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Wednesday, 18 May 1960


Mr HAYLEN (Parkes) .- I support the remarks made by the honorable member for Lang (Mr. Stewart). From the viewpoint of our side of the House there is a very serious aspect of this hurried gathering together of legislation of importance towards the end of a session and then, after having allowed it to go through - or, rather, after having forced it through by means of the guillotine and other methods - amending it. This Parliament's records are full of bills which have been amended and amended and amended, because either the Leader of the House, or the bureaucrats, or the Parliamentary Draftsman, or somebody in control anyway, is not giving the Parliament a reasonable chance of getting at these things. I do not blame the present Leader of the House (Mr. Harold Holt), who is a reasonable man; but he, too, has to have a look at this question.

There are important pieces of legislation coming before us which we say, quite frankly, we have not had time to examine. There are, for instance, the Broadcasting and Television Bill 1960 and the bill concerned with civil aviation. You have to remember, if these things are just rammed down our throats, that through the last three weeks in this House we have been ambling along just making sea-way and no more, wasting our time here because there was no business before the House. Because of the generosity and kindliness of the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Calwell), we let you on the Government side amble along, but it is not fair then, at the conclusion of your halcyon days, your three weeks of do-nothing, to give us suddenly a great volume of business which is important to the community and which should be properly analysed.

I support with great fervour the suggestion of the honorable member for Lang that in future legislation must come down in a reasonable flow. If we cannot handle it adequately now, well, let us sit for another week or two in order to do so.







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