Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Immigration and community relations [policy]



Download PDFDownload PDF

•:(

f f

:: _ — — v fl r Cl [♦ 1 1

: MICK YOUNG

Shadow Minister of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs

t H ^,^.:

e

r' - -j 9 y J ^Yii' -e. ^R^ ^+ {E Z„A i '7

! ( S Y

3. ^. ? :' I ^fJ //, x j b l t C K 4^ a^^1^;

CONTENTS

A. Introduction

B. Immigration and Population Policy E

.1. National Population Council

2. Immigration and the labour market-3. The Family Reunion Progran

4. The Refugee Program

5. Australian Citizenship Act

6.. Deportation

C. Community Relations

1. Education and National Language Policy

2. Ethnic Welfare and Community Organisations

(i) Grant-in-Aid

(ii) Migrant Resource Centres

3. Government Services

(i) Interpreter and Translator Services 4. Industry and Employment

5. Migrant Women

6. Ageing Migrants

7. Ethnic Press, Radio and Multicultural Television

D. Australian Institute of Multicultural Affairs

E. Discrimination

A.

INTRODUCTION

The Labor Party will maintain the general thrust of

immigration and community relations policies established under

the Whitlam Government which was recognised' as an innovator

and pioneer in many 4 areas of this portfolio. Our policies are

based on the belief that Australia has become .a multicultural

society and that each ethnic community has a right, without

discrimination, to the retention and development of 'its

culture, language and lifestyle as part of the Australian

nation. .The ' Labor Party in Government will maintain and

develop its strong commitment to ethnic communities'

development and to the recognition of the significant

contribution which is made by them to our society.

Labor regards it as the government's responsibility to assist•

migrants in establishing themselves with the--same rights,

opportunities . and responsibilities as all Australians.

Participation of. these settlers in Australian society at the

level desired by them must be facilitated in every possible

.__way,. recognising the important role family reunion plays in

this process.

All ethnic groups must be free to retain and express their

ethnic identity if they desire to do so, without sacrificing

their rights of equal access to the community's resources.

Improved community relations; the relationships of particular

.ethnic groups, whether English speaking or not, with all

sections of the community, must be positively encouraged and

any measures taken must be administered with flexibility and

an understanding of the ethnic diversity of the population.

1

1 , F 7 ^ F r ^2- s

f ,

B. IMMIGRATION AND POPULATION POLICY'

In the two decades after the Second World War, migration to Australia took place on an unprecedented scale. It took place

in- an ..economic climate of :considerable industrial expansion

and development. v - The state .of, the international economy

coupled with disastrous monetarist policies at home during the.

Fraser years, have caused this development to stagnate in some

areas and. led to recession in. others. The present economic

climate of change from a. period of high economic and

population growth to one of high unemployment and economic

recession may be a. time for reappraisal of our immigration

policy.

1. National Population Council

Australia has. consciously pursued policies-of -attracting

migrants for permanent settlement.. Labor will continue with

this policy, concentrating mainly on family reunion but also

taking into consideration the needs and the' capacity of

Australia's economy to absorb migrants. A Labor Government will, therefore,

ESTABLISH A. NATIONAL POPULATION COUNCIL, TO CONSIDER AND MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN POPULATION GROWTH, IMMIGRATION . , THE ECONOMY AND THE QUALITY OF LIFE..

In order to undertake long-term projections on population and

workforce growth, Labor believes that as many community and

organisational representatives as possible should participate

in 'forward planning'.

The Council will, therefore, be drawn from groups representing

the community, including ethnic, economic, environmental,

industrial and social interests. Ideally, the Council would

work closely with trade unions, employer. organisations,

relevant community organisations and the Department. of

^a

a, ,. >

.. `

ih +^. - F LLsi rr x ' 7'^, w'^ ' 3.t _

. - Y ; rf 4y^.

- ^k nt ^; r aft ^ ra r ^ ^ r »' ^ ^^ `"^rc, c ^A '?^ .`y'},

.. .. - .. .++.wa. .. .. '' - +N ''. w1 Y^ .+'a- .rw . ..v n. .ice. ..

Employment and Industrial Relations.

