison

6.131

Statement of Gary Bailison - 23-Aug-2018 N/A

204. Mark Raberger

6.132

Statement of Mark Raberger - 23-Aug-2018 N/A

6.209

Further statement of Mark Raberger - 28-Aug-2018

205. Gerard Kerr 6.133 Statement of Gerard Kerr - 23-Aug-2018 N/A

206. Megan Beer 6.135 Statement of Megan Beer - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

207. Sally Phillips 6.177 Statement of Sally Phillips - 06-Sep-2018 N/A

208. Loraine van Eeden 6.179 Statement of Loraine van

Eeden - 31-Aug-2018 13, 14-Sep-2018 P-5658

6.180

Statement of Loraine van Eeden - 05-Sep-2018

209. Andrew Morrison

6.210

Statement of Andrew Morrison - 03-Sep-2018 N/A

210. Melinda Howes

6.211

Statement of Melinda Howes - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

211. Peter Chun 6.212 Statement of Peter Chun - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

6.213

Statement of Peter Chun - 31-Aug-2018

212. Dr Lisa Butler Beatty 6.214 Statement of Dr Lisa Beatty

- 21-Aug-2018

N/A

213. Thomas Garde

6.125

Statement of Thomas Garde - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

82

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

214. Caroline James

6.216

Statement of Caroline James - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

215. Paul Schroder

6.217

Statement of Paul Schroder - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

216. Jason Sommer

6.218

Statement of Jason Sommer - 12-Sep-2018 N/A

6.219

Statement of Jason Sommer - 31-Aug-2018

217. Noel Lacey 6.220 Statement of Noel Lacey - 12-Sep-2018 N/A

6.221

Statement of Noel Lacey - 31-Aug-2018

218. Colin Cassidy

6.222

Statement of Colin Cassidy - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

219. Lachlan Ross

6.224

Statement of Lachlan Ross - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

6.225

Statement of Lachlan Ross - 07-Sep-2018

220. Natalie Binns

6.229

Statement of Natalie Binns - 31-Aug-2018 N/A

221. Paul Howard

6.230

Statement of Paul Howard - 07-Sep-2018 N/A

6.422

Statement of Paul Howard - 20-Sep-2018

222. Joseph De Bruyn 6.231 Statement of Joseph De

Bruyn - 12-Sep-2018 N/A

223. Paul Sainsbury

6.233

Statement of Paul Sainsbury - 10-Sep-2018 17-Sep-2018 P-5859

6.234

Statement of Paul Sainsbury - 05-Sep-2018

Final Report

83

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

224. Gary Dransfield

6.251

Statement of Gary Dransfield - 11-Sep-2018 N/A P-6277

6.325

Statement of Gary Dransfield - 13-Jun-2018

6.368

Statement of Gary Dransfield - 13-Jun-2018

6.369

Statement of Gary Dransfield - 24-Jun-2018

6.370

Statement of Gary Dransfield - 29-Aug-2018

225. Michael Winter

6.252

Statement of Michael Winter - 30-Aug-2018 17, 18-Sep-2018

P-5909

6.263

Statement of Michael Winter - 24-Aug-2018

6.282

Further statement of Michael Winter - 17-Sep-2018

6.414

Statement of Michael Winter - 19-Sep-2018

226. David Krawitz

6.253

Statement of David Krawitz - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

6.319

Statement of David Krawitz - 13-Jun-2018

6.320

Further statement of David Krawitz - 25-Jun-2018

6.412

Supplementary statement of David Krawitz - 20-Sep-2018

227. Mark Milliner 6.254 Statement of Mark Milliner - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

84

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

6.315

Supplementary statement of Mark Milliner - 14-Sep-2018

6.415

Statement of Mark Milliner - 19-Sep-2018

228. Miles Sowden

6.255

Statement of Miles Sowden - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

6.416

Statement of Miles Sowden - 19-Sep-2018

229. Sinead Taylor

6.256

Statement of Sinead Taylor - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

230. Gareth Russell

6.257

Statement of Gareth Russell - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

6.417

Statement of Gareth Russell - 20-Sep-2018

231. Christopher Killourhy 6.258 Statement of Christopher

Killourhy - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

6.418

Statement of Christopher Killourhy - 19-Sep-2018

232. David Roberts

6.259

Statement of David Roberts - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

