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Chicken meat research



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PRESS-...:.:.

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MINISTER - FOR

S T A T,E M ENT ,1 A , PRIMARY INDUSTRY

"I

CEICKEN HEAT RESEARCH The Minister for Primary Industry, the Hon.

J.D. Anthony, announced today that he had approved the

first programme of research recommended by the Australian

Chicken Heat Research Committee appointed under the

legislation which established the Commonwealth/Industry

Chicken Heat Research Scheme in July, 1969. Industry

funds for this scheme are provided by a levy on all

cickens hatched for meat production and the funds

collected in this way are matched by the Commonwealth.

Mr. Anthony referred to the rapid growth of

the industry since it adopted intensive production methods

approximately fifteen years ago. That expansion was

continuing , was enhanced by the fact that in the four

years ending 1968/69 the dressed weight of chicken meat

produced in Australia increased by 80 million lbs or 62%.

The industry expects that production will continue to

rise but at the same time realises that the efficiency

of its production methods can be improved.

Mr. Anthony stated that the research programme

he had approved involved an expenditure of approximately

0

_2

$140,000 in 1970/71 for 19 projects dealing with a range

of problems of importance to the chicken meat industry.

The research will be undertaken mainly by Australian

Universities and State Departments of Agriculture.

The main emphasis of the research will be on

the study of disease problems and the .development of

control measures, including the production of more

effective vaccines. Nutrition of breeding .stock and of

growing chickens is also the subject of several

projects, some of which are concerned with the evaluation

of Australian vegetable protein feed sources. Some

aspects of chicken processing will also be examined.

Mr. Anthony said that with both disease and

nutrition, problems exist which require research under

Australian conditions. In the past, the industry has

largely had to depend on technology and research

developed in overseas countries. While this has been

of great assistance to producers, there has been the

need for testing new developments and, where necessary,

adapting them to local use.

CANBERRA.

28th May, 1970.