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Notice given 28 September 2010

4  Senator Bob Brown: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency—

(1) Between the release of the Government’s green and white papers in 2008 on the proposed Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS) for Australia, how many times did representatives of the Business Council of Australia or their members meet with: (a) the Minister or anyone from the Minister’s office; and (b) departmental officials.

(2) Can copies be provided of correspondence, including emails, between the Minister or anyone in the Minister’s office or departmental officials and the Business Council of Australia, its representatives or members relating to the development of the CPRS between the release of the green and white papers.

5  Senator Bob Brown: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Foreign Affairs—With reference to the Australian Political Parties for Democracy Program, can all application forms for funding to date be provided for the 2009-10 financial year.

10  Senator Bob Brown: To ask the Minister representing the Treasurer—

(1) For the 3 year period up to 2020, using the price forecast used in standard treasury modelling, what revenue will be raised from the Minerals Resource Rent Tax, based on price assumptions for coal and iron ore as used in the Treasury modelling for the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme.

(2) What is the estimated cost of the company tax reduction during that period.

 

 (3) Is there any risk that the additional net revenue from the Minerals Resource Rent Tax will fall short of the estimated reduction in revenues from company tax; if so, how great is that risk; if not, how safe is that assumption and why.

16  Senator Humphries: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Home Affairs ( transferred to the Minister representing the Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government on 15 October 2010 )—Are there any electronic gaming machines located on Commonwealth land; if so: (a) what are their locations; and (b) how many are at each location.

Senator Humphries: To ask the Ministers listed below (Question Nos 19-54)—Do any of the departments or agencies within the Minister’s portfolio consider that new or additional office accommodation may be required in the next 2 years; if so, would that accommodation be provided in Canberra; and if so, approximately how many staff are estimated to need accommodation in the new or additional offices.

20 Minister representing the Treasurer

27 Minister representing the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

41 Minister representing the Minister for the Status of Women

44 Minister for Social Housing and Homelessness

49 Minister representing the Assistant Treasurer ( transferred to the Minister representing the Treasurer on 5 October 2010 )

50 Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation ( transferred to the Minister representing the Treasurer on 5 October 2010 )

57  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—(a) What steps or procedures are banks and lending institutions required to undertake before enforcing their securities; and (b) is there a prescribed level of consultation with the customer.

61  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—If employee entitlements were to be given a higher priority in respect of any fixed and floating charge security a bank holds, would this not make a bank more proactive in monitoring loans it has and in ensuring a situation is not allowed to deteriorate to a position where only a secured creditor recovers their funds.

62  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—If a bank receives a series of offers for a secured liability: (a) how are these evaluated; and (b) is the decision on which offer to take documented.

63  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Do bank staff receive formal training in the realisation of assets.

64  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—(a) How much training are banks and lending institutions required to undertake each year in training their staff in the recovery of securities; (b) in what areas is this training provided; and (c) who provides this training.

 

 66  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—When any assets are, or property is, sold, does a bank take steps to minimise the costs incurred; if so, why do banks in most cases use higher priced law firms for often routine matters for which the customer is obligated to pay for under the security documents.

67  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Is there any control over costs incurred, such as a quote obtained for advice on issues.

68  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Who supervises the recovery process, and to whom are bank staff accountable for the issues that may arise.

69  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Is there an external professional body that monitors the recovery activities of banks, to which aggrieved people can go to with complaints and to have the matter independently investigated.

70  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Is there a code of conduct that bank staff have to observe in the recovery of securities; if so, how is it monitored and reported.

71  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Is there a prescribed level of quality control on recovery procedures; (a) if so: (i) can details be provided of where this is documented in the form of a formal manual; and (ii) how and when banks and lending institutions that do have a formal process or manual are certified; and (b) if not, why not.

74  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Does a bank require confirmation from every customer signing a guarantee that they have had the guarantee and its implications explained to them.

75  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Have there been any situations where the banks’ ‘all Monies clause’ has been used to try to attach a debt to people who were not even aware that they were responsible for the guarantee of a third party.

76  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—When receiving funds from a prime borrowing, how is the decision to apply funds recovered to loans permitted to be made.

77  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—Given that most people faced with a problem under a guarantee have little recourse other than the legal process, and that most cannot afford to pay for this: what assistance or help is provided for persons affected by recovery procedures by banks.

78  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—How much was lost by banks on defaulting loans in the 2008-09 financial year.

