Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
Budget 2022 - 2023: Federal Financial Relations



Download PDFDownload PDF

Federal Financial Relations Budget Paper No. 3 2022-23

Circulated by

The Honourable Josh Frydenberg MP Treasurer of the Commonwealth of Australia

and

Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham Minister for Finance of the Commonwealth of Australia

For the information of honourable members on the occasion of the Budget 2022-23

29 March 2022

© Commonwealth of Australia 2022

ISSN 0728 7194 (print); 1326 4133 (online)

This publication is available for your use under a Creative Commons BY Attribution 3.0 Australia licence, with the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms, third-party content and where otherwise stated. The full licence terms are available from http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode.

Use of Commonwealth of Australia material under a Creative Commons BY Attribution 3.0 Australia licence requires you to attribute the work (but not in any way that suggests that the Commonwealth of Australia endorses you or your use of the work).

Commonwealth of Australia material used ‘as supplied’. Provided you have not modified or transformed Commonwealth of Australia material in any way including, for example, by changing the Commonwealth of Australia text; calculating percentage changes; graphing or charting data; or deriving new statistics from published statistics - then the Commonwealth of Australia prefers the following attribution:

Source: The Commonwealth of Australia.

Derivative material If you have modified or transformed Commonwealth of Australia material, or derived new material from those of the Commonwealth of Australia in any way, then the Commonwealth of Australia prefers the following attribution:

Based on Commonwealth of Australia data.

Use of the Coat of Arms The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are set out on

the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet website (see www.pmc.gov.au/ government/commonwealth-coat-arms).

Other uses Enquiries regarding this licence and any other use of this document are welcome at: Manager Media Unit

The Treasury Langton Crescent Parkes ACT 2600 Email: media@treasury.gov.au

Internet A copy of this document is available on the central Budget website at: www.budget.gov.au.

Printed by CanPrint Communications Pty Ltd.

Page iii

Foreword

This Budget Paper presents information on the Australian Government’s financial relations with state, territory and local governments.

Notes

(a) The following definitions are used in this Budget Paper:

- Budget year refers to 2022-23, while the forward years refer to 2023-24, 2024-25 and 2025-26.

- one billion is equal to one thousand million.

(b) Except where otherwise indicated, payments to the states in this Budget Paper are reported in expense terms, not cash terms.

(c) Figures in tables and the text have generally been rounded. Discrepancies in tables between totals and sums of components reflect rounding unless otherwise noted.

- Estimates of $100,000 and over are generally rounded to the nearest tenth of a million.

- Estimates midway between rounding points are rounded up.

- Percentage changes in tables are based on the underlying unrounded amounts.

(d) Tables use the following notations:

- nil

na not applicable

$m millions of dollars

$b billions of dollars

nfp not for publication

* unquantifiable

.. not zero, but rounded to zero

~ allocation not yet determined

(e) This Budget Paper uses the following conventions.

- The Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory of Australia are referred to as ‘the territories’.

- References to the ‘states’ or ‘each state’ include state governments and territory governments.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page iv

- Local governments are instrumentalities of state governments. Consequently, payments made to the state government sector include payments made to the local government sector unless otherwise specified.

- The following abbreviations are used, where appropriate:

NSW New South Wales

VIC Victoria

QLD Queensland

WA Western Australia

SA South Australia

TAS Tasmania

ACT Australian Capital Territory

NT Northern Territory

GST Goods and Services Tax

(f) The term ‘Commonwealth’ refers to the Commonwealth of Australia. The term is used when referring to the legal entity of the Commonwealth of Australia.

The term ‘Australian Government’ is used when referring to the Government of, and the decisions and activities made by the Government on behalf of, the Commonwealth of Australia.

Appendix B, Total Payments to the States by Function; Appendix C, Supplementary Tables; Appendix D, Debt Transactions; and Appendix E, Appropriations and Conditions are available online at: www.budget.gov.au.

Budget Paper No. 3, Federal Financial Relations 2022-23, is one of a series of Budget Papers that provides information to supplement the Budget Speech. A full list of the series is printed on the inside cover of this paper.

Page v

Contents

Foreword ........................................................................................................ iii

Notes ............................................................................................................................... iii

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations ............................................................. 1

Overview ......................................................................................................................... 1

Australian Government funding to the states .................................................................. 3

Measures affecting payments to the states .................................................................... 9

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes ...................................................... 15

Overview ....................................................................................................................... 15

Health ............................................................................................................................ 19

Education ...................................................................................................................... 39

Skills and workforce development................................................................................. 44

Community services ...................................................................................................... 48

Affordable housing ........................................................................................................ 52

Infrastructure ................................................................................................................. 56

Environment .................................................................................................................. 68

Contingent payments .................................................................................................... 90

Other payments ............................................................................................................. 92

Part 3: General revenue assistance .......................................................... 105

Overview ..................................................................................................................... 105

GST payments ............................................................................................................ 106

Other general revenue assistance .............................................................................. 110

Mirror tax arrangements .............................................................................................. 111

Appendix A: Parameters and further information .................................... 113

Population ................................................................................................................... 113

Data sources ............................................................................................................... 115

Further information ...................................................................................................... 116

Page vi

List of tables

Table 1.1: Australian Government payments to the states, 2021-22 to 2025-26 ....................................................................................................... 5

Table 1.2: Total Australian Government payments to the states as a proportion of GDP ........................................................................................................... 6

Table 1.3: Australian Government’s contribution to state expenditure ........................... 8 Table 1.4: Measures affecting payments to the states ................................................... 9

Table 2.1: Total payments for specific purposes by category, 2021-22 to 2025-26 ..................................................................................................... 16

Table 2.2: Payments for specific purposes by sector and category, 2021-22 to 2025-26 ..................................................................................................... 18

Table 2.3: Payments to support state health services .................................................. 19

Table 2.3.1 Health services ........................................................................................... 22

Table 2.3.2 Health infrastructure ................................................................................... 29

Table 2.3.3 Indigenous health ....................................................................................... 32

Table 2.3.4 Other health National Partnership payments ............................................. 34

Table 2.4: Payments to support state education services ............................................ 39

Table 2.5: Payments to support state skills and workforce development services ......................................................................................................................... 44

Table 2.6: Payments to support state community services .......................................... 48

Table 2.7: Payments to support state affordable housing services .............................. 52 Table 2.8: Payments to support state infrastructure services ....................................... 56

Table 2.9: Payments to support state environment services(a) ..................................... 68

Table 2.10: Contingent payments to the states ............................................................ 90

Table 2.11: Payments to support other state services(a) ............................................... 92

Table 3.1: General revenue assistance ...................................................................... 105

Table 3.2: Reconciling GST revenue, GST entitlement and GST payments to the states ........................................................................................ 107

Table 3.3: Reconciliation of the GST entitlement estimates since the 2021-22 Budget and 2021-22 MYEFO ....................................................................... 107

Table 3.4: Policy decisions since the 2021-22 MYEFO that affect the GST entitlement .......................................................................................................... 108

Table 3.5: Calculation of GST entitlements ................................................................ 109

Table 3.6: Reconciliation of the GST administration budget ....................................... 110

Table 3.7: Other general revenue assistance ............................................................. 110

Table 3.8: Mirror taxes accrued on behalf of the states .............................................. 112

Table A.1: Population by state, at 31 December ........................................................ 113

Table A.2: Population by state, at 30 June ................................................................. 113

Table A.3: Total fertility rate, for years ending 30 June .............................................. 114

Table A.4: Life expectancy at birth, for years ending 30 June .................................... 114

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Page vii

Table A.5: Net overseas migration, for years ending 30 June .................................... 114

Table A.6: Net interstate migration by state, for years ending 30 June ...................... 115 Table A.7: Wage cost indices ...................................................................................... 115

List of charts

Chart 1.1: Payments for specific purposes 2022-23, by sector ...................................... 4

Chart 1.2: Total Australian Government payments to the states, 2022-23 ..................... 7

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 1

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

Overview

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide the states with $166.4 billion in total payments, including payments of $81.6 billion for specific purposes like schools and hospitals and general revenue assistance of $84.8 billion. It will continue to provide significant financial support as part of Australia’s transition to living with COVID-19 and in response to natural disasters (see Box 1.1).

Through its payments to the states, the Australian Government is:

• delivering more doctors, more nurses and more services across public hospitals in every state through funding of $149.8 billion from 2021-22 to 2025-26

• investing $137.5 billion in schools over the five years from 2021-22 to 2025-26

• increasing its payments to support state infrastructure services to $76.9 billion from 2021-22 to 2025-26

• providing $2.2 billion over five years from 2021-22 in Commonwealth funding to preschools

• permanently boosting the size of the GST pool to be distributed among the states each year. From 2021-22, the Australian Government will inject $600 million annually into the GST pool, followed by a further $250 million annually from 2024-25, with these amounts to grow each and every year in line with the underlying growth of the GST.

• providing an estimated $14.9 billion in horizontal fiscal equalisation (HFE) transition payments from 2021-22 to 2025-26 to support the transition to the new HFE system.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 2 | Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

Box 1.1: Working with the states to support Australians through challenging times

Australia has faced some remarkable challenges in recent years, including bushfires, a global pandemic and devastating floods. The Australian Government continues to work with the states to overcome such challenges and manage the economic impacts of uncertainty, while guaranteeing the essential services Australians rely on. The Australian and state governments remain committed to working together to benefit the Australian people, building on the effective management of the pandemic and securing a strong economic recovery.

Australia’s National COVID-19 Response has been pivotal in managing the impact of the pandemic. The Australian Government has worked in partnership with state governments to support state health services, including through the delivery of vaccinations to Australians. Under the National Agreement on COVID-19 Response, the Government has committed $11.6 billion to public health measures, including a further $982.5 million in this Budget to extend funding until 30 September 2022.

Australians have also benefited from $14.4 billion in COVID-19 business support payments that have been jointly funded by the Australian and state governments. The Australian Government’s share of this was $7.1 billion in 2021-22 to businesses across Australia impacted by COVID-19 lockdowns and other restrictions. These payments have been administered by the states under COVID-19 Business Support Agreements.

The Australian Government, jointly with state governments, is supporting Australians in regions affected by natural disasters. The Government has committed funding under the Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements and the Emergency Response Fund to assist communities with recovery from natural disasters and reducing the impact of future events. Further information on the Government’s response to floods can be found in Statement 3: Fiscal Strategy and Outlook of Budget Paper No. 1, Budget Strategy and Outlook 2022-23.

The Government’s health and economic measures have bolstered the resilience of the Australian economy, with the result that the economic recovery has been much stronger than expected. A significant benefit of this is increased GST payments to the states. GST-related payments (entitlements plus HFE transition payments) to the states in 2022-23 are expected to be $5.7 billion greater than estimated at the 2021-22 Budget and well above pre-pandemic levels. Over the four years from 2021-22 to 2024-25, estimated GST payments to the states have been revised up by $18.4 billion since last budget.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 3

Australian Government funding to the states

The Australian Government provides substantial funding to the states in key sectors such as health, education, community services and infrastructure and continues to support important productivity-enhancing projects and reforms. In addition, the Australian Government provides general revenue assistance that can be spent according to states’ own budget priorities.

The states are estimated to receive total Australian Government payments of $166.4 billion in 2022-23.

Payments to the states in 2022-23 are estimated to be 26 per cent of total Australian Government expenditure.

Payments for specific purposes

As at this Budget update, the Australian Government is expected to provide $90.9 billion of payments for specific purposes in 2021-22. This includes significant support the Australian Government provided for COVID-19 related measures, including $7.1 billion of business support arrangements.

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide the states with $81.6 billion in payments for specific purposes. This represents a decrease of $9.3 billion or 10 per cent compared with 2021-22 due to the unwinding of temporary COVID-19 measures and the bring-forward of financial assistance grants for local government. Payments for specific purposes are estimated to make up 13 per cent of total Australian Government expenditure in 2022-23.

National Specific Purpose Payments (National SPPs), National Health Reform, the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement and Quality Schools funding are expected to total $57.8 billion in 2022-23.

National Partnership payments are expected to be $23.8 billion in 2022-23.

The conditions for payments to states for specific purposes are outlined in written agreements between the Commonwealth and the states. The Federation Funding Agreement (FFA) Framework sets out the governance arrangements for these agreements. Further information on the FFA Framework can be found on the Federal Financial Relations website at www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au.

Part 2 of this Budget Paper provides further information on payments to the states for specific purposes. Chart 1.1 illustrates estimated specific purpose payments to the states in 2022-23 by sector.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 4 | Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

Chart 1.1: Payments for specific purposes 2022-23, by sector

General revenue assistance

General revenue assistance, which principally comprises the GST entitlement, provides untied funding to support the delivery of state services.

In 2022-23, the states are expected to receive $84.8 billion in general revenue assistance, including $80 billion for the GST entitlement. General revenue assistance to the states is estimated to represent 13 per cent of total Australian Government expenditure in 2022-23.

Part 3 contains further details of general revenue assistance to the states.

Health $28.8b

Education $27.0b Skills and w orkforce development

$1.8b

Community services $1.3b

Affordable housing $2.0b

Infrastructure $17.5b

Environment $1.9b

Other $1.3b

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 5

Payments to the states

Total Australian Government payments to the states are shown in Table 1.1.

Table 1.1: Australian Government payments to the states, 2021-22 to 2025-26 $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22

Payments for specific

purposes(a) 29,720 21,811 16,945 9,605 5,422 1,813 1,390 1,964 90,934

GST-related payments(b) 22,289 17,500 15,813 5,324 6,805 3,025 1,431 3,371 75,558 Other general revenue

assistance(c) - - - 34 - - 42 - 936

Total payments to the states 52,008 39,311 32,758 14,963 12,227 4,839 2,863 5,335 167,429 2022-23

Payments for specific

purposes(a) 23,785 19,415 17,146 9,532 5,405 2,042 1,197 1,800 81,646

GST-related payments(b) 25,456 18,889 17,811 5,868 7,378 3,201 1,539 3,743 83,885 Other general revenue

assistance(c) - - - 43 - - 42 - 902

Total payments to the states 49,240 38,304 34,957 15,443 12,783 5,242 2,778 5,544 166,433 2023-24

Payments for specific

purposes(a) 24,861 20,315 18,635 10,010 6,110 2,100 1,351 1,557 85,509

GST-related payments(b) 26,517 19,803 18,636 6,132 7,680 3,335 1,602 3,904 87,609 Other general revenue

assistance(c) - - - 39 - - 43 - 796

Total payments to the states 51,378 40,119 37,270 16,181 13,790 5,435 2,997 5,461 173,913 2024-25

Payments for specific

purposes(a) 25,296 19,846 19,078 8,966 5,979 1,963 1,254 1,601 84,229

GST-related payments(b) 27,656 20,796 19,477 6,879 7,985 3,466 1,673 4,052 91,985 Other general revenue

assistance(c) - - - 30 - - 44 - 682

Total payments to the states 52,952 40,642 38,555 15,875 13,964 5,429 2,971 5,653 176,896 2025-26

Payments for specific

purposes(a) 23,744 19,505 18,779 8,194 5,501 1,923 1,306 1,406 80,536

GST-related payments(b) 27,978 21,109 19,798 7,173 8,126 3,553 1,705 4,199 93,641 Other general revenue

assistance(c) - - - 22 - - 44 - 517

Total payments to the states 51,722 40,615 38,577 15,388 13,627 5,476 3,056 5,605 174,694 (a) State allocations for a number of programs have yet to be determined. These payments are not reflected in state totals. As a result, total payments for specific purposes may not equal the sum of the state figures. (b) Includes GST entitlement, transitional GST top-up payments and HFE transition payments. State

allocations are dependent upon the GST revenue sharing relativities for each financial year. They are calculated using the Commonwealth Grants Commission’s 2022-23 GST relativities as the starting point. The estimates do not reflect any attempt to project future GST relativities or GST entitlements. See Part 3 for further information. (c) As state allocations for royalties are not published due to commercial sensitivities, these payments are not

reflected in state totals. Total general revenue assistance does not therefore equal the sum of the state figures.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 6 | Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

For 2022-23, total payments to the states are estimated to be 7.2 per cent of GDP. Payments for specific purposes are estimated to be 3.5 per cent of GDP and general revenue assistance is estimated to be 3.7 per cent of GDP.

Table 1.2: Total Australian Government payments to the states as a proportion of GDP $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Payments for specific purposes

National SPPs 1,578 1,606 1,631 1,658 1,684

National Health Reform funding 29,604 28,139 28,717 30,659 32,653

Quality Schools funding 25,030 26,413 27,701 28,690 29,659

National Housing and Homelessness

funding 1,616 1,645 1,605 1,631 1,655

National Partnership payments 33,106 23,844 25,855 21,592 14,885

Total payments for specific purposes 90,934 81,646 85,509 84,229 80,536

Per cent change from previous year 32.0 -10.2 4.7 -1.5 -4.4

Per cent of GDP 4.0 3.5 3.6 3.4 3.1

General revenue assistance

GST entitlement 73,310 80,005 83,534 87,504 91,306

Other general revenue assistance 3,185 4,782 4,871 5,163 2,852

Total general revenue assistance 76,495 84,787 88,405 92,667 94,158

Per cent change from previous year 1.9 10.8 4.3 4.8 1.6

Per cent of GDP 3.3 3.7 3.7 3.7 3.6

Total payments to the states 167,429 166,433 173,913 176,896 174,694

Per cent change from previous year 16.3 -0.6 4.5 1.7 -1.2

Per cent of GDP 7.3 7.2 7.3 7.1 6.7

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 7

Chart 1.2: Total Australian Government payments to the states, 2022-23

National SPPs $1.6b

National Health Reform funding $28.1b

Quality Schools funding $26.4b

National Housing and Homelessness funding $1.6b

National Partnership payments $23.8b

GST and other GRA $84.8b

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 8 | Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

Table 1.3 provides information on the Australian Government’s financial contributions to state expenditure in key sectors in 2020-21 (the latest year for which there are data to enable this calculation). It shows that Australian Government financial assistance in 2020-21 effectively supported 45 per cent of states’ expenditure.

Table 1.3: Australian Government’s contribution to state expenditure

2020-21

Commonwealth tied payments $million

State spending supported by general revenue assistance (b)

$million

Total state spending $million

State spending supported by Commonwealth revenue

per cent

Health 25,838 20,246 94,450 49

Education 24,834 12,823 68,291 55

Housing and community amenities 3,137 1,873 9,485 53

Transport 8,606 8,555 37,599 46

Social protection 1,862 7,896 28,623 34

Other functions (a) 4,608 23,703 84,938 33

Payments for specific purpose 68,885

General revenue assistance 75,097

Total 323,385 45

Source: Australian Government 2020-21 Final Budget Outcome and state and territory 2020-21 Final Budget Outcomes. Note: 2020--21 data on an ABS Classification of the Functions of Government (COFOG-A) basis is unavailable for the Commonwealth. Commonwealth expense by purpose data has been adjusted to

align with COFOG-A. (a) ‘Other functions’ includes additional functions not elsewhere itemised. (b) General revenue assistance (GRA) is provided to the states without conditions, to spend according to their own budget priorities. For illustrative purposes GRA is allocated to expense functions based on the ratio

of discretionary spending in each function as a share of states’ total discretionary spending.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 9

Measures affecting payments to the states

Table 1.4 lists all measures in the 2022-23 Budget that affect payments to the states. Details of the measures are available in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23, arranged by portfolio. Information on the payments affected is available in Parts 2 and 3 of this Budget Paper.