6.419

Statement of David Roberts - 19-Sep-2018

233. Bert Bakker 6.261 Statement of Bert Bakker - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

6.327

Statement of Bert Bakker - 08-Jun-2018

6.328

Supplementary statement of Bert Bakker - 21-Jun-2018

6.421

Statement of Bert Bakker - 19-Sep-2018

Final Report

85

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

234. Lori Callahan

6.284

Statement of Lori Callahan - 24-Aug-2018 18-Sep-2018 P-5986

6.321

Statement of Lori Callahan - 13-Jun-2018

235. Benjamin Bessell 6.304 Statement of Benjamin

Bessell - 27-Aug-2018 18, 19-Sep-2018 P-6080

236. Declan Moore

6.316

Statement of Declan Moore - 30-Aug-2018 N/A

237. Paul Holmes 6.317 Statement of Paul Holmes - 11-Jun-2018 N/A

238. Brenda Staggs

6.318

Statement of Brenda Staggs - 11-Sep-2018 N/A

239. Sacha Murphy

6.330

Statement of Sacha Murphy - 20-Jun-2018 19-Sep-2018 P-6154

240. Glen Sutton 6.332 Statement of Glen Sutton - 20-Jun-2018 19-Sep-2018 P-6171

241. Jason Storey

6.334

Statement of Jason Storey - 17-Sep-2018 19, 20-Sep-2018

P-6185

6.335

Statement of Jason Storey - 17-Sep-2018

242. Bernadette Heald 6.382 Statement of Bernadette

Heald - 30-Aug-2018 20-Sep-2018 P-6328

243. Lynelle Briggs

6.401

Statement of Lynelle Briggs - 14-Sep-2018 N/A

244. Anne Brown 6.402 Statement of Anne Brown - 28-Aug-2018 N/A

245. Robert Whelan

6.404

Statement of Robert Whelan - 27-Aug-2018 21-Sep-2018 P-6391

246. Sally Loane 6.409 Statement of Sally Loane - 30-Aug-2018 21-Sep-2018 P-6432

247. Andrew Mair 6.413 Statement of Andrew Mair - 19-Sep-2018 N/A

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

86

Policy questions

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

248. Matthew Comyn

7.2

Statement of Matthew Comyn - 11-Nov-2018 19, 20-Nov- 2018

P-6514

249. Catherine Livingston N/A N/A

20, 21-Nov-2018 P-6687

250. David Abusah

7.47

Statement of David Abusah - 02-Nov-2018 N/A

251. Brett Tollman

7.48

Statement of Brett Tollman - 06-Nov-2018 N/A

252. Brian Hartzer

7.50

Statement of Brian Hartzer - 16-Nov-2018 21, 22-Nov-2018

P-6790

253. Nicholas Moore

7.60

Statement of Nicholas Moore (Rubric 7-06) - 19-Nov-2018 22-Nov-2018 P-6882

7.61

Statement of Nicholas Moore (Rubric 7-16) - 19-Nov-2018

254. James Shipton

7.63

Statement of James Shipton - 07-Nov-2018 22, 23-Nov-2018

P-6901

7.64

Supplementary statement of James Shipton - 12-Nov-2018

255. Andrew Thorburn

7.80

Statement of Andrew Thorburn - 19-Nov-2018 26-Nov-2018 P-7029

7.81

Supplementary statement of Andrew Thorburn - 24-Nov-2018

Final Report

87

Witness

Exhibit no. Statement

Oral evidence given

Transcript reference

256. Dr Kenneth Henry N/A N/A

26, 27-Nov-2018 P-7098

257. Lynda Dean 7.108 Statement of Lynda Dean - 02-Nov-2018 N/A

7.109

Second statement of Lynda Dean - 16-Nov-2018

258. Fiona Wardlaw

7.110

Statement of Fiona Wardlaw - 02-Nov-2018 N/A

259. Michael Wilkins

7.112

Statement of Michael Wilkins - 21-Nov-2018 27, 28-Nov-2018

P-7187

260. Shayne Elliott

7.120

Statement of Shayne Elliott - 08-Nov-2018 28, 29-Nov-2018

P-7247

7.121

Statement of Shayne Elliott - 16-Nov-2018

261. Robert Johanson 7.141 Statement of Robert

Johanson - 07-Nov-2018 29-Nov-2018 P-7358

262. Wayne Byres

7.145

Statement of Wayne Byres - 12-Nov-2018 29, 30-Nov-2018

P-7384

Some witnesses gave evidence in more than one round of hearings.

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

88

Appendix 6:

Submissions

Final Report

89

Consumer lending

Received from Date

ASIC 03-Apr-2018

Aussie Home Loans - Part A 03-Apr-2018

Aussie Home Loans - Part B 03-Apr-2018

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited Not dated

Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) Not dated

Choice 03-Apr-2018

Citi International 03-Apr-2018

Commonwealth Bank of Australia 03-Apr-2018

Consumer Action Law Centre 03-Apr-2018

Finance Sector Union Not dated

Legal Aid NSW Not dated

National Australia Bank 03-Apr-2018

National Australian Bank - Introducer case study Not dated

Smartline Home Loans Pty Ltd 03-Apr-2018

Westpac 03-Apr-2018

Westpac - Auto Finance 03-Apr-2018

Westpac - Credit Card Credit Limit Increases 03-Apr-2018

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

90

Financial advice

Received from Date

AMP - Submission - General Questions 07-May-2018

AMP - Case Study 1 - Fees for no service 04-May-2018

AMP - Case Study 2 - Investment platform fees 04-May-2018

AMP - Case Study 3 - Inappropriate Financial Advice 04-May-2018

Andrew Smith - Submission Not dated

APRA Not dated

ASIC 07-May-2018

Association of Financial Advisers (AFA) 07-May-2018

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ) 07-May-2018

Choice 07-May-2018

Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) - Part A Wealth Management 04-May-2018

Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) - Part B 07-May-2018

Dover Financial Advisers Not dated

Finance Sector Union (FSU) Not dated

Financial Planners Association of Australia (FPA) - Part A Not dated

Financial Planners Association of Australia (FPA) - Part B 04-May-2018

Henderson Maxwell Entities 04-May-2018

M3 and RI - Case Study Submissions Not dated

M3 and RI - Supplementary Case Study Submission 09-May-2018

Mr John Doyle - Submission 04-May-2018

National Australia Bank - General Questions 07-May-2018

National Australia Bank - Case Study Submissions 04-May-2018

National Australia Bank - Case Study Supplementary Submissions 09-May-2018

Treasury Not dated

Westpac Banking Corporation - General Submission 04-May-2018

Westpac Banking Corporation - Financial Advice Case Study 07-May-2018

Final Report

91

Small and medium enterprises

Received from Date

ABA written submission 08-Jun-2018

ANZ written submission 12-Jun-2018

ANZ case study submission 08-Jun-2018

APRA written submission Not dated

ASIC written submission 12-Jun-2018

BOQ written submission 12-Jun-2018

BOQ case study submission 08-Jun-2018

CBA written submission Not dated

CBA case study submission Not dated

CBA written response to Doherty submission 19-Jun-2018

Consumer Action Law Centre written submission 12-Jun-2018

Doherty written submission 19-Jun-2018

Finance Sector Union written submission Not dated

FOS case study submission 08-Jun-2018

Legal Aid NSW case study submission Not dated

Mr Dillon case study submission 08-Jun-2018

NAB written submission 12-Jun-2018

NAB case study submission 08-Jun-2018

Suncorp case study submission 08-Jun-2018

Treasury written submission Not dated

Westpac written submission 12-Jun-2018

Westpac case study submission - Flanagan 08-Jun-2018

Westpac case study submission - Marjo 08-Jun-2018

Westpac case study submission - Thir 08-Jun-2018

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

92

Regional and remote communities

Received from Date

ACBF case study submission 13-Jul-2018

ANZ written submission 16-Jul-2018

ANZ case study submission 13-Jul-2018

APRA written submission Not dated

ASIC written submission 16-Jul-2018

Bendigo Bank (Rural Bank) written submission 16-Jul-2018

Bendigo Bank (Rural Bank) case study submission 13-Jul-2018

CBA written submission Not dated

CBA case study submission Not dated

Consumer Action Law Centre written submission 16-Jul-2018

Consumer Action Law Centre case study submission 13-Jul-2018

Financial Counselling Australia written submission 16-Jul-2018

Financial Counselling Australia written submission 16-Jul-2018

Finance Sector Union written submission Not dated

Legal Aid NSW written submission Not dated

Legal Aid NSW case study submission Not dated

NAB written submission 16-Jul-2018

NAB case study submission 13-Jul-2018

Rabobank Australia Limited written submission 16-Jul-2018

Rabobank Australia Limited case study submission 13-Jul-2018

St Andrews Life Insurance (AFSL) case study submission 13-Jul-2018

Westpac written submission 16-Jul-2018

Final Report

93

Superannuation

No. Received from

1 Geoffrey Alexander Adams

2 Thomas Ronald Adams

3 William Adams

4 Alan

5 Max Aleckson

6 John Alexander

7

All Members of Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme Pool B

8 Anthony Allison

9 Derek Vincent Amos

10 AMP Limited

11 Lesley Jeannette Anderson

12 Elizabeth Andrews

13 Anthony

14 Tom Anthony Arnold

15 Anthony Asher

16

Association of Financial Advisers Limited

17

Association of Independent Retirees

18

Australia And New Zealand Banking Group Limited and Its Associated Entities (ANZ)

