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Business for today

Business of the Senate—Notices of motion

Notice given 2 July 2019

1          Senator Rice : To move—That the following matter be referred to the Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee for inquiry and report by 3 December 2019:

The continuing discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender diverse, intersex and queer people and their families in Australia, its prevalence and its impacts, including:

(a)              existing discrimination within federal, state and territory law and policy;

(b)              experience of discrimination in Australian life, including but not limited to educational settings, workplaces, aged care, healthcare, sporting clubs and organisations, religious organisations, the provision of government services, including where contracted out, and in the provision of goods, services, housing and accommodation;

(c)              where discrimination is sanctioned by federal, state and territory legislation and where it is occurring in breach or potential breach of legislation;

(d)             how this discrimination affects the human rights, legal rights, access to justice, health, wellbeing and educational and economic outcomes of LGBTIQ+ people in Australia;

(e)              the additional and compounding impacts of discrimination on LGBTIQ+ people and their families who are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, of different or minority race, ethnicity or religion, or on the grounds of their migrant status, age, ability and socio-economic background or circumstances, who have intersectional LGBTIQ+ identities, or who have a range of these personal characteristics;

(f)               how the experience of discrimination on LGBTIQ+ people and their families differs for young people;

(g)              how the experience of discrimination on LGBTIQ+ people and their families differs based on whether they live in urban, regional, rural or remote areas;

(h)             the specific discrimination, stigmatisation and human rights violations, including harmful practices in medical settings, experienced by people born with variations of sex characteristics, including infants, children and adolescents, and also encompassing prenatal interventions due to variations of sex characteristics;

(i)                the broad range of sexual orientation and gender identity change efforts and associated formal and informal activities, particularly by religious organisations, and the impacts of these on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender diverse and queer people;

(j)                the reforms and initiatives required to remedy prejudice, stigma and discrimination against LGBTIQ+ people and their families, including legislative and policy reforms, funding for training and education programs, funding for community and government initiatives, development of funded government strategies, better liaison between government, relevant NGOs and the LGBTIQ+ community, and the development of national standards for best-practice legislative, policy and program initiatives; and

(k)              any other related matters.

Notice given 13 November 2019

2         Senator Patrick : To move—

(1)               That the Senate notes that, in respect to the development of Greater Sunrise oil and gas fields:

(a)              on 6 March 2018, Australia and Timor-Leste signed a maritime boundaries treaty establishing permanent maritime boundaries in the Timor Sea, and a legal framework for developing the Greater Sunrise gas fields, together and sharing in the benefits - the treaty has now been ratified by both countries and entered into force on 30 August 2019;

(b)              there are two options for processing the Greater Sunrise gas fields:

(i)                onshore in Australia, or

(ii)              onshore in Timor Leste, as part of the Timor-Leste Government’s Tasi Mane development strategy for a corridor of petroleum infrastructure along the southwest coast of the country;

(c)              the Australian Government stated, in response to a question asked during the estimates hearings of the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Legislation Committee on 4 September 2019, that ‘Australia wants Greater Sunrise to be developed in a commercially sound way that maximises the return for the parties, and therefore contributes to Timor Leste’s economic development priorities. Provided these conditions are met, Australia is neutral as to whether Greater Sunrise gas is processed in Timor-Leste or Australia’; and

(d)             the establishment of a corridor of petroleum infrastructure along the southwest coast of Timor-Leste would be a more complex and challenging endeavour than processing in existing facilities in Australia.

(2)              That the following matter be referred to the Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee for inquiry and to report by the final sitting day of June 2020, relating the Tasi Mane project:

(a)              assistance and co-operation offered, to date, by the Australian Government to the Tasi Mane project;

(b)              possible future assistance and co-operation by the Australian Government in relation to the Tasi Mane project;

(c)              opportunities for Australian industry to assist with the design, development and execution of the Tasi Mane project;

(d)             opportunities for the Australian Government to assist Timor-Leste, in respect of activities and projects incidental to the Tasi Mane project;

(e)              opportunities for Australian industry, in respect of activities and projects incidental to the Tasi Mane project; and

(f)               any related matters.

Government business—Orders of the day

1          Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Amendment (Ensuring Integrity) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( Senator McAllister , in continuation, 26 November 2019 ).

2         Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Amendment (Air Pollution) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( Senator Whish-Wilson , in continuation, 14 November 2019 ).

3         Education Legislation Amendment (Tuition Protection and Other Measures) Bill 2019

VET Student Loans (VSL Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019

Higher Education Support (HELP Tuition Protection Levy) Bill 2019 ( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

4         Aged Care Legislation Amendment (New Commissioner Functions) Bill 2019 —( Senate bill ) —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 16 October 2019 ).

5         Counter-Terrorism Legislation Amendment (2019 Measures No. 1) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 1 August 2019 ).

6         Customs Amendment (Product Specific Rule Modernisation) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

7         Crimes Legislation Amendment (Sexual Crimes Against Children and Community Protection Measures) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

8         Migration Amendment (Repairing Medical Transfers) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters, Senator Seselja )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 29 July 2019 ).

9         Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Amendment (Single Treatment Pathway) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters, Senator Seselja )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 16 September 2019 ).

10        Treasury Laws Amendment (2018 Measures No. 2) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

11        New Skilled Regional Visas (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

12        Social Services Legislation Amendment (Drug Testing Trial) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Families and Social Services, Senator Ruston )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 17 October 2019 ).

13        Fair Work Laws Amendment (Proper Use of Worker Benefits) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, Senator Canavan )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 September 2019 ).

14        Migration Amendment (Strengthening the Character Test) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment, Senator Birmingham )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 19 September 2019 ).

15        Migration Amendment (Streamlining Visa Processing) Bill 2019 —( Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, Senator Canavan )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 September 2019 ).

Government business—Notices of motion

Notice given 25 November 2019

1          Minister for Families and Social Services ( Senator Ruston ): To move—That—

(a)              if the notices of motion proposing the disallowance of the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, standing in the names of the Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances (Senator Fierravanti-Wells) and Senator McKim, on behalf of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights, for three sitting days after today (28 November 2019), have not been resolved by 12.45 pm on 28 November 2019, the notices of motion be called on and considered together at 3.30 pm on 28 November 2019; and

(b)              if consideration of the motions listed in paragraph (a) is not concluded by 4 pm, the question on the unresolved motions shall then be put.

Notice given 26 November 2019

*2        Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters ( Senator Seselja ): To move—That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969 , the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report, as expeditiously as possible:

Fit-Out of Leased Premises for the Australian Taxation Office at 152 Wharf Street, Brisbane.

*3        Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters ( Senator Seselja ): To move—That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969 , the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report, as expeditiously as possible:

Australian Securities and Investments Commission - Proposed Fit-Out of Leased Premises, 100 Market Street Sydney.

*4       Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters ( Senator Seselja ): To move—That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969 , the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report, as expeditiously as possible:

Armoured Fighting Vehicles Facilities Program Stage 1.

*5        Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters ( Senator Seselja ): To move—That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969 , the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report, as expeditiously as possible:

LAND 121 Stage 5B Facilities Project.

