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Ken Ticehurst: tough on illicit drug use on the coast.



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For further information, please contact Lisa-Maree Bailey on (02) 4334 1930 or 0419 225 844 Canberra Office: Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600 Phone: (02) 6277 2106 Fax: (02) 6277 8441 Ken.Ticehurst.MP@aph.gov.au

Electorate Office:

211b The Entrance Road (PO Box 407) The Entrance NSW 2261 Phone: (02) 4334 1930

Fax: (02) 4334 7144

Thursday 19 February, 2004

Ken Ticehurst - tough on illicit drug use on the coast

Federal Member for Dobell Ken Ticehurst has secured $58,644 in federal funding for Wyong youth centre, Oasis, to implement a Tough on Drugs program.

Mr Ticehurst said the funding would allow the youth centre to deliver a range of early intervention and education projects to prevent illicit drug use on the Central Coast.

Oasis Youth Centre Managers, Bruce and Helen Ellicott welcomed the funding.

“Young people often face a range of pressures, and to help them, we provide flexible support services that relate to the circumstances of young people and their families," Mr Elliot said.

"This funding will help us to continue to provide young people and their families with support, information and strategies to encourage young people to reject drugs. We need to help young people avoid the patterns of behaviour that can place them at risk.

Mr Ticehurst said, “Programs such as this are vital to a fast-growing region like the Central Coast with its high proportion of children and young people, and high level of early school leavers.

“Oasis is already making a real difference to young people on the coast by providing a safe haven for them to develop a range of skills, boost self-esteem and improve employment outcomes.

“As well as employment and training, the centre provides counselling services, a drop- in centre, free health clinic, court support and various recreational activities.”

Since 1997, the Australian Government has committed more than $1 billion to Tough on Drugs and there is evidence that the strategy is contributing to real results.

Mr Ticehurst said, “The success of the Tough on Drugs policy shows that the federal Labor Party’s permissive approach to heroin injecting rooms is just not right.

“The Australian Government recognises that young people are Australia’s future. Through community partnerships, we are working to deliver services that give young people the best opportunities to develop capable and confident adults.

“I wish Salvation Army Oasis Youth Centre every success in their vital work.”

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For further information, please contact Lisa-Maree Bailey on (02) 4334 1930 or 0419 225 844 Canberra Office: Parliament House Canberra ACT 2600 Phone: (02) 6277 2106 Fax: (02) 6277 8441 Ken.Ticehurst.MP@aph.gov.au

Electorate Office:

211b The Entrance Road (PO Box 407) The Entrance NSW 2261 Phone: (02) 4334 1930

Fax: (02) 4334 7144

The Australian Government’s Tough on Drugs initiative The Prime Minister recently announced funding totalling $6.6 million to 89 non-government organisations under the Tough on Drugs Community Partnerships Initiative.

The successful recipients represent communities in all states and territories.

With this announcement, 223 organisations including the Oasis Youth Centre have received funding for a range of projects to provide young people and their families with support, information and strategies to encourage people to reject illicit drugs.

Since 1997, the Australian Government has committed more than $1 billion to Tough on Drugs and there is evidence that the Strategy is contributing to real results.

The 2001 National Drug Strategy Household Survey reported a 23 per cent reduction in the proportion of people using illicit drugs in the previous three years. Since 1999, there has been a 67 per cent reduction in heroin- related deaths for people aged 15 to 55 years.

Australian Government law enforcement agencies have prevented over nine tonnes of illicit drugs from reaching Australian streets since 1997 and recent work by the National Alcohol and Drug Centre suggests that this reduction in supply has particularly deterred drug use by teenagers and young adults.