19 Australian Greens

20

Australian Institute of Company Directors

21

Australian Institute of Superannuation Trustees

22

Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA)

23

Australian Securities and Investments Commission

No. Received from

24 Australian Super

25 Michael Ayling

26 Dr Kim Backhouse

27 Dr Kim Backhouse

28 Darryl E Bacon

29 Paul Badcock

30 Debbie Maree Bahr

31 Carol Bailey

32 Margaret Baltatzidis

33 Bank Reform Now

34 Andrew Banks

35 Sharon Baragry

36 Richard Bardon

37 Graeme Barnes

38 Elisa Barwick

39 William Beatts-Rattray

40 James De Beaux

41 Jeremy Beck

42 Peter Beck

43 William Charles Best

44 Mark Best

45 Paul Best

46 Steven Bird

47 David Michael Blackwell

48 Milton Block

49 William Boeder

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

94

No. Received from

50 Eldon John Bottcher

51 Carlos Boughton

52 David John Bowden

53 Malcolm Boxall

54 Janis Christine Boyd

55 John HC Boyd

56 Ian Leslie Brander

57 Nathan Bray

58 Michael Peter Brennan

59 Brenden Briese

60 Richard Gary Brown

61 Brad Brown

62 Leanne Bull

63 Shane Burgess

64 Nadia Burgess

65 Michael Patrick Burns

66 Noel Gregory Butland

67 Sandra Ann Campbell

68 Trudy Ann Campbell

69 Graham Cann

70 David De Carlo

71 Steven Carr

72 Denham Wilson Carter

73 Ann Cash

74 Martin Cash

75 Trenton Caust

76 Ronald Chandler

77 Graeme Harry Chapman

78 Shane Osmond Chellis

No. Received from

79 Shane Chellis

80 Philip Chetcuti

81

CHOICE and Superannuation Consumers’ Centre

82 Mrs Kay Christensen

83

Civil Liberties, Consumer Rights, No-Tolls Political Party

84 Rita St Clair

85 Klaus Gerhard Clapinski

86 Henry Layland Clarke

87 Thomas Clarke

88 Michael J Clayton

89 The Investment Collective

90 Adrian Collier

91

Colonial First State Investments Limited and Avanteos Investments Limited

92 Connecting Every Dot Pty Ltd

93 Connecting Every Dot Pty Ltd

94 Andrew Coogan

95 Peter Charles Cook

96 Peter Cooper

97 John Cosstick

98 Lane Cove Council

99 Janet Thomasina Cowden

100 Graham Crowther

101 Nicholas Culling

102 William Arthur Dagger

103 Brian Davies

104 Granada Day

105 Robert M Dealtry

Final Report

95

No. Received from

106 Debra

107 Jay Dellavanzo

108

Department of The Prime Minister and Cabinet (Commonwealth of Australia)