2. Immigration and the labour market

Labor does not advocate an ".immigration freeze" as a temporary measure nor abandoning immigration, but will support immigration at a level which is consistent with the national • interest and Australia's humanitarian obligations. However, • care will be taken that immigration is not used as a

substitute for manpower planning and employment policies. A Labor Government would ensure that immigration is not used by • employers or industry as 'a means of avoiding their responsibilities to the Australian community. Skilled workers

already in Australia should be employed before seekin g . recruitment overseas. Industr y . has an obligation to train people (both teenagers entering the workforce for the first

time and older workers whose jobs have -disappeared with

technological innovation) to fill anticipated vacancies rather than depend. upon the recruitment of . skilled workers overseas•.

Whilst it is recognised that cut- backs • in immigration intake offer • no permanent solution to Australia's , present unemployment situation, in the short term a Labor Government • would •

'IN DETERMINING ITS IMMIGRATION POLICY ENSURE THAT LEVELS

OF EMPLOYMENT AND THE NEEDS OF. THE LABOUR MARKET ARE TAKEN INTO CONSIDERATION.

Bearing that in mind •, there are certainly some immigration' categories which. should be investigated with a view to

limiting intake (e.g. the Employer Nomination Scheme, the Working Holiday Scheme, labour shortage migration, and in

particular the unrestricted flow of Trans-Tasman migration).

A..Labor• Government would encourage research to be carried out into the effects of immigration upon economic growth,

3

t x^.^ y s f t„i^,.+a^ r c ' `^yf rhtN`

^t n tc (^ a4 ^.id,{2i

t st^' ^-^,,

investment, consumption, innovation and employment.

3. The Family Reunion

A Labor Government does not intend to curtail this program.

It is only natural that new .settlers. should wish their

families to join them. Also, the assistance provided to

newcomers by friends and family cannot be underestimated.

Therefore, the ALP Platform states that

WITHIN THE IMMIGRATION PROGRAM, FAMILY REUNION MUST HAVE A VERY HIGH PRIORITY.

A criticism which can be levelled at the family reunion

program as it is administered at the moment, is that. it

discriminates against the not so well off among migrants. The

vast majority of recently arrived are blue collar workers.

They are usually quite unable to fully sponsor--relatives as it

involves being able to guarantee for the new arrival-s

employment, accommodation and, in the case of relatives of

non-working `age, "assurances of support" (the reimbursement by

the sponsor of any social security payments that the

Australian Government may make to their relatives). The

financial resources and influence with potential employers

such an undertaking requires are simply not available to the

majority of ethnic Australians. A Labor Government is.

committed to abolishing "assurances of support", but for the

sake 'of' equality, `would also be looking at the feasibility of employment offers.

4. The Refugee Program

Australia has one of the highest refugee intakes (on a per

capita basis) among ' Western countries. Since the Second World War, some 400,000 refugees have been settled here. This considerable effort pales into insignificance, however, when

one considers that there are up to 16 million refugees in the

4

I ^

T .. 1

.. .:law>^ .^y^+S'^i X^r=

world (United Nations estimate). The Labor Party believes

that although Australia should fulfill its humanitarian

obligations, more_ . emphasis. should be placed on trying to reach political settlement on the plight of refugees. Australia

should be adopting a far more constructive attitude in the

international .arefta. to try and bring about political

settlements (such as the one initiated by France and Mexico in.

El Salvador)

In the short term, of course, the refugee situation remains a

humanitarian -problem requiring •urgent solution. Australia.

cannot avoid some responsibility, therefore a Labor Government

would

ACCEPT REFUGEES WITHOUT DISCRIMINATION FOLLOWING. NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSION FOR REFUGEES.

In particular, Labor would make a greater effort to diversify_

the geographical areas from which refugees are accepted.

5. Australian Citizenship Act

Citizenship is essential to full participation in the national life of the country. It entitles people to vote and serve the

country in a variety of ways not presently possible for

non-citizens. -In return, citizens are awarded the maximum

possible protection of the State when outside the country of.

citizenship. Certain benefits are ensured for citizens, among

them being: entitlement, under Australian law, to the same

rights as people born. in Australia; the right to apply for

appointment to any public offica or to stand for election as a

member of parliament; the right to apply for an Australian

passport and to leave and re-enter Australia without a

re-entry authority; and freedom from deportation.

Labor considers that the Australian Citizenship Act of 1948 is

in urgent need of reform.

The current Act- contains many

anomalies and discrimination on the grounds of sex, ethnic

origin and nationality. All discrimination would be removed

from the Act as quickly as possible. This would include the

requirement that an -applicant,_..demonstrate an adequate

knowledge of the EAglish language. Labor does believe that

such knowledge is essential to full participation in

Australia's social and political life, but does not consider

that testing of applicants for citizenship on their knowledge

of -English is appropriate.

