Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document
 Download Full Day's HansardDownload Full Day's Hansard    View Or Save XMLView/Save XML

Previous Fragment    Next Fragment
Thursday, 22 September 1949


Mr Francis s asked the Minister for the Army, upon notice -

1.   What is the present strength of the (a) Permanent Army, and (6) Citizen Military Forces ?

2.   How many personnel are engaged in administration, ordnance and other noncombatant duties in (a) the Permanent Army, and ( 6 ) the Citizen Military Forces, and what is the nature of their duties?

3.   What is the number of school cadets in Australia at present, and are they included in the figures furnished for Citizen Military Forces ?


Mr Chambers - The answers to the honorable member's questions are as follows : - 1. (o) The number of personnel serving on continuous full-time duty in the Australian Military Forces on the 7th September, 1949, was 14,958. (6) The number of personnel serving in the Citizen Military Forces on the 7th September, 1949, was. 16,202. 2. (o) The number of personnel serving on continuous full-time duty in the Australian Military Forces on the 7th September, 1949, in head-quarters and UnitS such as army headquarters, head-quarters of commands and military districts, army records offices, medical and dental units, recruiting staffs, inspection staffs and education units was 5,518. Similarly, the number of personnel in armoured, artillery, engineer, signal, infantry, supply and transport and other units of a like nature on the 7th September, 1949, was 9,440. It is not practicable to distinguish between personnel employed on administrative duties and other members of the Australian Military Forces as, even in war, certain personnel in every unit are required for administration, such as clerks, storemen, telephonists, &c. It is also not practicable to regard personnel so employed as being engaged on non-combatant duties, as all personnel, with the exception of soldiers of the Royal Australian Army Medical Corps and the Royal Australian Army Dental Corps, are required to carry arms and are trained in their use. (6) The number of personnel serving in the Citizen Military Forces on the 7th September, 1949, in Divisional Headquarters, medical and dental units and other similar units was 648, whilst the number of personnel in armoured, artillery, engineer, signal, infantry, supply and transport and other units of a like nature on the same date was 15,554.

3.   The number of personnel serving in the Australian Cadet Corps (i.e., school cadets) on the 30th June, 1949, the date of the last return received at Army Head-quarters, was 24,663. Members of the Australian Cadet Corps are not members of the Citizen Military Force, and, therefore, their numbers are not included in the strength of the Citizen Military Forces.

Broadcasting.


Mr CALWELL L - On the 7th September, the honorable member for Parramatta (Mr. Beale) drew my attention to certain scripts which had been prepared for broadcasting by the Queensland branch of the Returned Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen's Imperial League of Australia and asked whether they had been banned under section 89 (3) of the Australian Broadcasting Act which prohibits the broadcasting of any dramatization of political matter current at the time of the broadcast or during the five preceding years. I have been informed by the Postmaster-General that the Returned Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen's Imperial League of Australia wished to have the two scripts to which the honorable member referred broadcast by certain commercial stations in Brisbane. Following on discussions between the league's representative and the local branch of the Australian Federation of Commercial Broadcasting Stations, the latter body took the view that the broadcasting of the scripts in their original form would have involved an infringement of section 89 (3) of the Australian Broadcasting Act relating to the broadcasting of dramatizations of political matter and was not prepared to agree to the broadcasting of the scripts in lie form proposed. "Whilst under a strict interpretation of the section, the federation was probably right, it is considered that the proposed broadcasts could have been brought into line with the provisions of the act with only minor modifications which would not have reduced their effectiveness. In an effort to prevent any similar misunderstandings arising in future, the Australian Broadcasting Control Board has issued an interpretation of section 89 (3) of the Broadcasting Act for the guidance of all concerned.







Suggest corrections