109 Sean Dewling

110 Victor Diduk

111 Craig Allan Dillon

112 Kiro Dimeski

113 Dr Scott Donald

114 David John Donkin

115 Terence Douglas

116 Robert Drake

117 Hugh Drum

118 Bernard Duffy

119 Paul Aubrey Dwyer

120 Peter Dyki

121 Neil Richard Eastway

122 Colin Edwards

123 Peter Eggers

124 John Allison Elliott

125

Energy Industries Superannuation Scheme Pool B Members

126 Vanessa Sally Errol

127 Clement Francis Fader

128

Family Financial Services Business

129 Finance Sector Union of Australia

130

Financial Planning Association of Australia

131 Financial Services Council

No. Received from

132 Diane Marie Finlay

133 Rod Force

134 Valerie Frame

135 Terry Fraser

136 Saul Benedict Freedman

137 Richard French

138 Ray Gala

139 Paul Gallagher

140 Dominic Gannon

141 Ashish Garg

142 Elise Geritz

143 Garth John Gilbert

144 Ian Gill

145 Kylie Gillespie

146 Michael Gilligan

147 Dennis Peter Glynn

148 Brad Golding

149 Aileen Joyce Goldthorpe

150 Leigh Goodchild

151 Robert Gordon

152 Robert Gordon

153 Kenneth Gosney

154 Max Goulter

155 Larry Green

156 Peter Greening

157 Antonio Gullace

158 Bradley Halfacre

159 Simon Joseph Hall

160 Roger Hall

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

96

No. Received from

161 Tony Halpin

162 Eli Everett Hammond

163 John Hanna

164 Sam Hansen

165 Nathan Hansford

166 Francis William Hardbottle

167 Ronald Hardie

168 Stephen Harding

169 Arie Hartland

170 David Hartley

171 Peter Harwood

172 James Frederick Haw

173 Paul Hayes

174 James Edward Hazzard

175 Anne Hern

176 Walter Hess

177 Jean-Francois Hirschy

178 Patrick Howard

179 Peter Albert Howells

180 Steve Hunter

181 Kenton Bruce Huxtable

182 William Robert Ifield

183 Industry Super Australia Pty Ltd

184 William Ingrey

185 Aaron Isherwood

186 Craig Isherwood

187 George Jacklyn

188 Bevan James

No. Received from

189 Mwrvyn James

190 Perry Jasper

191 Perry Jasper

192 Ron Jean

193 Peter John Johnston

194 William Paul Jones

195 Gail Jones

196 Darryl Joy

197 Kamal

198 Lidia Laura Kardos

199 Stephen Kardos

200 Brian Anthony Kehl

201 Keira

202 Mary Kellett

203 Glynn D Kelly

204 Keith Kerr

205 Peter Kirk

206 Scott Kirwan

207 Gary Knock

208 Noelene Knopke

209 Steve Kordatos

210 Kathleen Merle Koschel

211 Alexander Kozlow

212 Nigel Lacey

213 Samuel Lackey

214 Robert Samuel Laing

215 John Henry Lauridsen

216 Tom Lawler Transport Pty Limited

Final Report

97

No. Received from

217 Barbara Lawler

218 Barbara Lawler

219 Geoff Leach

220 Neil Bayden Lehmann

221 Cheryl Leijer

222 Rod Lewis

223 John Loiterton

224 Paul Loiterton

225 Cliff Longshaw

226 Rick Louder

227 Michael Lozo

228 Alan Lutherborrough

229 Geoffrey Graeme Manifold

230 Anthony Mantella

231 Robert Marotta

232 Win Martin

233 & E Martino Super Fund

234 Sergio Mason

235 Vincent Maxwell

236 Bernadine McCullagh

237 Chris McDonald

238 Laura McDonough

239 Scott William McEwan

240 Patricia McInnes

241 Jocelyn Constance McKenzie

242 Gary McMahon

243 Glen Anthony McNamara

244 Cathleen Meggitt

245 Sandra Mel

No. Received from

246 Heather Mildred

247 David Mills

248 Roy Moosa

249 John Mountney

250 Kirsten Muir

251 Teodora Nagy

252 National Australia Bank (NAB)

253 Elizabeth Needham

254 Thomas Joseph Nelson

255 James Graham Niccol

256 Richard Bruce Nicholls

257 Adam Richard Nichols

258 Doug Noble

259 Alfred Obrien

260 Rodney Bruce Ofarrell

261 Patrick Ohare

262 Deb Oliver

263 Michael James O'shannessy

264 Eddie Ozols

265 Colin Parkhurst

266 Samuel James Parr

267 Brian Parris

268 John Pathinathan

269 Reea Pawley

270 Benjamin Joel Pearce

271 Harry Rex Pearsall

272 Peter James Pendlebury

273 Ian Pendleton

274 Matthew Peos

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

98

No. Received from

275 Francesco Pettinato

276 Airan Pevcic

277 Colin Horace Phillips

278 Jennifer Pickard

279 Leonia Picone

280 Emma Pimblett

281 Margaret Pinder

282 David Pinzone

283 Anna Pisckunov

284

Platinum Investment Management Limited

285 Linda Polic

286 Linda Polic

287

Robert Poppi Poppi Superannuation Fund

288 Robert Poppi

289 Louis Poulter

290 Barry Powell

291 Peter Pronczak

292 Dennis Shane Pukallus

293 Alan Francis Quirk

294 Carol Ralston-Bryce

295 Carol Ralston-Bryce

296 David Ralston-Bryce

297 Jason Anthony Rapp

298 Dan Reinhold

299 Rice Warner Actuaries

300 Alan Francis Rider

301 Robert

302 Jean Helen Robinson

No. Received from

303 Peter Robert Rolliston

304 Jorge Roshkov

305 Barbara Roy

306 Brett Sanders

307 Ron Sandilands

308 Reinhard Schemmann

309 Errol Schmetzer

310 Arthur Richard Schulz

311 Eric John Scroop

312 Graham Setterberg

313 Naveen Sharma

314 David Philip Sheedy

315 Annette Shields

316 Geoffrey Shields

317 Andrew Shine

318 Rachel Skelton

319 Garrick Small

320 Mark Smith

321 Nick Smith

322 Andrew Soulos

323 Karen Spencer

324 Andja Srzich

325 Andja Srzich

326 Charles Stanger

327 Dianne Stebbing

328 SteveH

329 Dr David Stevens

330 Shannon Stevens

331 Stockspot

Final Report

99

No. Received from

332 Shaun Stoddart

333 Michael John Stone

334 David Stow

335 Noel Stratford

336 Frank Student

337 Judith Sudholz

338 Wilson Sy

339 Harry Tan

340 David Taylor

341

The Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia (ASFA)

342

The Australian Banking Association

343 David Thomas

344 Don Thomas

345 Margaret [Meg] Thornton

346 Lars Thystrup

347 Anton Tjioe

348 Anthony Tomlinson

349 Treasury

350 Stephen Trounson

351 Rosemary Trudeau

352 Grahame Turner

353 Anthony Tweedie.

354 TWU Nominees ATF Twusuper

355 Suzanne Vasanji

356 Sonya Verning

357 Victims of Financial Fraud

No. Received from

358 Victims of Financial Fraud

359 Roula Vlassis

360 April Waldron

361 Alexander Joseph Walsh

362 Ernst Van Walsum

363 Trevor Ward

364 Sam Warne

365 Shawna Warne

366 Clive Waterman

367 Graeme Stewart Waugh

368 John Weber

369 Ray Weeks

370 Michael Weigang

371 Westpac Banking Corporation

372 Robert Whalley

373 Bruce Whitehead

374 Andrew Whyte

375 Desmond Whyte

376 David Williams

377 Michael Wolf

378 Morgwn Wood

379 Monty Woodbridge

380 David Woodhouse

381 Loretta Woolston

382 Sleiman Yohanna

383 Alison Zerk

This includes all policy submissions in response to Round 5 (Superannuation) that have been published on the Royal Commission’s website. The Commission reserved the right not to publish submissions where matters are subject to a non-publication order, or where there were privacy concerns about the information included. The Commission received 124 submissions in response to Round 5 (Superannuation) where the individual asked that their name be withheld.

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

100

Insurance

No. Received from

1 AAI Limited

2 AMP

3 Daniel Archibald

4 ASFA

5 Anthony Asher

6

Association of Financial Advisers (AFA)

7

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited

8

Australian Institute of Company Directors

9

Australian Institute of Superannuation Trustees

10 Australian Lawyers Alliance

11

Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA)

12

Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC)