Labor, also questions the appropriateness of the "Oath of

Allegiance" as it is currently worded. Many ethnic and

native-born Australians are dissatisfied with the wording of

the oath. Labor would initiate a study to be carried out

which would investigate possible alternatives to the present

oath and then consult the Australian people on--this important

matter.

6. Deportation

Like the Citizenship Act, the Migration Act is in urgent need

• of reform. There have been several deportation cases in

recent times which have highlighted this necessity. Under the

Act an alien is rendered subject to deportation at any time

• until citizenship is granted if certain events occur (criminal

conviction with a. sentence of one year or more of

imprisonment) or the Minister deems his or her conduct such

that the alien should not remain in Australia. The

legislation permits discrimination on the grounds of

nationality and leaves open the possibility of victimisation

of groups of certain national origin. The Government has •already shown its propensity for such actions in the "Greek Conspiracy" case. The Act should be amended to eliminate the

distinction between aliens and immigrants so that all

• immigrants, regardless of origin, can be free from the threat

6

y) f

of deportation after a certain time.

A Labor Government would continue with the present framework

for appeals against deportation orders in which the

Administrative Appeals. Tribunal. has a. recommendatory but not a

determinative jurisdiction; i.e. is empowered to hear appeals

against deportation orders, but the Minister has the final say

•and can override the decision of the AAT:

WHI.LE WE ACCEPT THE POLICY OF THE ULTIMATE DISCRETION TO DEPORT RESTING IN THE RESPONSIBLE MINISTER RATHER THAN THE COURTS, TRIBUNAL DECISIONS SHOULD ONLY BE OVERTURNED BY THE MINISTER IN EXCEPTIONALLY CLEAR CIRCUMSTANCES WHEN

STRONG NEW PROBATIVE EVIDENCE CAN BE PRODUCED TO JUSTIFY THE DECISION.

To ensure that the Minister uses his or her overriding. powers

only where there is exceptionally clear justification, he or

she should - in circumstances where it is proposed to deport

notwithstanding an AAT recommendation to the contrary - table

in Parliament a statement of the reasons before a deportation

is ordered.

I rA

C.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS

The Whitlam Labor Government made the decision to officially

acknowledge Australia as a multicultural society and develop

policies accordingly.

4L

In a multicultural society all residents, irrespective of

ethnic origin, race, sex, or knowledge of English, should have

equal rights and opportunities to achieve total participation

in the Autralian political and social systems. It is

recognised that there are very real. obstacles in the way of

that desired equality and that those are not merely due to

communication problems. The ALP therefore seeks, by identifying those obstacles, to provide the framework within

which it should operate if it is to promote and achieve equality.

1. Education and National Language Policy

Much of the attitudinal discrimination and lack of awareness

of the problems and contributions of ethnic communities

relates to education - or lack of it - for the multicultural

society.. We believe that this will decrease as multicultural

education improves. A multicultural education policy would eliminate connotations of "migrant" education, . "migrant"

cultures, etc, but rather promote Australian education and

Australian cultures, etc. by taking due cognizance of the

diversity within our society.

However, it is recognised that lack of knowledge of English is

the major barrier - not only impeding sociability and

education, not only decreasing information and awareness, but

also impairing access to support services, affecting the

outcome of legal proceedings, medical and hospital treatment

and, if employed, safety and full participation.

8

If we accept equality of opportunity we accept that all adults

who do not speak English adequately f)r their needs must have

the opportunity to learn English. ' At the moment, inconvenient hours are often dictated, and there are few opportunities to

learn English on the job and in the communities where there is

greatest need. To overcome this demands diversity - full-time

"on arrival" courses for more than the 7% of recent arrivals

currently handled,. and for longer than the currently

recommended 215 hours. Also part-time courses: English at the

work place during working hours; beginners courses for those

longer term immigrants not previously taught; bridging

courses, advanced writing courses, English for special

purposes courses. It also demands permanent teachers trained

to teach adults, to understand other . ultures, and above all, to devise relevant materials.