*6       Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters ( Senator Seselja ): To move—That, in accordance with the provisions of the Public Works Committee Act 1969 , the following proposed work be referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works for consideration and report, as expeditiously as possible:

Reserve Bank of Australia - Head Office Workplace Project.



 

General business—Notices of motion

A complete list of all general business notices of motion and orders of the day remaining on the Notice Paper is published at: www.aph.gov.au/Senate/business

Notice given 31 July 2019

84       Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That, in accordance with the recommendations of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances in its report, Parliamentary scrutiny of delegated legislation—

(1)               The standing orders be amended, with effect from 4 December 2019, as follows:

(a)              omit standing order 23, substitute:

23 Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation

(1)               A Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation shall be appointed at the commencement of each Parliament.

(2)              All instruments made under the authority of Acts of the Parliament, which are subject to disallowance, disapproval or affirmative resolution by the Senate and which are of a legislative character, shall stand referred to the committee for consideration and, if necessary, report.

(3)              The committee shall scrutinise each instrument as to whether:

(a)       it is in accordance with its enabling Act and otherwise complies with all legislative requirements;

(b)       it appears to be supported by a constitutional head of legislative power and is otherwise constitutionally valid;

(c)       it makes rights, liberties, obligations or interests unduly dependent on insufficiently defined administrative powers;

(d)       those likely to be affected by the instrument were adequately consulted in relation to it;

(e)       its drafting is defective or unclear;

(f)        it, and any document it incorporates, may be freely accessed and used;

(g)       the accompanying explanatory material provides sufficient information to gain a clear understanding of the instrument;

(h)       it trespasses unduly on personal rights and liberties;

(i)        it unduly excludes, limits or fails to provide for independent review of decisions affecting rights, liberties, obligations or interests;

(j)        it contains matters more appropriate for parliamentary enactment; and

(k)       it complies with any other ground relating to the technical scrutiny of delegated legislation that the committee considers appropriate.

(4)              The committee shall also scrutinise each instrument to determine whether the attention of the Senate should be drawn to the instrument on the ground that it raises significant issues, or otherwise gives rise to issues that are likely to be of interest to the Senate.

(5)              The committee may, for the purpose of reporting on its terms of reference, consider any proposed or draft legislative instrument, including an exposure draft of such an instrument.

(6)               

(a)       The committee shall consist of 6 senators, 3 being members of the government party nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, and 3 being senators who are not members of the government party, nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or by any minority groups or independent senators.

(b)       The nominations of the opposition or any minority groups or independent senators shall be determined by agreement between the opposition and the minority groups or independent senators, and, in the absence of agreement duly notified to the President, the question of the representation on the committee shall be determined by the Senate.

(7)              The committee may appoint sub-committees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and refer to any such sub-committee any matters which the committee is empowered to consider.

(8)              The committee shall elect as chair a member appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate.

(9)              The committee shall elect as deputy chair a member appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, and the member so elected shall act as chair of the committee when there is no chair or the chair is not present at a meeting of the committee.

(10)           Where votes on a question before the committee are equally divided, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, shall have a casting vote.

(11)            The committee and any sub-committee shall have power to send for persons and documents, to move from place to place, and to meet and transact business in public or private session and notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives.

(12)           The committee may inquire into and report on any matter related to the technical scrutiny of delegated legislation.

(13)           The committee may appoint with the approval of the President a legal adviser to the committee.

(14)           The committee shall be empowered to print from day to day any of its documents and evidence. A daily Hansard shall be published of public proceedings of the committee.

(15)           The committee may report from time to time its proceedings and evidence and any recommendations, and shall make regular reports of the progress of the proceedings of the committee.

(b)              omit standing order 25(2)(a), substitute:

(a)     The legislation committees shall inquire into and report upon:

(i)        estimates of expenditure in accordance with standing order 26,

(ii)       bills or draft bills referred to them by the Senate,

(iii)      legislative instruments made in the portfolios allocated to them,

(iv)      annual reports in accordance with paragraph (20), and

(v)       the performance of departments and agencies allocated to them.

(2)              The initial members of the Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation shall be the members of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances appointed at the commencement of this Parliament.

(3)              The Standing Committee for the Scrutiny of Delegated Legislation have the power to consider and use the records of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances.

Notice given 25 November 2019

269     Senator Bilyk : To move—

(1)               That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century tabled its report on 14 February 2019,

(ii)              the unanimous report of Labor, Liberal, Australian Greens and United Australia Party senators called on the Australian Government to work with state and territory governments to harmonise Australia’s charity fundraising law within two years,

(iii)            while government responses to committee reports are due within three months, the government’s response to the charity fundraising inquiry has not been forthcoming nine months after the report was tabled,

(iv)            the Morrison Government’s failure to progress this important issue was highlighted when charity fundraising law reform was absent from the agenda of the Legislative and Governance Forum on Consumer Affairs - key meeting of Commonwealth, state, territory and New Zealand consumer affairs ministers - in Queenstown, New Zealand, on 30 August 2019,

(v)              without fundraising law reform, charities raising funds online are required to register and comply with seven state and territory fundraising regulatory regimes,

(vi)            the charity and not-for-profit sector has been calling for reform of Australia’s charity fundraising laws for several years,

(vii)          the Department of the Treasury’s 5 year review of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC), delivered on 31 May 2018, identified fundraising law as the major reporting burden on charities, and recommended that fundraising law be harmonised across the country, and

(viii)        the failure of the Morrison Government to act on reform to charity fundraising law is costing charities $15 million a year; and

(b)              calls on the Morrison Government to:

(i)                deliver its overdue response to the report of the Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century,

(ii)              stand up for Australia’s charities, not-for-profits and their donors, whose donations and fundraising efforts are being needlessly eroded by unnecessary regulatory costs, and

(iii)            provide national leadership and - as a matter of urgency - work with the states and territories to harmonise Australia’s complex and outdated charity fundraising laws.

(2)              That the Senate requires on Monday, 2 December 2019, at 12.20 pm, before government business is called on, the Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters to:

(a)              table the Government's overdue response to the report of the Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century; and

(b)              attend the Senate to provide an explanation, of no more than 20 minutes, of the government’s response and for the delay in responding to the committee’s report.

(3)              At the conclusion of the explanation, any senator may move to take note of the explanation.

(4)              Any motion under paragraph (3) may be debated for no longer than 60 minutes, shall have precedence over all business until determined, and senators may speak to the motion for not more than 10 minutes.

Notice of motion altered on 26 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

270     Senators Marielle Smith and Ciccone: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that 11 to 15 November 2019 was Perinatal Anxiety and Depression (PANDA) Week;

(b)              recognises that:

(i)                perinatal anxiety and depression is common and serious,

(ii)              one in five expecting or new mums will experience perinatal anxiety or depression,

(iii)            one in ten expecting or new dads will experience perinatal anxiety or depression,

(iv)            100,000 families across Australia are affected by perinatal anxiety or depression every year, and

(v)              postnatal psychosis affects one or two new mums in every 1000 and that, if left untreated, the consequences of perinatal anxiety and depression can be devastating; and

(c)               calls on the Federal Government to take action to raise awareness about the signs and symptoms of perinatal anxiety and depression, and encourage open and honest conversations about the mental health of expecting and new parents in communities and workplaces.



