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The myths of casual employment.



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THE HON KEVIN ANDREWS MP

MINISTER FOR EMPLOYMENT AND WORKPLACE RELATIONS MINISTER ASSISTING THE PRIME MINISTER FOR THE PUBLIC SERVICE

Media Release

12904

The Myths Of Casual Employment

Labor continues to misrepresent the facts about casual employment. Casual employment is an essential and legitimate part of a flexible labour market, which is needed to create more jobs and higher wages for more Australians.

Myth 1: Casual Employment is growing at a disproportionate rate:

Facts:

● Over the 12 months to April 2004, 90.4 per cent of all jobs created were full-time.

● Currently, 25.4 per cent of the workforce are casuals.

● Under Labor, between 1990 and 1996, casual employment grew by an average of

6.4% per year. Under the Coalition, from 1996 to 2003, this rate declined to 2.8 per cent.

Myth 2: Casual employees are dissatisfied with casual work and would rather be "permanent":

Facts:

● Certain manufacturing awards already give casual employees the option to

voluntarily convert to "permanent" status after six months. The take-up rate has been less than two per cent. ● According to a recent Job Futures/Saulwick Employment Sentiment Survey

(October 2003), 83 per cent of casuals are either ‘very’ or ‘reasonably’ satisfied with their current job.

Myth 3: Casual employees have inferior conditions:

Facts:

● Casual employees receive loadings of up to 30 per cent above normal wages.

● Labor plans to force employers to pay casuals’ holiday pay, sick pay and

redundancy pay. ● Businesses cannot afford to pay these entitlements on top of existing loadings.

Casual employees will either lose their loadings, or lose their jobs.

Myth 4: Casual jobs are not real jobs:

Fact:

● Casual work is often the only viable option for young students or working mothers.

It is flexible and family friendly

Deputy Opposition Leader Jenny Macklin recently said having no job was better than a casual job for young people. This is insulting. Labor’s plan to destroy casual employment will lock people out of the labour market and cost jobs. The greatest threat to Australia’s prosperity is Labor’s plans to re-regulate the workplace which will cost jobs and destroy investment.

For further information contact:

Felicity Dargan Press Secretary 0409 550 446

7/06/2004