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Emergency assistance for woolgrowers



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e'PRES S

MINISTER FOR

STAT EMENT -1 AUSTRALiA PRIMARY INDUSTRY

EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE FOR.. WOOLGRO ERS

Application forms for emergency assistance to woolgrowers

will be available from some Post U ffices in woolgrowing districts from about the middle of next week.

This was announced today by the Minister for Primary Industry,

Mr: Anthony.

He said forms should be available from all Post Offices in

woolgrowing areas by the end of the following week.

Mr. Anthony said woolgrowers suffering from the effects of low

wool prices and drought should use the forms to apply for a

financial grant under the terms of the Government's 5330 million

provision for this purpose in the 1970 Budget.

He said an interim payment would be made to woolgrowers who were entitled to assistance as soon as applications were processed.

The interim payment would represent 50 per cent of the assessed grant.

A final payment would be made after all applications had been

processed and when it was known whether the 530 million provided

would allow all claims to be met in full or in part.

Applications must be lodged with the Secretary, Department of Primary Industry, G.P.O. Box 2528W, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001 by

30 November, 1970.

Mr. Anthony said the application form, while it might appear

at first glance to be complicated, was a fairly simple one.

All applicants would need to complete Part A of the form,

which dealt with sources of wool income, and details of the

structure of the family unit earning that income.

Depending on the nature of the applicant's activity as a sole

trader, member of a partnership, beneficiary in an estate, or

shareholder in a private company, the applicant then would complete

the appropriate part of the remainder of the form. The great majority of applicants would need to fill in only Part A and one

other part.

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Mr. Anthony said that, for the purposes of the application,

a family unit - husband, wife and dependents - would be regarded as one person and one application should be sufficient.

Eligibility for full assistance would be limited to growers

who derived at least 50 per cent of their gross income from wool

in the year ended 30 June, 1969.

Growers who derived less than 50 per cent but more than 33-1/3 per cent of their gross income from wool during that period

would be eligible for some assistance.

Assistance would be based on the extent of the fall beyond eight per cent in a woolgrower's gross income from wool in the year ended 30 June, 1970, as compared with the previous year.

"From this it is clear that applications should be lodged only by growers who derived more than a third of their gross income from

wool in the year en-ed 30 June, 1969, and who suffered a fall in gross income from wool of more than eight per cent between the years ended 30 June 1969 and 1970", Mr. Anthony said.

"By and large the year 1968-69 was an average season, although

there were woolgrowers whose production was affected by drought in

that year.

"This low production, due to drought, in 1968-69, may cause some growers to appear ineligible for assistance. We are prepared to review such cases in the light of individual circumstances.

"The upper limit of assistance to a woolgrower will be

X1,500 and assistance will be granted only if the amount payable

is $50 or more."

CANBERRA

4th geptember, 1970