Table 1.4: Measures affecting payments to the states Payment Section of

Budget Paper 3 Measure title Section of

Budget Paper 2

COVID-19 public health response Part 2 - Health COVID-19 Response Package - guaranteeing Medicare and

Access to medicines

Payments - Health

COVID-19 public health response Part 2 - Health COVID-19 Response Package - personal protective equipment

and rapid antigen tests

Payments - Health

COVID-19 public health response Part 2 - Health COVID-19 Response Package - supporting hospitals and

emergency response extension

Payments - Health

COVID-19 public health response Part 2 - Health COVID-19 Response Package - vaccines and treatments

Payments - Health

Japanese encephalitis virus mosquito surveillance and control

Part 2 - Health Japanese Encephalitis Virus National Plan Payments - Health

Multidisciplinary outreach care Part 2 - Health Ageing and Aged Care Payments - Health

Reducing stillbirths

Part 2 - Health Women’s Health Package Payments - Health

Surge Capacity for BreastScreen Australia

Part 2 - Health Preventive Health Payments - Health

Western Australia Children’s Hospice

Part 2 - Health Preventive Health Payments - Health

Western Australia Comprehensive Cancer Centre

Part 2 - Health Fighting Cancer Payments - Health

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Health component

Part 2 - Health Development of Future Support for Improved Outcomes for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

Payments - Prime Minister and Cabinet

Public dental services for adults Part 2 - Health Guaranteeing Medicare - strengthening primary care

Payments - Health

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Children and schooling component

Part 2 - Education Development of Future Support for Improved Outcomes for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

Payments - Prime Minister and Cabinet

JobTrainer Fund Part 2 - Skills and workforce development

Boosting Participation and Building Australia’s Workforce Payments - Education, Skills and Employment

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 10 | Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

Table 1.4: Measures affecting payments to the states (continued) Payment Section of

Budget Paper 3 Measure title Section of

Budget Paper 2

National Skills and Workforce Development SPP

Part 2 - Skills and workforce development

Skills Reform to Support Future Growth Payments - Education, Skills and Employment

Skilling Australians Fund Part 2 - Skills and workforce

development

Skills Reform to Support Future Growth Payments - Education, Skills and Employment

Electronic monitoring of family, domestic and sexual violence offenders

Part 2 - Community services

Women’s Safety Payments - Cross

Portfolio

Family, domestic and sexual violence responses

Part 2 - Community services

Women’s Safety Payments - Cross

Portfolio

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Community safety implementation plan

Part 2 - Community services

Development of Future Support for Improved Outcomes for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

Payments - Prime Minister and Cabinet

Remote Community Store Licensing Scheme

Part 2 - Community services

Development of Future Support for Improved Outcomes for Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

Payments - Prime Minister and Cabinet

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Remote Australia strategies component

Part 2 - Affordable housing Development of Future Support for Improved Outcomes for

Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory

Payments - Prime Minister and Cabinet

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment Payments - Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - Australian Capital Territory Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - New South Wales Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - Northern Territory Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - Queensland Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 11

Table 1.4: Measures affecting payments to the states (continued) Payment Section of

Budget Paper 3 Measure title Section of

Budget Paper 2

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - South Australia Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - Tasmania Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - Victoria Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Infrastructure Investment Program

Part 2 - Infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment - Western Australia Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Albury Wodonga Regional Deal Part 2 - Infrastructure

Albury Wodonga Regional Deal Payments - Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

Barkly Regional Deal Part 2 - Infrastructure

School Education Support Payments - Education, Skills and Employment

Local Roads and Community Infrastructure

Part 2 - Infrastructure Local Roads and Community Infrastructure - Phase 3

extension

Payments - Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications

National Water Grid Fund Part 2 - Infrastructure

National Water Grid Fund - project funding Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Perth City Deal Part 2 -

Infrastructure

Perth City Deal - Edith Cowan University CBD Campus Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

South East Queensland City Deal

Part 2 - Infrastructure

South East Queensland City Deal Payments - Infrastructure, Transport,

Regional Development and Communications

Boosting our northern Biosecurity Frontline

Part 2 - Environment

Agriculture - continuing to deliver Agriculture 2030 Payments - Agriculture, Water and the

Environment

Emergency Response Fund - Flood Recovery and Resilience Package

Part 2 - Environment

Flood Package Payments - Cross

Portfolio

Management of established pest and weeds

Part 2 - Environment

Agriculture - continuing to deliver Agriculture 2030 Payments - Agriculture, Water and the

Environment

Pest and disease preparedness and response programs

Part 2 - Environment

Japanese Encephalitis Virus National Plan Payments - Health

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 12 | Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations

Table 1.4: Measures affecting payments to the states (continued) Payment Section of

Budget Paper 3 Measure title Section of

Budget Paper 2

Recycling Modernisation Fund - Plastics technology stream

Part 2 - Environment

Building Australia’s Circular Waste Economy Payments - Agriculture, Water and the

Environment

Support Plantation Establishment Part 2 - Environment

Forestry and Fishing - supporting the forestry and fishery industry

Payments - Agriculture, Water and the Environment

Supporting farmers to maximise farm gate output through traceability and on-farm biosecurity

Part 2 - Environment

Agriculture - continuing to deliver Agriculture 2030 Payments - Agriculture, Water and the

Environment

Transforming Digital Environmental Assessments

Part 2 - Environment

Streamlining Environmental Protections and Modernising Indigenous Cultural Heritage Protections

Payments - Agriculture, Water and the Environment

Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements

Part 2 - Contingent payments

Flood Package Payments - Cross

Portfolio

Additional Funding for Legal Aid Commissions to support court reform

Part 2 - Other payments Attorney-General’s Portfolio - additional resourcing

Payments - Attorney- General’s

Commonwealth High Risk Terrorist Offender Regime

Part 2 - Other payments Strengthening Australia’s arrangements for managing

terrorist offenders and countering violent extremism

Payments - Home Affairs

Legal assistance for floods in Qld and NSW

Part 2 - Other payments Flood Package Payments - Cross

Portfolio

National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020-25

Part 2 - Other payments Women’s Safety Payments - Cross

Portfolio

Specialised and trauma-informed legal services for victim-survivors of sexual assault

Part 2 - Other payments Women’s Safety Payments - Cross

Portfolio

Support for businesses impacted by COVID-19

Part 2 - Other payments COVID-19 Economic Support Payments - Treasury

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Addressing Cost of Living Pressures - temporary reduction

in fuel excise

Payments - Treasury

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 1: Australia’s Federal Relations | Page 13

Table 1.4: Measures affecting payments to the states (continued) Payment Section of

Budget Paper 3 Measure title Section of

Budget Paper 2

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Australia UK Free Trade Agreement - increasing market

access opportunities and strengthening ties between our two countries

Payments - Home Affairs

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Migration Program - 2022-23 planning levels

Payments - Home Affairs

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Changes To Visa Rules - supplementing Australia’s

workforce during the recovery

Payments - Home Affairs

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Indirect Tax Concession Scheme - diplomatic and

consular concessions

Payments - Treasury

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Varying the GDP uplift factor for tax instalments

Payments - Treasury

GST entitlement Part 3 - GST payments Humanitarian Program 2022-23 and Update on Afghan Arrivals

Payments - Home Affairs

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 15

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Overview

The Australian Government provides payments to the states for specific purposes in policy areas for which the states have primary responsibility. These payments cover most areas of state and local government activity, including health, education, skills and workforce development, community services, housing, Indigenous affairs, infrastructure and the environment.

Funding for public hospitals under the National Health Reform Agreement is the largest single specific purpose payment to the states, estimated to be $28.1 billion in 2022-23. This includes funding for the COVID-19 public health response.

Schools funding payments under the Australian Education Act 2013 are estimated to be $26.4 billion in 2022-23, comprising funding for government schools of $10.3 billion and non-government schools of $16.1 billion.

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is supporting the states in the Skills and Workforce Development sector by providing $1.6 billion through a National Specific Purpose Payment (National SPP). The states are required to spend this funding in the sector.

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is providing an estimated $1.6 billion under the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement. Funding will support access to affordable safe and sustainable housing, which includes preventing and addressing homelessness.

National Partnership payments to the states are the key vehicle to facilitate reforms or support the delivery of particular projects and services. Funding agreements are typically entered into for a fixed period of time, reflecting the nature of the project or reform involved.

To the fullest extent possible, National Partnership payments are aligned with the achievement of milestones and are made after the states have achieved the outcomes or outputs specified in the relevant agreement. National Partnership payments are estimated to be $23.8 billion in 2022-23.

Funding agreements and other Commonwealth-State agreements are publicly available on the Federal Financial Relations website at: www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au. Details of the appropriation mechanisms for all payments to the states and the terms and conditions applying to them are set out in Appendix E, available online.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 16 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Table 2.1: Total payments for specific purposes by category, 2021-22 to 2025-26 $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total(a)

2021-22

National SPP 501 407 321 165 109 33 26 15 1,578

National Health Reform

funding(b) 9,911 6,914 6,251 3,168 1,835 578 533 415 29,604

Quality Schools funding 7,657 6,183 5,455 2,558 1,796 572 388 422 25,030

National Housing and

Homelessness funding 495 416 334 175 113 35 28 21 1,616

National Partnership

payments(c) 11,156 7,891 4,583 3,540 1,570 595 415 1,091 33,106

Total payments for specific

purposes 29,720 21,811 16,945 9,605 5,422 1,813 1,390 1,964 90,934

2022-23

National SPP 508 414 328 168 111 34 27 15 1,606

National Health Reform

funding(b) 8,592 7,141 6,230 2,966 1,712 582 514 401 28,139

Quality Schools funding 8,043 6,552 5,747 2,748 1,888 591 408 437 26,413

National Housing and

Homelessness funding 502 423 342 178 115 36 28 21 1,645

National Partnership

payments(c) 6,140 4,884 4,499 3,471 1,579 799 220 926 23,844

Total payments for specific

purposes 23,785 19,415 17,146 9,532 5,405 2,042 1,197 1,800 81,646

2023-24

National SPP 514 422 334 171 112 34 27 16 1,631

National Health Reform

funding 8,686 7,141 6,509 3,075 1,774 583 534 415 28,717

Quality Schools funding 8,414 6,896 6,020 2,899 1,982 614 427 449 27,701

National Housing and

Homelessness funding 499 408 334 172 111 34 26 20 1,605

National Partnership

payments(c) 6,747 5,448 5,436 3,693 2,131 835 338 658 25,855

Total payments for specific

purposes 24,861 20,315 18,635 10,010 6,110 2,100 1,351 1,557 85,509

2024-25

National SPP 522 431 340 174 113 35 28 16 1,658

National Health Reform

funding 9,223 7,572 7,048 3,296 1,866 615 577 463 30,659

Quality Schools funding 8,703 7,166 6,235 3,004 2,053 633 441 455 28,690

National Housing and

Homelessness funding 506 416 340 174 113 34 27 20 1,631

National Partnership

payments(c) 6,342 4,260 5,116 2,318 1,833 646 182 648 21,592

Total payments for specific

purposes 25,296 19,846 19,078 8,966 5,979 1,963 1,254 1,601 84,229

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 17

Table 2.1: Total payments for specific purposes by category, 2021-22 to 2025-26 (continued) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total(a)

2025-26

National SPP 529 440 345 176 115 35 28 16 1,684

National Health Reform

funding 9,790 8,027 7,578 3,522 1,962 649 620 505 32,653

Quality Schools funding 8,995 7,431 6,442 3,106 2,121 649 455 459 29,659

National Housing and

Homelessness funding 513 424 345 177 114 35 27 20 1,655

National Partnership

payments(c) 3,917 3,183 4,069 1,213 1,190 555 176 406 14,885

Total payments for specific

purposes 23,744 19,505 18,779 8,194 5,501 1,923 1,306 1,406 80,536

(a) As state allocations for a number of programs have not yet been determined, these payments are not included in state totals. As a result, total payments may not equal the sum of state totals. (b) Includes $5.8 billion in total for the COVID-19 public health response over 2021-22 and 2022-23. (c) Includes financial assistance grants for local government, payments direct to local government and

payments funded through appropriations including but not limited to section 16 of the Federal Financial Relations Act 2009.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 18 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Table 2.2: Payments for specific purposes by sector and category, 2021-22 to 2025-26 $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Health

National Health Reform funding(a) 29,604 28,139 28,717 30,659 32,653

National Partnership payments 797 689 437 407 36

Total health payments 30,401 28,828 29,155 31,067 32,689

Education

Quality Schools funding 25,030 26,413 27,701 28,690 29,659

National Partnership payments(b) 576 545 549 524 388

Total education payments 25,606 26,958 28,250 29,213 30,047

Skills and workforce development

National Skills and Workforce

Development SPP 1,578 1,606 1,631 1,658 1,684

National Partnership payments 573 233 22 - -

Total skills and workforce development

payments 2,150 1,839 1,653 1,658 1,684

Community services

National Partnership payments 2,166 1,281 1,192 5 6

Affordable housing

National Housing and

Homelessness funding 1,616 1,645 1,605 1,631 1,655

National Partnership payments 1,969 314 5 1 1

Total affordable housing payments 3,585 1,958 1,610 1,632 1,656

Infrastructure

National Partnership payments(b) 12,269 17,513 19,179 16,832 11,139

Environment

National Partnership payments(b) 1,597 1,912 981 229 143

Contingent payments

National Partnership payments 1,719 42 7 1 ..

Other

Business support 7,140 - - - -

National Partnership payments(b) 4,302 1,317 3,483 3,592 3,172

Total payments for specific purposes 90,934 81,646 85,509 84,229 80,536

(a) Includes $5.8 billion in total for the COVID-19 public health response over 2021-22 and 2022-23. (b) Includes financial assistance grants for local government, payments direct to local government and payments funded through appropriations including but not limited to section 16 of the Federal Financial Relations Act 2009.

Further information on each of these payments is contained in this Part. Total payments to the states for specific purposes, categorised by functions, are set out in Appendix B, which is available online.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 19

Health

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $28.8 billion to support state health services, including $28.1 billion in National Health Reform funding and $688.6 million in National Partnership payments, as detailed in Table 2.3. National Partnership payments in this section include a small number of agreements for sport.

Table 2.3: Payments to support state health services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Health Reform funding(a) 29,603.8 28,139.5 28,717.3 30,659.3 32,652.5 National Partnership payments

Health services 89.4 87.8 85.8 31.4 24.9

Health infrastructure 193.7 323.9 310.0 344.7 11.3

Indigenous health 16.4 16.2 16.3 8.0 -

Other health payments 497.4 260.7 25.1 23.4 -

Total National Partnership payments 796.8 688.6 437.2 407.4 36.2

Total 30,400.6 28,828.1 29,154.6 31,066.7 32,688.7

(a) Totals for 2021-22 and 2022-23 include $5.8 billion in total for the COVID-19 public health response.

National Health Reform funding

In 2022-23, National Health Reform funding is estimated to be $28.1 billion including $934.1 million for the COVID-19 public health response.

National Health Reform funding $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22

Hospital services 7,720.9 5,266.7 5,628.9 2,616.5 1,629.7 510.5 466.0 385.7 24,225.0 Public health 148.7 121.2 95.5 49.1 32.4 9.9 7.9 4.6 469.2

COVID-19 public

health response(a) 2,041.3 1,526.0 526.8 502.1 172.6 57.5 58.7 24.6 4,909.6

Total 9,910.9 6,913.9 6,251.1 3,167.7 1,834.8 577.9 532.6 414.9 29,603.8

2022-23

Hospital services 8,023.9 6,739.3 6,023.4 2,838.9 1,652.1 556.9 492.8 386.5 26,713.7 Public health 155.2 126.9 100.6 51.6 34.0 10.4 8.3 4.8 491.7

COVID-19 public

health response(a) 413.3 275.2 105.9 75.5 26.1 14.9 13.1 9.9 934.1

Total 8,592.4 7,141.4 6,229.9 2,966.0 1,712.2 582.2 514.2 401.2 28,139.5

2023-24

Hospital services 8,523.9 7,007.2 6,403.7 3,021.1 1,738.6 571.9 525.0 409.5 28,200.9 Public health 162.5 133.8 105.8 54.3 35.6 10.8 8.7 5.0 516.5

COVID-19 public

health response - - - - - - - - -

Total 8,686.4 7,141.0 6,509.5 3,075.4 1,774.1 582.7 533.7 414.5 28,717.3

2024-25

Hospital services 9,052.5 7,430.6 6,937.0 3,238.5 1,828.7 603.9 568.0 457.3 30,116.6 Public health 170.4 141.2 111.2 57.0 37.2 11.3 9.1 5.2 542.7

COVID-19 public

health response - - - - - - - - -

Total 9,222.9 7,571.8 7,048.2 3,295.5 1,865.9 615.2 577.1 462.6 30,659.3

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 20 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

National Health Reform funding (continued) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2025-26

Hospital services 9,611.4 7,877.3 7,460.8 3,461.6 1,922.8 637.6 610.4 499.7 32,081.7 Public health 178.9 149.3 116.9 59.9 38.9 11.8 9.6 5.5 570.8

COVID-19 public

health response - - - - - - - - -

Total 9,790.3 8,026.6 7,577.8 3,521.5 1,961.8 649.4 620.0 505.2 32,652.5

(a) Payments to states for the COVID-19 public health response complement funding under the 2020-25 Addendum to the National Health Reform Agreement and are separate to state and territory National Health Reform funding entitlements under the Addendum.

From 2021-22 to 2025-26, National Health Reform funding is linked to growth in public hospital activity, the national efficient price and national efficient cost determined by the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority. Over this period, the Australian Government will fund 45 per cent of the efficient growth in activity-based services, with growth in total Australian Government funding capped at 6.5 per cent a year.

National Health Reform funding amounts are also influenced by the level of payments made through the National Partnership on COVID-19 Response, with some hospital activity which would normally be paid through the National Health Reform Agreement in 2021-22 and 2022-23 instead estimated to be paid through the National Partnership on COVID-19 Response. The estimates are currently subject to greater than usual uncertainty given the impacts COVID-19 is having on public hospital activity.

The Australian Government is providing financial assistance to the states for the additional costs incurred by state health services in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic through the National Partnership on COVID-19 Response. This includes:

• 50 per cent contribution to the costs incurred by state and territory public health and hospital systems to test, diagnose and treat people with COVID-19 and minimise spread

• 100 per cent contribution to states to guarantee the viability of private hospitals, to retain capacity for responding to COVID-19 and enable them to resume normal operations.

The Australian Government has committed funding under the National Partnership on COVID-19 Response to boost COVID-19 preparedness in residential aged care facilities and support the rollout of Australia’s COVID-19 vaccination program. This includes:

• 100 per cent of costs incurred from 1 July 2020 to support states to deliver infection, prevention and control training and COVID-19 preparedness in residential aged care facilities

• 50 per cent contribution to the price per vaccination dose delivered by the states

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 21

• 50 per cent Australian Government contribution to the genuine net additional costs incurred by states to set up additional COVID-19 vaccination sites on or after 21 April 2021.

The Australian Government is supporting the provision of Rapid Antigen Tests in schools and early childhood settings and to eligible concession card holders from pharmacies through 50:50 cost share arrangements under the National Partnership on COVID-19 Response.

New measures associated with this item are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Final entitlements to National Health Reform funding, 2020-21 $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

National Health Reform(a) 8,165.0 6,941.9 5,717.4 2,741.4 1,700.4 540.1 487.5 367.6 26,661.3 (a) Final entitlements for National Health Reform include entitlements for the COVID-19 public health response.

In February 2022, the Treasurer determined final entitlements for 2020-21 National Health Reform funding in accordance with advice from the Administrator of the National Health Funding Pool. Reconciliation adjustments have been made to state 2021-22 payment estimates based on the final 2020-21 entitlements.

National Partnership payments for health

A total of $688.6 million will be provided to the states in 2022-23 under the following categories:

• health services

• health infrastructure

• indigenous health

• other health payments.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 22 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Health services

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is estimated to provide $87.8 million to support the delivery of health services in the states.

Table 2.3.1 Health services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Access to HIV treatment - - 12.5 12.5 12.5

Achieving better health outcomes 0.5 0.5 - - -

Adult mental health centres 4.0 4.0 4.0 - -

Comprehensive palliative care in aged care 14.7 9.8 10.3 - -

Hummingbird House 0.8 0.8 - - -

Japanese encephalitis virus mosquito surveillance

and control 17.5 - - - -

Management of Torres Strait / Papua New

Guinea cross-border health issues 5.2 5.3 5.4 - -

Mosquito control and cross border liaison

in the Torres Strait 0.9 0.9 0.9 - -

Mosquito Control in Tennant Creek 0.8 0.6 - - -

Multidisciplinary outreach care - 10.3 10.3 - -

National bowel cancer screening

program — participant follow-up function 9.0 8.1 8.5 - -

National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention

Agreement — Bilateral schedules 2.6 11.5 9.2 14.3 12.4

NSW Mental Health Support 1.5 - - - -

OzFoodNet 1.9 1.9 1.9 - -

Reducing stillbirths - 4.4 4.5 4.5 -

Royal Darwin Hospital — equipped, prepared

and ready 24.9 17.3 - - -

Specialist dementia care 4.0 9.4 9.5 - -

Surge Capacity for BreastScreen Australia - 2.0 7.8 - -

Vaccine-preventable diseases surveillance 1.0 1.0 1.1 - -

Total 89.4 87.8 85.8 31.4 24.9

Access to HIV treatment $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 6.7 3.7 1.4 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 12.5

2024-25 6.7 3.7 1.4 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 12.5

2025-26 6.7 3.7 1.4 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 12.5

Total 20.2 11.0 4.1 0.6 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.7 37.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the delivery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care to all people living with HIV in Australia who are not eligible for Medicare.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 23

Achieving better health outcomes $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.5 - - - - - - - 0.5

2022-23 0.5 - - - - - - - 0.5

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1.0 - - - - - - - 1.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve emergency department facilities for vulnerable patients and those with mental health issues, and help children with high medical needs and their families to spend less time in hospital.