 

271      Senator Dean Smith : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that the 2019 Grandparent of The Year Award was announced on 1 November 2019;

(b)              congratulates the following 2019 Grandparent of The Year Award recipients: Maxine and Geoff Bolland of Willaston, South Australia, in recognition of their tireless advocacy on behalf of a growing number of grandparents working from ‘outside the system’, to keep children out of foster care and give them the opportunity to thrive;

(c)               congratulates the 2019 Community Service Grandparent of The Year Award recipient Michelle Cooper of Nubeena, Tasmania; and

(d)              recognises Grandparents Day Magazine for its promotion of important issues to grandparents, and for establishing the Grandparent of The Year Award to acknowledge and celebrate the contributions grandparents make to our community.

272     Senator Gallagher : To move—That the Senate notes that—

(a)              the work of the Australian Public Service (APS) is incredibly important to the lives of Australians;

(b)              federal public servants work in a wide range of roles, from regulating the quality of life-saving medicines to providing support during times of tragedy or natural disasters;

(c)               nearly two-thirds of the public service work outside of Canberra, and 70% work in implementation or service delivery; and

(d)              the enduring and apolitical nature of the APS means that it plays an essential role in maintaining public trust in democratic institutions.

273     Senators Watt, Green and Chisholm: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the Department of Home Affairs employs over 130 dedicated and hardworking Queenslanders to process visa applications,

(ii)              this is crucial work that ensures the integrity of our visa processing system and is the cornerstone of our sovereignty as a nation,

(iii)            the Federal Government’s plan to privatise Australia’s visa system threatens the livelihoods of over 130 Queenslanders and their families; and

(iv)            privatising Australia’s visa system will lead to increased costs of visas, greater risks of worker exploitation, data security breaches and will make protecting national security more difficult;

(b)              condemns the Federal Government for auctioning Australian jobs off to the highest bidder, and for undermining the integrity of our visa processing system and our nation’s sovereignty; and

(c)               calls on the Federal Government to guarantee the protection of these 135 jobs in Queensland, and the 2,000 jobs across Australia, which will be lost under the Morrison Government if they persist with their efforts to privatise Australia’s visa system.

274      Senator Farrell : To move—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 , and for related purposes. Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Transparency Measures—Real Time Disclosure) Bill 2019 .

275      Senator Farrell : To move—That the following bill be introduced: A Bill for an Act to amend the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 , and for related purposes. Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Transparency Measures—Lowering the Disclosure Threshold) Bill 2019 .

276     Senator Rice : To move—That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Attorney-General, by no later than 5 pm on 2 December 2019, a list of roundtables on the Religious Discrimination Bill since the release of the exposure draft, and a list of organisations attending.

Notice of motion altered on 25 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

277     Senator Faruqi : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes with deep concern the findings of the:

(i)                Charles Sturt University’s report Islamophobia in Australia 2019 , which show:

(A)             between 2016 and 2017, 349 incidents of anti-Muslim racism reported to the lslamophobia register,

(B)             severe attacks requiring hospitalisation more than doubled from 2% to 5%,

(C)             most incidents of racism towards Muslims involve the targeting of women - 72% of the victims of lslamophobia were women, and almost all were wearing a hijab or scarf at the time of the incident,

(D)            attacks in public areas have become more common, with harassment of Muslims in public areas in the presence of security officers and CCTV jumping by 30%,

(E)             the second most common place for harassment was schools and universities, with incident reports outlining racist slurs from other students, teachers, principals and sports coaches, and

(F)             insults targeting Muslims’ religious appearance and religion were the highest at 67% of all reported incidents, and

(ii)              All Together Now 2019 study which analysed 281 media pieces from the most popular newspapers and television shows over a 12-month period, which show:

(A)             racialised identities most often discussed negatively in media included Muslim Australians, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and African Australians,

(B)             Muslim Australians were the most frequently targeted, with 63 of the 281 pieces discussing Muslims specifically,

(C)             Muslim women are most often targeted by negatively racialised social commentary, with perpetrators primarily being mainstream newspapers, and

(D)            social commentators expressed racist views in both overt and covert ways, such as dog-whistling, decontextualisation and irony;

(b)              denounces lslamophobia in all its forms;

(c)               condemns lslamophobia in public debate and in the media; and

(d)              calls on the Federal Government to show leadership at the national level to stop the spread of lslamophobia.

278     Senators Griff and McKim: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              acknowledges that author, journalist and filmmaker, Mr Behrouz Boochani, will be appearing at the WORD Christchurch literary event on 29 November 2019;

(b)              notes that Mr Boochani is also a Kurdish refugee who fled persecution in Iran, sought asylum in Australia and spent 2269 days held by Australia’s offshore processing regime;

(c)               notes that Mr Boochani is an award winning author and journalist - his memoir, No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison , won the Victorian Prize for Literature, the Victorian Premier’s Prize for Nonfiction, the Anna Politjovskaya Prize for Press Freedom and the 2017 Amnesty Media Award, and his work has been published and featured around the world in The Guardian and other international newspapers;

(d)              further notes that Mr Boochani has reported in the media and in his award-winning book of his internment in offshore detention included being jailed for eight days for reporting on a hunger strike in the centre, and twice tortured for several days in the notorious Chauka solitary confinement block for reporting on the conditions in the now-demolished Manus detention centre to the outside world; and

(e)              pays tribute to all those involved, including Amnesty International and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, in securing a visa for Mr Boochani to travel to New Zealand to attend the Christchurch literary event.

Notice of motion altered on 25 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

279     Senator Griff : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              acknowledges that anti-Semitic attacks involving face-to-face interactions surged 30% in the year to September, according to the Executive Council of Australian Jewry’s ­annual report on anti-Semitism;

(b)              notes that incidents involving direct verbal anti-Semitic abuse, harassment and ­intimidation increased from 88 to 114, and graffiti attacks more than doubled from 46 to 95;

(c)               further notes that, according to the report, anti-Semitic attacks have included physical assaults to abuse, harassment, vandalism and graffiti, threats via emails, letters, phone calls, posters, stickers and leaflets;

(d)              repudiates all anti-Semitic attacks in Australia; and

(e)              calls for increased Holocaust education in all Australian schools.



 

280     Senator Whish-Wilson : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                recent bushfires have resulted in thousands of insurance claims being filed by affected residents,

(ii)              the General Insurance Code of Practice is a voluntary code that is not enforceable by regulators,

(iii)            insurance contracts are not currently subject to laws protecting consumers against unfair contract terms, and

(iv)            the handling and settling of insurance claims is not considered a financial service and, as such, licensees are not subject to the general obligations to do all things necessary to ensure the service is provided efficiently, honestly and fairly; and

(b)              calls upon insurance companies to act with integrity, and to be as sympathetic and as prompt as is possible, when assessing and settling claims made by people affected by the recent bushfires.

