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Transcript of interview with Daniel Gawned and Ash Pollard: Sea 101.3 FM with Gawndy and Ash Pollard: 5 September 2018: Labor's plan to help Australians study at uni



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TRANSCRIPT: RADIO INTERVIEW SEA 101.3FM WITH

GAWNDY AND ASH POLLARD WEDNESDAY 5

SEPTEMBER 2018

tanyaplibersek.com

/transcript_radio_interview_sea_101_3fm_with_gawndy_and_ash_pollard_wednesday_5_september_201

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THE HON TANYA PLIBERSEK MP

DEPUTY LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION

SHADOW MINISTER FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING

SHADOW MINISTER FOR WOMEN

MEMBER FOR SYDNEY

E&OE TRANSCRIPT

RADIO INTERVIEW

SEA 101.3FM WITH GAWNDY AND ASH POLLARD

WEDNESDAY 5 SEPTEMBER 2018

SUBJECTS: Labor’s plan to help Australians study at uni.

DANIEL GAWNED, PRESENTER:

So on the Coast today, Shadow Minister for Education

Tanya Plibersek and she's here today to explain Labor's pledge, they're going to invest, well

they pledge to invest an extra $174 million into tertiary education which is going to benefit

locals wanting to study here on the Coast and Tanya joins us on the show right now. Good

morning!

TANYA PLIBERSEK, DEPUTY LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION:

Hello, it's really nice to be with

you.

ASH POLLARD, PRESENTER:

Tanya you say that currently a young person from the Central

Coast is about three times less likely to get a uni degree than somebody on Sydney's North

Shore. Why is that?

PLIBERSEK:

Well we know it's not cause the kids on the Central Coast aren't brainy and

hardworking it's just because they've got less opportunity to go to university. It's a really

common story right across Australia that young people growing up in the outer suburbs of

capital cities and in regional communities have much lower university attendance rates and

that's why we're investing this new money to try and boost expectations amongst those

students and help them get into uni and help them in that first year when they're making a

really difficult transition as well. When we were in government we worked with universities

to do this, the Liberal Government's actually cut some of the programs that we introduced

but the University of Newcastle, Ourimbah Campus for example has got fantastic pathways

programs into uni, targeting young people growing up on the Central Coast and they've got

really great, specialised programs including for example one for young people who have

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been growing up in foster care to help them get into uni and stay there once they get there.

POLLARD:

So where is the money actually going, I mean does it go to universities, are you

offering it for scholarships?

GAWNED:

How do you plan on spending that $174 million?

PLIBERSEK:

We'll work with universities but also with TAFE and non-government

organisation that are really experienced in mentoring and support to make sure that we've

got really good outreach from the universities, for example universities partnering with

local high schools. I've seen some great programs around Australia where the uni students

are going to schools where there's low levels of kids going into university and they're

mentoring and tutoring those kids and talking to them about what a university education

would be like, the sort of jobs it would make available for them because one of the things

we know is the economy is really changing, nine out of ten jobs that will be created in the

next few years will require either a TAFE qualification or a university degree to do. So, we

need to be talking to young people when they're in year 9 and year 10 about the fact that

the sort of jobs market that they'll be entering will really need them to do a bit of

educational training after school as well. This announcement is actually on top of another

announcement that we made a few weeks ago which is that we are uncapping a number of

places at university, as well. So, when we were in government, we uncapped university

places so where there was a demand for more university places, universities could expand

those courses or expand the number of students on their campuses. More recently, the

Liberals have recapped the number of students at universities. So, we've gone back to the

bad old days, really, where you could study very hard in year 12, do your very best in the

HSC, get a reasonable mark but still miss out on university and we don't think that's fair

either. We want kids to have the opportunity of a great education at school but also a

chance to go to TAFE or uni afterwards.

GAWNED:

And say if you do take the cap off, though and the numbers do rise. How do you

manage that with facilities, teachers and all this kind of stuff that comes with it.

PLIBERSEK:

The reason we're pretty confident that there's not going to be a blow-out in the

number of students going to uni is because we're looking at the increases in university

attendance rates in the last few years of the uncapped system and it was growing at

around the same rate as the population so, we think there'll be an increase of about one or

two per cent a year - it won't be much more than that. And I'm sure universities can cope,

they tell us that they can cope, that they actually want the uncapped system, they want to

give more people the opportunity of an education that will help them get a job.

GAWNED:

Well, we appreciate you joining us on the show this morning and just quickly,

Tanya because I know politics has been big the last few weeks with what we saw with

Malcolm Turnbull and the Liberal party and the, you know, they're all fighting within - if we

go to the polls any time soon, are you guys confident you can take this one out this time

round?

PLIBERSEK:

Well, Gawndy, I don't think you can ever be confident in politics. The one thing

that the other week tells you for sure is that things change very quickly so we're really

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working very hard to focus on what matters to the Australian people - a job with decent pay

and conditions, a chance of a good education for your kids or yourself, a hospital when you

need it, aged care, child care if you need it for your family - that's what matters and we're

just going to keep plodding along with that and make sure we get those policies right and

hope for the best.

GAWNED:

Interesting times, that's for sure over the next six months.

POLLARD:

Thanks, Tanya.

GAWNED:

Thanks, Tanya, thanks for joining us on the show.

PLIBERSEK:

Thanks Ash, thanks Gawndy, bye bye, nice to talk to you.

ENDS

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