Language needs for all Australians are covered-by-the National

Language Policy to which the Labor Party is committed. There-are three major components in the Platform for achieving the

aims of the policy:

a) TO EXTEND AND IMPROVE THE PROGRAM FOR TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE TO CHILDREN AN) ADULTS AND TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO TRANSITIONAL BI-LINGUAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AS A RIGHT FOR ALL CHILDREN ENTERING PRIMARY SCHOOLS WITH HIGH

ETHNIC CONCENTRATIONS

We recognise the need to enable all children and adults from

non-English speaking backgrounds to becom' competent in the

use of English. So far the Government's record has been inadequate for helping migrant children to learn English. To.

help children become competent in English, we will increase

the number of teachers of English as a Second Language (ESL)

in accordance with local-needs, compleiented by an increase in

grants for teaching materials. For :;chools too small for a full-time ESL teacher, suitable provisions will be made for

shared teachers, who will have proper travelling allowances.

.tI u

. . _ ^ ^. ^ _ .- .P fie. S,r. ,t'r.... . . . . . .. ..^, g in r • J.yA ..%:i'

Labor will extend support for ethnic schools by the provision

of per capita grants for children who attend ethnic schools.

Currently, funding takes place on a State and Federal shared

basis, with States providing $28 and the Federal Government

ti

adding another $30 per child. Labor will increase' the

Commonwealth grant 4 per pupil to $45, which would result, in

total additional expenditure of about $1.7 - an increase of

50%.

At adult level, we will be providing for adequate on-arrival

English tuition. In view of the fact that only certain groups

of. immigrants and refugees now enter migrant hostels, such

tuition must be provided in the community as well as hostels.

In particular, it would seem that family reunion arrivals miss

out on classes because they go straight into family homes.

The Adult Migrant Education Service will be upgraded. At the

moment, casual and part-time teachers are carrying full'

teaching loads -without, proper recognition for the work they

perform. A 'Labor Government would create a permanent Service

to _deal not only with language instruction for newly arrived

persons but also with the enormous backlog which has been

created by the present Government's lack of commitment in this

area Labor will, therefore, provide for the transfer of all

current full-time casual teachers to permanent positions.

Across Australia the number of teachers estimated to be

affected by such a measure is 580, and the additional

expenditure is expected to be about $3.68 million per annum.

Migrant ,women appear to be adversely affected by disadvantages

now associated with teaching English to adults. They often

find it difficult to travel to the centrally located classes

from outer suburban homes and even more difficult to have

their children looked after during their absence. A Labor Government would . , therefore, look into possibilities of bringing classes into the community and to providing child

WC

t J S ..M4C

`C'x

k. i ,., i s s ) t i`-.4 .h ".'' '^v '' c 4 r. 3 ^.'tq

care facilities for periods

of classes.

b) TO PROVIDE FOR THE STUDY OF COMMUNITY LANGUAGES AND CULTURE FOR ALL AUSTRALIANS AND FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS WHERE NEEDED

This item relates L not only to the teaching of -community_ languages, history and culture for immigrants and their

children, but also to the need for Australians to acquire

second languages. We are one of the very few Western

countries which still produces monolingual High School

graduates.

Australia's increasing involvement in international trade and

diplomacy requires personnel capable to communicate in

languages other* than English. It is also of great practical

importance that, if we aspire to a leading role in our

region's affairs, we must develop the facility to communicate

with our neighbours effectively.

A Labor Government will, also give encouragement to the

training of professionals in contact with ethnic groups to

include courses in the history, culture and language of

immigrant groups.

c) TO ACT IN CONJUNCTION WITH EMPLOYERS TO SEEK THE ESTABLISHMENT OF ENGLISH COURSES FOR NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING PERSONS AT THE WORK PLACE DURING WORKING HOURS

We believe that this third item of the policy guidelines for a

National Language ' Policy is of particular significance. The

Labor Party and major sections of the trade union movement

agree that English tuition for workers is an industrial right,

along with other on-the-job training, recreation leave,.

maternity leave and other awards.

A Labor Government would work closely with trade unions and

employers to establish industry-based and occupationally

relevant English courses for migrant workers.

11

•2.

Ethnic Welfare and Community Organi sations

While a Labor Government would make every effort to ensure

that existing Government Departments cater for migrants as

adequately as possible, we acknowledge that certain services S are carried out fair more successfully at community level, by

r, people who have a more direct understanding of the needs and requirements of ethnic communities. We also recognise the

right of every Australian to develop the welfare and community

activities of whatever group he or she choses to belong to.