79  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Financial Services and Superannuation—What percentage of total loans by banks were defaulted in each of the following financial years: (a) 2004-05; (b) 2005-06; (c) 2006-07; (d) 2007-08; and (e) 2008-09.

 

 93  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications’: How many full-time equivalent uniformed personnel were employed in the military workforce: (a) as at 30 June 2010; and (b) as at 1 July 2009.

94  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Military Workforce’: How many full-time equivalent civilian personnel were employed in implementing the White Paper initiatives: (a) as at 30 June 2010; and (b) as at 1 July 2009.

95  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Military Workforce’: For the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010, how many full-time equivalent uniformed personnel were employed in implementing the White Paper initiatives.

96  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Military Workforce’: For the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010, what reduction has there been in the number of full-time equivalent personnel employed in implementing: (a) efficiency improvements; (b) civilianisation; and (c) support productivity improvements.

97  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Military Workforce’: As at 30 June 2010, what increase or reduction has there been in full-time equivalent civilian personnel employed in the department and in the Defence Materiel Organisation since 1 July 2008.

98  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Civilian Workforce’: For the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010, how many full-time equivalent personnel were employed as Australian Public Service staff or contractors.

100  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Civilian Workforce’: For the period 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2010, what reduction has there been in the number of full-time equivalent Australian Public Service staff or contractors employed in implementing: (a) efficiency improvements; (b) civilianisation; (c) support productivity improvements; (d) contractor conversion (reduction to contractors); and (e) support productivity improvements.

101  Senator Johnston: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Defence—With reference to the White Paper and the Strategic Reform Program ‘Indicative Workforce Implications - Civilian Workforce’: As at 30 June 2010, what increase or reduction has there been in full-time equivalent Australian Public Service staff or contractors employed since 1 July 2008.

Senator Johnston: To ask the Ministers listed below (Question Nos 117-119)—

(1) (a) What was the hospitality spend for each agency within the responsibility of the Minister/Parliamentary Secretary; and (b) for each hospitality event, can the following details be provided: (i) the date, (ii) the location, (iii) the purpose, and (iv) the cost.

 

 (2) Can details be provided of the total hospitality spend for the office of the Minister/Parliamentary Secretary.

117 Minister representing the Minister for Defence

118 Minister representing the Minister for Defence Science and Personnel ( transferred to the Minister representing the Minister for Defence on 29 September 2010 )

119 Minister representing the Minister for Defence Materiel ( transferred to the Minister representing the Minister for Defence on 29 September 2010 )

145  Senator Ludlam: To ask the Minister representing the Minister for Immigration and Citizenship—

(1) (a) For each financial year since the last published figures in 2004-05, how many cases have been referred to the War Crimes Screening Unit (WCSU); and (b) of those cases referred, how many individuals were refused citizenship or a visa on suspicion of having committed war crimes.

(2) Upon refusal of an application does the department notify the relevant state authorities in which the individual resides.

(3) Does the Minister have plans to improve reporting of results of border screening by the WCSU.

(4) (a) How many visas have been refused or cancelled in the past 10 years based on Article 1F of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, that provides that an asylum seeker can be denied protection on the basis there are serious reasons for considering an individual has committed a ‘crime against peace, a war crime, or a crime against humanity’; (b) how many of these decisions have been upheld by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT); and (c) of those cases upheld by the AAT, have all these individuals been removed from Australia; if not: (i) how many of these individuals remain in Australia, (ii) for how long have they remained in Australia since the AAT decision, and (iii) what action is the department taking in regard to these individuals.

(5) For the past 10 years: (a) how many suspected war criminals have been extradited from Australia; and (b) on how many occasions has Australia rejected an extradition application from another country for a suspected war criminal.

(6) For what reasons has Australia rejected applications for extradition from other states other than for the lack of prima facie evidence.

(7) How many times in the past 10 years has a person’s visa been revoked for suspicion of having committed a war crime, crimes against humanity or genocide.

(8) (a) Does the department provide any specialised training to staff who conduct visa and refugee interviews to assist them in screening for potential war criminals; and (b) if training is provided, is it offered to all staff that process refugee and visa claims; if not, which staff receive the training.

(9) How many requests has Australia made annually to the following international courts and tribunals to check their databases for information on an individual applying for a visa or citizenship: (a) the International Criminal Court; (b) the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia; (c) the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda; and (d) the Special Court for Sierra Leone.