Adult mental health centres $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - 4.0 - - - 4.0

2022-23 - - - - 4.0 - - - 4.0

2023-24 - - - - 4.0 - - - 4.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 12.0 - - - 12.0

The Australian Government is providing $12 million over three years from 2021-22 to establish an adult mental health centre in South Australia to be located in Adelaide. The centre will provide a range of mental health support services.

Comprehensive palliative care in aged care $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 2.0 8.1 2.2 1.1 0.8 0.2 0.2 0.1 14.7

2022-23 2.0 3.0 2.3 1.2 0.8 0.2 0.2 0.1 9.8

2023-24 2.1 3.1 2.4 1.3 0.8 0.3 0.2 0.1 10.3

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 6.1 14.2 6.9 3.6 2.4 0.7 0.6 0.3 34.8

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve access to palliative care for older Australians living in residential aged care facilities, supporting new approaches, such as ‘in reach’ services, that will improve palliative and end-of-life care.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 24 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Hummingbird House $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 0.8 - - - - - 0.8

2022-23 - - 0.8 - - - - - 0.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 1.6 - - - - - 1.6

The Australian Government is providing funding for the operation of a dedicated respite and hospice care facility for children with life-limiting conditions and their families and carers.

Japanese encephalitis virus mosquito surveillance and control $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.6 4.2 3.1 1.3 2.7 .. .. 0.7 17.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 5.6 4.2 3.1 1.3 2.7 .. .. 0.7 17.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the mosquito surveillance and control activities being conducted by the jurisdictions to manage the spread of the Japanese encephalitis virus.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Management of Torres Strait / Papua New Guinea cross-border health issues $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 5.2 - - - - - 5.2

2022-23 - - 5.3 - - - - - 5.3

2023-24 - - 5.4 - - - - - 5.4

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 15.9 - - - - - 15.9

The Australian Government is contributing to the costs of treating Papua New Guinean nationals who travel through the Torres Strait treaty zone and access healthcare facilities in the Queensland health and hospitals network.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 25

Mosquito control and cross border liaison in the Torres Strait $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 0.9 - - - - - 0.9

2022-23 - - 0.9 - - - - - 0.9

2023-24 - - 0.9 - - - - - 0.9

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 2.6 - - - - - 2.6

The Australian Government is providing funding to assist with surveillance and control of, and efforts to eliminate, the Aedes Alboquitus mosquito in the Torres Strait. Funding also supports increasing community awareness of strategies to reduce the risk of acquiring dengue fever, zika virus and other mosquito borne diseases.

Mosquito Control in Tennant Creek $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 0.8 0.8

2022-23 - - - - - - - 0.6 0.6

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 1.4 1.4

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the surveillance, control and, where possible, elimination of Aedes aegypti mosquitos (known for transmitting dengue) in Tennant Creek and the wider Barkly region of the Northern Territory.

Multidisciplinary outreach care $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 10.3

2023-24 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 10.3

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.6 20.6

The Australian Government is providing funding to trial models of multidisciplinary outreach care for residents of aged care facilities.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 26 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

National bowel cancer screening program — participant follow-up function $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 2.8 2.2 1.8 1.0 0.7 0.3 0.2 0.1 9.0

2022-23 2.5 1.9 1.6 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.2 0.1 8.1

2023-24 2.6 2.1 1.7 0.9 0.6 0.3 0.2 0.1 8.5

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 7.9 6.2 5.1 2.8 1.9 0.8 0.6 0.4 25.6

This initiative funds the follow-up of participants who return a positive bowel cancer screening test result and are not recorded as having attended a consultation with a health professional.

National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Agreement — Bilateral schedules(a)(b) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.9 ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ 0.9 2.6

2022-23 7.6 ~ ~ ~ 0.4 ~ ~ 1.0 11.5

2023-24 5.7 ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ 0.4 9.2

2024-25 6.7 ~ ~ ~ 4.1 ~ ~ 0.4 14.3

2025-26 6.4 ~ ~ ~ 4.2 ~ ~ - 12.4

Total 27.3 ~ ~ ~ 8.7 ~ ~ 2.6 50.1

(a) State allocations reflect bilateral schedules announced as at 18 March 2022. (b) Totals include some unallocated funding and do not reflect total available funding for states under the bilateral schedules.

The National Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Agreement sets out the shared intention of the Australian Government and state and territory governments to work in partnership to improve the mental health of all Australians and ensure the sustainability and enhance the services of the Australian mental health and suicide prevention system.

The Australian Government’s funding contributions are outlined in the bilateral schedules to this Agreement. This is made up of payments to the states, which are outlined in the table above, and payments made to the Department of Health and Primary Health Networks to commission services and activities under the bilateral schedules. For further information on funding under the Department of Health, please refer to the 2022-23 Health Portfolio Budget Statements - Program 1.2.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 27

NSW Mental Health Support $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 1.5 - - - - - - - 1.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1.5 - - - - - - - 1.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to support New South Wales, through Sonder Australia Pty Ltd (Sonder), to provide wellbeing support to those in mandatory isolation. Sonder will provide anyone subject to a mandatory 14-day isolation order with free, 24-hour health and wellbeing support.

OzFoodNet $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.9

2022-23 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.9

2023-24 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.9

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1.2 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 5.7

The Australian Government is continuing to provide funding for a collaborative initiative with state health authorities to undertake enhanced surveillance of foodborne disease. OzFoodNet coordinates investigations into foodborne disease outbreaks, particularly those that cross state and country borders.

Reducing stillbirths(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4.4

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4.5

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4.5

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 13.4

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing funding to increase the rate of stillbirth autopsies and investigations.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 28 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Royal Darwin Hospital — equipped, prepared and ready $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 24.9 24.9

2022-23 - - - - - - - 17.3 17.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 42.2 42.2

The Australian Government is providing funding to maintain the National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre at the Royal Darwin Hospital in a state of readiness to respond to major health incidents in Australia and the region.

Specialist dementia care(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.3 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.3 ~ 0.3 ~ 4.0

2022-23 0.3 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.3 ~ 0.3 ~ 9.4

2023-24 0.3 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.3 ~ 0.3 ~ 9.5

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.8 2.4 2.4 0.8 0.8 ~ 0.8 ~ 22.9

(a) Totals include unallocated funding.

The Australian Government is providing funding to deliver a program which will deliver intensive, specialised care for people with very severe behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.

Surge Capacity for BreastScreen Australia(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7.8

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 9.7

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing funding as a one-off boost to capacity for the BreastScreen Australia program. It will enable services to catch up on delayed appointments and re-engage women during the pandemic.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 29

Vaccine-preventable diseases surveillance $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 .. .. 0.1 1.0

2022-23 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 .. .. 0.1 1.0

2023-24 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 .. .. 0.1 1.1

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.3 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.2 3.1

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve surveillance reporting of nationally notifiable vaccine-preventable diseases. This program facilitates national monitoring, analysis and timely reporting of data to provide an evidence base for policy formulation.

Health infrastructure

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is estimated to provide $323.9 million to support the development of health-related infrastructure.

Table 2.3.2 Health infrastructure $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Community Health, Hospitals and

Infrastructure projects 177.3 227.3 200.5 145.0 -

Health infrastructure projects 1.4 3.5 3.6 0.3 -

Home for the Matildas 7.5 7.5 - - -

Proton beam therapy facility - 27.3 - - -

Western Australia Children's Hospice 7.5 - - - -

Western Australia Comprehensive Cancer

Centre - 58.3 105.9 199.5 11.3

Total 193.7 323.9 310.0 344.7 11.3

Community Health, Hospitals and Infrastructure projects $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 32.5 42.5 57.2 20.3 9.1 9.0 6.5 0.2 177.3

2022-23 26.5 86.2 34.6 41.8 17.4 12.0 8.8 - 227.3

2023-24 80.5 52.2 11.4 33.4 7.0 12.0 4.0 - 200.5

2024-25 130.0 3.0 4.7 7.3 - - - - 145.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 269.5 183.9 107.9 102.7 33.5 33.0 19.3 0.2 750.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to all states for vital health infrastructure and services to ensure Australians can access the care they need, where they need it.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 30 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Health infrastructure projects $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 1.4 - - - - - - 1.4

2022-23 - 1.7 - - 1.8 - - - 3.5

2023-24 - 1.1 - - 2.5 - - - 3.6

2024-25 - 0.3 - - - - - - 0.3

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 4.5 - - 4.3 - - - 8.8

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the implementation of the Regional Cancer Treatment Centres for Radiation Therapy program in Victoria and South Australia.

Home for the Matildas $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 7.5 - - - - - - 7.5

2022-23 - 7.5 - - - - - - 7.5

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 15.0 - - - - - - 15.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the construction of the ‘Home for the Matildas’, with a purpose built, State Football Centre at La Trobe University, Bundoora.

Proton beam therapy facility $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - - - 27.3 - - - 27.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 27.3 - - - 27.3

The Australian Government is funding the establishment of a proton beam therapy facility in Adelaide. The technology will be used as an alternative to conventional radiotherapy to treat people with certain types of cancer and for research.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 31

Western Australia Children’s Hospice $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - 7.5 - - - - 7.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - 7.5 - - - - 7.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to enable construction of the Western Australian Children’s Hospice - a dedicated respite and hospice care facility for children with life-limiting conditions, and their families and carers.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Western Australia Comprehensive Cancer Centre $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - - 58.3 - - - - 58.3

2023-24 - - - 105.9 - - - - 105.9

2024-25 - - - 199.5 - - - - 199.5

2025-26 - - - 11.3 - - - - 11.3

Total - - - 375.0 - - - - 375.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the establishment of a Western Australian Comprehensive Cancer Centre in Perth.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 32 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Indigenous health

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is estimated to provide $16.2 million to the states for programs to improve the health of Indigenous Australians.

Table 2.3.3 Indigenous health $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Addressing blood-borne viruses and

sexually transmissible infections

in the Torres Strait 1.1 1.1 1.1 - -

Improving trachoma control services for

Indigenous Australians 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.9 -

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal

Investment

Health component 7.7 7.4 7.4 - -

Rheumatic fever strategy 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.1 -

Total 16.4 16.2 16.3 8.0 -

Addressing blood-borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections in the Torres Strait $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 1.1 - - - - - 1.1

2022-23 - - 1.1 - - - - - 1.1

2023-24 - - 1.1 - - - - - 1.1

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 3.4 - - - - - 3.4

The Australian Government is providing funding for disease prevention activities, testing and treatment, and sexual health checks, and to deliver a culturally appropriate sexual health education campaign.

Improving trachoma control services for Indigenous Australians $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 0.3 1.5 1.2 - - 1.7 4.7

2022-23 - - 0.3 1.5 1.2 - - 1.7 4.7

2023-24 - - 0.3 1.6 1.3 - - 1.7 4.8

2024-25 - - 0.3 1.6 1.3 - - 1.8 4.9

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 1.0 6.2 5.0 - - 6.9 19.1

The Australian Government is providing funding for trachoma control activities in jurisdictions where trachoma, an infectious disease which can lead to blindness, is endemic.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 33

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment — Health component $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 7.7 7.7

2022-23 - - - - - - - 7.4 7.4

2023-24 - - - - - - - 7.4 7.4

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 22.4 22.4

The Australian Government provides funding to supplement primary health care services in remote Northern Territory communities and position the Northern Territory for the long-term sustainability of its services to Indigenous Australians. The funding includes support for the provision of integrated oral and hearing health services to children in remote communities.

The Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment agreement supports the Northern Territory to improve schooling for Indigenous children, make communities safer and healthier, and increase access to interpreter services and job opportunities for Indigenous Australians. Other components of this agreement are discussed in the Community Services, Education and Affordable Housing sections of this Part.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Rheumatic fever strategy(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - ~ ~ ~ - - ~ 2.9

2022-23 - - ~ ~ ~ - - ~ 3.0

2023-24 - - ~ ~ ~ - - ~ 3.0

2024-25 - - ~ ~ ~ - - ~ 3.1

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - ~ ~ ~ - - ~ 12.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing funding to programs that register and control acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 34 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Other health payments

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is estimated to provide $260.7 million to the states in other health-related National Partnership payments.

Table 2.3.4 Other health National Partnership payments $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Centre for National Resilience 318.7 127.8 - - -

Contribution to ACT Asbestos Scheme 8.0 - - - -

Encouraging more clinical trials in Australia 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 -

Essential vaccines 18.7 19.9 19.8 20.1 -

Health Innovation Fund 21.8 - - - -

Increasing specialist services for children

with harmful sexual behaviours in the NT 0.7 1.4 1.4 1.4 -

Lymphoedema garments

and allied health therapy program 2.0 2.0 2.0 - -

National Coronial Information System 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 -

Public dental services for adults 107.9 107.8 - - -

Queensland 2032 Olympic and Paralympic

Games Candidature 5.5 - - - -

SA Home Quarantine Application 12.2 - - - -

Total 497.4 260.7 25.1 23.4 -

Centre for National Resilience $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 318.7 318.7

2022-23 - - - - - - - 127.8 127.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 446.5 446.5

The Australian Government is providing funding for increased quarantine capacity at the Centre for National Resilience, including the capital expenditure, health services and facility operations costs to accept Australian repatriations.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 35

Contribution to ACT Asbestos Scheme $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - 8.0 - 8.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - 8.0 - 8.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the delivery of the ACT Asbestos Disease Support Scheme to provide support for people who have contracted an asbestos related disease after living in a property containing loose fill asbestos insulation in the ACT who are not supported by an existing compensation scheme.

Encouraging more clinical trials in Australia(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.5

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.5

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.5

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.5

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing funding to increase the number and value of clinical trials to deliver health benefits, provide jobs and improve the nation’s innovative capacity.

Essential vaccines $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.3 4.4 3.6 2.0 1.5 0.7 0.7 0.6 18.7

2022-23 5.7 4.6 3.8 2.1 1.5 0.8 0.7 0.6 19.9

2023-24 5.7 4.6 3.8 2.1 1.5 0.8 0.7 0.6 19.8

2024-25 5.8 4.7 3.9 2.1 1.5 0.8 0.7 0.6 20.1

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 22.5 18.4 15.1 8.3 6.0 3.0 2.7 2.4 78.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve the health of Australians through the cost-effective delivery of the National Immunisation Program.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 36 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Health Innovation Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - 6.8 - - 15.0 21.8

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 6.8 - - 15.0 21.8

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the delivery of trials aimed at improving health outcomes for Australians and ensuring the sustainability of the health system, including through prevention and the better use of health data.

Increasing specialist services for children with harmful sexual behaviours in the NT $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 0.7 0.7

2022-23 - - - - - - - 1.4 1.4

2023-24 - - - - - - - 1.4 1.4

2024-25 - - - - - - - 1.4 1.4

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 4.7 4.7

The Australian Government is providing funding for increased specialist therapeutic services for children with harmful sexual behaviours in the Northern Territory.

Lymphoedema garments and allied health therapy program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.2 0.1 .. .. .. 2.0

2022-23 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.2 0.1 .. .. .. 2.0

2023-24 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.2 0.1 .. .. .. 2.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1.9 1.6 1.2 0.6 0.4 0.1 0.1 0.1 6.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to contribute to improved access to specialised compression garments by eligible patients.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 37

National Coronial Information System $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 0.4 - - - - - - 0.4

2022-23 - 0.4 - - - - - - 0.4

2023-24 - 0.4 - - - - - - 0.4

2024-25 - 0.4 - - - - - - 0.4

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 1.7 - - - - - - 1.7

The Australian Government is providing funding for the administration, maintenance and improvement of Australia’s national coronial data base.

Public dental services for adults $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 34.4 26.9 21.7 9.7 9.4 3.4 1.0 1.4 107.9

2022-23 34.4 26.9 21.7 9.7 9.4 3.4 1.0 1.4 107.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 68.7 53.8 43.3 19.4 18.8 6.8 2.0 2.8 215.6

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the improved oral health of patients who rely on the public dental system.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Queensland 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games Candidature $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 5.5 - - - - - 5.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 5.5 - - - - - 5.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the assessment of the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games opportunity, subject to necessary approvals, including the development, management, and administration of candidature for Queensland to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 38 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

SA Home Quarantine Application $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - 12.2 - - - 12.2

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 12.2 - - - 12.2

The Australian Government is providing financial assistance to South Australia to develop the South Australian Home Quarantine Application for COVID-19 home quarantine trials.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 39

Education

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $27.0 billion to support state education services, including $26.4 billion in Quality Schools funding and $545.3 million through National Partnership payments, as detailed in Table 2.4.

Table 2.4: Payments to support state education services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Quality Schools funding 25,030.3 26,412.6 27,700.8 28,689.6 29,659.4

National Partnership payments

Early Childhood Education

Preschool Reform Agreement 166.7 454.6 458.7 462.4 326.6

Universal access to early childhood

education 317.2 - - - -

MoneySmart teaching 0.1 - - - -

National school chaplaincy program 61.4 61.4 61.4 61.4 61.4

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal

Investment(a)

Children and schooling component 29.3 29.3 29.3 - -

School pathways program 1.2 - - - -

Total National Partnership payments 576.0 545.3 549.4 523.8 388.0

Total 25,606.3 26,957.9 28,250.2 29,213.4 30,047.4

Memorandum item - payments for non-government

schools included in payments above

Quality Schools funding 15,302.3 16,126.2 16,890.4 17,467.8 18,004.9

Total 15,302.3 16,126.2 16,890.4 17,467.8 18,004.9

(a) Includes funding for non-government representative bodies.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 40 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Quality Schools funding

The Australian Government’s Quality Schools policy aims to improve the educational outcomes of Australian students and their schools.

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide $26.4 billion in Quality Schools funding to government and non-government schools in all states. This includes recurrent funding, capital funding, non-government school reform support funding, Choice and Affordability Fund funding and other prescribed purpose funding.

Quality Schools funding $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22

Government

schools(a) 3,009.9 2,270.2 2,157.8 1,019.9 665.6 234.3 142.9 227.3 9,728.0

Non-government

schools(b)(c)(d) 4,647.1 3,913.1 3,297.1 1,538.2 1,129.9 337.6 244.7 194.6 15,302.3 Total 7,657.0 6,183.3 5,454.9 2,558.2 1,795.5 571.9 387.6 421.9 25,030.3

2022-23

Government

schools(a) 3,118.3 2,453.9 2,276.1 1,116.9 699.6 235.7 155.5 230.4 10,286.4

Non-government

schools(b)(c)(d) 4,924.4 4,097.6 3,470.7 1,631.3 1,188.3 354.9 252.3 206.7 16,126.2 Total 8,042.7 6,551.5 5,746.8 2,748.2 1,887.9 590.6 407.8 437.1 26,412.6

2023-24

Government

schools(a) 3,257.7 2,604.1 2,381.8 1,192.7 732.9 241.6 166.1 233.4 10,810.4

Non-government

schools(b)(c)(d) 5,156.1 4,291.7 3,638.6 1,706.4 1,249.1 372.8 260.4 215.2 16,890.4 Total 8,413.9 6,895.8 6,020.5 2,899.1 1,982.0 614.4 426.5 448.6 27,700.8

2024-25

Government

schools(a) 3,375.1 2,722.3 2,469.7 1,242.8 756.8 246.3 174.1 234.7 11,221.8

Non-government

schools(b)(c)(d) 5,327.6 4,444.0 3,765.1 1,761.7 1,296.3 386.3 266.8 220.0 17,467.8 Total 8,702.7 7,166.3 6,234.9 3,004.5 2,053.2 632.6 440.9 454.7 28,689.6

2025-26

Government

schools(a) 3,504.7 2,841.5 2,561.9 1,294.4 783.5 251.0 182.5 235.0 11,654.5

Non-government

schools(b)(c)(d) 5,490.7 4,589.8 3,880.2 1,811.7 1,338.0 398.3 272.5 223.7 18,004.9 Total 8,995.4 7,431.3 6,442.0 3,106.1 2,121.5 649.3 455.0 458.8 29,659.4

(a) Includes Literacy Support for Tasmanian Students and funding for the Northern Territory to accelerate evidence-based reforms to improve outcomes for vulnerable students. (b) Includes capital funding. (c) Includes prescribed circumstances funding. (d) Includes funding for non-government school reform support and the Choice and Affordability Fund.

The Australian Government uses a needs-based model for school funding, which delivers a consistent national approach for all schools in all states.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 41

National Partnership payments for education

In addition to Quality Schools funding, the Australian Government will provide funding for state education services through National Partnership payments.

Early Childhood Education

The Australian Government is providing funding to the states for preschools under the new Preschool Reform Agreement, which succeeded the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education from the commencement of the 2022 preschool year.

