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Wednesday, 8 November 1967


Mr Barnard asked the Minister for External Affairs, upon notice:

1.   What arrangements have been made for the recruitment in Australia of advisers, consultants and experts to serve under (a) the Colombo Plan and (b) United Nations technical assistance programmes?

2.   How many advisers, consultants and experts have been recruited for (a) the Colombo Plan and (b) the United Nations technical assistance programmes since the inception of these programmes up-to-date, and how many were specifically recruited in the years 1965 and 1966?

3.   What was Australia's contribution to the provision of expert personnel employed by (a) the Colombo Plan and (b) the United Nations technical assistance programmes since the inception of these programmes up-to-date, and how many experts were specifically provided by Australia in the years 1965 and 1966?

4.   Which are the main professional skills of Australian personnel employed under (a) the Colombo Plan and (b) the United Nations technical assistance programmes?

5.   To which countries were persons sent when employed under (a) the Colombo Plan and (b) the United Nations technical assistance programmes?

6.   Have arrangements been made in and outside Australia to evaluate the results achieved by expert personnel employed by (a) the Colombo Plan and (b) the United Nations technical assistance programmes?


Mr Hasluck - The answers to the honourable member's questions are as follows: 1. (a) Recruitment of Colombo Plan personnel is arranged by the Department of External Affairs, in most cases with the assistance of the Department of Labour and National Service which keeps detailed records of persons with suitable qualifications.

(b)   Recruitment of personnel in Australia for United Nations technical assistance programmes is carried out by the Department of Labour and National Service. The representative of the United Nations development programme for Australia and New Zealand acts as liaison between the Department and the United Nations agencies.

 

 

4. (a) and (b) Australian experts under both the Colombo Plan and the various United Nations programmes disposed of a very wide range of professional skills. The main professional skills demanded are those in the fields of agriculture, medicine, transport and education. 5. (a) Afghanistan, Australia, Bhutan, Brunei,

Burma, Cambodia, Ceylon, India, Indonesia, Iran, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, the United States and Vietnam.

(b)   United Nations technical assistance personnel have served on 322 projects in 132 countries. I could, if the honourable member so desires, furnish him with a list of the countries involved. It would include practically all the lessdeveloped countries of the world. 6. (a) and (b) Yes. There is a continuing process of evaluation of work done by expert personnel both by recipients and donors. In some cases such as teaching, evaluation must be subjective as precise measuring devices are not available. In other cases the creation of a road or bridge or other tangible assets offers good opportunity for evaluation of the work done. Evaluation is also periodically undertaken at meetings of the relevant organisations, such as the 18th meeting of the Colombo Plan Consultative Committee which is to be held next month in Burma. Such meetings also provide information on the way in which countries have used and perhaps profited by the expert advice given to them.







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