13 Maurice Barry

14 Dennis Bass

15 Clifford Berenger

16 Berril & Watson Lawyers

17 Beyond Blue

18 Mark Glendon Bird

19 Margaret Blade

20 Paul Thomas Bourne

21 Deborah Brown

22 Dr Irfan Cakan

23 Charles Richard Campbell

No. Received from

24 Charmaine Casey

25 Ronald George Cassar

26 Peter Chia

27

CHOICE and the Superannuation Consumers’ Centre

28 ClearView

29 Commonwealth Bank of Australia

30 Consumer Action Law Centre

31

Consumer Credit Legal Service WA Inc

32 Tim Cull

33 Matthew Darragh

34 Department of Treasury

35 Serge Diklitch

36 Tony Di Donato

37 Timothy Dowling

38 Mohamed El-Ansary

39 Eric Insurance Limited

40 Phillip Everett

41

Prof Alan Fels AO and Prof David Cousins AM

42 Finance Sector Union of Australia

43

Financial Planning Association of Australia

44 Financial Rights Legal Centre

45 Financial Rights Legal Centre

46 Financial Services Council

Final Report

101

No. Received from

47 Grant James Forbes

48 Carolyn Forsberg

49 Russell Francis

50 Robert Franklin

51 Anthony Gliding

52 Dallas Graham

53 Innes Cowie Grant

54 GRC Institute

55 Andrew George Halliday

56 Christopher Nicholas Haslet

57

Health Professionals Australia Reform Association

58 Stephen Hitchcock

59 Bruce Holloway

60 Peter Horwath

61 Peter Horwath

62 Gary Roderick Howard

63 Industry Super Australia Pty Ltd

64 Insurance Council of Australia

65 David Johnson

66 Paul Jones

67 Holly Kelsall

68 Gillian Kirby

69 Selwyn Krepp

70 Terry Lai

71 Legal Aid NSW

72 Legal Aid Queensland

73 Wendy Lewthwaite

74 Local Government NSW

75 Peter Bowden Lockhart

76 Peter Lockhart

77 Steven Anthony Mark AM

No. Received from

78 Ian Mcintosh

79 Mental Health Australia

80 Robert Milne

81 Colin Minson

82 Leigh Selby Morgan

83 NAB

84

National Insurance Brokers Association

85

National Mental Health Commission

86 Lee Nicolle ta LDN Wholesale

87 Adrian Nixon

88 Patrick Joseph O'Connor

89 Diane Ohlmann

90 Anthony O'Leary

91 Shane Palmer

92 Joseph Panthradil

93 David Pham

94 Gavin Polmans

95 Jeff Pope

96 Kylie Prince

97 Public Interest Advocacy Centre

98 Lea Pustetto

99 The QSuper Board

100 Marion Rae

101 Peter Razos

102 Rudolf Rensburg

103 Rest

104 Ian Rischmueller

105 Anthony Russell

106 Heather Ryan

107 Helen Kristina Ryan

108 Ian Satill

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

102

No. Received from

109 Ben Saunders

110 Kathy Savvidis

111 Steven Sinfield

112 Slater and Gordon Lawyers

113 John Paul Sterndale

114 Terry Stokes

115 Michael John Stone

116 Dirk Swagerman

117 Penelope Tastula

118 Chris Thomas

119 Tom

No. Received from

120 James Edward Troy

121 TWUSUPER

122 Gerasimos Nicholas Vallianos

123 Stuart Bruce Venn

124

Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission

125 Roula Vlassis

126 Rebecca Welsh

127 Westpac Banking Corporation

128 Christopher Sam Whitworth

129 Youi Pty Ltd

This includes all policy submissions in response to Round 6 (Insurance) that have been published on the Royal Commission’s website. The Commission reserved the right not to publish submissions where matters are subject to a non-publication order, or where there were privacy concerns about the information included. The Commission received 43 submissions in response to Round 6 (Insurance) where the individual asked that their name be withheld.

Final Report

103

Interim Report

No. Received from

1 ACBF Group Holdings PTY LTD

2 Mario Andres Munoz Acosta

3 Thomas W Adams

4 Adaptive Cultures Pty Ltd

5 Ahmed Ahmetagic

6 Aidin

7 Patricia Ainsworth

8 Max Aleckson

9 Robert Alexander

10 Margaret Mary Alford

11 Anthony Allison

12 Amanda

13 Edwin Amery

14 AMP Limited

15 Amstelveen

16 Donna Anderson

17 Donna Anderson

18 Donna Anderson

19 Michael Anderson

20 Jacob Andrews

21 Lara Angell

22 Bundy Apostolou

23 ARCA

24 Daniel Archibald

25 Arenburg Consulting

26 Heather Armitage

No. Received from

27 James Tom Anthony Arnold

28 Anthony Asher

29

Association of Financial Advisers Ltd

30

Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia (ASFA)

31 Stephen Atkin

32 Steve Atkin

33 Merrill Austin

34 Tony Austin

35

Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (ANZ)

36

Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman

37

Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC)

38

Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA)

