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Transcript of interview with Eddie McGuire: Triple M The Hot Breakfast: 18 July 2018: character cancellations; US and Russia; Melbourne African crime gangs



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Interview with Triple M 'The Hot Breakfast' Melbourne

Wednesday, 18 July 2018

18 July 2018

Subjects: Character cancellations; US and Russia; Melbourne African crime gangs.

EO&E...........................................................................................................................................

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

It's always a pleasure to have Peter Dutton join us on Triple M's Hot Breakfast for Great Northern Brewing Co. Good morning Peter, great to have you here this morning.

PETER DUTTON:

Morning Ed, morning Darce. Great to be here.

LUKE DARCY:

G'day Pete.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Now Peter, there's a story this morning in the Herald Sun, it's headlined 'Deporting Foreign Criminals Brings Big Savings to Taxpayers' by Keith Moor. Can you take us through just what this means because some of the figures are quite astonishing? I'll read a few of them out if I could and then get your response. Cancelling or refusing the visas of 184 organised crime offenders saved an estimated $116 million dollars. Can you take us through the breakdown there?

PETER DUTTON:

Well Ed, obviously the Government's had a big program in cancelling visas of non-citizens who have committed crimes against Australians. We've had 184 outlaw motorcycle gang members - we've cancelled their visas. Now, they are the biggest distributors of ice and amphetamine in our country.

And the ACIC - the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission - in some of the work that they've done, they've had a look at the impact, the financial impact, the savings of cancelling those visas, the amount of money saved by not having people in jail, by

minister.homeaffairs.gov.au/peterdutton/Pages/Eddie-and-Luke.aspx

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deporting them sooner. There's less cost to society, to victims of crime and they've been able to quantify that, as you say, to over $116 million and that's money that we can spend elsewhere on health or education, national security and that's why it's a really good outcome.

LUKE DARCY:

Extrapolating that out Peter, 3687 criminals stripped of their Australian visas since December 2014 when you had some legislation changed and that number is just on 184 specific incidents and people that you deported. So, was that part of your strategy saying how expensive it is? I can't believe the numbers of what it costs to keep people incarcerated in our country and if they're not Australian citizens or dual-citizens, I suppose the opportunity's there to do exactly what you've been doing.

PETER DUTTON:

Well, I think that's right Darce. And I mean the other point is we're a welcoming country, we accept people into our country, we're a country built on people that have come from the four corners of the Earth over a long period of time and we're proud of that fact that people come here, work hard, educate their kids.

But the one per cent who come here and commit crimes, I don't see why we should tolerate their presence. And particularly if you look at some of the cases where they've been here for years and years, many Australians have suffered at the hands of these criminals and why would we allow it to continue? Let's kick them out and allow good people to come in and we make for a safer society and there's bigger savings to the Budget and, as I say, you can plough that money back into better areas.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

One of your stats here Peter is that by the age of 60, the average bikie in Australia will have spent almost seven years in jail at a cost of taxpayers of more than $800,000 each. So, $100,000 a year basically to put them in jail and seven years in jail for a 60-year-old adult.

PETER DUTTON:

And the other thing that we don't take into account here - which maybe we will in the update of the figures in time - is the savings to the welfare system as well. Because many of these people will live on disability support pensions, they'll be rorting whatever they can from the taxpayer. They don't abide by the law, they don't have respect for Australians.

And if you come into somebody's home, it's no different than when we invite somebody into our country, you expect them to respect your family, you expect them to abide by the rules of your house and if not, you show them the front door. And that's what we've done with these gang members and with those criminals who have committed pretty serious offences.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

So with an extra $116 million, can you double down or what are you going to do?

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PETER DUTTON:

Well we want to, as I say, bring people in that are going to come here to work, to pay taxes, to contribute to society. That's been the great success story of migration over many decades and we want to make sure that we can continue that. But if there's a saving to the Budget, it means we can put more money into national security, into hospitals, into our police, into education and I think that's what the taxpayer would expect with their dollars.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

They're the figures released to the Herald Sun this morning and Triple M's Hot Breakfast, revealing the continued blitz on offenders such as Home Affairs - not Home Affairs Minister - offenders…

PETER DUTTON:

….[Indistinct].

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

…3700 violent thugs, sex perverts and drug traffickers being stripped of their visas by the Home Affairs Department. The Minister Peter Dutton is our special guest this morning.

LUKE DARCY:

And a fair bit happening on the world stage. We saw it take place in Finland with Trump and Putin, keen to get your thoughts on that Peter.

But we thought we might just ask Peter, we're going to play a song now, can we take a request from the Minister for Home Affairs?

PETER DUTTON:

Well mate, maybe a bit of INXS, New Sensation. I was born in 1970, so an '80s kid growing up, so INXS was pretty big in my day. Shows you how old I am.

