Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Transcript of joint doorstop interview: Echuca, Vic: 9 November 2010: Murray‐Darling Basin Authority’s proposed water plan



Download PDFDownload PDF

 

LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION 

THE HON. TONY ABBOTT MHR 

FEDERAL MEMBER FOR WARRINGAH 

 

Tony Abbott Doorstop â€ Murray‐Darling Basin Authority’s proposed water plan  

09/11/10  

Subjects: Murray‐Darling Basin Authority’s proposed water plan.  

E&OE 

TONY ABBOTT: 

It’s good to be here in Echuca with my distinguished friends and colleagues Sharman Stone, the local  member and also Barnaby Joyce, the Shadow Minister for Water. 

This has been a long and passionate public meeting. It’s been long and it’s been passionate because  it’s been about the people of this area whose livelihoods are on the line and people are right to feel  passionate about their community and about the livelihoods that they have built up over many  generations and the tragedy is that there has not been a single Government Minister here to listen.   There has not been a single Government Minister at any of these consultations and what we have  seen is Government Ministers hiding behind the Authority and the Authority hiding behind  Government Ministers and the Act. It’s just not good enough. The Prime Minister should be here,  the Water Minister should be here, the Minister for Regional Australia should be here because this is  about the heart of country Australia, but it’s also about every Australian because if the farmers of  Australia can’t go on, well food prices go up and that’s a huge issue for everyone. 

So, the first point I want to make is, yet again, Government Ministers have been missing and they  shouldn’t be missing when the people of rural Australia are speaking from their hearts. 

The second point I want to make is that as things stand this is a bad plan and you just can’t trust this  Government to get this plan right because this is a Government which is essentially a Labor‐Green  alliance and we all know that at the heart of what the Greens want is just this deep unhappiness  with agriculture, particularly irrigated agriculture. 

Now, the point is that any plan which makes it very difficult for the agricultural industries of the  Murray‐Darling Basin, any plan which makes it very hard for the irrigators of the Murray‐Darling  Basin to continue is not a good plan and I just think it’s very, very disappointing that we didn’t have  Ministers here today, we haven’t had Ministers at any of these meetings to listen to the voice of  country Australia. 

I’m going to ask Barnaby to say a few words then I’m going to ask Sharman to say a few words and  then we’ll have some questions. 

BARNABY JOYCE: 

Well thank you very much, Tony, and thank you very much for being here. Well, it’s the same old  same old isn’t it. Another day, another Labor party stuff‐up, another demonstration. This Greek  tragedy just keeps rolling on down the river, doesn’t it. But sooner or later the Australian people are  going to wake up and realize that we can’t go on like this. What I implore people to do is to realize  that the stink that happened in that room there will not be smelt in Canberra, so you have got to get  yourself to Canberra so that Ms Gillard understands exactly what’s going on out in regional Australia.  She got there on the back of regional Australia, she’s supposed to be there because she’s going to  represent regional Australia. Everything we’ve seen so far, she’s shutting down regional Australia. 

We’ve got this guide out but the lady who sits in that house over there wants to know what’s going  to happen to her mortgage and the value of her house and this guide doesn’t talk about that, it talks  about everything else but it doesn’t talk about the fundamentals of people’s lives and how they’re  affected by what would be an arbitrary and ridiculous outcome. 

We’ve had so many things that are inconsistencies here. In the meeting there today I asked if they  knew anything about the $4.3 billion which was apparently what their economic benefit to the lower  end of the system is. They said they knew nothing about it but it’s in actually volume two of their  report. So that’s all, it just means you have no confidence in what’s going on. 

But I say to Ms Gillard, Ms Gillard, when are you actually going to sign on, in this debate? When are  you actually going to stand up and say that you’re going to deal with the issue and remove the  uncertainty and help these people out? And I say to Minister Burke I know you were landed a bad  tasting cake by reason of Ms Wong setting this process up but you should have fixed it up by now.  You shouldn’t leave people hanging out on tenterhooks. And we know what you’re up to. You’re  playing this game where you’re going to delay, you’re going to say you’re going to deal with it later  on, you’re going to try and push it up against an election and then you’re going to be dividing these  people up against inner‐urban electorates. Well, I think that is absolutely despicable. If you’re fair  dinkum about regional Australia, come out today, come out right now and say look we’ve looked  through the guide, we’re human beings, we understand it’s a complete and utter stuff up and we’re  going to remove the numbers in there, we’re going to make sure that we amend this guide back to  something that’s reasonable, we will not go forward, as Tony said, with a bad plan. A bad plan  destroys peoples’ lives and that is a bad outcome for the lady in Blacktown pushing the shopping  trolley or the bloke in Blacktown pushing a shopping trolley trying to pay for their groceries, and this  nation’s capacity to feed itself. 

TONY ABBOTT: 

Ok, Sharman. 

SHARMAN STONE: 

Well, I just have to say that there was probably several thousand people in the hall today. Every one  of them survivors of the worst drought on record. What they need now is a government that 

understands their need to re‐group and survive into the future because, after all, in our part of the  world, where we stand in the Murray‐Goulburn Irrigation Area, a hundred years of irrigation history  behind us and we’re irrigated because we need water security in a 15 inch rain fall. Sometimes it  floods, sometimes it droughts in this part of the world. 