281     Senator Siewert : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                robodebt has caused extreme distress, trauma and hardship in the Australian community,

(ii)              the Federal Government’s recent changes to the averaging process is an acknowledgement that the process is flawed,

(iii)            the Federal Government failed to implement the key recommendation contained in the report by the Community Affairs References Committee, Design, scope, cost-benefit analysis, contracts awarded and implementation associated with the Better Management of the Social Welfare System initiative , tabled on 21 June 2017, which was to suspend the program and instead ramped up the program, relentlessly pursuing people on low incomes, and

(iv)            there are questions regarding the legality of income averaging, and placing the burden of proof on the income support recipient; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to immediately abandon automated debt recovery, complete the review of all existing and past alleged debts in a timely manner, and to repay and compensate those who have already paid or commenced paying a robodebt which is found to be an error.

282     Senator McAllister : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                5 November 2019, was the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women,

(ii)              it marked the beginning of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence,

(iii)            the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence concludes on 10 December 2019, which is Human Rights Day,

(iv)            on average, one woman a week is murdered by her current or former partner, and

(v)              eight women a day are hospitalised after being assaulted by their spouse or partner;

(b)              acknowledges that:

(i)                violence against women exists in many forms, including physical, psychological, sexual, emotional, social and financial,

(ii)              the effort to end violence against women requires unwavering genuine commitment, national leadership and fundamental cultural and attitudinal change,

(iii)            the responsibility to end violence against women rests with us all - from communities to individuals, governments, civil society and business, and

(iv)            the government and business can make it easier for women to leave abusive and violent relationships;

(c)               recognises that the workplace represents a significant aspect of the prevention of family violence and violence against women, and notes that:

(i)                financial security and independence is vital to a woman leaving a violent relationship,

(ii)              in leaving a violent relationship, women will need to search for new and safe accommodation, and access health, legal and other support services,

(iii)            according to the ACTU, leaving an abusive relationship and finding new and safe accommodation costs on average $18,280 and takes an estimated 141 hours, and

(iv)            many employers already provide paid family violence leave; and

(d)              calls on the Federal Government to introduce 10 days paid domestic violence leave in the National Employment Standards.

283     Senator Hanson-Young : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                Norwegian oil giant, Equinor, plans to drill for oil in the pristine ocean environment of the Great Australian Bight,

(ii)              the majority of Australians oppose the plan, recognising that there is no safe way to drill for oil in the remote, rough seas of the Bight and it is not worth the environmental or economic risks, and three out of four South Australians stated in an Advertiser survey, released on 22 November 2019, they would not support it even if it would drive down their fuel prices,

(iii)            on 23 November 2019, a National Day of Action was held to Fight for the Bight, which saw more than 10,000 people attend more than 50 events across the country from Exmouth, Western Australia, to Townsville, Queensland, and on some of Australia’s most iconic beaches, including Bondi, Manly, Bells Beach, Byron Bay, Margaret River and Currumbin, and

(iv)            according to the most recent polling from The Australian Institute, Australians want to see the Great Australian Bight protected, and more than four in five South Australians (84%) support World Heritage protection for the Bight; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                back the calls of the majority of Australians and tell Equinor that they are not welcome here, and

(ii)              protect the Great Australian Bight by listing it as a World Heritage site.

284     Senator Siewert : To move—

(1)               That the Senate notes that legal professional privilege is not a recognised ground for refusing to provide information to the Senate.

(2)              That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Government Services, by 10 am on 27 November 2019, any legal advice received by the Government, or Services Australia (Department of Human Services), relating to the decision to stop relying solely on income-averaging processes to raise debts under the Income Compliance Programme.

285     Leader of the Australian Greens ( Senator Di Natale ): To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes with deep concern that:

(i)                the 2019 report on anti-Semitism in Australia, published by the Executive Council of Australian Jewry, found a 30% year-on-year increase in reported incidents of anti-Semitic verbal abuse, harassment and intimidation,

(ii)              the rise in anti-Semitic and Nazi sentiment is seen even more clearly online, especially on sites used by the far-right, white supremacists, Nazis and other racists, and

(iii)            racism, more broadly, is on the rise in Australia, being fed by irresponsible sections of the media and extremist politics; and

(b)              urges the Australian Government to introduce an Australian Charter of Rights, recognising that we are the only western democracy that does not protect the basic rights and freedoms of its people in either legislation or the Constitution.

286     Senators Waters, Keneally, McCarthy, Rice, Bilyk, Siewert and Polley: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                more than 2000 children are stillborn in Australia each year,

(ii)              the Select Committee on Stillbirth Research and Education identified the need for more support to be provided to bereaved parents and families affected by stillbirth,

(iii)            under current laws:

(A)             parents are not eligible for a bereavement payment for a stillborn child, but will be eligible for a bereavement payment for a child who dies shortly after birth,

(B)             parents of a stillborn child are eligible for a stillborn baby payment, and

(C)             the amount of the stillborn baby payment is reduced by half for second or subsequent stillborn children,

(iv)            support payments to affected families can relieve financial pressure at a time of high stress by assisting with autopsy expenses, funeral or memorial costs, and access to counselling and health services,

(v)              the grief and stress experienced by parents and families in response to a stillbirth is no less than that experienced in response to the death of a child, and

(vi)            the grief and stress experienced by parents and families in response to a stillbirth is not lessened by having previously experienced a stillbirth, and the cumulative impact of subsequent stillbirths may increase the physical and mental health impacts on bereaved parents; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                take action to implement all 16 recommendations of the Select Committee on Stillbirth Research and Education, and

(ii)              ensure equitable financial support is available to all parents and families experiencing the death of a child prior to, at, or near the time of birth by:

(A)             extending eligibility for bereavement payments to parents of stillborn children, and

(B)             increasing stillborn baby payments for second and subsequent stillbirths to be commensurate with the entitlements for a first stillbirth.

Notice given 26 November 2019

*287   Senator Waters : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes:

(i)                that 2019 marks the 50 year anniversary of the equal pay decision that gave women the right to be paid the same as their male counterparts,

(ii)              the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) Equality Scorecard, released on 13 November 2019, which found that:

(A)             the base salary gap between men and women across all industries and occupations is 15.5% or $15,176 per annum,

(B)             when accounting for total remuneration, including overtime and bonuses, the real gap is wider, with men earning $25,679, or 20.8%, more than women each year on average,

(C)             the number of female CEOs has remained static at 17.1% , and women make up only 26.8% of board positions,

(D)            gender pay gaps favour men across all industries and all levels of the workforce, with financial services, real estate and construction recording the highest gaps,

(E)             fewer than 50% of employers offer paid parental leave for employees, and

(F)             while 73% of workplaces have a formal policy and strategy in place to support flexible working arrangements for employees, only 2.3% have set targets for men’s engagement in flexible work, and

(iii)            that the Federal Government’s Retirement Income Review Consultation paper acknowledges that the wages gap between men and women affects women’s ability to save for retirement, leading to women retiring with lower average superannuation balances than men; and

(b)              calls on the Federal Government to:

(i)                increase the resourcing for WGEA and expand its coverage to include the public sector,

(ii)              require all large employers to publicly report their gender pay gap, and strengthen WGEA’s powers to take action against employers who fail to report,

(iii)            prohibit the use of pay gag clauses in employment contracts, which disguise the gender pay gap in the private sector,

(iv)            require superannuation contributions to be made for employees taking paid parental leave,

(v)              set gender pay equality as an objective of awards and the Fair Work Act, and

(vi)            take action to close the gender retirement income gap.