Preschool Reform Agreement(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 42.2 38.6 25.5 13.9 8.5 3.0 2.9 1.4 166.7

2022-23 140.8 128.5 86.3 46.5 28.2 9.8 9.7 4.7 454.6

2023-24 140.8 128.5 90.0 46.8 28.2 9.8 9.7 4.8 458.7

2024-25 141.5 128.5 92.2 47.4 28.2 9.8 9.7 4.9 462.4

2025-26 100.2 90.0 65.7 33.8 19.8 6.9 6.8 3.5 326.6

Total 565.5 514.2 359.7 188.5 113.0 39.4 38.6 19.3 1,868.9

(a) State allocations for 2021-22 exclude implementation project funding, which is still under negotiation with the states.

In 2022-23, the Australian Government is providing $454.6 million to the states under the new Preschool Reform Agreement. The agreement covers the 2022 to 2025 preschool years and will support continued universal access to at least 15 hours of preschool each week (600 hours per year) for children in the year before they start school.

The new agreement will ensure that all children benefit from Commonwealth funding regardless of the setting they attend. It also aims to improve preschool enrolment and attendance as well as outcomes for children.

Universal access to early childhood education $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 98.6 90.0 59.5 32.5 19.8 6.9 6.8 3.3 317.2

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 98.6 90.0 59.5 32.5 19.8 6.9 6.8 3.3 317.2

Previously, Australian Government funding for preschools was provided through the National Partnership Agreement on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education. The remaining funding under that agreement is for the 2021 preschool year.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 42 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

MoneySmart teaching $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - 0.1 - 0.1

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - 0.1 - 0.1

The Australian Government is supporting the delivery of professional learning to teachers in primary and secondary schools and the development of materials to improve financial literacy education in schools.

National school chaplaincy program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 11.3 12.8 18.4 7.7 7.6 2.2 1.0 0.5 61.4

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 61.4

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 61.4

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 61.4

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 61.4

Total 11.3 12.8 18.4 7.7 7.6 2.2 1.0 0.5 307.2

(a) State allocations from 2022-23 to 2025-26 have not yet been determined.

This program supports the wellbeing of students through the provision of pastoral care services in participating schools.

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Children and schooling component $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 29.3 29.3

2022-23 - - - - - - - 29.3 29.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - 29.3 29.3

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 87.8 87.8

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve student attendance, educational attainment, Indigenous workforce development and teacher housing in remote and very remote schools.

The Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment agreement supports the Northern Territory to improve schooling for Indigenous children, make communities safer and healthier, and increase access to interpreter services and job opportunities for Indigenous Australians. Other components of this agreement are discussed in the Health, Community Services and Affordable Housing sections of this Part.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 43

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

School pathways program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - 0.6 0.6 - - - 1.2

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - 0.6 0.6 - - - 1.2

This program assists in providing a career path for young people to enter the defence industry. It focuses on increasing the number of students undertaking subjects relevant to the defence industry in participating schools.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 44 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Skills and workforce development

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $1.8 billion to support state skills and workforce development services, including $1.6 billion through the National Skills and Workforce Development SPP, and $232.9 million through other National Partnership payments, as detailed in Table 2.5.

Table 2.5: Payments to support state skills and workforce development services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Skills and Workforce

Development SPP 1,577.5 1,605.7 1,630.5 1,657.9 1,684.0

National Partnership payments

Energising Tasmania 4.6 4.7 - - -

JobTrainer Fund 413.6 226.5 22.1 - -

Revitalising TAFE campuses across

Australia 27.3 1.8 - - -

Skilling Australians Fund 127.1 - - - -

Total National Partnership payments 572.6 232.9 22.1 - -

Total 2,150.1 1,838.7 1,652.6 1,657.9 1,684.0

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 45

National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development

The National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development (NASWD) identifies the long-term objectives of the Australian Government and the states in the areas of skills and workforce development.

To support Australia’s future growth and prosperity, in 2020 First Ministers from all jurisdictions committed to the Heads of Agreement for Skills Reform. As part of this commitment, the Australian Government and the states are working towards agreeing a new National Skills Agreement (NSA) by mid-2022 to replace the NASWD.

National Skills and Workforce Development SPP $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 500.9 407.1 321.1 164.7 108.8 33.2 26.5 15.1 1,577.5

2022-23 507.8 414.4 328.4 168.2 110.8 33.8 26.9 15.4 1,605.7

2023-24 514.2 422.3 334.0 171.0 112.1 34.2 27.3 15.6 1,630.5

2024-25 521.7 431.5 339.6 173.8 113.3 34.6 27.7 15.7 1,657.9

2025-26 528.8 440.4 344.9 176.4 114.6 34.9 28.2 15.9 1,684.0

Total 2,573.4 2,115.7 1,667.9 854.1 559.5 170.8 136.5 77.7 8,155.6

The National Skills and Workforce Development SPP is the funding associated with the NASWD. The total amount of the payment is indexed each year by a composite of Wage Cost Index 1 (85 per cent) and Wage Cost Index 6 (15 per cent) - see Appendix A. The growth factor is estimated to be 1.79 per cent in 2022-23.

The Australian Government is willing to increase its payments to states above the National Skills and Workforce Development SPP as part of a new NSA. A new measure associated with this is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

The NSA is a shared priority across all jurisdictions, as per the Heads of Agreement for Skills Reform. It will support increased investment in training and implement reforms to strengthen VET quality and relevance. Through the NSA, the Government is seeking to assist more Australians to acquire the skills that businesses need. Increased investment will lift access to high-value training extending from foundation skills to higher level qualifications.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 46 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

National Partnership payments for skills and workforce development

In addition to the National Skills and Workforce Development SPP, the Australian Government will provide funding through National Partnership payments as detailed below.

Energising Tasmania $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - 4.6 - - 4.6

2022-23 - - - - - 4.7 - - 4.7

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - 9.3 - - 9.3

The Australian Government is providing fee-free training and support for training materials to encourage Tasmanians to train in areas of priority skills needed for the energy sector.

JobTrainer Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 143.3 117.3 60.3 31.1 41.4 9.5 5.0 5.8 413.6

2022-23 72.1 59.0 45.5 23.5 15.6 4.8 3.8 2.2 226.5

2023-24 7.0 5.8 4.4 2.3 1.5 0.5 0.4 0.2 22.1

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 222.4 182.1 110.2 56.8 58.5 14.7 9.2 8.2 662.1

With an initial contribution of $500 million from the Australian Government, matched by state and territory governments to create a $1 billion fund, the JobTrainer Fund is providing low-fee and fee-free training places for job seekers and young people, including school leavers, in areas of identified skills need and/or employment growth, to support them into employment as Australia emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic.

An additional $500 million was made available by the Australian Government over two years from 2021-22, and a further $48.5 million over two years from 2022-23 subject to state and territory governments matching this funding, resulting in a $2.1 billion fund. This funding enables governments to extend the JobTrainer enrolment period prioritising aged care and digital skills training until 31 December 2022, with a further Aged Care Boost of 15,000 additional places being made available through to 31 December 2023.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 47

Revitalising TAFE campuses across Australia $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.0 5.7 7.0 2.0 1.2 5.0 0.6 0.8 27.3

2022-23 - - 0.5 - 1.3 - - - 1.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 5.0 5.7 7.5 2.0 2.5 5.0 0.6 0.8 29.1

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve vocational education infrastructure, ensuring TAFEs are equipped to deliver training to the standards expected by students and industry.

Skilling Australians Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 71.1 - - 29.7 15.0 4.5 3.7 3.0 127.1

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 71.1 - - 29.7 15.0 4.5 3.7 3.0 127.1

The Skilling Australians Fund supports the training of Australians through a range of projects focussed on skills priorities. These include training in occupations in high demand, those that rely on skilled migration, future growth industries, and rural and regional areas. There is also a strong focus on apprenticeships and traineeships.

The current time limited funding agreement provides signatory states with an annual amount of guaranteed funding and a further amount determined by the revenue paid into the Skilling Australians Fund. The revenue in the Fund is drawn from a levy which is paid by businesses employing foreign workers on certain skilled visas.

The Australian Government is willing to provide further support for training for Australians in priority skills areas through a new National Skills Agreement.

A measure associated with this is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 48 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Community services

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $1.3 billion to support state community services as detailed in Table 2.6.

Table 2.6: Payments to support state community services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Electronic monitoring of family, domestic

and sexual violence offenders - 1.0 2.0 5.0 6.0

Family, domestic and sexual violence

responses 130.0 140.7 - - -

NDIS Strategic Investment in QLD 7.6 - - - -

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal

Investment

Community safety implementation plan 35.8 46.0 46.5 - -

Payments from the DisabilityCare Australia

Fund 1,991.2 1,086.7 1,143.4 - -

Remote Community Store Licensing Scheme 1.0 6.5 - - -

Total 2,165.6 1,281.0 1,191.9 5.0 6.0

National Partnership payments for community services

The Australian Government provides National Partnership payments to the states, as detailed below.

Electronic monitoring of family, domestic and sexual violence offenders(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2.0

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 5.0

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.0

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 14.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

This initiative will provide funding to states and territories for electronic monitoring projects targeting family, domestic, and sexual violence (FDSV) offenders. The Electronic Monitoring Program will monitor FDSV perpetrators in the community where the risk of violence is managed as part of a relevant justice order. The measure will reduce the immediate and short-term risk of reoffending and improve the safety of women and children.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 49

Family, domestic and sexual violence responses(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 20.0 15.7 13.3 7.5 4.8 1.4 1.1 1.2 130.0

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 140.7

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 20.0 15.7 13.3 7.5 4.8 1.4 1.1 1.2 270.7

(a) State allocations may not sum to totals because they are contingent on states’ compliance with the multilateral schedule, submission of agreed performance milestones, and Commonwealth agreement to state financial contributions.

The Australian Government is providing funding to states to invest in services to support women and children who are experiencing or at risk of violence, including in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to trial new initiatives to support women and children experiencing violence.

The funding will support states to respond to high levels of demand for domestic, family and sexual violence services, and to ensure services can continue to support those who need it most.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

NDIS Strategic Investment in QLD $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 7.6 - - - - - 7.6

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 7.6 - - - - - 7.6

As a continuation of funding first reported in the 2019-20 Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook, the Australian Government has provided funding to support the delivery of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) in Queensland through projects focussed on increasing the number of NDIS participants in Queensland, ceasing in 2022.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 50 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Community safety implementation plan $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021--22 - - - - - - - 35.8 35.8

2022-23 - - - - - - - 46.0 46.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - 46.5 46.5

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 128.3 128.3

The Australian Government is providing funding to the Northern Territory to make remote communities safer, improve child and family safety, and address alcohol-related harm through this implementation plan.

The Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment agreement supports the Northern Territory to improve schooling for Indigenous children, make communities safer and healthier, and increase access to interpreter services and job opportunities for Indigenous Australians. Other components of this agreement are discussed in the Health, Education and Affordable Housing sections of this Part.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Payments from the DisabilityCare Australia Fund(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 630.0 261.4 211.5 758.5 77.9 24.1 17.4 10.4 1,991.2

2022-23 349.8 270.5 218.9 113.1 80.6 25.0 18.0 10.8 1,086.7

2023-24 361.9 280.0 226.6 135.9 83.4 25.9 18.7 11.1 1,143.4

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1,341.7 811.8 657.0 1,007.5 241.9 75.0 54.1 32.3 4,221.3

(a) Funding amounts for WA are indicative estimates only. Negotiations are continuing on drawdown arrangements.

This funding agreement partially reimburses the states for expenditure incurred in relation to the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013. Under the DisabilityCare Australia Fund Act 2013, a proportion of the funding held in the DisabilityCare Australia Fund has been allocated to the states over a 10-year period.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 51

Remote Community Store Licensing Scheme $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 1.0 1.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - 6.5 6.5

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 7.5 7.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to transition the remote community store licensing scheme currently delivered by the Australian Government to the Northern Territory Government.

The scheme was introduced in 2007, with the aim of supporting improved store governance, management practices and quality of food in remote community stores. The scheme regulates around 100 stores across 70 remote Indigenous communities.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 52 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Affordable housing

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $2.0 billion to support state affordable housing services, consisting of $1.6 billion through the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement (NHHA) and $313.7 million through National Partnership payments, as detailed in Table 2.7.

Table 2.7: Payments to support state affordable housing services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Housing and

Homelessness Agreement 1,616.2 1,644.5 1,604.9 1,630.6 1,655.1

National Partnership payments

HomeBuilder 1,777.8 85.1 - - -

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal

Investment

Remote Australia strategies component 3.7 3.8 3.8 - -

Remote housing 185.0 223.8 - - -

Social Impact Investments

Vulnerable priority groups 1.1 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

Youth at risk of homelessness 1.1 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

Total National Partnership payments 1,968.7 313.7 4.9 1.1 1.1

Total 3,584.8 1,958.2 1,609.8 1,631.7 1,656.1

National Housing and Homelessness Agreement(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 495.0 415.9 334.4 174.5 113.0 35.1 27.6 20.7 1,616.2

2022-23 501.8 423.0 341.8 178.1 115.0 35.7 28.0 21.1 1,644.5

2023-24 499.3 407.9 334.4 171.5 111.4 34.1 26.4 19.9 1,604.9

2024-25 506.3 416.3 339.8 174.2 112.6 34.5 26.8 20.1 1,630.6

2025-26 512.9 424.5 344.8 176.7 113.8 34.8 27.2 20.4 1,655.1

Total 2,515.3 2,087.7 1,695.2 875.0 565.8 174.2 136.0 102.2 8,151.3

(a) Bilateral agreements under the NHHA expire at the end of 2022-23, beyond which funding is subject to negotiation.

The NHHA contributes to improving access to affordable, safe and sustainable housing, including to prevent and address homelessness, and to support social and economic participation. The NHHA supports state and territory governments to deliver better outcomes for housing and homelessness funding.

Australian Government funding under the NHHA is ongoing and indexed by Wage Cost Index 1 (see Appendix A), providing greater certainty for the sector. The Australian Government’s contribution to homelessness funding will be matched by the states.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 53

National Partnership payments for affordable housing

The Australian Government will provide a total of $313.7 million in 2022-23 through National Partnership payments to support state affordable housing services. Further details are provided below.

HomeBuilder(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1,777.8

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 85.1

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1,862.9

(a) State allocations are not available as this is a demand-driven program.

HomeBuilder was announced on 4 June 2020 to respond to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the residential construction sector by encouraging eligible Australians to build a new home or substantially renovate an existing home.

A $25,000 grant is available for eligible contracts signed between 4 June 2020 and 31 December 2020 (inclusive). A $15,000 grant is available for eligible contracts signed between 1 January 2021 and 31 March 2021 (inclusive). Applications for the program closed on 14 April 2021.

Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment - Remote Australia strategies component $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 3.7 3.7

2022-23 - - - - - - - 3.8 3.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - 3.8 3.8

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 11.3 11.3

The Remote Australia strategies component provides funding to improve public housing in remote communities by investing in housing works and removing asbestos from community buildings. This funding will also support a sustainable, professional and accredited Indigenous interpreter service.

The Northern Territory Remote Aboriginal Investment agreement supports the Northern Territory to improve schooling for Indigenous children, make communities safer and healthier, and increase access to interpreter services and job opportunities for Indigenous Australians. Other components of this agreement are discussed in the Health, Education and Community Services sections of this Part.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 54 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

This funding complements the funding provided under the agreement on remote housing.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Remote housing $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 185.0 185.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - 223.8 223.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 408.8 408.8

The Australian Government is supporting significant reform in the provision of housing for Indigenous Australians in remote communities to help address overcrowding, homelessness, poor housing conditions and severe housing shortages. Funding for other states was provided in prior years.

This funding supports the delivery of new houses, housing refurbishments and housing-related infrastructure. It also provides incentives to establish more sustainable housing systems in remote Indigenous communities.

Social Impact Investments

Vulnerable priority groups(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.7 ~ ~ ~ 1.1

2022-23 - - - - 0.5 - - - 0.5

2023-24 - - - - 0.5 - - - 0.5

2024-25 - - - - 0.5 - - - 0.5

2025-26 - - - - 0.5 - - - 0.5

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ 2.9 ~ ~ ~ 3.2

(a) State allocations for 2021-22 have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding to state governments to trial social impact investments which aim to assist vulnerable priority groups.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 55

Youth at risk of homelessness(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.1

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.5

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.5

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.5

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.5

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3.2

(a) State allocations for all years have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding to state governments to trial social impact investments which aim to help young people at risk of homelessness.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 56 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Infrastructure In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $17.5 billion to support state infrastructure projects, as detailed in Table 2.8.

Table 2.8: Payments to support state infrastructure services $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Infrastructure Investment Program

Black Spot Projects 137.0 128.9 121.1 121.1 110.0

Bridges Renewal Program 90.0 131.1 131.1 101.1 101.1

Developing Northern Australia

Improving cattle supply chains 0.3 5.8 0.5 1.0 0.1

Northern Australia Roads 39.6 70.1 111.8 118.4 128.1

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity

Program 65.0 67.2 101.6 69.3 69.3

Major Projects Business Case Fund 58.7 53.6 52.1 37.8 2.5

Rail investment component 2,295.1 3,438.7 4,101.4 3,670.3 2,971.9

Road investment component 6,207.2 9,134.1 10,343.6 9,115.7 5,113.1

Roads of Strategic Importance 702.7 1,126.3 1,096.5 860.6 742.7

Roads to Recovery 499.5 490.9 485.3 499.5 499.5

Urban Congestion Fund 725.0 941.3 1,004.0 477.5 302.5

Infrastructure Growth Package

Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan 138.4 147.9 338.7 402.4 123.2

Other payments

Adelaide City Deal 49.7 42.0 49.5 5.0 -

Albury Wodonga Regional Deal 0.7 20.0 20.0 21.0 15.0

Barkly Regional Deal 11.4 10.8 - - -

Darwin City Deal 27.3 - - - -

Drought Communities Programme - Extension 13.1 10.0 - - -

Geelong City Deal 24.2 48.0 51.7 44.6 -

Hinkler Regional Deal 7.5 3.0 - - -

Launceston City Deal 17.3 16.3 7.6 - -

Local Roads and Community

Infrastructure 914.0 649.3 349.6 249.7 -

National Water Grid Fund 57.6 748.7 547.7 833.4 874.0

Perth City Deal 86.8 78.7 74.0 74.0 -

Regional Recovery Partnerships 41.2 - - - -

Southeast Queensland City Deal - 44.8 122.0 111.5 85.6

Townsville City Deal 35.5 90.0 69.0 18.0 -

Western Sydney City Deal 22.3 14.9 - - -

WiFi and mobile coverage on trains 2.0 - - - -

Total 12,269.0 17,512.5 19,178.8 16,832.0 11,138.7

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 57

Table 2.8: Payments to support state infrastructure services (continued) $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Memorandum item — payments direct to local

governments included in payments above

Infrastructure Investment Program

Roads to Recovery 471.2 464.8 461.4 473.5 473.5

Other payments

Drought Communities Programme - Extension 13.1 10.0 - - -

Local Roads and Community Infrastructure 914.0 649.3 349.6 249.7 -

Total 1,398.3 1,124.2 811.0 723.2 473.5

National Partnership payments for infrastructure

Infrastructure Investment Program

The Australian Government is providing funding for road and rail infrastructure through the Infrastructure Investment Program under the funding agreement on land transport infrastructure projects. The Australian Government has established a 10-year funding allocation for this program.

The program assists economic and social development regionally and nationally by providing funding to improve the performance of land transport infrastructure.

A portion of Australian Government funding for road infrastructure is sourced from the additional net revenue received from the reintroduction of fuel excise indexation, announced in the 2014-15 Budget.

The Infrastructure Investment Program includes several components that involve payments to the states, detailed in the tables below.

Black Spot Projects $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 42.9 34.7 27.1 14.8 8.4 3.8 2.2 3.1 137.0

2022-23 35.4 35.4 26.7 14.2 9.0 3.9 2.4 1.9 128.9

2023-24 35.2 30.3 25.6 13.2 9.1 3.5 2.3 1.9 121.1

2024-25 35.2 30.3 25.6 13.2 9.1 3.5 2.3 1.9 121.1

2025-26 33.3 26.8 22.7 13.2 7.9 2.6 1.5 1.9 110.0

Total 182.0 157.6 127.6 68.6 43.5 17.3 10.7 10.7 618.1

The Black Spot Program funds safety works in places where there have been serious crashes or where serious crashes are likely to occur.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 58 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Bridges Renewal Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 33.7 10.5 33.5 4.4 2.5 1.4 2.4 1.5 90.0

2022-23 47.5 35.4 26.0 12.7 6.2 1.9 1.2 0.2 131.1

2023-24 43.6 13.8 49.4 9.9 4.5 5.2 1.2 3.6 131.1

2024-25 33.6 10.7 38.1 7.6 3.4 4.0 0.9 2.8 101.1

2025-26 31.9 26.7 20.6 10.4 6.8 2.1 1.7 0.9 101.1

Total 190.4 97.1 167.5 45.0 23.4 14.7 7.4 9.1 554.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to upgrade bridges across the nation. This program renews and replaces bridges serving local communities and facilitates higher productivity vehicle access.

