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Extra vehicles on the nation's highways by 2030



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Media Statement

EXTRA VEHICLES ON THE NATION’S HIGHWAYS BY 2030

Over the next two decades the nation’s highways and major arteries are set to become even busier, particularly the routes into and out of Australia’s largest cities.

According to research I have released the total distance driven by Australians on the ‘non-urban’ part of the national network will reach 55.8 billion kilometres a year by 2030. This is almost 50% greater than in 2005 and equivalent to 186 round trips to the Sun.

The extra traffic won’t be shared evenly across the 23,000 km network, with the research finding most of the network will have the capacity to carry the higher volumes without the need for an upgrade.

Many of the additional cars, trucks, motorbikes and buses will instead be travelling on those sections of the network connecting Australia’s four biggest capitals - Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth - with their outer suburbs and nearby regional centres.

For example, daily vehicle numbers on the Pacific Highway between Brisbane and the Gold Coast will almost double to 172,990; while traffic on Princes Highway between Melbourne and Geelong is projected to rise from 63,152 to over 118,000 vehicles a day.

The research vindicates our decision to significantly increase the roads budget. It also highlights the need to invest in the alternate ways of moving people and freight such as rail.

We need to encourage more people out of their cars and get more freight onto trains. A greater investment in rail will not only be crucial to tackling urban congestion, but also to reducing carbon emissions and lifting Australia’s export performance.

That’s why we’ve committed $3.2 billion to improve the performance of rail and stated a willingness to invest Federal money in public transport infrastructure.

We are planning for the nation’s future transport needs.

Compiled by the Government’s Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE), National road network intercity traffic projection to 2030, provides long-term projections and will inform the Government’s future spending priorities.

The full report can be downloaded from www.bitre.gov.au.

Media contact: Jeff Singleton 0410 476 890

Monday, 9 March 2009

FASTEST GROWING ROUTES: TOP 10

Corridor Link

Length

(km)

Daily traffic

(2005)

Daily traffic

(2030)

Annual

Growth

%

Adelaide-Darwin Katherine-Darwin 301.2 1990 4215 3.05

Brisbane-Cairns Brisbane-Gympie 146.3 34737 69959 2.84

Melbourne-Adelaide Melbourne-Ballarat 87.6 25335 49358 2.70

Melbourne-Sale Moe-Melbourne 92.1 21841 42400 2.69

Perth-Darwin (via Great Northern Highway) Broome-Halls Creek 650.9 290 561 2.68

Sydney-Brisbane (via Pacific Highway) NSW border-Brisbane 82.5 91269 172990 2.59

Melbourne-Geelong West Gate Freeway- Geelong 48.5 63152 118292 2.54

Perth-Darwin (via Great Northern Highway) Halls Creek-NT border 400.1 629 1134 2.39

Perth-Bunbury Mandurah-Bunbury 105.5 10208 18126 2.32

Perth-Darwin (via Great Northern Highway) Perth-Brand Highway turnoff

33.6 11171 19552 2.26

BUSIEST ROUTES IN 2030: TOP 10

Corridor Link

Length

(km)

Daily traffic

(2005)

Daily traffic

(2030)

Annual

Growth

%

Melbourne-Sale Moe-Melbourne 92.1 21841 42400 2.69

Melbourne-Adelaide Melbourne-Ballarat 87.6 25335 49358 2.70

Brisbane-Cairns Brisbane-Gympie 146.3 34737 69959 2.84

Sydney-Brisbane (via New England Highway) Newcastle-Maitland 14.7 35860 51255 1.44

Perth-Bunbury Perth-Mandurah 54.8 36982 62988 2.15

Sydney-Wollongong Sydney-Wollongong 63.4 44530 59416 1.16

Sydney-Dubbo Sydney-Katoomba 65.7 46224 57087 0.85

Sydney-Brisbane (via New England Highway) Sydney-Newcastle 129.0 52934 77683 1.55

Melbourne-Geelong West Gate Freeway- Geelong 48.5 63152 118292 2.54

Sydney-Brisbane (via Pacific Highway) NSW border-Brisbane 82.5 91269 172990 2.59