*288   Senators Hughes, Griff, Lambie and Steele-John: To move—

(1)               That a select committee, known as the Select Committee on Autism, be established to inquire into and report on the services, support and life outcomes for autistic people in Australia and the associated need for a National Autism Strategy, with particular reference to:

(a)              current approaches and barriers to consistent, timely and best practice autism diagnosis;

(b)              the prevalence of autism in Australia;

(c)              misdiagnosis and underrepresentation of females in autism data, and gender bias in autism assessment and support services;

(d)             international best practice with regards to diagnosis, support services and education;

(e)              the demand for and adequacy of Commonwealth, state and local government services to meet the needs of autistic people at all life stages;

(f)               the interaction between services provided by the Commonwealth, state and local governments, including:

(i)                health and mental health,

(ii)              education,

(iii)            employment,

(iv)            justice, and

(v)              housing;

(g)              the social and economic cost of failing to provide adequate services, including to support key life stage transitions of autistic people;

(h)             the adequacy and efficacy of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) for autistic people, including:

(i)                autism understanding within the NDIS,

(ii)              the utility of the Early Childhood Early Intervention Pathway for autistic children,

(iii)            the ability of the NDIS to support autistic people with complex needs, including those transitioning from prison settings, and

(iv)            the adequacy and appropriateness of supports to empower autistic people to participate in the NDIS planning process, and exercise self-determination through choice and control over their support services;

(i)                the development of a National Autism Strategy and its interaction with the next phase of the National Disability Strategy;

(j)                the adequacy of funding for research into autism;

(k)              the social inclusion and participation of autistic people within the economy and community;

(l)                the capacity and sustainability of advocacy for autistic people;

(m)           any bill that relates to matters within the scope of this inquiry that is referred to this committee; and

(n)             any other related matters.

(2)              That the committee present its final report on or before the first sitting day of October 2021.

(3)              That the committee consist of six senators, two nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, two nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate, Senator Griff and Senator Steele-John.

(4)              That:

(a)              participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator;

(b)              participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee; and

(c)              a participating member shall be taken to be a member of the committee for the purpose of forming a quorum of the committee if a majority of members of the committee is not present.

(5)              That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that not all members have been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.

(6)              That the committee elect as chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, and Senator Stirling Griff as deputy chair.

(7)              That the deputy chair shall act as chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.

(8)              That the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, may appoint another member of the committee to act as chair during the temporary absence of both the chair and deputy chair at a meeting of the committee.

(9)              That, in the event of an equally divided vote, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, have a casting vote.

(10)           That the committee have power to appoint subcommittees consisting of three or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to examine.

(11)            That the committee and any subcommittee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings, the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.

(12)           That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President of the Senate.

(13)           That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such documents and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public.

Notice of motion altered on 26 November 2019 pursuant to standing order 77.

*289   Senator Faruqi : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                all forms of asbestos are carcinogenic to humans,

(ii)              according to the World Health Organisation, an estimated 125 million people around the world continue to be exposed to asbestos at work, including in Australia’s neighbours in the Asia-Pacific, and the most efficient way to eliminate asbestos-related diseases is to stop the use of all types of asbestos,

(iii)            Australia is a founding member of the Asian Development Bank,

(iv)            the Asian Development Bank’s Safeguard Policy prohibits investments that include the ‘production of trade in or use of unbonded asbestos fibres’, however, this does not apply to the purchase and use of bonded asbestos cement sheeting where the asbestos content is less than 20% - this in effect is an exemption for almost all bonded asbestos-containing materials used in the construction sector, and

(v)              Union Aid Abroad-Australian People for Health, Education and Development Abroad (APHEDA) and their partners in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Indonesia have been at the forefront of work to ban asbestos through the ‘Asbestos. Not Here. Not Anywhere’ campaign;

(b)              congratulates Union Aid Abroad-APHEDA and their local partners for their work in campaigning to ban asbestos in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and Indonesia; and

(c)               calls on the Federal Government to lobby for a change in policy to end the use of asbestos in Asian Development Bank financed projects.

*290   Senators O’Neill, McCarthy and Urquhart: To move—

(1)               That the Senate notes that legal professional privilege is not a recognised ground for refusing to provide information to the Senate.

(2)              That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Government Services, by 5.30 pm on 28 November 2019, all legal advice that has been received by the Government, the Department of Human Services, or Services Australia, relating to the 2015-16 Budget Measure ‘Better Management of the Social Welfare System’, the Online Compliance Intervention (OCI), the Employment Income Confirmation (EIC), and the Check and Update Past Information (CUPI), known as the ‘Online Compliance Programme’.

*291    Senators Wong, Farrell, Gallacher and Marielle Smith: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the Department of Home Affairs employs over 160 dedicated and hardworking South Australians to process visa applications,

(ii)              this is crucial work that ensures the integrity of our visa processing system and is the cornerstone of our sovereignty as a nation,

(iii)            the Federal Government’s plan to privatise Australia’s visa system threatens the livelihoods of over 160 South Australians and their families; and

(iv)            privatising Australia’s visa system will lead to increased costs of visas, greater risks of worker exploitation, data security breaches and will make protecting national security more difficult;

(b)              condemns the Federal Government for auctioning Australian jobs off to the highest bidder, and for undermining the integrity of our visa processing system and our nation’s sovereignty; and

(c)               calls on the Federal Government to guarantee the protection of these 163 jobs in South Australia, and the 2000 jobs across Australia, which will be lost under the Morrison Government if they persist with their efforts to privatise Australia’s visa system.

*292   Senators Siewert and Di Natale: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              acknowledges that:

(i)                a class action against companies owned by Johnson & Johnson, on behalf of 1350 Australian women who had transvaginal mesh and tape products implanted was won last week,

(ii)              thousands of women have been left in severe, debilitating and chronic pain, as well as suffering a significant psychological toll as a result of transvaginal mesh devices,

(iii)            transvaginal mesh devices were not properly tested for safety before being allowed onto the Australian market, though Johnson & Johnson, and the associated companies, were aware of the potential for serious complications and they aggressively promoted and marketed them as a cheap and a relatively risk-free way to boost profits,

(iv)            women were frequently not believed when they told doctors of pain and symptoms, and

(v)              women are still not getting the care and support that they need;

(b)              notes that not all the recommendations contained in the 2018 report of the Community Affairs References Committee, Number of women in Australia who have had transvaginal mesh implants and related matters , have been implemented; and

(c)               calls on the Australian Government to implement recommendation no. 13 to ensure the women affected by mesh have access to the full suite of services and supports they need.

*293   Senator Watt : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                there are 120,000 older Australians waiting for their approved home care package, with many waiting more than two years for the care they have been approved for,

(ii)              there are more than 16,000 older Australians who died waiting for the approved home care package which they were assessed for in 2017-18, and sadly, that was approximately 300 older Australians who died each week in that year waiting for care, and

(iii)            there are around 14,000 older Australians who entered residential aged care prematurely because they could not get the care they were assessed for and approved for in 2017-18, and sadly, that was approximately 200 older Australians each week having no other choice but to enter residential aged care;

(b)              further notes that, since 2017, the number of older Australians waiting for home care grew from 88,000 to 120,000; and

(c)               condemns the Morrison Government for its inadequate response to the Royal Commission’s interim report, and not providing the home care older Australians need.