39 Australian Labor Party

40

Australian Institute of Company Directors

41

Australian Institute of Performance Sciences

42

Australian Institute of Superannuation Trustees

43 Australian Greens

44

Australian Financial Complaints Authority

45 Australian Finance Group Ltd

46

Australian Finance Industry Association

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

104

No. Received from

47 Australian Banking Association

48 Michael Ayling

49 Christie Bader

50 Peter Baker

51 Henk Ballast

52 Bank of Queensland Limited

53 Banking Standards Board

54 Prof Elise Bant

55 Richard Bardon

56 Scotty Barr

57 Raylee Barrett

58 Dominic Barry

59 Ian Barry

60 Irene Barry

61 Michael Barry

62 Barry

63 Elisa Barwick

64 Benjamin Susan Bath

65 Gordon Batt

66 Dr Colin Beardsley

67 Kenneth Gerard Bebb

68 Jeremy Beck

69 Marjet Bedi

70 Theresa Beecroft

71 Adam Bell

72 Desmond Bell

73 Jennifer Bell

74

Bendigo and Adelaide Bank Limited

No. Received from

75 David Alexandria Bennett

76 Peter Bennett

77 Ernest Frank Berlic

78 Mark Best

79 Paul Best

80 Neil Bidder

81 Farhad B Billimoria

82 Steven Maxwelln Bird

83 Anthony Barry Blackman

84 Kelvin Blair

85 Roger Blakeway

86 Leigh John Boileau

87 Bob Bone

88 Bernie Bourke

89 Rory Bowler

90 Rory Bowler

91 Martin Andrew Boyd

92 Nolene Bradshaw

93 Ian Leslie Brander

94 Ivan Brbot

95 Bredan Briese

96 Brisbane Residents United Inc

97 Henry Neil Gribble Broadbent

98 Steven Henderson Brown

99 Adrian Bryant

100 Mr B A Bucktin

101 Roger Bugg

102 Margo Bunt

103 Allan Burke

Final Report

105

No. Received from

104 Gerald Burns

105

Burrell Stockbroking & Superannuation

106 Jessica Buxton

107 Brian Byrne

108 Wendy Cain

109 Joshua Lawrence Camm

110 Joshua Camm

111 Tony Cammarano

112 Meredith Melinda Campbell

113 Professor Liz Campbell

114 Meredith Campbell

115 Trudy Campbell

116 Thomas Canning

117 Martin Carey

118 Leslie J Carnegie

119 Steven Carr

120 Genevieve Carrier

121 Brett Robert Cash

122 Troy Michael Cash

123 John Sommers Casley

124 Caux Round Table

125 William John Cebula

126

Centre for Future Work at the Australia Institute

127

Centre for Law Markets and Regulation, UNSW

128

Centre for Research in Religion and Social Policy, University of Divinity

129 Andrew Jack Chalkley

No. Received from

130 Ronald Chandler

131

Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand

132 Lorena Chater

133 Neil Chater

134 Chai Yee Cheng

135 CHOICE

136 Mrs Kay Christensen

137

Citizens Electoral Council of Australia

138 Fanita Clark

139 Nathan Clark

140 Peter Clark

141 Martin Claxton

142 Peter Clements

143 JOST & Co

144 Julian Cochran

145 David Collett

146 Adrian Collier

147

Combined Pensioners and Superannuants Association (CPSA)

148 Combined Industry Forum

149 Dr Vicky Comino

150

Commercial & Asset Finance Brokers Association of Australia

151

Commonwealth Bank of Australia and its associated entities

152

Community and Public Sector Union (PSU Group)

153 Brian Concannon

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

106

No. Received from

154 Barry Conde

155

Connective Broker Services Pty Ltd

156 Thomas Moore Connelly

157 Maxwell John Connor

158

Constituents of the Burdekin Electorate (Queensland)

159 Consumer Credit Law Centre SA

160

Consumer Credit Legal Service WA Inc

161 Consumer Action Law Centre

162

Consumer Policy Research Centre

163 Nick Contarino

164 Colin Evan Cook

165 Geoffrey Cornell

166 Lindsay D Cosgrove

167 John Cosstick

168 Robert Couper

169 Mark Coutts

170 Janet Thomasina Cowden

171 Stephen Cox

172 CPA Australia

173 Timothy Cragg

174 Caulfield Craig

175 Glenn Crichton

176 David John Cridland

177 Anne Crocker

178 Mr Rik Crockford

179 Phillip Randall Cross

180 Tina Gayle Crossley

No. Received from

181 John Crothers

182 Geoffrey Crowther

183 Graham Crowther

184 Graham Crowther

185 Ngaire Crowther

186 Nicholas Culling

187 John Charles Culverwell

188 Stephen Donald Currie

189

Customer Owned Banking Association

190 Mark Dalrymple

191 Andrew Dalton

192 Victor Damos

193 Andrew Lloyd Davey

194 George Davies

195 Peter James Davis

196 Ian Davis

197 Anne Marie Dawborn

198 Timothy J de Beaux

199 Robert Melvyn Dealtry

200 Geoffrey Youle Dean

201

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

202 DFS Group

203 Stephen Dobson

204 Rodney Doel

205 John Douglass

206 Mr Ronald J Doyle

207 Joshua Anthony Doyle

208 Peter Doyle

Final Report

107

No. Received from

238 Simon Fenton

239 James Ferguson

240 Andrew Fernbach

241 Finance Sector Union of Australia

242

Finance Brokers Association of Australia Limited

243 Financial Services Council

244

Financial Services Institute of Australasia (FINSIA)