Therefore, a Labor Government would

ASSIST ETHNIC GROUPS TO DEVELOP THEIR OWN CULTURAL, EDUCATIONAL AND WELFARE PROJECTS

and

ASSIST ETHNIC COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS, COMPOSED OF DEMOCRATICALLY ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES FROM----VARIOUS ETHNIC GROUPS, TO ACT AS ADVOCATES FOR ETHNIC GROUPS AND INDIVIDUALS

(i). Grant-in-Aid

Continuation and extension of the Grant-in-Aid scheme, which

funds ethnic community workers, is anticipated. There is increasing demand for community grants and, at the moment, the

scheme does not seem to distribute grants on a fair and

equitable basis. In order to overcome this, a Labor Government will increase the amount currently spent on

Grant-in-Aid by $1.6 million - an increase of 50%.

A Labor Government would also

ENSURE THAT MIGRANTS HAVE EQUAL ACCESS TO WELFARE SERVICES. FURTHER, LABOR WILL ASSIST ETHNIC GROUPS TO DEVELOP THEIR OWN WELFARE PROJECTS, INCLUDING AN EXTENSION OF THE GRANT-IN-AID SCHEME AND A NEW WELFARE RIGHTS PROGRAM

In this process, representatives of ethnic communities will,

12

.:..,:^eYll

1

as far as possible, be consulted in matters affecting welfare

services.

(ii) Migrant Resource Centres

A Labor Government swill continue support for Migrant Resource

Centres. We believe that such Centres adequately funded and

staffed, are able to provide resources for ethnic groups as

well, as offering •a base for migrants to come together and share their views and experiences, thus enabling them to

participate more fully in the political, economic and social

life of Australia. The Centres can also be a place for mutual

support, a place people can identify with, and where they can

pursue their cultural and social interests.

Priority will be given to those Centres serving highly

industrialised areas with high concentrations -of migrant

workers and their families, especially if these are also

experiencing extreme unemployment problems.

3. Government Services

The Labor Party believes that responsibility for settlement

services rests with the Government. We will, therefore,

ESTABLISH CONSULTATIVE MACHINERY BETWEEN THE STATES, TERRITORIES AND THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO DETERMINE THE LEVEL OF IMMIGRATION INTAKE AND OF FEDERAL FINANCIAL

SUPPORT TO ENSURE THE STATES AND TERRITORIES CAN PROVIDE ADEQUATE FACILITIES, SERVICES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL NEW SETTLERS

and

ENSURE THAT ALL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS AND STATUTORY AUTHORITIES RECOGNISE THE DIVERSITY OF THE POPULATION, ARE GEARED TO MEET THE SPECIAL NEEDS OF ETHNIC COMMUNITIES, PROVIDE EQUALITY OF ACCESS OF NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING PEOPLE

TO EMPLOYMENT IN THESE ORGANISATIONS AND EQUAL ACCESS'TO INFORMATION AND SERVICES THROUGH BI—LINGUAL AND INTERPRETER SERVICES

13

This would also ascertain the levels of immigration intake

each State or Territory could cope with in terms of the

facilities provided in those States and Territories.

(i) Interpreter and Translator Services

Labor recognises that as taxpayers and citizens, -non-English

speaking members of our community have the right to expect

that Government services at every level incorporate adequate

translation and interpreter facilities. Some advances were

made in the past but in recent times these have been eroded by

Federal Government funding cuts. Consequently, the services

currently provided show large gaps: some ethnic groups, are

poorly serviced; in the comprehensiveness of available

information, basic areas such as consumer and legal rights,

citizenship and employment are inadequately covered; and poor

services are still provided at courts and psychia-tr-ic clinics.

Labor will ensure that adequate services are available at

police stations (independent of the police), the courts,

-_. hospitals, schools, child care centres, women's shelters and crisis centres, industry, Government Department, and for trade

union meetings. For this, the cooperation of Statesand

Territories will be required and a Federal Labor Government

would consult with the relevant authorities at every possible

level. In the provision of these services, the Commonwealth

GovernmentDepartments should set an example.

r.

4.. Industry and Employment

People of non-English speaking backgroLnds have special

problems in employment and industry. These problems must form

14

a major, part of the work of a responsive Ministry of

Immigration and Community. Relations. To facilitate a responsive approach, a Labor Government will

ESTABLISH A TRIPARTITE COMMITTEE CONSISTING OF GOVERNMENT, MANAGEMENT -AND UNIONS, TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIES TO OVERCOME THE HUMAN PROBLEMS OF A MULTICULTURAL WORKFORCE COVERING SUCH , MATTERS AS LANGUAGE PROBLEMS,

SAFETY PRACTICES, WORKERS COMPENSATION,. RECOGNITION OF OVERSEAS QUALIFICATIONS AND PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEMPLOYMENT AND THE EXPLOITATION OF MIGRANT WORKERS

Labor regards employment and industrial affairs as a priority area in ethnic affairs as well as one that, relates to

immigration intakes. On the one hand, therefore, we will take a series of comprehensive measures designed to protect the

rights of and opportunities available to migrant workers, and, on the other make sure that employers do not recruit •overseas labour irresponsibly.