*294   Senator McGrath : To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the Paradise Dam, located in the drought-declared Wide Bay-Burnett region, opened in 2006 at a cost of $200 million to Queensland taxpayers,

(ii)              105,000 megalitres of water has been released from the dam, and

(iii)            it is one of the largest infrastructure failures in the history of Australia; and



 

(b)              calls on the Queensland Government to:

(i)                publish the safety and engineering reports that led to the decision to release water from the dam, and

(ii)              establish a public parliamentary inquiry into the design and construction of the dam.

Business for future consideration

On the next day of sitting (28 November 2019)
Business of the Senate—Notices of motion

Notice given 16 September 2019

1           Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, made under the Aged Care Act 1997 , be disallowed [F2019L00511].

Two sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the motion or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

2          Senator McKim, on behalf of the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights: To move—That the Quality of Care Amendment (Minimising the Use of Restraints) Principles 2019, made under the Aged Care Act 1997 , be disallowed [F2019L00511].

Two sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the motion or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Privileges—Standing Committee

Report to be presented on the development of a foreign influence transparency scheme.

2         Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Legislation Amendment (Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority Board and Other Improvements) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )



 

Government Business—Notice of motion

Notice given 25 November 2019

1           Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians ( Senator Colbeck ): To move—That, in accordance with section 5 of the Parliament Act 1974 , the Senate approves the following proposals by the National Capital Authority for capital works within the Parliamentary Zone:

(a)    National Gallery of Australia Foreshore Public Domain upgrade; and

(b)    the Sir John Gorton commemorative sculpture.

 

Order for Production of Documents

219      Gender and sexuality census questions—Order for production of documents

By the Minister representing the Assistant Treasurer to table, by 28 November 2019, documents relating to the Australian Bureau of Statistics census and questions on gender and sexuality. ( Motion of Senator Rice agreed to 13 November 2019. )

On 2 December 2019
Business of the Senate—Notice of motion

Notice given 26 November 2019

*1        Senator Whish-Wilson : To move—That the following matter be referred to the Economics References Committee for inquiry and report by 7 September 2020:

The review of foreign investment proposals against the national interest test, with particular reference to:

(a)              the protection of Australia’s market-based system from manipulation that would benefit proposed foreign investment;

(b)              the assessment of the impact of proposed foreign investment on market concentration and competition;

(c)              the imposition of conditions on foreign investors, and any limitation that trade agreements have on the imposition of such conditions;

(d)             the enforceability of market access provisions in trade agreements, and the impact of this enforcement on the integrity of Australia’s market­ based system;

(e)              the role of the Foreign Investment Review Board; and

(f)               any other related matters.



 

General Business—Notice of motion

Notice given 30 July 2019

72       Senator Kitching : To move—

(1)               That a select committee, to be known as the Select Committee on Integrity, be established to inquire into and report on the integrity of government administration, with particular reference to:

(a)              the adequacy and performance of existing integrity measures including, but not limited to:

(i)                the Statement of Ministerial Standards, and

(ii)              the Lobbyist Code and Register of Lobbyists;

(b)              the funding, functions and performance of Commonwealth integrity agencies;

(c)              the adequacy of government responses to Senate committee reports;

(d)             the adequacy of government responses to Senate orders for the production of documents;

(e)              the operation of the Commonwealth Procurement Framework;

(f)               the administration of the Freedom of Information Act 1982 legislation;

(g)              any proposals to strengthen the integrity of government administration; and

(h)             any related matters.

(2)              That the committee present its final report on or before the third sitting day of 2021.

(3)              That the committee consist of 8 senators, as follows:

(a)              2 nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate;

(b)              2 nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate;

(c)              1 nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens; and

(d)             3 nominated by minor party and independent senators.

(4)              That:

(a)              participating members may be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator; and

(b)              participating members may participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee.

(5)              That 4 members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee.

(6)              That the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that not all members have been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy.

(7)              That the committee elect as chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate and as deputy chair one of the members nominated by the Leader of the Australian Greens or by minor party and independent senators.

(8)              That the deputy chair shall act chair when the chair is absent from a meeting of the committee or the position of chair is temporarily vacant.

(9)              That, in the event of an equality of voting, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, have a casting vote.

(10)           That the committee have power to appoint subcommittees consisting of 3 or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to consider.

(11)            That the committee and any subcommittee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament or dissolution of the House of Representatives, and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings and the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit.

(12)           That the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President.

(13)           That the committee be empowered to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public.

On 3 December 2019
General Business—Notices of motion

Notice given 11 November 2019

217      Senator Brown : To move—That the Senate notes:

(a)              that 3 December 2019 is the International Day of People with Disability;

(b)              that the theme for 2019 is ‘Empowering persons with disabilities and ensuring inclusiveness and equality’;

(c)               that 3 December is recognised each year as the day for the celebration of the achievements of people living with disability;

(d)              that it is also the day when we promote awareness of the challenges faced by people with disability, and the role that communities and society can play in accelerating the eradication of barriers to social inclusion, equality, participation and citizenship;

(e)              that approximately 1 billion people worldwide, and 3.96 million people in Australia, live with disability - this represents 15% of the global population and 20% of the population of Australia; and

(f)                the remarkable contributions people with disability make to Australia, and congratulates all of the organisations and communities throughout Australia that are celebrating this important day.

Notice given 13 November 2019

249     Senators Sheldon and Gallacher: To move—That the Senate—

(a)              notes that:

(i)                the road transport industry is Australia’s deadliest industry,

(ii)              a 2016 report by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics stated ‘Heavy trucks are disproportionately involved in casualty crashes: approximately 16% of road crash fatalities and 4% of injuries involve these vehicles’ - Australian Bureau of Statistics data shows that trucks represent just 3.6% of registered motor vehicles,

(iii)            the latest quarterly report from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics shows 183 people died from truck crashes in the year to June 2019,

(iv)            Safe Work Australia shows transport workers have the highest numbers of deaths out of any profession - so far this year, 41 transport workers have been killed on the job out of a total of 121 workers killed,

(v)              on 15 October 2019, Channel 9 News aired shocking evidence of a disregard for safety: safety doors blocked, fire equipment hemmed in, chaotic food storage, filthy floors, faulty electrics, poor lighting for truck drivers delivering goods and a flooded yard outside a loading dock at Aldi stores across Australia, and

(vi)            on 16 October 2019, truck drivers across Australia took part in nationwide protests to highlight concerns they have with safety at Aldi; and

(b)              congratulates transport workers and their worker representatives, the Transport Workers Union of Australia, on helping bring the safety issues at Aldi to light.

On 4 December 2019
Business of the Senate—Notice of motion

Notice given 26 November 2019

*1         Senator Brown : To move—That the Marine Order 47 (Offshore industry units) 2019, made under the Navigation Act 2012 , be disallowed [F2019L01324].

