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Wednesday, 29 August 1906


Senator PULSFORD (New South Wales) . - There is a touch of cruelty about this amendment of Senator Symon's. It has very much the effect of making a puncture in a bladder. It lets out the air. The amendment does something to expose the character and quality of the boasted desire to do something for the mother country which we have so often heard expressed. At the same time, I think that the Government are greatly to blame for leading people on the other side of the world to believe that they are permeated with a desire to do something special for them. It is very much to be regretted that they should allow such ideas to get abroad, because now after such declarations as have fallen from the leader of the Government in the Senate, they are made to look rather silly. I have here a copy of the British Australasian of19th July, and I find it rather interesting to note what is said in this periodical with regard to this very Bill, and the expectation held with respect to it in certain quarters in Great Britain. A leading article in the publication is entitled "A Blow at the Trusts," and here are two sentences from it -

The more important provisions of this Bill are given in detail in an article which appears in another page of this issue. It will be seen that Australia has entered very seriously upon a campaign to prevent the dumping of foreign-made goods in Australia, to the detriment both of Australian and English manufacturers.

The believers in preference at Home imagine that the Government out here, permeated with the idea of preference, considered the position of the manufacturers of England and of Australia as being on the same footing.


Senator Sir Josiah Symon - And that the English manufacturers ought not to be subjected to this Bill. That is what the article says.


Senator Trenwith - It does not say that or anything like it.


Senator PULSFORD - I think that it does. If the honorable senator will permit me I shall read the last sentence again -

It will be seen that Australia has entered very seriously upon a campaign to prevent the dumping of foreign-made goods in Australia, to the detriment both of Australian and English manufacturers.


Senator Guthrie - On a point of order, I direct the attention of the Chairman to standing order No. 400, and ask whether Senator Pulsford is in order in reading extracts from a newspaper referring to a debate which' has taken place in this Parliament ?







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