LUKE DARCY:

Right in the Triple M heartland, a bit of New Sensation.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Thought there might have been a bit of Linda Ronstadt - you're no good, you're no good, you're no good, baby, you're no good - but alright some INXS.

When we come back we're going to speak about African gangs in Melbourne and Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump. That's next with Peter Dutton on Triple M's Hot Breakfast.

[Music break]

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Great to have with us this morning the Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton. Peter…

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LUKE DARCY:

….and that was INXS, as requested by the Home Affairs Minister if you don't mind on Triple M.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Exactly. LUKE DARCY:

I liked it.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

You like it?

LUKE DARCY:

I'm a bit of an INXS fan.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Okay.

LUKE DARCY:

Spinning the discs in this morning.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Dangerous Dutton.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

There you go. Spin to win.

LUKE DARCY:

Exactly.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Peter, I want to play a grab from 1962 - '61, '62. John F Kennedy speaking about the Cuban Missile Crisis and I pitch it to you in relation to what has been going on with yesterday's discussion or press conference between Putin and Donald Trump. But more in relation to what the effect has been on the allies of the United States with his behaviour in recent times. We've seen him declare war on Canada, declare war even on us in the first instance, telling us there was a raw deal and yelling abuse at our Prime Minister in the very first conversation he had with him. We've seen him have a crack at the Germans. He's had a go at NATO, which has been our biggest defence situation for the Western world in Europe after World War II. We saw him cosying up yesterday and doing a backflip today.

Here's what John F Kennedy said at the time that set the tone for American presidents right through the Cold War era up until yesterday.

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[Excerpt]

JOHN F KENNEDY: This sudden, clandestine decision to station strategic weapons for the first time outside of Soviet soil is a deliberately provocative and unjustified change in the status quo, which cannot be accepted by this country if our courage and our commitments are ever to be trusted again by either friend or foe.

[End of excerpt]

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

By either friend or foe. Now clearly foe - being the Russians - they've got no fear of what's going on at the moment given yesterday's press conference. I'm more concerned about the friends because we're supposed to be one of them, or we are one of them and anyone who's ever run out to play a game of sport or play football or even in a work situation, when everyone says: right, are we all in and you turn around when the heat's on you and go, oh no, I didn't mean that, oh, did you think I said that? No I didn't mean that. No I'm not there. How does Australia look at this last 24 hours?

PETER DUTTON:

Well Ed, we're not a fair-weather friend. I mean, we've been through good times and bad times with allies in the past.

The United States remains one of our closest allies and if anyone can predict what will happen in our region in the next decade, or two, or three, or four, then they're much smarter than any of us.

And we need to recognise that we've got a long and deep military history. Today, we share information around foreign fighters coming out of the Middle East into South East Asia. We have a million people a year who holiday in Indonesia. We want to make sure that we get the best we can out of these relationships.

And you'll see these blips from time to time and things that sort of make you scratch your head. But in the end, we're not a fair-weather friend and we've got to stay true to our allies, particularly in my judgement, the United States, the United Kingdom.

Russia is a threat and it always has been and I think President Obama can share some of the grief here as well because I think President Putin going into the Ukraine, his actions in relation to Crimea - over eight years he was allowed to have a run, a pretty free run and that happened in North Korea as well. And you can go back to Bush 43 as well, back to Bill Clinton and 41 before that.

So, I think you can be critical in ways and you can have a look at the style of President Trump and be critical, but from our perspective, we have a good relationship. We have to continue to work on that relationship and it's important for the future safety and security of our country.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

But he has shown that he is prepared to go to archenemies and do deals. We see him

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cosying up there and cleaning up the NATO on the way through. Now, I don't doubt [indistinct] with the United States, but they've been shown to oscillate these days that no one quite knows where he's going. Now, he might be playing the best game of all time, but it is a worrying situation where we don't know where he is. I mean, he had to come out yesterday, or today, and recant, which we'll play after 7 o'clock, like a recalcitrant school boy.

PETER DUTTON:

Well, you want to make sure that you see consistency. That's important. Now, we've got equities in the relationship beyond security. I mean, there's a lot that we've done and we're very grateful to the United States for taking people off Manus and Nauru for example. Well over 300 people now. President Obama did that deal with the Prime Minister and that's continued to President Trump's credit under his administration. We're getting people off and again, there's a lot of exchange of information and intelligence.

A big business community here and investment two-way between our two countries. So, a lot that we want to continue to do together and again, we need to make sure that we're not a fair-weather friend.

President Trump's - to say the least - a different President than any of us would be used to, but he's been a reality TV star, he's been a dealmaker as a businessman and that's his approach that he's brought to the White House.

Now, just this final quick point, I mean, on NATO for example, the United States is right to say: hang on, why are we contributing so much from our national budget and European countries aren't?

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

….but he did come out and slaughter his FBI, the [indistinct].