245 Financial Rights Legal Centre

246

Financial Planning Association of Australia

247 Financial Counselling Australia

248 Financial Counselling Australia

249 Financial Counselling Australia

250 Andre Fink

251 Diane Marie Finlay

252 First Impressions Image Training

253 Jared Fletcher

254 Rhonda Fletcher

255 Peter Maurice Flynn

256 Russell Folland

257 John Ford

258 Luke Ford

259 Stephen Foster

260 John Fowler

261 Finley Francois

262 Richard French

No. Received from

209 Philip Edward Drew

210 Robert Dring

211 Peter Drury

212 Magdalene DSilva

213 Christine Dudley

214 Martin Duffield

215 Benard William Duffy

216 Robert Bruce Duncan

217 Alexander Duncan

218 Andrew Dunlop

219 Paul Durling

220 John Dwyer

221 William Edgar

222 Rosemarie Edler

223 Karl Randall Edson

224 Robertus van Egdom

225 Dr Liz Elliott

226 Dr Elizabeth Elliott

227 Shane Ellis

228 Tooraj Enayati

229 Clive Ettia

230 Mikayla Lee Evans

231 Christopher Evers-Swindell

232 Elmore Family

233 David Farmer

234 Thomas Michael Farrell

235 Charles Faulkner

236 Sergii Fedotov

237 Linda Fencaros

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

108

No. Received from

263 Trevor John Frost

264 Daniel Frydrych

265 Bonita Louise Fulham

266 Jutta Maria Galbory

267 David R Gallagher

268 Mitchell Gamble

269 Scott Gandy

270 Anthony Garner

271 John Garrick

272 Tim Gaspar

273 Dennis Gentilin

274 Kylie Gillespie

275 Steve Gillham

276

Associate Professor George Gilligan

277 Gary Glancy

278 Brad Golding

279 Donald George Goldsmith

280 William Edward Gollan

281 Lewis Bramley Goodridge

282 Jen Goods

283 Richard Gorman

284 Michael John Gough

285 Suzanne Gould

286 Theresa Ann Goulson

287 Governance Institute of Australia

288 Rosamund Clare Grady

289 Natasha GraebnerBraun

290 Anthoy Irving Graham

No. Received from

291 Laurie Gransden

292 Karin Grant

293 GRC Institute

294 Mary Green

295 Gregory

296 Mark Greville

297 Kenneth Walter Grundy

298 Guerdon Associates Pty Limited

299 Anthony Gunn

300 Peter Hagen

301 Mark P Haikonen

302 Roger Hall

303 Elizabeth Handley

304 Brian Hankinson

305 Keith Harper

306 Douglas Harrison

307 Douglas Harrison

308 Ian Harrison

309 Edward Hartman

310 Carol Harvey

311 Simon Haselgrove

312 Mike Haydon

313 Trevor Haydon

314 Bruce Thomas Haynes

315 James Edward Hazzard

316 Greg Healey

317 Peter Hedley

318 Ian Hegglun

Final Report

109

No. Received from

319 Richard Heidtmann

320 Anthony Stephen Herbert

321 Neil Hermes

322 Dean Herron

323 Charles Higby

324 David Hodgen

325 Ivan Holko

326 Brendan Holland

327 Home Loan Experts

328 Paul Homolka

329 Peter Horwitz

330 Stuart Howe

331 Ray Huang

332 Carole Hubbard

333 Anthony Joseph Hudson

334 Steven Hughes

335 Douglas Humphries

336 Johanna Hunneman

337 Warwick William Alfred Hunt

338 Gordon Hunter

339 Steve Hunter

340 Kenton Huxtable

341 Liudmyla Iakovets

342 Kingsley Iddon

343 William Ifield

344 William Ifield

345 Industry Super Australia Pty Ltd

346 Graeme Inglis

No. Received from

347 William Robert Ingrey

348

Institute of Managed Account Professionals

349 Insurance Council of Australia

350 Noelene Isherwood

351 Raymond N Jans

352 Ronald Ernest Jean

353 Heike Jindra

354 John

355

M. Johnston, A. Lofts, I. Peel, B. Cobb, N. Watson, M. Newman, W. McDonald

356 Evan Jones

357 William Jones

358 Thomas James Jordan

359 Simon Joseph Hall

360 Kathleen

361 Mr John Kearney

362 David Kecek

363 Cynthia Kardell

364 Leslie Thomas Kelly

365 Keith Derek Kerr

366 Michelle Kiamil

367 Don Kim

368 Anthony King

369 Phillip King

370 Norma Kirkland

371 Joerg Steven Kiss

372 Werner Klose

373 Marcel Knuffel

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

110

No. Received from

403 Louise Locke

404 Warren Loone

405 Barrett Loraine

406 Ricky Luder

407 Neil Frncis Lyon

408 Macquarie Group Limited

409 Reynaldo Maestre

410 Reynaldo Maestre

411 Michael Clinton Maher

412 Irene Maher

413 Peter Mair

414 Nakisa Malakooti

415 Nakisa Malakooti

416 Philip Henry Mancy

417 John Mandalios

418 Geoffrey Graeme Manifold

419 John Henry Mann

420 Anthony Mantella

421 Robert Marotta

422 John D Marsh

423 James Keith Marshall

424

Martin North Digital Finance Analytics

425 Colin W Martin

426 Kenneth Arthur Martin FCPA

427 Cv & E Martino Super Fund

428 Thomas Marwick

429 Rainer Mora Mathews

430 Richard Matthews

No. Received from

374 John Kohl

375 John Kohl

376 John Kohl

377 Tully Kops

378 Laurence Krass

379 Selwyn Krepp

380 John Krylyszyn

381 Hans Kuehn

382 Carl Kuen

383 Nigel Lacey

384 Anton Lagerway

385 Alan Lane

386 Kieren Lane

387 Larry

388 Law Council of Australia

389 Ann Lawler

390 Anthony Lawless

391 Michael Lawrance

392 Christopher Lee

393 Peter Lee

394 Legal Aid NSW

395 Legal Aid Queensland

396 Christopher John Lewis

397 Nerida Lewis

398 Rod Lewis

399 Life. Be in it.

400 Geoffrey Links

401 Loan Market Group

402 Adrian Lobo

Final Report

111

No. Received from

431 Stephen Lewis Matthews

432 Coral May Tait

433 Robyn Mayne

434 Joanne McAndrews

435 Daniel James McCabe

436 Shaun McCarthy

437 Mark McDonald

438 William McDonough

439 McGing Advisory & Actuarial

440 John Mcgowan

441 Patricia McInnes

442 Joan Mcintyre

443 Jocelyn Constance Mckenzie

444 Christopher Mcmahon

445 Alexander Craig McMorron

446 Dale Andrew McNally

447 Dale Andrew McNally

448 Barry McTaggart

449 Jerry Allen Mecham

450 Graeme John Medhurst

451 William (Bill) Meeke

452 Dan Meiers

453 Melis Developments P/L

454 Mario Menso

455 Gordon Menzies

456 Daniel Meyerowitz-Katz

457 Michael

458 Graham Miller

459 Thomas George Millerd

No. Received from

460 Jon Minney

461 Douglas Mitchell

462 Aidin Mohajeri

463 Michael Molesworth

464 Lindsay Morris

465 Wayne Morrison

466 Mortgage Choice

467

Mortgage & Finance Association of Australia (MFAA)

468 Jackie Morton

469 Kirsten Muir

470 Kerryn Lee Munday

471 Tony Murphy

472 Eric Michael Murray

473 Mike Musgrave

474 Di Myers

475 Teodora Nagy

476 Max Najar

477 National Australia Bank (NAB)

478

National Association of Community Legal Centres and Financial Counselling Australia