New measures associated with this component of the Infrastructure Investment Program are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Developing Northern Australia - improving cattle supply chains $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 0.3 - - - - - 0.3

2022-23 - - 5.8 - - - - - 5.8

2023-24 - - 0.1 0.5 - - - - 0.5

2024-25 - - 1.0 - - - - - 1.0

2025-26 - - 0.1 - - - - - 0.1

Total - - 7.3 0.5 - - - - 7.7

The Australian Government is providing funding to Queensland and Western Australia for road infrastructure projects that will improve the resilience and productivity of the northern cattle supply chains.

Developing Northern Australia - Northern Australia Roads $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 17.2 3.2 - - - 19.2 39.6

2022-23 - - 27.3 22.8 - - - 20.0 70.1

2023-24 - - 45.8 22.0 - - - 44.0 111.8

2024-25 - - 52.4 22.0 - - - 44.0 118.4

2025-26 - - 44.0 22.0 - - - 62.1 128.1

Total - - 186.7 92.0 - - - 189.4 468.1

The Australian Government is providing funding to Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory for infrastructure projects that are essential to the movement of people and freight to support economic development in the region. Projects include links to roads connecting communities and regional towns to ports and airports.

New measures associated with this component of the Infrastructure Investment Program are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 59

Heavy Vehicle Safety and Productivity Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 29.9 2.0 19.8 6.8 5.3 .. 0.7 0.5 65.0

2022-23 26.2 9.0 21.8 6.5 2.5 0.5 0.4 0.2 67.2

2023-24 40.3 9.1 23.9 7.9 6.1 4.0 2.1 8.3 101.6

2024-25 27.5 6.2 16.3 5.4 4.1 2.7 1.5 5.6 69.3

2025-26 21.9 18.3 14.1 7.1 4.7 1.4 1.2 0.6 69.3

Total 145.9 44.5 95.8 33.7 22.7 8.7 5.9 15.3 372.5

The Australian Government is contributing to the safety and productivity of heavy vehicles by funding projects that improve the safety of the road environment, enhance the capacity of existing roads and improve connections to freight networks.

Major Projects Business Case Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 3.8 31.3 16.8 6.9 - - - - 58.7

2022-23 10.0 1.0 33.6 8.9 - - - - 53.6

2023-24 16.5 - 30.8 4.9 - - - - 52.1

2024-25 8.0 - 26.3 3.5 - - - - 37.8

2025-26 - - - 2.5 - - - - 2.5

Total 38.3 32.3 107.5 26.7 - - - - 204.6

The Australian Government is providing funding to support the development of business cases for road and rail infrastructure projects. Funding will support a range of scenarios relating to business case development, including supporting joint state, territory and Australian Government planning processes.

Rail investment component(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 876.8 960.2 74.8 256.2 70.0 37.0 20.0 0.3 2,295.1

2022-23 1,339.6 1,103.7 233.1 681.7 15.9 42.8 20.0 1.9 3,438.7

2023-24 1,125.1 1,518.4 416.7 959.5 5.1 22.1 52.5 1.9 4,101.4

2024-25 1,165.3 1,573.8 394.8 483.3 3.4 37.7 10.0 1.9 3,670.3

2025-26 623.0 1,603.5 546.7 125.7 3.4 37.7 30.0 1.9 2,971.9

Total 5,129.8 6,759.6 1,666.2 2,506.4 97.8 177.2 132.5 8.0 16,477.4

(a) Includes the National Rail Program.

The rail investment component of the Infrastructure Investment Program delivers the Australian Government’s rail investment. It funds projects across Australia, including the Victorian regional rail program.

New measures associated with this component of the Infrastructure Investment Program are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 60 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Road investment component(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 1,674.7 1,219.6 1,598.3 952.5 479.2 97.0 24.2 161.7 6,207.2

2022-23 1,975.2 1,841.9 2,361.9 1,400.2 874.8 362.7 82.7 234.7 9,134.1

2023-24 2,492.1 1,751.2 2,688.2 1,289.3 1,479.0 319.9 134.4 189.4 10,343.6

2024-25 2,587.5 1,194.8 2,757.7 702.6 1,448.4 184.6 66.3 173.9 9,115.7

2025-26 1,516.8 382.7 1,568.4 395.4 832.1 202.4 58.6 156.7 5,113.1

Total 10,246.2 6,390.3 10,974.6 4,739.9 5,113.5 1,166.6 366.3 916.4 39,913.8

(a) Includes the New Investments program.

The road investment component of the Infrastructure Investment Program delivers the majority of the Australian Government’s investment in road infrastructure. It targets nationally significant projects that will improve the efficiency and safety of Australia’s road network. Funding is provided for road construction projects and network maintenance, as well as transport development, innovation projects and grants to land transport research bodies.

New measures associated with this component of the Infrastructure Investment Program are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Roads of Strategic Importance initiative $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 60.9 68.7 140.1 208.1 96.4 94.2 - 34.2 702.7

2022-23 132.1 131.7 231.4 350.5 96.5 112.0 - 72.1 1,126.3

2023-24 159.6 125.8 285.1 212.1 20.5 200.4 - 93.1 1,096.5

2024-25 151.9 77.0 208.6 103.0 10.7 199.2 - 110.2 860.6

2025-26 122.2 87.0 155.9 89.7 2.2 167.4 - 118.3 742.7

Total 626.8 490.2 1,021.1 963.3 226.3 773.2 - 427.8 4,528.7

The Australian Government is providing funding to upgrade key routes to improve access for businesses and communities to essential services, markets and employment opportunities.

New measures associated with this component of the Infrastructure Investment Program are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 61

Roads to Recovery(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 137.1 102.6 102.4 71.2 45.2 16.3 10.2 14.5 499.5

2022-23 136.2 101.2 101.4 70.5 44.6 16.3 8.0 12.8 490.9

2023-24 132.7 101.9 101.9 69.0 44.4 16.2 5.7 13.5 485.3

2024-25 139.3 101.7 101.7 73.1 44.9 16.3 8.0 14.5 499.5

2025-26 139.3 101.7 101.7 73.1 44.9 16.3 8.0 14.5 499.5

Total 684.5 509.2 509.1 356.9 224.1 81.3 39.8 69.9 2,474.7

(a) These figures include payments direct to local governments.

The Australian Government is providing funding for the Roads to Recovery program for road construction and maintenance projects at a local level. Funding recipients have a set program allocation for each 5-year program and choose the projects on which they will spend their funding based on local priorities.

Urban Congestion Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 97.6 152.6 142.7 223.7 98.9 9.6 - - 725.0

2022-23 136.1 383.2 161.2 196.8 49.4 14.5 - - 941.3

2023-24 188.0 423.3 202.5 136.6 39.6 14.0 - - 1,004.0

2024-25 131.9 166.5 78.0 83.8 8.0 9.5 - - 477.5

2025-26 113.6 68.5 24.4 36.1 59.2 0.3 0.2 0.1 302.5

Total 667.1 1,194.0 608.7 677.0 255.2 47.9 0.2 0.1 3,450.3

The Urban Congestion Fund supports projects to remediate pinch points, improve traffic safety and flow and increase network efficiency for commuter and freight movements in major urban areas.

New measures associated with this component of the Infrastructure Investment Program are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 62 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Infrastructure Growth Package

The Australian Government announced the Infrastructure Growth Package, comprising New Investments and the Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan, in the 2014-15 Budget.

Western Sydney Infrastructure Plan $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 138.4 - - - - - - - 138.4

2022-23 147.9 - - - - - - - 147.9

2023-24 338.7 - - - - - - - 338.7

2024-25 402.4 - - - - - - - 402.4

2025-26 123.2 - - - - - - - 123.2

Total 1,150.7 - - - - - - - 1,150.7

The Australian Government is providing funding to enhance capacity and improve transport infrastructure in Sydney’s western suburbs. This includes infrastructure to support the new Western Sydney airport at Badgerys Creek.

Other payments

Adelaide City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - 49.7 - - - 49.7

2022-23 - - - - 42.0 - - - 42.0

2023-24 - - - - 49.5 - - - 49.5

2024-25 - - - - 5.0 - - - 5.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 146.2 - - - 146.2

The Australian Government is providing funding to support projects under the Adelaide City Deal, including the development of a new innovation and cultural precinct in the city centre.

Albury Wodonga Regional Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 0.7 - - - - - - 0.7

2022-23 7.5 12.5 - - - - - - 20.0

2023-24 9.5 10.5 - - - - - - 20.0

2024-25 21.0 - - - - - - - 21.0

2025-26 15.0 - - - - - - - 15.0

Total 53.0 23.7 - - - - - - 76.7

The Australian Government will provide an additional $83.2 million over 5 years from 2022-23 to support projects under the Albury Wodonga Regional Deal to unlock economic benefits and opportunities in the region.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 63

Barkly Regional Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 11.4 11.4

2022-23 - - - - - - - 10.8 10.8

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 22.2 22.2

The Australian Government will provide an additional $6.3 million in 2022-23 to support the construction of a purpose-built boarding facility in Tennant Creek to provide accessible housing for secondary school children.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Darwin City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 27.3 27.3

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 27.3 27.3

The Australian Government is providing funding to support projects under the Darwin City Deal, including an education and civic precinct in Darwin’s city centre.

Drought Communities Programme - Extension $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 3.6 1.5 1.5 4.1 1.9 0.3 - 0.2 13.1

2022-23 2.8 1.1 1.1 3.1 1.5 0.2 - 0.2 10.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 6.4 2.6 2.6 7.2 3.4 0.5 - 0.4 23.1

The Australian Government is supporting local infrastructure projects and other drought relief activities that provide employment for people whose work opportunities have been affected by drought. Funding is being provided to local government areas for projects that stimulate local community spending, use local resources, businesses and suppliers, and provide long-lasting benefits to communities and the agricultural industries on which they depend.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 64 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Geelong City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 24.2 - - - - - - 24.2

2022-23 - 48.0 - - - - - - 48.0

2023-24 - 51.7 - - - - - - 51.7

2024-25 - 44.6 - - - - - - 44.6

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 168.5 - - - - - - 168.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to support projects under the Geelong City Deal, including the Shipwreck Coast Master Plan, Great Ocean Road projects and projects in the Geelong city centre.

Hinkler Regional Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 7.5 - - - - - 7.5

2022-23 - - 3.0 - - - - - 3.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 10.5 - - - - - 10.5

The Australian Government is providing funding to support projects at the Port of Bundaberg, including the construction of a multi-use conveyor, as part of the Hinkler Regional Deal.

Launceston City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - 17.3 - - 17.3

2022-23 - - - - - 16.3 - - 16.3

2023-24 - - - - - 7.6 - - 7.6

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - 41.1 - - 41.1

The Australian Government is investing in the 10-year Launceston City Deal, in partnership with the Tasmanian Government and the City of Launceston. The City Deal aims to improve liveability and innovation in Launceston, increasing incomes and reducing levels of disadvantage. The City Deal includes funding to reduce pollution and improve the health of the Tamar River.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 65

Local Roads and Community Infrastructure $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 271.5 204.7 178.8 120.3 77.6 26.2 13.1 21.8 914.0

2022-23 184.5 136.3 131.5 91.7 57.3 20.2 10.3 17.5 649.3

2023-24 97.5 71.2 71.2 51.1 31.4 11.4 5.6 10.2 349.6

2024-25 69.6 50.9 50.9 36.5 22.5 8.1 4.0 7.3 249.7

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 623.1 463.1 432.4 299.7 188.7 65.9 33.0 56.7 2,162.6

The Australian Government is providing funding to support local councils to deliver priority local road and community infrastructure projects across Australia, supporting jobs and the resilience of local economies to help communities bounce back from the COVID-19 pandemic.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

National Water Grid Fund(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 10.7 8.5 7.5 5.5 10.1 8.7 ~ 2.7 57.6

2022-23 304.2 56.5 179.7 64.1 19.7 47.6 ~ 14.1 748.7

2023-24 108.0 17.8 186.2 94.5 8.9 25.0 ~ 103.1 547.7

2024-25 197.7 16.2 376.5 23.5 0.1 20.0 ~ 197.4 833.4

2025-26 90.0 0.2 750.0 13.2 - 20.0 ~ 0.6 874.0

Total 710.6 99.1 1,499.9 200.8 38.8 121.3 ~ 318.0 3,061.4

(a) State allocations are indicative estimates only to be determined on the signing of agreements. State allocations for the balance have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide $6.9 billion over 12 years from 2021-22 to expand investment in nationally significant, transformational water infrastructure projects to assist in developing regional communities.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

2021-22 payments for projects under the former National Water Infrastructure Development Fund are included in the Part 2 - Environment section of Budget Paper No. 3.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 66 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Perth City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - 86.8 - - - - 86.8

2022-23 - - - 78.7 - - - - 78.7

2023-24 - - - 74.0 - - - - 74.0

2024-25 - - - 74.0 - - - - 74.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - 313.5 - - - - 313.5

The Australian Government will provide an additional $49.0 million over 3 years from 2022-23 under the Perth City Deal to support the Edith Cowan University’s Cultural and Creative Industries CBD campus project. This funding brings the total Commonwealth investment for this project to $294.0 million.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Regional Recovery Partnerships $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 10.0 - 5.0 6.2 10.0 10.0 - - 41.2

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 10.0 - 5.0 6.2 10.0 10.0 - - 41.2

Regional Recovery Partnerships coordinate investments with all levels of government and include payments to states to support recovery and growth in 10 regions across Australia, delivering jobs and economic diversification.

South East Queensland City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - 44.8 - - - - - 44.8

2023-24 - - 122.0 - - - - - 122.0

2024-25 - - 111.5 - - - - - 111.5

2025-26 - - 85.6 - - - - - 85.6

Total - - 363.9 - - - - - 363.9

The Australian Government will provide $680.6 million over 11 years from 2022-23 to support projects under the South East Queensland (SEQ) City Deal. The City Deal will deliver jobs, greater digital and transport connectivity and more liveable communities throughout the SEQ region.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 67

Townsville City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 35.5 - - - - - 35.5

2022-23 - - 90.0 - - - - - 90.0

2023-24 - - 69.0 - - - - - 69.0

2024-25 - - 18.0 - - - - - 18.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 212.5 - - - - - 212.5

The Australian Government will provide funding to support projects under the Townsville City Deal, including the port of Townsville channel capacity upgrade.

Western Sydney City Deal $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 22.3 - - - - - - - 22.3

2022-23 14.9 - - - - - - - 14.9

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 37.3 - - - - - - - 37.3

The Australian Government is providing funding under the Western Sydney City Deal to deliver improved community facilities and urban amenities, and to cut development costs and boost housing supply.

WiFi and mobile coverage on trains $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 2.0 - - - - - - - 2.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 2.0 - - - - - - - 2.0

This program is establishing mobile and internet connectivity along the train route between Hornsby and Wyong.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 68 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Environment

In 2022-23, the Australian Government will provide funding of $1.9 billion to support state environment projects, as detailed in Table 2.9.

Table 2.9: Payments to support state environment services(a) $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Australian Fire Danger Rating System 20.5 - - - -

Bilateral Energy and Emissions Reduction

Agreements 30.0 - - - -

Boosting our northern Biosecurity Frontline - - 6.0 5.7 5.3

Building resilience to manage fruit fly 1.0 15.0 14.0 - -

CarbonNet - 10.0 5.0 5.0 -

Construction Softwood Transport

Assistance 4.6 10.0 - - -

Disaster risk reduction 20.9 20.9 20.9 - -

Ehrlichia canis pilot program 0.2 0.1 - - -

Emergency Response Fund

Coastal and Estuaries Risk Mitigation

Program - 50.0 - - -

Flood Recovery and Resilience Package 150.0 150.0 - - -

National Flood Mitigation Infrastructure

Program 100.0 - - - -

Environment Restoration Fund 5.1 3.3 - - -

Environmental assessment systems

upgrade 9.1 - - - -

Environmental management of the former

Rum Jungle Mine site 2.3 nfp nfp nfp nfp

Feasibility study into Curtis Island

LNG Electrification 1.5 - - - -

Fishing and Camping Facilities Program 16.7 - - - -

Future Drought Fund

Farm business resilience 25.0 20.0 15.0 - -

Regional drought resilience planning 13.5 10.5 5.5 - -

Great Artesian Basin Sustainability Initiative 9.0 11.0 4.0 - -

Horse traceability 0.1 0.6 0.6 - -

Horticultural Netting 33.0 - - - -

Hydrogen energy supply chain project 12.5 3.8 3.8 - -

Hydrogen Ready Gas Generation 5.0 - - - -

Implementing water reform in the

Murray-Darling Basin 20.0 20.0 20.0 - -

Kamay 250th Anniversary Project 4.5 - - - -

Lindenow Valley water security scheme 1.6 - - - -

Management of established pest and weeds 8.8 8.9 5.0 5.0 -

National Forestry Industry Plan 3.5 - - - -

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 69

Table 2.9: Payments to support state environment services(a) (continued) $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

National Plant Health Surveillance Program 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 -

National Water Infrastructure Development

Fund

Capital 130.4 - - - -

Feasibility studies 46.2 - - - -

North Queensland Strata Title Resilience

Pilot Program 28.0 12.0 - -

On-farm emergency water infrastructure

rebate 34.8 16.0 - - -

Pest and disease preparedness and

response programs 76.2 38.9 33.2 37.8 38.3

Raine Island Recovery Project - 0.7 0.7 - -

Recycling Modernisation Fund

Plastics technology stream - 5.8 20.8 20.8 12.8

Recycling Infrastructure 84.2 84.6 52.5 18.5 -

Reducing regulatory burden and streamlining

audit arrangements in the dairy sector 0.2 0.4 - - -

Regional fund for wildlife and habitat

bushfire recovery 19.9 8.3 - - -

Support Plantation Establishment - 10.0 25.0 30.0 20.0

Supporting farmers to maximise farm gate

output through traceability and on-farm

biosecurity - 6.0 8.0 6.0 -

Sustainable rural water use and

infrastructure program 324.0 445.6 342.9 - -

Transforming Digital Environmental

Assessments - 4.0 4.7 1.8 -

Water for Fodder Program 0.6 - - - -

Water for the Environment Special Account

Implementation of constraints measures 82.9 52.3 50.6 - -

Off-farm Efficiency Program 268.5 807.0 276.5 - -

Water Efficiency Program 0.3 - - - -

World Heritage Sites 9.5 9.5 - - -

Yellow crazy ant control 3.0 - - - -

Total 1,596.8 1,911.7 980.7 229.4 142.7

(a) Total figures include items not for publication.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 70 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

National Partnership payments for the environment

Australian Fire Danger Rating System(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.5

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding to support the implementation of the Australian Fire Danger Rating System. The new Australian Fire Danger Rating System will improve public safety and reduce the impacts of bushfires by improving decision making enabled by more accurate scientific information. Nationally consistent fire danger rating information will be available to the public, reducing confusion about how to react to a warning.

Bilateral Energy and Emissions Reduction Agreements $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 30.0 30.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 30.0 30.0

The Australian Government will provide up to $30 million in 2021-22 for 2 key projects in the Northern Territory to deliver reliable and affordable energy, reduce emissions and support economic recovery. The funding will enable installation of a 35-megawatt big battery for the Darwin-Katherine Interconnected System and microgrids in up to 10 remote Indigenous communities across the Northern Territory.

This builds on the $28.5 million the Australian Government provided to the Western Australian Government for a big battery and microgrids program in 2020-21. These funding amounts will be reflected in energy and emissions reduction agreements (State Deals) with these jurisdictions, once finalised.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 71

Boosting our northern Biosecurity Frontline(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - ~ ~ - - - ~ 6.0

2024-25 - - ~ ~ - - - ~ 5.7

2025-26 - - ~ ~ - - - ~ 5.3

Total - - ~ ~ - - - ~ 17.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding to build regional resilience to manage biosecurity risks in northern Australia. The funding will support implementation of regional biosecurity plans in identified regions of growth and fund targeted actions to proactively de-risk investment and business operations including the delivery of critical biosecurity infrastructure.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Building resilience to manage fruit fly(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.0

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 15.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 14.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 30.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding to build resilience of Australia’s fruit fly management system. This investment will reduce the significant impact of fruit flies by helping to stop the spread of fruit fly, driving down pest pressure in vulnerable areas and growing exports by providing critical post-harvest treatment options for export of horticultural crops.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 72 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

CarbonNet $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - 10.0 - - - - - - 10.0

2023-24 - 5.0 - - - - - - 5.0

2024-25 - 5.0 - - - - - - 5.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 20.0 - - - - - - 20.0

The Australian Government will provide up to $20 million to support CarbonNet’s Stage 3 activities, as it aims to establish a commercial carbon capture and storage network in Victoria’s Gippsland Basin. The funding will enable CarbonNet to undertake key regulatory works and complete the Front End Engineering Design for onshore and offshore infrastructure.