English classes on the job have been discussed under Section 1. Translating services should be available to. migrant workers to cover workers' compensation claims, information on

-occupational health and safety, conditions of employment, and their participation in trade unions.

Appropriate mechanisms for the recognition of overseas trade and professional qualifications should be developed. At the

moment, too many accreditation bodies appear to exist. Labor will try to develop a uniform approach.

5. Mi.gran.t Women

Problems associated with the work place are often far more

acute for migrant women than their male.colleagues or even

Anglo-Australian women. A Labor government will

RECOGNISE THE SPECIAL NEEDS OF MIGRANT WOMEN WHO SUFFER EVEN GREATER DISCRIMINATION THAN THEIR MALE COUNTERPARTS. THE AREAS OF SPECIAL PRIORITY BEING - HEALTH, OCCUPATIONAL 15

HEALTH AND SAFETY, PSYCHIATRIC CARE, DISCRIMINATION IN

EMPLOYMENT, SEXUAL HARRASSMENT, AND LEARNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Following the activities of the "Razor Gang", women's services

positions were abolished in most Commonwealth Government Departments, including the one women's services position in

the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs. We feel

that, given the special problems of migrant women as outlined

above, ;-. a "Women's Desk". should be recreated for that

Department. Part of its task would be to investigate the abovementioned issues.

An area of constant concern to migrant women is . finding the

means to attend English classes, especially when young

children have to be taken care of. Child care facilities

should, therefore, be made available alongside English clases

which contain a heavy concentration of migrant.

A 'Labor Government would provide special assistance to women's shelters and crisis centres to deal with the special problems

of migrant women subjected to domestic violence and during

marriage break-up.

In developing strategies for dealing with 'the problems of

migrant women, close consultation with migrant women's groups

would be desirable, and policies should be worked out in

conjunction with the Office of the Status of Women.

6. Ageing Migrants

Labor will •create support services for elderly migrants and assist ethnic communities to care for their aged.

Related to this area is also the concern in ethnic communities over the system of "assurances of support", which are

currently required before migrants may bring 'aged parents to

16

tt ^ t}L f t _ ^dC`^

61

Australia. As this system clearly disadvantages the not •so

well off in our community, a Labor Government will not require

assurances of support for the sponsoring of relatives by

Australian residents.

7. Ethnic Press, Radio and Multicultural Television

Equality of opportunity implies equality of access to

information, yet most of the community information which

'Anglo-Australians take for granted would only be distributed

in English if it were not for the existence of the ethnic

media.. The ethnic media, therefore, supplies a. valuable

community service as well as satisfying the cultural and

social needs of our communities. A Labor Government will

PROVIDE FOR COMPREHENSIVE ETHNIC MEDIA PROGRAMMING, WHICH INCLUDES COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT, ON PUBLIC AND NATIONAL SERVICES

A Labor Government would be committed to increase funding of

ethnic and :multicultural broadcasting, •and develop these

services as facilities controlled by ethnic communities

themselves. This will also involve an expansion of ethnic radio . through the public radio system, under community control. Multicultural television will be further developed

-as-an .independent channel available in all States and

Territories with public access for ethnic communities.. In o.-rder to achieve this, existing ABC technical services should

be made: available both in television and radio areas. In addition, all sectors of broadcasting will be encouraged to

present multicultural broadcasting.

A Labor Government will ensure that all Government advertising

is placed in the ethnic press without discrimination.

17

I

II IIII Il IIII 1IIII 1111111 0051138-09724-0

M F^^^,^cx ss

s

D. AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS

The Institute was established as a statutory authority byan Y Y . Act of Parliament in 1979.

A Labor Government ,-will review the Institute's operation and administration.

E. DISCRIMINATION

Labor opposes all forms of racial discrimination and will

ensure that Australia fulfils its obligations arising from the

International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of

Racial. Discrimination (1965), and will provide proper and

adequate machinery to deal with racial discrimination.

t