479 Sandra Elizabeth Neal

480 Roland Nelson

481 George Neofitou

482

Assoc Prof Ben Neville and Prof Dirk Matton

483 Khoa Nguyen

484 Carl Nickson

485 Don Nicol

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

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No. Received from

515 Jennifer Pickard

516 Howard Pierce

517 A Lois Pinnell

518

Platinum Investment Manahement Limited

519 Greg Poett

520 Jennifer Poett

521 Rodney John Polkinghorne

522 Diane Poppi

523 Robert Poppi

524 Robert Poppi

525 Adrian Power

526 Bruce Preston

527 Claire Priestley

528 Marie Pringalle

529 Property Council of Australia

530 Janet E Pukallus

531 Dennis Pukallus

532 Qld Whistleblowers Action Group

533

Queensland Whistleblowers Action Group

534 Alan Quirk

535 Adviser Ratings

536 Kim Rees

537

Regional Banks - AMP Bank, Bendigo and Adelaide Bank, Bank of Queensland, ME

538 Dennis Reincastle

539 Shane Reynolds

540 John P Richards

No. Received from

486 Jennifer Oakley

487 Kevin Edward OBrien

488 Paul O'Carrigan

489 Michael Offe

490 Danny O'Mahony

491 Michael Ooms

492 Mark Opie

493 Stephen ORourke

494 Stephen John O'Rourke

495 Andreas Ortmann

496 Peter Ousby

497 John Howan Owens

498 Eerik Owerhall

499 Cris Parker

500 Cris Parker

501 Jeremy Parker

502 Graham Paterson

503 Robert Paterson

504 Julie Suzanne Hamblin Patullo

505 Nichalus Thomas Payne

506 Gregory Payne

507 Benjamin Pearce

508 Graeme Pearce

509 Daniel Pearson

510 Stuart Penhall

511 Paul Gregory Penny

512 Nicholas Perna

513 Peter

514 John Geoffrey Philp

Final Report

113

No. Received from

541 John Richardson

542 Alan Francis Rider

543 Garry Richard Bligh Ridge

544 Maria Marcia Rigoni

545 Benjamin Glyn Roberts

546 Anthony James Robey

547 Jane Robinson

548 Jean Robinson

549 William Stewart Roddick

550 Graham Rodwell

551 Brendan Rolfe

552 Paul Ross

553 Ronald Rowlands

554 Barbara Roy

555 Ross Russell

556 Mario Russo

557 Joshua Saik

558 Daniel Francis Salisbuy

559 Marcus Oliver Saltmarsh

560 Michael Sanderson

561 Ron Sandilands

562 Reg Sandy

563 Heidi van Schaik

564 Reinhard Schemmann

565 Errol Schmetzer

566 Errol Schmetzer

567 Frank Scott

568 Keallie Scott

569 Mark Sell

No. Received from

570 Gregory Semfel

571 Dennis Sgargetta

572 Geoff Shannon

573 Geoff Shannon

574 Kevin John Sharp

575 Dr Kym Sheehan

576

Dr Kym Sheehan and Professor David Kinley

577 Graham Shepherd

578 Nathan John Shoesmith

579 Leeann Short

580 Sr MaryJane Singleton OPI

581 Michael Sita

582

Alan George Skyring, BE MIE Aust.

583

Smartline Home Loans Pty Ltd (trading as Smartline Personal Mortgage Advisers)

584 Colin Smartt

585 Jim Smith

586 Michelle Smith

587 Veronica Smith

588 SMSF Association

589 Mark Sneddon

590 Edward Raymond Snyder

591 Joan Sohl

592 Ray Somlai

593 Christopher Sorbello

594

Christopher Soren Shann Turnbull

595 Andreas Soulos

Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry

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No. Received from

625

Tasmanian Small Business Council

626 John Terenzini

627 The QSuper Board

628 The Ethics Centre

629 The Australia Institute

630 Andrew Thompson

631 Carolyn Thomson

632 Margaret Thornton

633 Lars Thystrup

634 Bronwyn Tillman

635 Bronwyn Tillman

636 Stavroula Tirekidis

637 Anthony Tomlinson

638 William Tonge

639 Ruth Lorraine Tonsbeek

640 Johan Tonsbeek

641 Norm Townsend

642 Janette Townshend

643 Treasury

644 Stephen Trounson

645 Neal Beirne Tully

646 Neal Beirne Tully

647

TWU Nominees atf TWU Superannuation (“TWUSUPER”)

648 Brian Tyler

649

Urban Development Institute of Australia

650 Gerrit Frederick van der Tang

651 Joshua Van Der Neut

No. Received from

596 Ursula Frances Soulsby

597 Paul Spajic

598 Karen Spencer

599 SR Group

600 Jeanette A Staehr

601 Geoffrey Stafford

602 Stand Fast Finance

603 John A Stanford

604 Charles Frederick Stanger

605 Mile Stankovic

606 Adam Steen

607 Bruce L Stephens

608 Nigel Stevenson

609 John Leslie Stewart

610 Andrew James Stewart

611 Tim Stewart

612 Pauline Joy Stow

613 David Stow

614 David Stubberfield

615 Frank Student

616 Bruce Styles

617 Pratap Subramanian

618 Suncorp Group Limited

619 Michael Swain

620 Wilson Sy

621 Zoltan Szentmihaly

622 Colin Tabell

623 Murad Talukdar

624 Sherryn Tanti

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No. Received from

652 Sandra van der Laan

653 George Vella

654 Stuart Bruce Venn

655 Jacob Vermeulen

656 Victims of Financial Fraud

657 Petrus Vlaar

658 Peter Wakeman

659 Russell Wallace

660 Alexander Joseph Walsh

661 Sir John Walsh of Brannagh

662 Robyn Wanicek

663 Vivienne Ward

664 Patricia Warren

665 Brian Lloyd Weekes

666 Ray Weeks

667 Stephen Weller

668 Eric Wells

669 David Wenk

670 Reginald Trevor Went

671 Westpac Banking Corporation

672 Barbara Whatham

673 Rodney Langford Kay Wheeler

No. Received from

674 Desmond Whyte

675 Leslie Robert Williams

676 Chris Williams

677 J Wilmott

678 Brett Wilson

679 Simo Wilson

680 Kenneth Graham Winton

681 David Wishart

682 Harold Ashley Witham

683 Wayne Wood

684 Montague Woodbridge

685 Monty Woodbridge

686 Monty Woodbridge

687 Linda Delores Woodward

688 Lenard Rhys Yarrow

689 Carlos Yohanna

690 Sleiman Yohanna

691 Zainah Yohanna

692 Michael Frank Zabel

693 Anthony Zarro

694 Mr Anton Zwickl

This includes all policy submissions in response to the Interim Report that have been published on the Royal Commission’s website. The Commission reserved the right not to publish submissions where matters are subject to a non-publication order, or where there were privacy concerns about the information included. The Commission received 196 submissions in response to the Interim Report where the individual asked that their name be withheld.

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Appendix 7:

Background Papers and Research Paper

Final Report

117

Title of Background Paper Date of publication

Background Paper 14: General Insurance 12-Jun-2018

Background Paper 15: Catastrophes and Natural Disasters Insurance 12-Jun-2018

Background Paper 20: Natural Disaster Insurance 21-Jun-2018

Background Paper 22: Superannuation 24-Jul-2018

Background Paper 23: Overview of Key Regulatory Reforms in Superannuation 24-Jul-2018

Background Paper 25: Legal Framework Governing Aspects of the Australian Superannuation System 26-Jul-2018

Background Paper 26: Some Features of the General and Life Insurance Industries 28-Aug-2018

Background Paper 27: Reforms to General and Life Insurance 28-Aug-2018

Background Paper 28: Group Life Insurance 28-Aug-2018

Background Paper 29: Life Insurance 28-Aug-2018

Background Paper 30: Information about Selected Aspects of Foreign Financial Services Regulation 14-Nov-2018

Research Paper: Conflicts of Interest and Disclosure 07-Nov-2018

Appendix 7 includes copies of the Background Papers and Research Paper, as listed in the following table.

Each of these Background Papers and Research Paper can be found on the Publications page of the Commission’s website.

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