Construction Softwood Transport Assistance(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.4 ~ ~ ~ 4.6

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.7 ~ ~ ~ 10.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.0 ~ ~ ~ 14.6

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide up to $15.1 million to respond to timber shortages that have been affecting the building industry. Of this amount, $14.6 million is available to provide states with administered funding for this program.

This program will primarily support transportation of salvaged construction-grade softwood from Kangaroo Island to timber mills with capacity to manufacture structural timbers.

Disaster risk reduction $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.4 3.3 4.8 2.5 1.7 1.0 1.0 1.0 20.9

2022-23 5.4 3.3 4.8 2.5 1.7 1.0 1.0 1.0 20.9

2023-24 5.4 3.3 4.8 2.5 1.7 1.0 1.0 1.0 20.9

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 16.3 10.0 14.4 7.5 5.0 3.1 3.1 3.1 62.6

The Australian Government is providing funding to the states to reduce the risk and impact of disasters on Australians in line with the priorities of the National Disaster Risk Reduction Framework. The funding forms part of a broader $130.5 million package over 5 years from 2019-20 to support resilience to disasters triggered by natural hazards.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 73

Ehrlichia canis pilot program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - 0.1 - - - 0.2 0.2

2022-23 - - - 0.1 - - - - 0.1

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - 0.2 - - - 0.2 0.3

The Australian Government will provide funding to support Western Australia and the Northern Territory in their management of Ehrlichia canis through national awareness for dog owners and control programs in several remote indigenous communities.

Emergency Response Fund

The Australian Government’s Emergency Response Fund is an investment fund which is intended to grow over time to maximise the Commonwealth’s capacity to support states’ and territories’ responses to major natural disasters into the future. The Emergency Response Fund allows the Australian Government to draw up to $200 million in any given year, beyond what is already available, to fund emergency response and natural disaster recovery and preparedness.

Coastal and Estuaries Risk Mitigation Program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 50.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 50.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide $50 million in funding from the Emergency Response Fund to target high priority locally and nationally significant coastal and estuarine disaster risk mitigation projects.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 74 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Flood Recovery and Resilience Package $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 75.0 - 75.0 - - - - - 150.0

2022-23 150.0 - - - - - - - 150.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 225.0 - 75.0 - - - - - 300.0

The Australian Government will provide $150 million from the Emergency Response Fund in each of 2021-22 and 2022-23 to support recovery activities in communities affected by the severe flooding disaster events in Queensland and New South Wales in February and March 2022.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

National Flood Mitigation Infrastructure Program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 13.4 6.9 9.9 0.7 3.2 3.2 3.3 9.4 100.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 13.4 6.9 9.9 0.7 3.2 3.2 3.3 9.4 100.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined for the second round of funding ($50 million).

The Australian Government will provide funding from the Emergency Response Fund to states to support national flood mitigation infrastructure priorities to reduce the impacts of floods on Australian communities. Payments totalling $50 million have been made for the first round of the program, which relate to an initial allocation from the Emergency Response Fund in 2020-21.

Environment Restoration Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.3 1.2 - - 3.5 0.1 - - 5.1

2022-23 - 1.8 - - 1.3 0.2 - - 3.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.3 3.0 - - 4.8 0.3 - - 8.4

The Australian Government is providing funding to improve water quality and manage erosion in coasts and waterways, support the recovery and recycling of waste, and protect threatened species and their habitats. The funding to states forms part of the Australian Government commitment of $100 million for the Environment Restoration Fund over 4 years from 2019-20.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 75

Environmental assessment systems upgrade $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.3 0.3 0.3 6.0 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.3 9.1

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.3 0.3 0.3 6.0 0.3 0.3 0.3 1.3 9.1

The Australian Government will provide funding to support activities to establish new and interoperable environmental assessment systems. The activities include developing an online environmental assessment portal, an environmental assessment system and a biodiversity data repository.

Environmental management of the former Rum Jungle Mine site $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 2.3 2.3

2022-23 - - - - - - - nfp nfp

2023-24 - - - - - - - nfp nfp

2024-25 - - - - - - - nfp nfp

2025-26 - - - - - - - nfp nfp

Total - - - - - - - 2.3 2.3

The Australian Government is continuing to fund the program of work established to improve the management of the Rum Jungle Mine site. This funding supports the site’s full rehabilitation, traditional owner participation in delivering work and ongoing engagement activities.

Feasibility study into Curtis Island LNG Electrification $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 1.5 - - - - - 1.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 1.5 - - - - - 1.5

The Australian Government will provide $1.5 million to the Queensland Government to support a feasibility study into the electrification of liquefied natural gas facilities at Curtis Island, Queensland. This will support the Government’s aim of unlocking more gas supply for the domestic market.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 76 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Fishing and Camping Facilities Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 4.2 2.0 3.8 2.3 1.7 0.9 0.2 1.4 16.7

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 4.2 2.0 3.8 2.3 1.7 0.9 0.2 1.4 16.7

The Australian Government is providing funding for local councils to improve, maintain or build new boating, marine rescue, fishing and camping facilities.

Future Drought Fund

The Future Drought Fund provides secure, continuous funding for drought resilience initiatives to help Australian farms and communities prepare for impacts of drought.

Farm business resilience(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 25.0

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 15.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 60.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been finalised.

The Australian Government is working with state and territory governments to provide farm businesses with training to develop strategic management skills and support the development of a Farm Business Plan. Participants develop a plan, tailored to their business and situation, and have the opportunity for professional assessment and feedback on the plan. Funding is provided from the Future Drought Fund.

Regional drought resilience planning(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 13.5

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 10.5

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 5.5

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 29.4

(a) State allocations have not yet been finalised.

The Australian Government is working with state and territory governments to support group partnerships with local councils and regional stakeholders to develop Regional Drought Resilience Plans for agriculture - identifying and guiding innovative actions to build resilience to future droughts. Small grants will be available for regions to take

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 77

forward priority actions identified in their plans. Funding is provided from the Future Drought Fund.

Great Artesian Basin Sustainability Initiative $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 3.8 - 2.9 - 2.2 - - 0.1 9.0

2022-23 3.6 - 3.3 - 4.0 - - 0.1 11.0

2023-24 1.3 - 1.3 - 1.3 - - 0.1 4.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 8.7 - 7.5 - 7.5 - - 0.3 23.9

The Australian Government provides funding under the Improving Great Artesian Basin Drought Resilience Program (Extension to the Great Artesian Basin Sustainability Initiative) to continue the capping of uncontrolled bores and piping open bore drains to reduce water loss and recover groundwater pressure. In addition to infrastructure works, this program also funds education and communication programs, and studies to assist with new water management arrangements.

Horse Traceability(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 0.1 - - - - - - 0.1

2022-23 ~ 0.3 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.6

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.6

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ 0.4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.2

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide $1.2 million to assist states and territories in efforts to bring forward national traceability arrangements for all horses.

Horticultural Netting $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.9 11.2 10.9 2.6 - 1.9 - 0.4 33.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 5.9 11.2 10.9 2.6 - 1.9 - 0.4 33.0

The Australian Government is supporting the delivery of funds to primary producers of horticultural crops to purchase and install protective netting to reduce the impact of adverse weather conditions and animal predation, and to reduce the water usage on those same farms.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 78 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Hydrogen energy supply chain project $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 12.5 - - - - - - 12.5

2022-23 - 3.8 - - - - - - 3.8

2023-24 - 3.8 - - - - - - 3.8

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 20.0 - - - - - - 20.0

The Australian Government is supporting the Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) pilot project to produce and transport liquid hydrogen from Australia to Japan. Hydrogen will be produced through the gasification of brown coal in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley. The pilot project is nearing completion, with the outcomes of the pilot to inform the development of a commercial-scale project. Funding from 2022-23 will support the pre-commercialisation phase of the project.

Hydrogen Ready Gas Generation $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.0 - - - - - - - 5.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 5.0 - - - - - - - 5.0

The Australian Government will support new gas generation projects to be hydrogen ready. Funding will support hydrogen-ready capability through grants for hydrogen-ready turbines or associated hydrogen supply infrastructure. Under this measure, the Australian Government will provide $5 million to the New South Wales Government to support the new Tallawara B power plant to be hydrogen ready.

Implementing water reform in the Murray-Darling Basin(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ - ~ - ~ - 20.0

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ - ~ - ~ - 20.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ - ~ - ~ - 20.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ - ~ - ~ - 60.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing funding for a new funding agreement with Basin jurisdictions (New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and the Australian Capital Territory) for new and ongoing activities required to implement water reform in the Murray-Darling Basin.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 79

Kamay 250th Anniversary Project $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 4.5 - - - - - - - 4.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 4.5 - - - - - - - 4.5

The Australian Government will provide funding to improve visitor access and safety at Kamay Botany Bay National Park.

Lindenow Valley water security scheme $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 1.6 - - - - - - 1.6

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 1.6 - - - - - - 1.6

The Australian Government is supporting the delivery of grants to eligible irrigators within the Lindenow Valley of East Gippsland Victoria, for the construction of on-farm water storage facilities, or bores and pumping facilities, to increase water security and improve resilience to drought.

Management of established pest and weeds(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.1 3.2 0.1 ~ 0.2 8.8

2022-23 0.4 0.3 0.4 0.2 1.3 0.2 ~ 0.2 8.9

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 5.0

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 5.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.6 0.6 1.0 0.3 4.5 0.3 ~ 0.3 27.7

(a) State allocations for the on-ground component have not been determined.

This program will support projects to deliver wild dog exclusion fencing in South Australia, support states to build the skills and capacity of land managers, communities and industry to better manage established pest animals and weeds, and undertake on-ground reduction and prevention activities for established pests and weeds.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 80 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

National Forestry Industry Plan $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.4 3.5

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.4 3.5

The Australian Government will support the delivery of projects to improve the quality of information available to land managers that are seeking to establish new farm forestry assets, private native forestry, or assess Indigenous forestry areas’ suitability for sustainable harvesting of forest products.

National Plant Health Surveillance Program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 .. 0.1 1.0

2022-23 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 .. 0.1 1.0

2023-24 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 .. 0.1 1.0

2024-25 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 .. 0.1 1.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.1 0.4 4.0

(a) State allocations are indicative estimates only. Funding is allocated based on pest risk profiles.

The Australian Government is providing funding to support Australia’s plant biosecurity system through the National Plant Health Surveillance Program. The program focuses on early detection of national priority plant pests that can enter and establish in Australia. The program is implemented through effective collaboration with all Australian jurisdictions and aims to minimise the impact of pest incursions on agricultural industries, environmental assets and communities through timely pest detection, and provide surveillance data that supports trade and market access.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 81

National Water Infrastructure Development Fund

The Australian Government is providing funding for water infrastructure through the funding agreement for the National Water Infrastructure Development Fund - Capital Component and the funding agreement for the National Water Infrastructure Development Fund - Feasibility Component.

Capital(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 20.0 36.3 70.7 - - 3.4 - - 130.4

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 20.0 36.3 70.7 - - 3.4 - - 130.4

(a) Funding from 2022-23 has been transferred to the National Water Grid Fund in Part 2 - Infrastructure.

The Australian Government provides funding to long-term regional economic growth and development by providing secure and affordable water through the construction of economically viable water infrastructure.

Feasibility studies(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 6.5 0.2 37.5 0.4 - - - 1.6 46.2

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 6.5 0.2 37.5 0.4 - - - 1.6 46.2

(a) Funding from 2022-23 has been transferred to the National Water Grid Fund in Part 2 - Infrastructure.

This program facilitates long-term economic and regional development by enhancing the knowledge base underpinning water infrastructure planning and decision making, undertaking the detailed planning required to inform water infrastructure investment decisions and expediting the construction of water infrastructure.

North Queensland Strata Title Resilience Pilot Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - 28.0 - - - - - 28.0

2023-24 - - 12.0 - - - - - 12.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 40.0 - - - - - 40.0

The Australian Government will provide funding to support strata title properties in North Queensland to undertake disaster mitigation works to improve resilience. The Queensland Government will implement and administer the initiative.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 82 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

On-farm emergency water infrastructure rebate(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 21.8 1.8 3.8 - 6.8 - - 0.6 34.8

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ - ~ - - ~ 16.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 21.8 1.8 3.8 - 6.8 - - 0.6 50.8

(a) State allocations for 2022-23 have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding for rebates to eligible primary producers and horticulture farmers to purchase and install water infrastructure that addresses animal welfare and permanent planting needs and improves drought resilience.

Pest and disease preparedness and response programs(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 3.6 11.3 46.8 10.5 2.0 - - 2.0 76.2

2022-23 3.3 2.8 28.1 1.1 1.9 - - 1.7 38.9

2023-24 0.2 1.3 30.6 0.2 - - - 0.9 33.2

2024-25 0.2 1.3 35.2 0.2 - - - 0.9 37.8

2025-26 0.2 1.3 35.7 0.2 - - - 0.9 38.3

Total 7.4 18.1 176.3 12.2 3.9 - - 6.5 224.3

(a) State allocations are indicative estimates only. Funding is conditional on agreed national responses to pest or disease incursions.

The Australian Government is supporting agricultural producers and protecting Australia’s unique environment by contributing to the eradication of exotic animal, plant and environmental pests and diseases.

This program protects Australia’s enviable animal and plant pest and disease status, enabling continued access to export markets. It also protects Australia’s unique environment and the tourism industries it supports, with direct positive effects on rural communities, businesses and employees.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 83

Raine Island Recovery Project $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - 0.7 - - - - - 0.7

2023-24 - - 0.7 - - - - - 0.7

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 1.3 - - - - - 1.3

The Australian Government is providing funding to re-establish and maintain Raine Island as a viable island ecosystem that supports sustainable populations of green turtles and seabirds through collaboration with Wuthathi and Meriam Nation (Ugar, Mer, Erub) Traditional Owners.

Recycling Modernisation Fund

The Australian Government will provide funding for improved recycling outcomes by addressing critical infrastructure and technology gaps in Australia’s waste management and resource recovery system.

Funding will be provided via a number of streams including a main Recycling Modernisation Fund stream, a Food Waste and Healthy Soils Fund stream, and a Plastics Technology stream.

Plastics technology stream(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 5.8

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.8

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.8

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 12.8

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 60.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been finalised.

The Australian Government will provide funding towards advanced and sophisticated recycling technologies which aim to build Australia’s recycling capability for hard-to-recycle plastics, address currently low plastics recycling rates, drive progress on the National Packaging Targets and deliver food grade recycled plastic for packaging.

A new measure associated with this funding agreement is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 84 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Recycling infrastructure(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 16.0 16.0 4.5 17.5 10.0 2.0 4.5 0.3 84.2

2022-23 7.0 12.8 6.5 16.5 9.0 2.0 1.0 3.2 84.6

2023-24 2.0 7.1 9.0 1.0 - 1.5 3.0 1.5 52.5

2024-25 - - - - - - 2.0 0.5 18.5

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 25.0 35.9 20.0 35.0 19.0 5.5 10.5 5.5 239.8

(a) State allocations have not yet been finalised, including for Food Waste for Healthy Soils Fund.

The Australian Government is investing in waste recovery and processing infrastructure to respond to the ban on the export of waste paper, plastic, glass and tyres, agreed by all Australian governments in March 2020. Funding has been provided towards a national solution for paper recycling, projects that address the regional and remote recycling challenges and help overcome the urban-regional divide, and projects that increase Australia’s waste processing capacity and support Australia’s circular economy. Funding will also be provided towards infrastructure to increase Australia’s capacity to process organic waste, including through composting.

Reducing regulatory burden and streamlining audit arrangements in the dairy sector $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 0.2 - - - - - - 0.2

2022-23 - 0.4 - - - - - - 0.4

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 0.5 - - - - - - 0.5

The Australian Government is working with Dairy Food Safety Victoria’s RegTech 2022 project ($0.5 million) to explore the opportunities for using data in food safety assurance.

Regional fund for wildlife and habitat bushfire recovery $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 10.5 6.6 1.5 - 1.2 - - - 19.9

2022-23 6.4 1.9 - - - - - - 8.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 16.9 8.5 1.5 - 1.2 - - - 28.2

The Australian Government is providing funding to provide strategic on-ground support for the most impacted native species, ecological communities and natural assets across 7 bushfire-affected regions.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 85

Support Plantation Establishment(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 10.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 25.0

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 30.0

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.0

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 85.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide matching grants to businesses in participating states wishing to establish new commercial plantations. The grants will be for establishment costs, such as soil preparation or pest exclusion, but cannot be used to purchase land or for replanting post-harvest.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Supporting farmers to maximise farm gate output through traceability and on-farm biosecurity(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 8.0

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.0

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 20.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined

The Australian Government will provide $20 million through grants administered and co-funded by states and territories to support activities that improve on-ground biosecurity and/or enhance pest and disease traceability within Australia.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 86 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Sustainable rural water use and infrastructure program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 210.5 47.9 16.5 - 28.8 - 20.4 - 324.0

2022-23 331.1 14.3 37.8 - 39.4 - 23.0 - 445.6

2023-24 243.8 - 13.2 - 65.9 - 20.0 - 342.9

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 785.4 62.2 67.5 - 134.0 - 63.4 - 1,112.4

The Australian Government funds several measures under this program to support delivery of the Murray-Darling Basin Plan, including water recovery investment for ‘bridging the gap’ to Sustainable Diversion Limits. The program also funds implementation of supply measures, support for communities throughout the Murray-Darling Basin and efforts to improve the health of wetlands and freshwater ecosystems.

Transforming Digital Environmental Assessments(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4.0

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4.7

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.8

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 10.5

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined

The Australian Government is building on previous work to implement programs, tools and mechanisms to harmonise and share biodiversity data among Commonwealth and state governments. Under this program, states will transform and share biodiversity data with the new National Biodiversity Data Repository that, among other activities, will support states to share environmental assessment processes and co-design environmental assessment portals.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 87

Water for Fodder Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - 0.6 - - - 0.6

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 0.6 - - - 0.6

The Australian Government is funding South Australia to produce 40 gigalitres of water from the Adelaide Desalination Plant at the actual marginal cost of production and to transfer water allocations from entitlements held by the state to irrigators in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin under the Water for Fodder Program.

Water for the Environment Special Account

The Water for the Environment Special Account (WESA) sets aside $1.8 billion of Commonwealth funding to pay for projects that enhance environmental outcomes listed in the Basin Plan 2012.

Implementation of constraints measures(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 46.6 6.6 - - 0.3 - - - 82.9

2022-23 21.5 1.6 - - 1.0 - - - 52.3

2023-24 27.5 ~ - - ~ - - - 50.6

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 95.6 8.2 - - 1.3 - - - 185.8

(a) State allocations may not sum to total due to unallocated funds.

The Australian Government is providing funding to New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia to ease or remove constraints in and along rivers of the southern Murray-Darling Basin that impede the delivery of water to environmental assets. Funding for constraints measures is also provided under the Sustainable Rural and Water Use and Infrastructure Program.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 88 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Off-farm Efficiency Program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 32.1 62.0 ~ - ~ - ~ - 268.5

2022-23 82.9 70.0 ~ - ~ - ~ - 807.0

2023-24 16.5 10.5 ~ - ~ - ~ - 276.5

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 131.5 142.5 ~ - ~ - ~ - 1,352.0

(a) State allocations may not sum to total due to unallocated funds.

The Australian Government will provide funding for state-led efficiency measures in the Murray-Darling Basin under the Water for the Environment Special Account. This will improve the efficiency of water delivery infrastructure and increase the volume of environmental water in the Murray-Darling Basin, leading to improved river health, agricultural activity and generating benefits for the local and regional communities.

Water Efficiency Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - 0.3 - 0.3

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - 0.3 - 0.3

The Australian Government’s new focus on Off-farm efficiency projects means the remaining funding for the Water Efficiency Program is now available under the WESA: Off-farm Efficiency Program. Any successful legacy applications made under the now closed Water Efficiency Program will remain funded through this program, while any new state-led proposals will be considered through the Off-farm Efficiency Program.

World Heritage Sites $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.8 - 3.1 0.4 0.1 5.1 - - 9.5

2022-23 0.8 - 3.1 0.4 0.1 5.1 - - 9.5

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1.6 - 6.2 0.8 0.2 10.2 - - 19.0

The Australian Government provides funding to assist addressing critical threats such as feral animals and weeds, and changed fire regimes, to conserve and restore the biodiversity of World Heritage sites, and for Executive Officers and Advisory Committees who support the provision of advice to government on the protection of World Heritage sites.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 89

Yellow crazy ant control $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 3.0 - - - - - 3.0

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 3.0 - - - - - 3.0

The Australian Government will provide funding to ensure a more concerted approach to yellow crazy ant control activities in and adjacent to the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 90 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Contingent payments

Contingent payments arise where the Australian Government has committed to provide compensation when an event occurs or has otherwise guaranteed a state’s financial position. Payments to the states will only arise if the relevant event occurs.

