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Thursday, 15 October 1970


Mr Wallis (GREY, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) asked the Prime Minister, upon notice:

Does any Commonwealth organisation exist to foster (a) decentralisation by close co-operation with State organisations set up for this purpose and (b) the balanced development of suitable regional areas to ensure that gainful employment opportunities are available, not only to adult males, but also to adult females and the young people of both sexes.


Mr Gorton - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

Decentralisation and regional development is primarily a State responsibility under the Constitution. However, the Commonwealth and the States are co-operating in the work of an

Officials Committee which is undertaking a joint pooling of knowledge about and study of the many issues involved in decentralisation. Moreover, the Commonwealth has itself implemented a number of measures which promote decentralisation, though these are not administered by any single Commonwealth organisation.

Examples of Commonwealth measures include: a broad range of assistance to the 'naturally decentralised' rural industries (bounty/subsidy payments, tax concessions, marketing arrangements, special rural credit); the financing (in whole or in part) of a large number of development projects, such as the Snowy Mountains Scheme, Rail Standardisation, the Townsville-MountIsa railway, Beef Roads, the Brigalow Scheme and the Ord River Scheme; provision of financial assistance by way of loans to help finance the construction of a thermal power station at Gladstone; the establishment of Commonwealth defence installations at Salisbury and Edinburgh leading to growth of Elizabeth and Commonwealth investment at Woomera; provision of finance for rural roads under the Commonwealth Aid Roads arrangements; a petroleum price equalisation scheme which reduces price differentials between metropolitan and rural areas; provision of mining and mineral exploration incentives; and financial assistance for travel by rural workers under certain circumstances.

Public Service Board (Question No.1897)


Mr Clyde Cameron (HINDMARSH, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) asked the Prime

Minister, upon notice:

(1)   Has the Public Service Board ever sought the approval of the Government before making a regulation introducing new pay rates.

(2)   If so, in connection with which proposed regulation did this action take place.


Mr Gorton - The answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   There is no instance in which the Board has ever sought the approval of my Government before making a regulation introducing new pay rates.

(2)   See (1) above.

Public Service: Pay Claims (Question No. 1898)


Mr Clyde Cameron (HINDMARSH, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) asked the Prime

Minister, upon notice:

What are the occasions during the past five years on which a permanent bead of a department has taken the initiative in recommending to the Public Service Board a change in the salary levels for a particular staff group within his department.


Mr Gorton - The Public Service Board has informed me that the answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

Some53 pay claims have been lodged by Permanent Heads since July 1965. A pay claim is defined for this purpose as a claim seeking specific variation in the rates of pay of a designation or a designation group.

A pay claim does not therefore includethe very large number of reports by Permanent Heads under section 29 of the Public Service Act 1922-1968 seeking reclassification of individual positions or groups of positions to higher levels within the appropriate classification structure. Aslo, it does not include oral representations by Permanent Heads or written representations of a general nature in relation to levels of salaries.

Public Service Board (Question No. 1900)


Mr Clyde Cameron (HINDMARSH, SOUTH AUSTRALIA) asked the Prime

Minister, upon notice:

(1)   Is it a fact that, as a matter of policy the Public Service Board will not recognise without prejudice consent determinations as tentative or interim settlements of disputes in salary or wage claims by staff associations.

(2)   If so, will be state how such a policy can assist in settlement of industrial disputes within the Commonwealth Public Service.


Mr Gorton -I am informed by the Pub lic Service Board that the answer to the honourable member's question is as follows:

(1)   Consent determinations issued by the Public Service Arbitrator are of 2 broad types. There are those which are issued with the full consent of the Association or Associations concerned. There are also those which are issued with the consent of the Association or Associations concerned but without prejudice to the rights of the Association or Associations to pursue any arbitration claims for increases in part or whole of the rates involved in the determination.

(2)   However, in both cases,the rates are a full and final response tothe claims of the Association or Associations and are not, so far as the Board is concerned, of a tentative or interim nature.

(2)   The issue of 'without prejudice' determinations by the Arbitrator is advantageous to the members of the Commonwealth Service insofar as it enables the application of increased rates immediately without awaiting the final determination by the Arbitrator, if indeed the matter is pursued in arbitration by the Association or Associations concerned.







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