Fifteen sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the motion or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Jobs for the Future in Regional Areas—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

2         Community Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Amendment (Assisted Reproductive Treatment Statistics) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 5 December 2019
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on the feasibility of a National Horse Traceability Register for all horses.

2         Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on regional inequality in Australia.

On 3 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Sport Integrity Australia) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 7 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Economics Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

2         Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

Government Business—Order of the day

1          Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 —( Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries, Senator Duniam )

Second reading—Adjourned debate ( 11 November 2019 ).

On 12 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on access to medicinal cannabis.

Twelve sitting days after today (13 February 2020)
Business of the Senate—Notice of motion

Notice given 14 November 2019

1           Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Ordinances ( Senator Fierravanti-Wells ): To move—That the Helicopter Aerial Application Endorsements Exemption 2019, made under the Civil Aviation Act 1988 , be disallowed [F2019L01132].

Thirteen sitting days remain, including today, to resolve the motion or the instrument will be deemed to have been disallowed.

On the tenth sitting day of 2020 (26 February 2020)
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legislation Committees

Reports to be presented on annual reports tabled by 31 October 2019.

On 27 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on the impact of changes to service delivery models on the administration and running of Government programs.

2         Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s declarations made under certain international laws.

On 28 February 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the provisions of the Native Title Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 1 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Corporations and Financial Services—Joint Statutory Committee

Report to be presented on the regulation of auditing in Australia.

On 16 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on the disclosure and reporting of sensitive and classified information.



 

2         Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on the impact of feral deer, pigs and goats in Australia.

On 19 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Tax Transparency in Procurement and Grants) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 23 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s oil and gas reserves.

On 24 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legislation Committees

Reports to be presented on the 2019-20 additional estimates.

On 25 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on Centrelink’s compliance program.

2         Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s dairy industry.

On 26 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Environment and Communications Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Competition and Consumer Amendment (Prevention of Exploitation of Indigenous Cultural Expressions) Bill 2019. ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 27 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on the adequacy of Newstart and related payments and alternative mechanisms to determine the level of income support payments in Australia.

On or before 30 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Road Safety—Joint Select Committee

Interim report to be presented.

On 31 March 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Environment and Communications Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2017 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 14 May 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Legal and Constitutional Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on nationhood, national identity and democracy.

2         Environment and Communications Legislation Committee

Report to be presented on the Product Stewardship Amendment (Packaging and Plastics) Bill 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

3         Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on the impact of seismic testing on fisheries and the marine environment.

On 15 June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

On 17 June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on policy, regulatory, taxation, administrative and funding priorities for Australian shipping.

On 18 June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on Federal Government’s drought response.

On 23 June 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legislation Committees

Reports to be presented on the 2020-21 Budget estimates.

On 25 June 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s sovereign naval shipbuilding capability.

2         Economics References Committee

Report to be presented on unlawful underpayment of employees’ remuneration.

On or before 31 July 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Road Safety—Joint Select Committee

Final report to be presented.

On 7 September 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Environment and Communications References Committee

Report to be presented on Australia’s faunal extinction crisis.

On the tenth sitting day after 30 June 2020 (9 September 2020)
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Legislation Committees

Reports to be presented on annual reports tabled by 30 April 2020.

On 30 September 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on the management of the Inland Rail project.

On 1 October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on water quality outcomes in the Great Barrier Reef.



 

On 7 October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Australia’s Family Law System—Joint Select Committee

Report to be presented.

On 12 October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Financial Technology and Regulatory Technology—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

On 14 October 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport References Committee

Report to be presented on the road transport industry.

On 1 November 2020
Business of the Senate—Orders of the day

1          Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

2         Select Committee on the Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan

Report to be presented on the Constitution Alteration (Water Resources) 2019 . ( Referred pursuant to Selection of Bills Committee report. )

On 3 December 2020
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Effectiveness of the Australian Government’s Northern Australia agenda—Select Committee

Report to be presented.

On the last sitting day in May 2022
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Implementation of the National Redress Scheme—Joint Select Committee

Report to be presented.



 

Within 6 months of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters receiving the reference
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee

Report to be presented on a review of the operation of the amendments, dealing with foreign donations and related matters, made by the Electoral Legislation Amendment (Electoral Funding and Disclosure Reform) Act 2018 , to commence on the second anniversary for the Royal Assent of the Electoral Legislation Amendment (Electoral Funding and Disclosure Reform) Act 2018 .

( Bill received royal assent on 29 November 2018. )

Date unspecified
Business of the Senate—Order of the day

1          Community Affairs References Committee

Report to be presented on a possible cancer cluster on the Bellarine Peninsula.

Other information

Bills currently before committees

 

Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Legislation Amendment (Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority Board and Other Improvements) Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport Legislation Committee (referred 19 September 2019; reporting date: 28 November 2019)

Anti-Money Laundering and Counter-Terrorism Financing and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 14 November 2019; reporting date: 7 February 2020)
Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Amendment (Assisted Reproductive Treatment Statistics) Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Community Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 25 July 2019; reporting date: 4 December 2019)

Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Amendment (Sport Integrity Australia) Bill 2019

Referred to Community Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 14 November 2019; reporting date: 3 February 2020)

Coal-Fired Power Funding Prohibition Bill 2017 ‡

Referred to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee (referred 4 July 2019; reporting date: 31 March 2020)

Competition and Consumer Amendment (Prevention of Exploitation of Indigenous Cultural Expressions) Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee (referred 4 July 2019; reporting date: 26 March 2020)

Constitution Alteration (Water Resources) 2019 ‡

Referred to Select Committee on the Multi-Jurisdictional Management and Execution of the Murray Darling Basin Plan (referred 12 September 2019; reporting date: 1 November 2020)

Currency (Restrictions on the Use of Cash) Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Economics Legislation Committee (referred 19 September 2019; reporting date: 7 February 2020)

Native Title Legislation Amendment Bill 2019 [provisions] ‡

Referred to Legal and Constitutional Affairs Legislation Committee (referred 17 October 2019; reporting date: 28 February 2020)

Product Stewardship Amendment (Packaging and Plastics) Bill 2019 ‡

Referred to Environment and Communications Legislation Committee (referred 12 September 2019; reporting date: 14 May 2020)

Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Tax Transparency in Procurement and Grants) Bill 2019

Referred to Finance and Public Administration Legislation Committee (referred 14 November 2019; reporting date: 19 March 2020)

‡ Reference adopted by the Senate following a recommendation of the Selection of Bills Committee.

Bills discharged or negatived

Private senators’ bills

Plebiscite (Future Migration Level) Bill 2018

Second reading negatived, 29 July 2019.

Protecting Australian Dairy Bill 2019

Second reading negatived, 11 November 2019.

Questions on notice

Questions remaining unanswered

Nos 929 to 933, 935 to 944, 946 to 960.

The full text of Question on Notice and their answers are available online at Questions on Notice .

 

Orders of the Senate

Allocation of departments/agencies

That departments and agencies be allocated to legislative and general purpose standing committees as follows:

Community Affairs

Health

Social Services, including Services Australia

Economics

Industry, Innovation and Science

Treasury

Education and Employment

Education

Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business, including Industrial Relations

Environment and Communications

Communications and the Arts

Environment and Energy

Finance and Public Administration

Finance

Parliament

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade

Defence, including Veterans’ Affairs

Foreign Affairs and Trade

Legal and Constitutional Affairs

Attorney-General, excluding Industrial Relations

Home Affairs

Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport

Agriculture

Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )

Australia’s Emissions Projections—Order of continuing effect

(1)               That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for the Environment, by not later than the last sitting day of each year, the report detailing Australia’s estimated future greenhouse gas emissions, Australia’s Emissions Projections .