Table 2.10: Contingent payments to the states $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements 1,719.3 41.6 6.5 0.8 -

Hepatitis C settlement fund 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

Total 1,719.4 41.7 6.6 0.8 0.1

Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements - expense estimates $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 1,405.6 1.6 281.3 30.1 0.7 0.1 - - 1,719.3

2022-23 27.3 1.7 10.5 1.5 0.5 .. - - 41.6

2023-24 5.9 .. 0.1 0.4 .. - - - 6.5

2024-25 0.8 - - - - - - - 0.8

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 1,439.6 3.3 291.9 32.0 1.2 0.1 - - 1,768.1

The Australian Government provides funding under the Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DRFA) to assist the states in relief and recovery efforts following natural disasters. The Government recognises a liability equal to the present value of future payments expected to be made to the states under the DRFA. The liability is based on estimated data provided by the states. It includes both known and future estimated expenditure for relief and recovery measures prior to states submitting a claim to the Australian Government.

Current estimates for the DRFA are based on the information available at the time of preparation. This includes initial assistance to the states in response to the recent floods in parts of New South Wales and Queensland under Category D of the DRFA. These estimates do not include other as yet unquantifiable support in relation to these events that will be provided through the DRFA (including funding that has been provisioned for in the aggregate budget estimates). Further information on the Australian Government’s response to the floods can be found in Budget Paper No. 1, Budget Strategy and Outlook 2022-23, Statement 3: Fiscal Strategy and Outlook.

Estimates of the cost of a disaster and the timing of expenditure are subject to change. The total cost of relief and recovery from these events may not be completely realised for some years. Estimates of all natural disasters are regularly reviewed and revised by the states as new information becomes available, and this, or the occurrence of future natural disasters, can significantly affect the estimated DRFA liability and payments.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 91

More information is available in Budget Paper No. 1, Budget Strategy and Outlook 2022-23, Statement 8: Statement of Risks.

Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements - cash estimates $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 364.1 48.0 484.5 176.8 26.4 6.9 2.5 20.9 1,130.1

2022-23 1,505.5 118.4 730.8 77.7 34.7 1.6 - - 2,468.7

2023-24 365.6 1.9 6.8 30.4 1.0 .. - - 405.6

2024-25 52.9 - - - - - - - 52.9

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 2,288.1 168.3 1,222.1 284.9 62.0 8.4 2.5 20.9 4,057.2

Estimated cash payments for the DRFA illustrate when the Australian Government expects to reimburse the states for costs incurred in relation to past disasters.

A new measure associated with this funding agreement is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Hepatitis C settlement fund(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.1

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.1

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.1

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.1

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.1

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0.5

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is contributing to out of court settlement costs for eligible people who contracted Hepatitis C as a result of blood transfusions in Australia between 1985 and 1991.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 92 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Other payments

The Australian Government makes payments to the states to support a range of other services, as detailed in Table 2.11.

Table 2.11: Payments to support other state services(a) $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

Additional Funding for Legal Aid

Commissions to Support Court Reform 8.3 8.3 - - -

Commonwealth High Risk Terrorist Offender

Regime 11.7 10.1 - - -

Countering Violent Extremism initiatives

High Risk Extremist De-radicalisation Program 1.6 3.3 3.3 3.3 -

Living Safe Together Intervention Program 2.8 5.6 5.6 5.6 -

Family law information sharing 2.8 6.4 6.4 6.4 -

Financial assistance for police officers 2.2 0.4 - - -

Financial assistance to local governments 3,505.0 704.4 2,927.3 3,048.2 3,169.5 Gas Well Trials 1.3 14.3 - - -

Indigenous Tourism Fund 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 -

Legal assistance for floods in Qld and NSW 1.4 4.1 - - -

National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020-25

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Legal Services 86.7 88.2 89.6 91.0 -

Community legal centres 55.9 56.7 57.6 58.6 -

Coronial inquiries and expensive and

complex cases 1.3 2.6 2.7 2.7 -

Domestic Violence Units and Health

Justice Partnerships 14.3 14.5 14.7 14.9 -

Family advocacy and support services 10.0 27.1 27.7 28.3 -

Frontline support to address workplace

sexual harassment 10.8 10.9 11.0 11.2 -

Increased legal assistance funding

for vulnerable women 31.6 32.0 32.5 32.9 -

Justice Policy Partnership 0.7 0.7 0.7 - -

Legal aid commissions 237.8 249.4 253.3 257.4 -

Legal assistance family law pilot program 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.6 -

State and territory legal assistance

administration 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.9 -

Supporting increased child sexual

abuse prosecutions 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 -

Supporting people with mental health

conditions access the justice system 14.0 14.5 14.5 14.5 -

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 93

Table 2.11: Payments to support other state services(a) (continued) $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

National Partnership payments

National Tourism Icons Package 16.7 3.3 - - -

North Bowen Pipeline Feasibility Study 2.5 2.5 - - -

North Queensland Strata Title Inspection

Scheme - 2.9 - - -

Optimise and Discover Program - 15.0 15.0 - -

Preventing Harm in Australian Prisons and

Other Places of Detention (OPCAT) nfp nfp - - -

Provision of fire services 24.2 nfp nfp nfp nfp

Sinking fund on state debt .. .. .. .. ..

Small business regulatory reform 218.8 - - - -

Specialised and Trauma-Informed Legal

Services for Victim-Survivors of

Sexual Assault - - 2.6 2.6 2.6

Supplementary funding to South Australia for

local roads 20.0 20.0 - - -

Support for businesses impacted by

COVID-19 7,139.6 - - - -

Victorian Energy Compare IT Infrastructure

Build for Consumer Data Right 1.0 0.9 - - -

Total 11,441.7 1,316.7 3,483.4 3,592.1 3,172.1

(a) Total figures include items not for publication.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 94 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Additional funding for Legal Aid Commissions to support court reform(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ ~ 8.3

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ ~ 8.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ ~ 16.5

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing $16.5 million over two years from 2021-22 for legal aid commissions to improve their capacity to support the implementation of, and transition to, a new case management approach in the Federal Circuit and Family Court of Australia. The funding will support the delivery of timely and effective family law services by legal aid commissions in response to increased demand arising from the new approach to case management.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Commonwealth High Risk Terrorist Offender Regime(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.6 6.1 - - - - - - 11.7

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 10.1

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 5.6 6.1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 21.8

(a) State allocations for 2022-23 have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing $21.8 million to the states to assist in protecting the Australian community from the threat posed by convicted high risk terrorist offenders. The states will provide support with detention and supervision orders and assist with assessment of ongoing risks.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 95

Countering Violent Extremism initiatives

The Australian Government is providing funding to the states to strengthen national efforts to countering violent extremism.

High Risk Extremist De-radicalisation Program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1.6

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3.3

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3.3

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3.3

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 11.5

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing $11.5 million over four years to the to support states to de-radicalise high risk violent extremists in their custody through a new High Risk Extremist De-radicalisation Program.

Living Safe Together Intervention Program $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.2 2.8

2022-23 1.1 1.1 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 5.6

2023-24 1.1 1.1 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 5.6

2024-25 1.1 1.1 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 5.6

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 3.9 3.9 2.6 2.6 2.6 1.3 1.3 1.3 19.6

The Australian Government is providing an additional $19.6 million to the states to assist in reducing the risk of young Australians becoming radicalised through an expansion of the existing Living Safe Together Intervention Program.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 96 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Family law information sharing(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 0.8 0.3 0.7 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 - 2.8

2022-23 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.4

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.4

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6.4

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 0.8 0.3 0.7 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 ~ 22.0

(a) State allocations from 2022-23 to 2024-25 have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is supporting the placement of state child protection and policing officials in the family law courts across Australia. These co-located officials are facilitating information sharing between the family law, child protection and family violence systems. They are also fostering a more coordinated response to safety issues, to promote the safety and wellbeing of families and children.

Financial assistance for police officers $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 2.2 - - - - - - - 2.2

2022-23 0.4 - - - - - - - 0.4

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 2.5 - - - - - - - 2.5

The Australian Government is providing transitional funding for the equal sharing of the costs of reimbursing New South Wales police officers who incur an additional tax liability from making voluntary superannuation contributions that exceed the statutory cap on concessional contributions. Funding covers liabilities incurred from 2016-17 to 2019-20 with reimbursements made in arrears over a five-year period. The funding will also contribute to the cost-sharing of any fringe benefits tax that results from reimbursing police officers in these situations.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 97

Financial assistance to local governments $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22

General purpose assistance 771.4 627.7 492.9 253.1 167.4 51.2 40.8 23.3 2,427.7

Local road component 312.5 222.1 201.8 164.7 59.2 57.1 34.5 25.2 1,077.3

Total financial assistance to

local governments 1,084.0 849.8 694.7 417.8 226.6 108.2 75.3 48.5 3,505.0

2022-23

General purpose assistance 154.9 125.9 99.3 51.0 33.7 10.3 8.2 4.7 487.9

Local road component 62.8 44.6 40.6 33.1 11.9 11.5 6.9 5.1 216.5

Total financial assistance to

local governments 217.7 170.6 139.9 84.1 45.6 21.8 15.1 9.8 704.4

2023-24

General purpose assistance 641.2 523.3 414.7 212.4 139.9 42.7 34.0 19.5 2,027.6

Local road component 261.0 185.5 168.6 137.6 49.4 47.7 28.8 21.1 899.7

Total financial assistance to

local governments 902.2 708.8 583.2 350.0 189.3 90.4 62.8 40.5 2,927.3

2024-25

General purpose assistance 665.8 546.9 432.5 221.4 145.1 44.3 35.3 20.1 2,111.3

Local road component 271.8 193.1 175.5 143.2 51.5 49.6 30.0 21.9 936.9

Total financial assistance to

local governments 937.6 740.0 608.0 364.6 196.6 93.9 65.3 42.1 3,048.2

2025-26

General purpose assistance 690.9 571.4 449.7 230.1 150.1 45.8 36.7 20.8 2,195.4

Local road component 282.6 200.8 182.5 148.9 53.5 51.6 31.2 22.8 974.2

Total financial assistance to

local governments 973.5 772.2 632.2 379.1 203.6 97.4 67.9 43.6 3,169.5

This program provides untied financial contributions to local governments to be spent according to local priorities. Funding of $2.1 billion has been brought forward from 2022-23 to be paid in 2021-22. This cash injection will give councils immediate access to funds to help manage the cumulative impacts of floods and COVID-19 pandemic.

The Financial Assistance Grant program consists of two components: a general purpose component and a local road component. The general purpose component is the larger component and is distributed between the states on a per capita basis, while the local road component is distributed between the states according to fixed historical shares.

Funding under the Financial Assistance Grant program is paid through state governments to local governments. State grants commissions determine the intrastate distribution of the grants between local governments. Both funding components are untied and can be spent according to each local government’s own priorities.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 98 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Gas Well Trials $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 1.3 - - - - - 1.3

2022-23 - - 14.3 - - - - - 14.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 15.6 - - - - - 15.6

The Australian Government is providing $15.6 million to the Queensland Government to support the delivery of a Gas Well Trials initiative in the North Bowen and Galilee basins. The initiative aims to improve gas recovery and lower production costs through a better understand of the regions’ geotechnical properties and by trialling innovative gas drilling and well completion techniques.

Indigenous Tourism Fund $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - 4.3 4.3

2022-23 - - - - - - - 4.3 4.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - 4.3 4.3

2024-25 - - - - - - - 4.3 4.3

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - - - - 17.0 17.0

The Australian Government is providing funding to co-invest with the States and Territories on strategic projects that increase the supply of Indigenous tourism experiences and/or create supply chain opportunities for Indigenous tourism businesses. This program uses the Indigenous Tourism Fund to leverage and co-invest in significant Indigenous tourism projects that align with state and territory government strategic priorities, and deliver long-term benefits for the Indigenous tourism sector in each state and territory.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 99

Legal assistance for floods in Qld and NSW(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 ~ - ~ - - - - - 1.4

2022-23 ~ - ~ - - - - - 4.1

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total ~ - ~ - - - - - 5.4

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government is providing $5.4 million over two years from 2021-22 for additional legal assistance services to support relief and recovery following the February and March 2022 floods in New South Wales and Queensland. The funding will enable increased delivery of legal assistance services to individuals, small businesses, and primary producers. The additional funding will be delivered to the affected states for distribution to existing legal assistance providers operating within affected communities.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020-25(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 128.6 89.8 101.7 58.8 38.7 15.8 10.4 29.3 473.2

2022-23 136.2 96.1 108.3 60.8 39.6 16.5 10.7 30.5 506.6

2023-24 138.5 97.6 110.1 61.6 40.2 16.8 10.8 30.9 514.5

2024-25 140.6 99.1 111.8 62.3 40.7 17.0 10.9 31.2 521.7

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 543.9 382.5 432.0 243.6 159.2 66.1 42.7 121.9 2,016.0

(a) Totals from 2022-23 to 2024-25 include unallocated funding.

From 1 July 2020 and over five years, the National Legal Assistance Partnership 2020-25 provides funding to all states for legal assistance services delivered by legal aid commissions, community legal centres and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services. Through the 2022-23 Budget, the Australian Government will provide increased funding for legal aid commissions to raise their capacity to meet increased demand for representation services resulting from the extension and expansion of the Lighthouse Project in the Federal Circuit and Family Court of Australia.

New measures associated with this item are listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 100 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

National Tourism Icons Package $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 0.6 12.5 - 3.6 - - 16.7

2022-23 - - 0.7 - - 2.6 - - 3.3

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 1.2 12.5 - 6.2 - - 19.9

The National Tourism Icons Package was announced in the 2019-20 Budget to enhance iconic tourist attractions. The projects will provide a catalyst for developing tourism within each region, create jobs and help to diversify local economies. Projects are the Wangetti Trail in Queensland, Rottnest Island in Western Australia and upgrading tourist facilities at Freycinet in Tasmania.

North Bowen pipeline feasibility study $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - 2.5 - - - - - 2.5

2022-23 - - 2.5 - - - - - 2.5

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 5.0 - - - - - 5.0

The Australian Government is providing a $5 million co-contribution to collaborate with the Queensland Government on a series pipeline feasibility studies. The studies will explore the feasibility of a new pipeline to link the north Bowen Basin to the east coast gas market and other centres of gas demand.

North Queensland strata title inspection scheme $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - 2.9 - - - - - 2.9

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - 2.9 - - - - - 2.9

This is a continuing scheme that provides bodies corporate in North Queensland with information about the existing resilience of their properties and strategies to improve that resilience if needed. The Queensland Government will continue to implement and administer the scheme.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 101

Optimise and discover program(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - ~ - ~ - - - 15.0

2023-24 - - ~ - ~ - - - 15.0

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - ~ - ~ - - - 30.0

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide $30 million in competitive grant funding to companies in the Cooper and Adavale basins, located across South Australia and Queensland. Grant funding will be delivered in partnership with the Queensland and South Australian governments. The program will support the development of a diverse portfolio of oil and gas projects in the basins.

Preventing harm in Australian prisons and other places of detention (OPCAT) (a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

2022-23 nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

(a) Funding amounts are not published as negotiations are yet to be finalised.

The Australian Government will provide funding over two years to states and territories to support implementation of the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (OPCAT) in each jurisdiction. OPCAT establishes mechanisms to prevent mistreatment of people deprived of their liberty, and creates a framework for continuously improving oversight of places of detention.

Provision of fire services(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 5.3 3.7 3.6 1.7 1.3 0.4 5.7 2.4 24.2

2022-23 nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

2023-24 nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

2024-25 nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

2025-26 nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp nfp

Total 5.3 3.7 3.6 1.7 1.3 0.4 5.7 2.4 24.2

(a) Funding amounts are not published from 2022-23 to 2025-26 as negotiations are yet to be finalised.

The Australian Government is contributing to the provision of standard fire services to Australian Government owned property in the states and territories.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 102 | Part 2: Payments for specific purposes

Sinking fund on state debt $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 .. .. - - - - - - ..

2022-23 .. .. - - - - - - ..

2023-24 .. .. - - - - - - ..

2024-25 .. .. - - - - - - ..

2025-26 .. .. - - - - - - ..

Total .. .. - - - - - - ..

The Australian Government is contributing to the Debt Retirement Reserve Trust Account on behalf of New South Wales and Victoria in accordance with the Financial Agreement Act 1994. Monies standing to the credit of the account are applied to repurchase state debt that is governed by this legislation.

Small business regulatory reform $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 56.9 59.6 57.3 20.4 19.8 4.7 - 0.2 218.8

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 56.9 59.6 57.3 20.4 19.8 4.7 - 0.2 218.8

The Australian Government is providing funding to deliver reforms that drive Australia’s economic performance, including reforms that reduce the regulatory burden on small businesses.

Specialised and trauma-informed legal services for victim-survivors of sexual assault(a) $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - - - - - -

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2.6

2024-25 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2.6

2025-26 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 2.6

Total ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7.7

(a) State allocations have not yet been determined.

The Australian Government will provide funding over three years from 2023-24 to pilot a new service model in three locations across Australia to provide victim-survivors of sexual assault with greater access to specialised and trauma-informed legal support and guidance in navigating the criminal justice system.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 2: Payments for specific purposes | Page 103

Supplementary funding to South Australia for local roads $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - - - - 20.0 - - - 20.0

2022-23 - - - - 20.0 - - - 20.0

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - - - - 40.0 - - - 40.0

The Australian Government is providing supplementary funding to South Australia for local roads. South Australia will receive $20 million in each of 2021-22 and 2022-23 for this purpose.

Support for businesses impacted by COVID-19 $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 3,455.0 3,187.4 225.1 54.7 14.1 36.5 164.8 2.0 7,139.6

2022-23 - - - - - - - - -

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total 3,455.0 3,187.4 225.1 54.7 14.1 36.5 164.8 2.0 7,139.6

The Australian Government is providing $7.1 billion in 2021-22 for COVID-19 Business Support Payments to assist businesses in coping with the effects of extended lockdowns and border closures as a result of COVID-19. Business Support Payments have been administered by all state and territory governments with the Australian Government generally contributing 50 per cent of the costs. In total, $14.4 billion is expected to be paid out in jointly-funded Business Support Payments in all states and territories.

A new measure associated with this item is listed in Table 1.4 and described in more detail in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Victorian energy compare IT infrastructure build for Consumer Data Right $million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total

2021-22 - 1.0 - - - - - - 1.0

2022-23 - 0.9 - - - - - - 0.9

2023-24 - - - - - - - - -

2024-25 - - - - - - - - -

2025-26 - - - - - - - - -

Total - 1.8 - - - - - - 1.8

The Australian Government is providing $1.8 million over two years from 2021-22 to make Victorian energy reference data available through the Consumer Data Right.

Part 3: General revenue assistance | Page 105

Part 3: General revenue assistance

Overview

General revenue assistance is provided to the states, without conditions, to spend according to their own budget priorities. In 2022-23, the states are expected to receive $84.8 billion from the Australian Government in total general revenue assistance, which is estimated to represent 13 per cent of total Australian Government expenditure in that year. The main form of general revenue assistance is the GST entitlement which in 2022-23 is estimated to be $80 billion.

The Australian Government’s reform of horizontal fiscal equalisation (HFE) and integrity measures have injected significant additional funds into the GST pool for the states. Further, the Australian Government’s focus on supporting the recovery from COVID-19, restoring business and consumer confidence and getting Australians back into jobs has, and will continue to help grow GST collections in the years to come. Total GST-related payments to the states (GST entitlements plus HFE transition payments and transitional GST top-ups) are estimated to increase every year over the forward estimates and reach $93.6 billion by 2025-26. This represents a 95 per cent increase on the states’ GST payments since 2012-13, and a 284 per cent increase since the GST was introduced in 2000-01.

2022-23 is the second year in the 6-year transition to the updated GST distribution system, which will ensure that no state will have a per capita GST share lower than the fiscally stronger of New South Wales or Victoria. It is also the first year that the GST relativity floor of 0.7 comes into effect. During this transition, the

Australian Government has guaranteed, through legislation, that each state will not receive less than they would have under the previous GST distribution system using, if necessary, HFE transition payments.

Estimated general revenue assistance provided to the states by the

Australian Government is shown in Table 3.1. Table 1.1 in Part 1 shows a breakdown by state.

