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Transcript of part of interview: ABC's Country Hour: 20 August 1970: Wool marketing



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ES S

TA T M A' ,jQ11S, R 1

MASTER FOR

PRIMARY INDUSTRY

/00

WOOL lv RATING

Transcript of part of an interview given by the Minister for Primary Industry,

Mr. Anthony, on the ABC's Country Hour, Thursday, 20th August, 1970.

Q. Could I turn to the vexed question of marketing. When do you hope the Government might make some decision about this ?

Mr. Anthony: The G overnment has told me that I am now to go into consultation with the wool industry to work out the details of a marketing plan that can be put to the industry and to the Government.

The Wool Board Advisory Committee brought forward a wool marketing plan based on a single marketing authority — a

statutory marketing authority. This left out a lot of the details, and I'm partly to blame for that because I had great pressure on this committee to bring forward a total plan for the wool industry.

The -rool marketing proposaldoes not clearly identify the degree to which the reserve price would operate. It doesn't clearly lay down the charter of the authority, nor does it show

what the structure of the authority will be, nor describe the finances involved in operating it, nor where the responsibility and obligation will lie for finding this finance,,.

Now these are all matters of considerable importance to the Government and we will have to know more of these matters before the G overnment can make a decision. And I believe the industry wants to know these things too before''it can clarify

its own points of view..

9

I would hope to do this as a matter of great urgency --I don't know how long it would take -- but I would hope it won't be many weeks before I can do it.

Q. In your statement in the House last night you were obviously pretty concerned that the wool industry seems to be tearing itself apart about this question at the moment.

A. I am, and as I said in my statement last night in Parliament, I am disappointed that so many people are pre—judging the marketing issue, because there has been no detailed

information given about a lot of the points that are in great conjecture and debate at the moment.

Now, why they should get into such a frenzy over these things I don't know. I suppose it's the nature of man to want to be debating issues.

I think it's most unfortunate that tempers are getting high, people are getting hot under the collar about this issue.

It really isn't the appropriate time to be doing it.

I hope that what I said last night might just calm the troubled waters for a short period.

9

I would hope to do this as a matter of great urgency --I don't know how long it would take but I would hope it won't be many weeks before I can do it.

Q. In your statement in the House last night you were obviously pretty concerned that the wool industry seems to be tearing itself apart about this question at the moment.

A. I am, and as I said in my statement last night in Parliament, I am disappointed that so many people are pre-judging

the marketing issue, because there has been no detailed

information given about a lot of the points that are in great conjecture and debate at the moment.

Now, why they should get into such a frenzy over these

things I don't know. I suppose it's the nature of man to want to be debating issues.

I think it's most unfortunate that tempers are getting high, people are getting hot under the collar about this issue.

It really isn't the appropriate time to be doing it,

I hope that what I said last night might just calm the

troubled waters for a short period.

Canberra,

20th August, 1970.