Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Full Day's HansardDownload Full Day's Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Thursday, 21 February 1980
Page: 300


Mr Holding asked the Minister for Science and the Environment, upon notice, on 22 November 1979:

(   1 ) Further to his predecessor's answer to part (2 ) of question No. 50 1 1 (Hansard, 20 November 1 979, pages 3260- 1 ), what is the (a) name and (b) designation and salary, of the officer of the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service who is currently working full-time in Kakadu National Park on the recording and documentation of art sites.

(2   ) Is that officer an Aboriginal person.

(3)   If not, (a) what is the nature and frequency of any contact the officer has with Aboriginal traditional owners and (b) are any Aboriginals employed as consultants in the recording and documentation of an sites.

(4)   If Aboriginal consultants are employed, what are their names, designations and salaries.

(5)   Has the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service carried out any survey to establish whether any Aboriginals resident within the Kakadu National Park and nearby areas could be employed in the protection of Aboriginal an sites in the areas; if so, how many Aboriginals does the Service estimate could be employed in this project and what is the estimated cost of the project.

(6)   If no survey has been carried out, why not.


Mr Thomson - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(   1 ) The officer working on the conservation of rock art sites is Mr D. Gillespie- Position No. 34, Clerk, Class 5 ($ 1 3,609- 1 4,7 1 4), Project Officer (Scientific Services ).

(2)   That officer is not an Aboriginal.

(3)   The officer receives advice from traditional owners of the Kakadu National Park region. There are three Aboriginals employed in the Kakadu National Park by the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service. These provide advice on the recording and documentation of an sites as well as a wide range of cultural matters. Their contribution encompasses advice on priorities of rock an sites, interpretation, methods of conservation and the location of sacred Sites. Consultation on rock art sites within the Kakadu National Park occurs on a continuous basis with traditional owners.

(4)   The three Aboriginal employees of the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service who are traditional owners and are consulted are:

Mr T.Gangali;Position No. 50, Clerk, Class 5 ($ 1 3,609- 1 4,7 1 4), Cultural Adviser

Mr M.Alderson; Position No. 49, Clerk, Class 5 ($ 1 3,609- 14,7 14), Cultural Adviser

Mr B.Neiiji Position No. 59, Clerical Assistant, Grade 4, ($9,865- 10,271)

(5)   No formal survey has been carried out. Through constant contact with Aboriginals resident in the Park, and the Northern Land Council, it is known which Aboriginals living in or adjacent to the Park or having traditional ties in the area could be employed in the Park. Employment potential is not restricted to the protection of Aboriginal art sites. The possibility of contracting groups of Aboriginals to protect specific sites is under consideration subject to the necessary approvals. It appears that four Aboriginals could be employed full time with additional Aboriginals involved on a contractural basis. It is not possible to give a realistic estimate of the overall costs since it is a long term project and the position is in a state of flux.

(6)   See (5) above.







Suggest corrections