Table 3.1: General revenue assistance $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

GST entitlement 73,310.0 80,004.8 83,533.7 87,504.1 91,306.0

Transitional GST top-up payments 2,115.2 - - - -

HFE transition payments(a) 133.2 3,880.1 4,074.9 4,480.7 2,335.2

Other general revenue assistance(b) 936.2 901.9 796.2 682.5 516.7

Total 76,494.7 84,786.8 88,404.8 92,667.3 94,157.9

(a) Estimates of the HFE transition payments for 2023-24 and later years are based upon the 2022-23 GST relativities and adjusted to take into account the transition to the new HFE system. The 2025-26 HFE transition payment is assumed to be half of that implied using the 2022-23 relativities.

(b) More detail about other general revenue assistance payments is provided in Table 3.7.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 106 | Part 3: General revenue assistance

GST payments

Under the Federal Financial Relations Act 2009, the states are entitled to receive payments from the Australian Government equivalent to the revenue raised from the GST in any given financial year, subject to some minor adjustments. From 2021-22, the states’ GST entitlements are boosted each year by additional Australian Government funding as discussed below.

The Australian Government makes monthly payments (advances) to the states throughout the year based on GST estimates for that year. Estimates of the GST are used as the actual amount of GST revenue for the financial year is unknown until after the end of the financial year. Once the amount of GST revenue is known, the Treasurer makes a determination of the GST entitlement for that year. A balancing adjustment is made to each state’s payments to ensure they receive the GST to which they are entitled. These balancing adjustments (referred to as the ‘prior year balancing adjustment’) are made in the following financial year.

Calculating the GST payments

Adjustments and additions are made to GST revenue to calculate the amount of GST paid to the states in any given year. In particular, adjustments are made to move from GST revenue (an accrual concept) to GST (cash) receipts as GST receipts are the basis for the GST paid to the states.

• Some GST revenue accrued during a financial year is not remitted to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) by 30 June of that year because it is not due to be paid until Business Activity Statements (BAS) are lodged in the following financial year. For taxpayers other than Australian Government agencies, this accrued amount is included in GST revenue but not in GST receipts.

• Penalties owed to the ATO, other than general interest charge (GIC) penalties, are not included in the GST to be paid to the states as defined in the Federal Financial Relations Act 2009.

• Some GST collected by Australian Government agencies is not remitted to the ATO by 30 June in each financial year because it is not due to be paid until the next BAS is lodged. This amount is included in Australian Government receipts but is not included in GST payments to the states until it is remitted to the ATO.

• From 2021-22, the Australian Government is boosting the states’ GST entitlement each year with additional funding. From 2021-22, the Australian Government is injecting $600 million annually into the GST pool, which will be followed by a further $250 million annually from 2024-25. Each year, these amounts will grow in line with the underlying growth of the GST and be distributed to the states in the same way as GST revenue.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 3: General revenue assistance | Page 107

In 2020-21, the states’ GST entitlement was $3.3 billion higher than the advances paid during that year. A prior year balancing adjustment has been made to states’ GST payments in 2021-22 to reflect this.

Table 3.2 reconciles GST revenue, GST entitlement and GST payments to the states.

Table 3.2: Reconciling GST revenue, GST entitlement and GST payments to the states $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

GST revenue 76,409 82,460 85,920 89,880 93,960

less Change in GST receivables 3,627 3,028 2,999 3,277 3,598

GST receipts 72,782 79,432 82,921 86,603 90,362

less Non-GIC penalties collected 70 80 70 60 60

less GST collected by Commonwealth

agencies but not yet remitted to

the ATO 2 2 1 3 2

plus GST pool boost 600 655 684 964 1,006

GST entitlement 73,310 80,005 83,534 87,504 91,306

plus Prior year balancing adjustment 3,312

GST payments to the States(a) 76,622 80,005 83,534 87,504 91,306

(a) These GST payment estimates do not take into account the ATO’s GST administration costs, which will be deducted from GST payments to the states throughout the year on a monthly basis. They also do not take into account the transitional GST top-up payments and HFE transition payments.

Table 3.3 reconciles the GST entitlement estimates since the 2021-22 Budget and the 2021-22 Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook (MYEFO). The reconciliation accounts for policy decisions and parameter and other variations. The GST entitlement in 2022-23 has been revised up by $2.6 billion since the 2021-22 MYEFO.

Table 3.3: Reconciliation of the GST entitlement estimates since the 2021-22 Budget and 2021-22 MYEFO $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25

GST entitlement at 2021-22 Budget 72,530 75,847 79,215 83,327

Changes between 2021-22 Budget and MYEFO

Effect of policy decisions 9 122 128 117

Effect of parameter and other variations 531 1,446 905 1,430

Total variations 540 1,568 1,034 1,548

GST entitlement at 2021-22 MYEFO 73,070 77,416 80,249 84,875

Changes between 2021-22 MYEFO and 2022-23 Budget

Effect of policy decisions -68 -177 69 35

Effect of parameter and other variations 308 2,766 3,216 2,595

Total variations 240 2,589 3,285 2,629

GST entitlement at 2022-23 Budget 73,310 80,005 83,534 87,504

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 108 | Part 3: General revenue assistance

The states’ GST entitlement is expected to reach $91.3 billion by 2025-26 - a 90 per cent increase from $48.1 billion in 2012-13. Since the 2021-22 MYEFO, GST receipts have been revised by $240 million in 2021-22 and by $8.7 billion across the 4 years to 2024-25. Increases in GST receipts largely reflect upgrades to consumption subject to GST and private dwelling investment. Increases in employment and wages are expected to flow through to higher nominal consumption, while private dwelling investment is partly driven by near-term supply chain shortages driving up prices in the construction sector.

The states’ GST entitlement is also supported by a range of decisions taken by the Australian Government in recent years. These policies focus on ensuring that the GST base adapts to the increasingly digital modern economy, and further supporting the integrity of the GST system by increasing funding for the ATO’s compliance activities.

Specific policy decisions taken since the 2021-22 MYEFO that affect the GST entitlement are shown in Table 3.4. These decisions are estimated to decrease the amount of the GST entitlement by $34 million over the 4 years to 2025-26.

Table 3.4: Policy decisions since the 2021-22 MYEFO that affect the GST entitlement $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Addressing Cost of Living Pressures -

temporary reduction in fuel excise -65.0 -130.0 - - -

Australia-UK Free Trade Agreement - increasing market

access opportunities and strengthening ties

between our two countries - .. 10.0 25.0 35.0

Changes To Visa Rules - supplementing Australia's

workforce during the recovery .. 5.0 10.0 5.0 *

Indirect Tax Concession Scheme - diplomatic and

consular concessions -2.6 -1.5 -1.5 -0.4 -0.4

Humanitarian Program 2022-23 and Update on

Afghan Arrivals - .. .. 5.0 5.0

Migration Program - 2022-23 planning levels - .. .. .. ..

Varying the GDP uplift factor for tax instalments - -50.0 50.0 - -

Total -67.6 -176.5 68.5 34.6 39.6

Detailed information on specific policy decisions taken since the 2021-22 MYEFO is included in Budget Paper No. 2, Budget Measures 2022-23.

Distribution of the GST among the states

The Australian Government distributes the GST among the states based on the GST revenue sharing relativities recommended by the Commonwealth Grants Commission (the CGC).

The detailed calculation for the distribution of the GST entitlement in 2022-23 is shown in Table 3.5. This method of calculation is prescribed in the Federal Financial Relations Act 2009. At the time of the 2022-23 Budget, the Treasurer had not yet made a

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 3: General revenue assistance | Page 109

determination of the 2022-23 GST revenue sharing relativities. The GST relativities in Table 3.5 use those contained in the CGC’s 2022 Update report.

Table 3.5: Calculation of GST entitlements Estimated Adjusted Share of Share of

31 December GST population adjusted GST pool

population relativities (1) x (2) population $million

2022-23 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

NSW 8,242,310 0.95065 7,835,552 30.1% 24,060.6

VIC 6,726,888 0.85861 5,775,773 22.2% 17,735.6

QLD 5,330,114 1.03377 5,510,112 21.1% 16,919.9

WA 2,730,176 0.70000 1,911,123 7.3% 5,868.5

SA 1,797,731 1.28411 2,308,484 8.9% 7,088.7

TAS 549,138 1.85360 1,017,882 3.9% 3,125.6

ACT 437,038 1.09250 477,464 1.8% 1,466.1

NT 250,086 4.86988 1,217,889 4.7% 3,739.8

Total 26,063,481 na 26,054,280 100% 80,004.8

In 2018, the Australian Government reformed the system of HFE to provide a fairer and more sustainable way to distribute the GST among the states. From 2021-22, the system began its transition to a more stable and predictable equalisation standard that will reduce volatility in states’ GST payments.

To support the states’ transition to the new system, the Australian Government has provided an additional $5.2 billion in transitional GST top-up payments over the 3 years to 2021-22 to ensure that no state has an effective GST relativity below 0.7 or 4.66024 for the Northern Territory. At the time of 2018 reforms, it was estimated that $1.8 billion in top-up payments would be required over those 3 years.

From 2022-23, the new HFE system will include a relativity floor of 0.7, permanently increasing to 0.75 in 2024-25. Further, the Australian Government has guaranteed, through legislation, that each state will receive at least the cumulative better of the old or the new HFE system for the 6 years from 2021-22 to 2026-27. The HFE transition payments associated with this guarantee are outlined in Table 3.1.

The CGC does not forecast GST sharing relativities beyond the budget year. The distribution of GST among the states and any resulting transitional payments for 2023-24 and 2024-25 are calculated based on a technical assumption that uses the 2022-23 relativities as the starting point, which are then adjusted to reflect the transition to the updated distribution system.

In 2025-26, this assumption is changed on the basis that relativities will begin to revert toward historical averages by that year (including because financial years with lower commodity prices, which are assumed to fall from their current elevated levels, will by then be incorporated in the CGC’s relativity calculations). The resulting transitional payment for 2025-26 is assumed to be half that of what would be expected from using

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 110 | Part 3: General revenue assistance

the 2022-23 relativities. The estimates (shown in Table 3.1) do not reflect any attempt to project future GST relativities or GST entitlements.

The Government is expected to provide an estimated $14.9 billion in HFE transition payments from 2021-22 to 2025-26 to support the transition to the new HFE system.

GST administration

States compensate the Australian Government for the costs incurred by the ATO for administering the GST including costs incurred by the Department of Home Affairs. In practice, this is achieved by the Australian Government reducing the monthly GST payments to the states by the GST administration costs.

The GST administration budget for the ATO is estimated to be $679.1 million for 2022-23, as shown in Table 3.6.

Table 3.6: Reconciliation of the GST administration budget $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Administration budget at 2021-22 Budget (a) 682.9 679.1 483.9 484.4 na

Total variations from 2021-22 Budget

to 2021-22 MYEFO -7.2 -1.9 -1.5 -1.6 na

Administration budget at 2021-22 MYEFO 675.7 677.2 482.4 482.7 na

Changes from 2021-22 MYEFO

to 2022-23 Budget

Parameter variations - 1.9 1.3 1.3 1.4

Other variations - - - - -

Total variations - 1.9 1.3 1.3 1.4

Administration budget at 2022-23 Budget 675.7 679.1 483.7 484.0 487.0

less Prior year adjustment (b) -83.3 - - - -

equals State government payments 592.4 679.1 483.7 484.0 487.0

(a) Decreases in estimates from 2023-2024 reflect the end of GST Compliance Program announced at the 2018-19 MYEFO. (b) The prior year adjustment relates to the ATO’s diversion of resources to support COVID-19 stimulus work.

Other general revenue assistance

Like GST, other general revenue assistance is provided to the states, without conditions, to spend according to their own budget priorities.

Table 3.7: Other general revenue assistance $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

ACT municipal services 41.7 42.4 43.0 43.7 44.4

Compensation for reduced royalties 34.1 42.7 39.1 29.8 21.5

Royalty payments 860.4 816.8 714.1 609.0 450.8

Total other general revenue assistance 936.2 901.9 796.2 682.5 516.7

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Part 3: General revenue assistance | Page 111

Australian Capital Territory municipal services

The Australian Government provides general revenue assistance to the Australian Capital Territory to assist in meeting the additional municipal costs that arise from Canberra’s role as the national capital. The payments also compensate the Australian Capital Territory for additional costs resulting from the national capital planning influences on the provision of water and sewerage services.

Compensation for reduced royalties

The Australian Government provides general revenue assistance to compensate Western Australia for the loss of royalty revenue resulting from the removal of the exemption of condensate from crude oil excise in the 2009-10 Budget.

Royalty payments

Western Australia

The Australian Government provides general revenue assistance to Western Australia from royalties collected under the Offshore Petroleum (Royalty) Act 2006 in respect of the North West Shelf oil and gas project off the coast of Western Australia. The Australian Government collects these royalties because it has jurisdiction over offshore areas.

Royalties are shared between the Australian Government (approximately one third) and Western Australia (approximately two thirds). These revenue sharing arrangements are set out in the Offshore Petroleum and Greenhouse Gas Storage Act 2006.

Northern Territory

The Australian Government provides general revenue assistance to the Northern Territory in lieu of royalties on uranium mining in the Ranger Project Area, due to the Australian Government’s ownership of uranium in the Northern Territory.

Payments are made at a royalty rate of 1.25 per cent of the net proceeds of sales under a continuing agreement established under the 1978 Memorandum of Understanding between the Australian Government and the Northern Territory.

Mirror tax arrangements

The Australian Government introduced mirror tax arrangements in 1998 to ensure that the states were not financially disadvantaged by the High Court decision in Allders International Pty Ltd v Commissioner of State Revenue (Victoria), which invalidated state taxes on Commonwealth places. These arrangements mirror certain state taxes, including payroll taxes, land taxes and stamp duties, with respect to Commonwealth places. The states collect these mirror taxes on behalf of the Australian Government and bear the administrative costs of collection.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 112 | Part 3: General revenue assistance

All mirror tax revenues are credited to the Australian Government and simultaneously appropriated to the states with no net impact on the Australian Government’s budget position as shown in Table 3.8.

Table 3.8: Mirror taxes accrued on behalf of the states $million 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Mirror taxes 621.5 690.9 726.9 759.1 795.7

less Transfers to state governments 621.5 690.9 726.9 759.1 795.7

Australian Government budget impact - - - - -

Appendix A: Parameters and further information | Page 113

Appendix A: Parameters and further information This appendix provides information on the parameters used in producing this Budget Paper.

Budget Paper No. 1, Budget Strategy and Outlook 2022-23, Statement 2: Economic Outlook (BS2), provides information on the forecasting approach used in the 2022-23 Budget.

Population Population data are used to distribute funding between the states and in the calculation of annual growth factors. The population projections are produced by the Treasury Centre for Population (the Centre).

Estimates of state populations

State population projections are constructed using the latest demographic data and incorporate assumptions regarding fertility, mortality, net overseas migration and net interstate migration.

The Centre estimates population and components of change on a financial year basis. Population for the mid-point of the financial year (31 December, Table A.1) is the simple average of the population at the beginning and end of the financial year (Table A.2).

Table A.1: Population by state, at 31 December million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total(a) Australia

2021 8.199 6.664 5.256 2.696 1.781 0.544 0.434 0.248 25.821 25.826

2022 8.242 6.727 5.330 2.730 1.798 0.549 0.437 0.250 26.063 26.068

2023 8.322 6.835 5.405 2.767 1.814 0.554 0.441 0.252 26.389 26.394

2024 8.415 6.960 5.477 2.803 1.828 0.558 0.447 0.253 26.742 26.747

2025 8.511 7.088 5.551 2.839 1.844 0.562 0.453 0.255 27.104 27.109

(a) ‘Total’ is the sum of the states and territories shown, and excludes Jervis Bay Territory, Christmas Island, the Cocos (Keeling) Islands and Norfolk Island.

Table A.2: Population by state, at 30 June million NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT Total(a) Australia

2020-21 8.189 6.649 5.221 2.682 1.773 0.541 0.432 0.246 25.735 25.739

2021-22 8.209 6.679 5.290 2.711 1.789 0.547 0.435 0.249 25.908 25.913

2022-23 8.276 6.775 5.370 2.749 1.807 0.552 0.439 0.251 26.219 26.223

2023-24 8.367 6.896 5.440 2.785 1.821 0.556 0.443 0.252 26.560 26.565

2024-25 8.463 7.024 5.514 2.821 1.836 0.560 0.450 0.254 26.923 26.928

2025-26 8.559 7.152 5.588 2.857 1.852 0.565 0.456 0.256 27.284 27.289

(a) ‘Total’ is the sum of the states and territories shown, and excludes Jervis Bay Territory, Christmas Island, the Cocos (Keeling) Islands and Norfolk Island.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 114 | Appendix A: Parameters and further information

Fertility

Assumptions about the fertility rate are based on analysis undertaken and commissioned by the Centre (Table A.3). The total fertility rate is assumed to be 1.66 babies per woman in 2021-22 before falling to 1.65 in 2025-26. In the near term, the total fertility rate is assumed not to be influenced by the impacts of COVID-19. Projected state fertility rates are assumed to move in line with the national fertility rate.

Table A.3: Total fertility rate, for years ending 30 June 2020-21 (a) 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Total fertility rate, Australia 1.62 1.66 1.66 1.66 1.65 1.65

(a) Preliminary outcome for 2020-21, from ABS National, state and territory population, September 2021.

Mortality

Assumptions about life expectancy at birth are based on life tables produced by the Australian Government Actuary and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (Table A.4). Life expectancies are informed by future mortality rates, which are assumed to improve at the same average annual rate that has been observed over the past three decades. Projected state mortality rates are assumed to move in line with the national mortality rates.

Table A.4: Life expectancy at birth, for years ending 30 June 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Male life expectancy at birth, Australia 81.6 81.7 81.9 82.1 82.3 82.4

Female life expectancy at birth, Australia 85.6 85.7 85.8 86.0 86.1 86.2

Net overseas migration

Forecasts for net overseas migration (NOM) are produced by the Centre (Table A.5). The forecasts incorporate information from detailed data on international arrivals and departures together with offshore visa grant data provided by the Department of Home Affairs, along with assumptions regarding international travel restrictions (see Box 2.1 in BS2).

Table A.5: Net overseas migration, for years ending 30 June 2020-21(a) 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Net overseas migration, Australia -89,900 41,000 180,000 213,000 235,000 235,000 (a) Outcome for 2020-21 from ABS National, state and territory population, September 2021.

Interstate migration

Assumptions about future net interstate migration (NIM) are produced by the Centre (Table A.6). Assumptions are modelled using historical interstate movements data supplied by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. They are informed by analysis of economic factors associated with interstate migration, and account for the impact of COVID-19 through fewer total movements over the period.

Budget Paper No. 3 |

Appendix A: Parameters and further information | Page 115

Table A.6: Net interstate migration by state, for years ending 30 June NSW VIC QLD WA SA TAS ACT NT

2020-21 -16,700 -18,300 30,900 4,600 700 0 900 -2,200

2021-22 -40,600 -17,300 41,000 7,600 4,500 2,800 900 1,100

2022-23 -30,200 -5,000 30,000 3,200 100 1,700 700 -400

2023-24 -20,000 6,900 19,200 -1,200 -4,200 700 500 -1,800

2024-25 -20,200 6,400 19,400 -1,200 -4,100 800 600 -1,700

2025-26 -20,200 5,900 19,600 -1,200 -4,000 900 600 -1,600

Wage cost indices

Table A.7 shows estimated growth in the wage cost indices used in this Budget Paper, rounded to the nearest quarter of a per cent.

Table A.7: Wage cost indices Per cent 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24 2024-25 2025-26

Wage cost index - 1 1 1 3/4 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 1/2

Wage cost index - 6 1 2 1/4 1 3/4 2 2

Data sources

The information in Appendix B and Appendix C of this Budget Paper is consistent with the ABS Government Finance Statistics reporting framework for the public sector.

Australian Government data are sourced from the Australian Government Final Budget Outcomes, ABS, and Australian Government Consolidated Financial Statements. See Budget Paper No. 1, Budget Strategy and Outlook 2022-23, Statement 11: Historical Australian Government Data, for more information.

| Budget Paper No. 3

Page 116 | Appendix A: Parameters and further information

Further information

Several publications of the ABS and academics also provide information that is relevant to analysing federal financial relations data, including:

• National, state and territory population

• Overseas Arrivals and Departures, Australia

• Migration, Australia

• Births, Australia

• Life tables

• Deaths, Australia

• Taxation Revenue, Australia

• Government Finance Statistics, Australia

• Australian System of Government Finance Statistics - Concepts, Sources and Methods

• Information Paper: Developments in Government Finance Statistics

• Information Paper: Accruals Based Government Finance Statistics

• McDonald, P (2020), A Projection of Australia’s Future Fertility Rates, Centre for Population Research Paper, Australian Government, Canberra.

Commonwealth Grants Commission publications provide information about the distribution of GST revenue. In relation to the 2021-22 financial year, the most relevant publication is the Report on GST Revenue Sharing Relativities - 2020 Review.