LUKE DARCY:

….I was going to ask you about that. When you're undermining your own agencies yesterday, who have come out and unequivocally said that Russia hacked the election Peter, to then effectively dismiss that, it just seems like an extraordinary thing to do on the world stage. I mean, you're the Minister for Home Affairs. It's right in your zone. Are the eyebrows raised by that yesterday?

PETER DUTTON:

Well, we've got great relationships with the FBI, with the CIA, with the NSA, with all of those agencies. So I - from anybody wouldn't take criticism from the work that they do and the way in which they work with us. Their work, their intelligence, their advice to us saves Australian lives and I see the evidence of that. And so, we need to make sure that those relationships remains static and remain constant for us. That is incredibly important.

So, you can understand the reaction when they're criticised by their President and Russia is a threat to world security and to world peace, as is North Korea. And the United States is one of the great superpowers of the world, as is the United Kingdom and we need to make

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sure that they keep that status because if not we don't want to be in the hands of Putin and North Korea and other dictators.

EDDIE MCGUIRE: Well, let's hope he hasn't taken over America already. Let's hope he hasn't got a puppet for the President. It's a frightening situation. We'll all have a laugh today and we will do that with Wil after seven o'clock. But certainly it is a scary situation, I would have thought, for all the allies of the world at the moment.

We'll take a break Peter. When we come back, there's been a comment you made a couple of months ago which has resurfaced yesterday with the Prime Minister on Neil Mitchell's program on 3AW in relation to - we're going to go to the news first, are we? No?

ROSIE WALTON:

Yeah, we've only got the one break to go so keep going.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Oh, we're going to keep going?

ROSIE WALTON:

Yeah.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Sorry Rosie, you're holding up a different sign there. Peter, let's just keep on going on this.

The African gangs in Melbourne has been a major issue down here. One side of politics says it's a beat up, that this is racial profiling, the others say that we can't - or you said you can't go for dinner. I think we're somewhere in between to be perfectly honest. What is your situation in relation to this? The Prime Minister came out and reiterated yesterday your thesis that there is a major issue down here with gangs.

PETER DUTTON:

Well Ed, you've got victims of crime. I mean people who have suffered at the hands of these gang members. And I don't care about their ethnicity, their racial background and I don't want the one per cent of a community defining the 99 per cent good people. I want the good stories to be told. And if you can't accept that there's a problem, you can't resolve it and there's no sense pretending that there aren't African gangs running around causing pain to victims...

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

…no, there absolutely are. Let's not kid ourselves.

PETER DUTTON:

So I don't understand where Dan Andrews has painted himself into this corner, how he's done it or what the logic to it is. I just think in public life you're better off to be honest and it's like some parallel universe he's running here.

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I mean, Victorians know, Melbournians know that there is a problem and let's admit that there's a problem, fix it up. I was talking to some Sudanese kids in Longman the other day up in Morayfield playing footy up there, or playing soccer as part of a club, volunteering in the community, they're working part time and that's a story of most migrants that come to our country. But if you've got young people who are causing trouble, my problem here is that if we don't call it out then it is going to lead to a more serious outcome.

Somebody is going to have their home invaded so, you know, they can steal the keys to the car and somebody's going to be killed because they'll retaliate, there'll be a fight in the kitchen, whatever it is, somebody of 70 or 80 years of age have a heart attack while they're struggling with one of these people. That's the reality, so I don't understand why this head in the sand approach. Call it out. Let's try and resolve it.

There's a big problem with the Victorian courts and soft bail laws and the rest of it which means that there's a problem in Victoria that's not present in New South Wales or Queensland or elsewhere. Just be honest about it and let's sort it out. It's not a racial thing, not a racist thing. Be honest about it. Sort the problem out and allow people to live their lives.

EDDIE MCGUIRE:

Would you look to deport these people if there's anyone who isn't born in Australia who comes in with these type of criminal activities?

PETER DUTTON:

Yes and we've already cancelled the visa of 14 members of gangs down here and there's another 14 that are under consideration at the moment. So we're working with VicPol through those referrals.

And again, if people are committing crimes, I don't care what country you've come from. I only discriminate on one basis and that is if you're committing crimes against Australian citizens.

And we want good people to come here and if you believe that you can come into our country and start committing offences against people, following them home from restaurants, breaking into their houses, stealing their keys, thieving their car, it's unacceptable and it's not going to be tolerated and if people are on visas and they're non- citizens they will have their visas cancelled and they'll be deported from our country and we'll make our society a safer place and I believe the majority of people support that.

LUKE DARCY:

Peter, you've been very clear on that message for a long period of time. As always, we appreciate you taking the time when you're in Melbourne dropping by our studio. Thanks again.

PETER DUTTON:

Thanks guys.

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EDDIE MCGUIRE: Good on you Peter.

[ends]

See: Index of Speeches

URL:https://minister.homeaffairs.gov.au/peterdutton/Pages/Eddie-and-Luke.aspx

Last update: Wednesday, 18 July 2018