We’ve built up a food bowl of Australia of only 23 food factories. We employ thousands of people in  the food sector and this government has created the perfect storm. They’ve said look, you’ve  already sold a lot of your water off to Penny Wong to so‐called the environment, through willing  sellings, you’ve lost twenty per cent of your water that way. We’re going to offer more sales through  the government to so‐called ‘willing‐sellers,’ they can take it up. Now sadly, what that leaves us with  is stranded assets, less water security over‐all, those who are left in the system with double the cost  to pay for their irrigation water. 

So, this government doesn’t seem to understand that its plan doesn’t help the environment, it  destroys those who manage the environment and they are the farmers. The farmers manage the  environment. They kill the weeds, they kill the ferals, they manage the soil salinity, the soil nutrition,  the dust‐suppression and if you remove viable farmers from the landscape of the Murray‐Darling  Basin, all you have left, I’m afraid, is an overgrown system with a few public servants running around  with not much to do because they don’t understand, they’re not managing it properly now. 

So this is the perfect storm. We’ve got Labor saying we’re going to take up to half your water. We’ll  do it through so‐called willing‐sellers only, that’s no compensation for the communities who’ll be  killed, for the businesses, the townspeople. No compensation for the footy teams, the churches that  fail, the schools that close. We’ll do it in the name of the environment, the metros will clap and  cheer, the greenies will say ‘well done’ but you’ll lose your food growing capacity of the biggest part  of Australia that grows food â€ the Murray Darling Basin. What other government in the world would  be behind a plan like that? They acknowledge that it’s a world first, I’d say only a Gillard‐led Labor  Government who’s inherited the plan from Penny Wong, a South Australian Senator. So this is a  serious time for us. This is not the end of the discussion here in Victoria, it is part of the fight we  have to have. We’ll take it to Canberra, that’ll be part of the plan, but we cannot fail our irrigators  now, that would be failing Australia but it would also mean an enormous loss of the cultural heritage  of Australia, which is country life. 

QUESTION: 

How can you, you talk a lot about regional Victoria and regional Australia, but you didn’t mention  the environment once in your opening speech. Why not? 

TONY ABBOTT: 

I think it’s very important that we have a sustainable environment but the farmers aren’t the villains  here. Farmers are conservationists and this idea that the farming community of Australia is an  environmental liability is just wrong. The farming community of Australia is an environmental asset.  Farmers understand that the last thing they can do is damage the environment that sustains them.  Any other questions? 

QUESTION: 

Is this what you’ll be taking back to Canberra on behalf of the farmers? 

TONY ABBOTT: 

Well, I’m here because I think that regional Australia has been tragically neglected by the current  Government. There is not a single Cabinet Minister in the current Government who is based outside  a metropolitan area. I think there are seven out of 20 members of my Shadow Cabinet live outside  metropolitan areas. So, we think we understand regional Australia. Certainly we want to listen to the  voice of regional Australia and it’s very important that that voice be heard, not just because it’s right  for the regions, but because it’s good for every Australian that we have a thriving regional Australia  and a strong Murray‐Darling Basin agricultural sector. 

QUESTION: 

This whole process was put in place by Malcolm Turnbull’s Water Act. How would you do it  differently? 

TONY ABBOTT: 

Look, the problem is not so much the Act, the problem is the Government. If you had a Government  with people like Sharman Stone and Barnaby Joyce and Bill Heffernan in it we would manage this  process effectively. The problem is that since November 2007 it’s just been one stuff‐up after  another, one Gillard mess after another and the fact that not a single Government Minister has  bothered to show up at these consultations shows that it is the Government that is the fundamental  problem here. 

QUESTION: 

But the MDBA said 3,000 gigalitres is the low end of what needs to be purchased to save the river.  How much would you buy back? 

TONY ABBOTT: 

The MDBA needs to talk to the Minister because what we’ve got at the moment are two different  stories, one from the Authority and one from the Minister. Now, the Minister can’t hide behind the  Authority and the Authority shouldn’t be taking bullets for the Minister. This is an issue that the  Minister needs to explain because as I said the Authority is saying one thing, he is saying another  thing. 

QUESTION: 

But how much water would you buy back in numerals? 

TONY ABBOTT: 

This is an issue that needs to be resolved by the Government and what we wouldn’t do is engage in  buy backs that end up damaging communities and leaving stranded assets. What we wouldn’t do is  engage in the kind of uncoordinated buy backs which this Government has been guilty of over the  last few years. The problem is that this Government is way ahead of schedule in buy backs but its  miles behind schedule in the infrastructure investments that the Basin needs if we are going to 

continue to have a strong farming sector as well as an improved environment and improved health  for the river. 

BARNABY JOYCE: 

If I could just add something to that. Look, it’s putting the cart before the horse and that’s something  that the Coalition just won’t do. We will do the proper homework before we come up with the  result. Not come up with the result and then be asked to do the homework. This is why we got  ourselves into this inordinate stuff up, it’s because an arbitrary number has been put on a piece of  paper then sent out to regional Australia. You can’t do business like that. You’ve got to talk to the  key people in the area first. The most key people in regional areas are actually regional people. How  about you have a yarn to them?