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Tuesday, 8 November 1904


Mr Henry Willis - The honorable member said that before.


Mr Frazer - Cannot the honorable member say it again?


Mr Henry Willis - No; it is tedious repetition.


Mr McDONALD - Then let the honorable member for Robertson rise to a point of order, and we can soon fix it up.


Mr Henry Willis - The Chairman will decide it.


Mr McDONALD - The honorable member should let the Chairman decide it. I point out that while, in the first instance, this House refused to grant the GovernorGeneral an extra £8,000 a year for the upkeep ofhis establishment, we are now paying over £8,000 for the purpose. The honorable and learned member for Ballarat gave this House an assurance on this subject, and, to-night, by his vote, he has gone back upon that assurance. The honorable and learned gentleman assured this House that the vote of £1,000 for the Executive Council, including £800 for the Secretary to the Executive Council, together with a vote of £5,500, would cover the whole of the expense of the Governor-General's establishment.


Mr Deakin - Certainly I said that, and I have voted as I have done to-night every time.


Mr McDONALD - The honorable and learned gentleman then gave this House an assurance that the votes to which I have referred would cover the whole of the expenditure required for this purpose.


Mr Deakin - And they did cover it, for that time.


Mr McDONALD - Then why did not the honorable and learned gentleman have the honesty to tell the members of this House, when he gave that assurance, that those votes would only cover the expenditure for that time?


Mr Deakin - If I had not more honesty than has the honorable member, I should leave this House.


Mr McDONALD - Why did not the honorable and learned gentleman come down and tell honorable members that the vote would be sufficient only for that time?


Mr Deakin - Because I was not seeking self-advertisement at the expense of the Governor-General.


Mr McDONALD - The honorable and learned gentleman comes forward now with a paltry excuse.


Mr Deakin - Because I was not seeking self-advertisement.


Mr McDONALD - We have had enough of the honorable and learned gentleman's advertisements lately. He has advertised himself so well that he has become the laughing-stock of Australia.


The CHAIRMAN - I point out that the conduct of the honorable and learned member for Ballarat is not now under discussion, and I must ask the honorable member to confine himself to the item.


Mr McDONALD - I regret very much that the honorable and learned member for Ballarat was not called to order when he accused me of seeking self-advertise ment. If he makes a statement which misleads honorable members, he must put up with the consequences. We are not to be set aside merely because he suggests . that we are seeking selfadvertisement. The action we take in this matter is no advertisement for us. The position we take up is a most unpopular one. The probability is that the whole of the press will be down upon us for taking this action. The honorable and learned member for Ballarat took action upon the popular side when he told the House that the vote of £5,500, together with the vote of £1,000 for the Executive Council, would cover the whole expenditure required. After his vote tonight, the honorable and learned gentleman says that that was the amount then required. I am surprised that he should take up such an attitude. I should have expected more from him in the circumstances. I have no more to say on the subject. I feel that I have done my duty by calling the attention of the public to the fact that, after having refused to vote £8,000 for this purpose, we are now voting considerably more in order to satisfy certain honorable members.







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