(2)              This order is of continuing effect.

( Agreed to 25 November 2019 )

Environment and Communications References Committee—Determination of committee chair—Standing order 25(9)

That, pursuant to standing order 25(9), the Senate determines:

(a)              that the chair of the Environment and Communications References Committee shall be elected by that committee from members nominated by minor parties or independent senators; and

(b)              that this order remain in effect until the President is duly notified of an agreement that meets the terms of standing order 25(9)(c).

( Agreed to 2 November 2011; varied 13 September 2016 )

Estimates hearings—2019-20 additional estimates; 2020-21 Budget estimates and supplementary Budget estimates

(1)               That estimates hearings by legislation committees for 2020 be scheduled as follows:

2019-20 additional estimates:

Monday, 2 March and Tuesday, 3 March ( Group A )

Wednesday, 4 March and Thursday, 5 March ( Group B ).

2020-21 Budget estimates:

Monday, 25 May to Thursday, 28 May, and, if required, Friday, 29 May ( Group A )

Tuesday, 2 June to Friday, 5 June, and, if required, Friday, 19 June ( Group B )

Monday, 19 October and Tuesday, 20 October ( supplementary hearings—Group A )

Wednesday, 21 October and Thursday, 22 October ( supplementary hearings—Group B ).

(2)              That cross portfolio estimates hearings on Indigenous matters and on Murray Darling Basin Plan matters be scheduled for Friday, 6 March, Friday, 29 May and Friday, 23 October, but not restricted to these days.

(3)              That the committees consider the proposed expenditure in accordance with the allocation of departments and agencies to committees agreed to by the Senate.

(4)             That committees meet in the following groups:

Group A:

Environment and Communications

Finance and Public Administration

Legal and Constitutional Affairs

Rural and Regional Affairs and Transport

Group B:

Community Affairs

Economics

Education and Employment

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade.

(5)              That the committees report to the Senate on the following dates:

(a)        Tuesday, 24 March 2020 in respect of the 2019-20 additional estimates; and

(b)        Tuesday, 23 June 2020 in respect of the 2020-21 Budget estimates.

( Agreed to 14 November 2019 )

Estimates questions (unanswered)—2019-20 Budget estimates

That—

(a)              answers to outstanding questions taken on notice in relation to the 2018-19 additional estimates and the 2019-20 Budget estimates, and which remained unanswered at the beginning of the 46th Parliament, be provided to legislation committees by 31 July 2019; and

(b)              for the purposes of standing order 74(5), the day set for answering each of the unanswered questions is 31 July 2019.

( Agreed to 29 July 2019 )

Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Amendment (Ensuring Integrity) Bill 2019—Consideration
That—
(a)       the routine of business for the remainder of today shall be:
(i)        consideration of the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Amendment (Ensuring Integrity) Bill 2019, second reading speeches only,
(ii)       if a division is called for after 7.20 pm, the division shall be taken on the next day of sitting, and
(iii)      the Senate shall adjourn without debate after the conclusion of the second reading debate, or at 9 pm, or after a motion for the adjournment is moved by a minister, whichever is the earlier; and
(b)       on Wednesday, 27 November 2019:
(i)        the routine of business from 7.20 pm shall be consideration of the Fair Work (Registered Organisations) Amendment (Ensuring Integrity) Bill 2019, second reading speeches only, and
(ii)       if a division is called for after 7.20 pm, the division shall be taken on the next day of sitting, and
(iii)      the Senate shall adjourn without debate after the conclusion of the second reading debate, or at midnight, or after a motion for the adjournment is moved by a minister, whichever is the earlier.

( Agreed to 26 November 2019 )

Formal business and suspensions of standing orders—Standing order 66—Amendment

That, in accordance with the recommendation in the Procedure Committee’s first report of 2019, standing order 66 be amended as follows:

After paragraph (3), insert:

(4)              The question on any motion to suspend standing orders moved in the following circumstances shall be put immediately without any amendment or debate:

(a)        any motion to suspend standing orders to provide for the consideration of a motion for which formality has been denied; and

(b)        any other motion to suspend standing orders moved during consideration of formal business under standing order 66.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )

Indigenous Australians—
Closing the Gap statement—Resolution

That each year, on the day on which the Prime Minister presents the annual report on progress in meeting the ‘Closing the Gap’ targets, the sitting of the Senate be suspended 10 minutes prior to the time set for the presentation of the report in the House of Representatives, until the ringing of the bells, to enable senators to attend.

Languages—Amendment to standing order 35 and resolution

At the end of standing order 35, add :

(3)              If evidence is heard by a committee in an Indigenous Australian language the transcript of that evidence shall record both:

(a)              the evidence as submitted in the Indigenous Australian language; and

(b)              an English translation of the evidence.

Resolution :

The Senate resolves that, where a committee has heard evidence in an Indigenous Australian language, the transcription by Hansard staff of the evidence as submitted, and its translation into English, should be assisted by the person who gave evidence or a person from their community.

( Agreed to 17 October 2019 upon adoption of the recommendation in the Procedure Committee’s second report of 2019 )

Meeting of Senate—2019

That the days of meeting of the Senate for the remainder of 2019 be as follows:

Winter sittings:

Monday, 22 July to Thursday, 25 July

Monday, 29 July to Thursday, 1 August

Spring sittings:

Monday, 9 September to Thursday, 12 September

Monday, 16 September to Thursday, 19 September

Monday, 14 October to Thursday, 17 October

Monday, 11 November to Thursday, 14 November

Monday, 25 November to Thursday, 28 November

Monday, 2 December to Thursday, 5 December.

( Agreed to 4 July 2019 )



 

Meeting of Senate—2020

That the days of meeting of the Senate for 2020 be as follows:

Autumn sittings:

Tuesday, 4 February to Thursday, 6 February

Monday, 10 February to Thursday, 13 February

Monday, 24 February to Thursday, 27 February

Monday, 23 March to Thursday, 26 March

Budget sittings:

Tuesday, 12 May to Thursday, 14 May

Winter sittings:

Monday, 15 June to Thursday, 18 June

Monday, 22 June to Thursday, 25 June

Spring sittings:

Tuesday, 11 August to Thursday, 13 August

Monday, 17 August to Thursday, 20 August

Monday, 7 September to Thursday, 10 September

Monday, 14 September to Thursday, 17 September

Monday, 12 October to Thursday, 15 October

Monday, 9 November to Thursday, 12 November

Monday, 23 November to Thursday, 26 November

Monday, 30 November to Thursday, 3 December.

( Agreed to 14 November 2019 )

Protection visas—Order of continuing effect

(1)               The Senate notes that the Australian public has a right to know vital information that is held within the Department of Home Affairs, and that regular and timely information should be reported to the Senate and the Australian people to provide oversight and transparency on activities of the Department.

(2)              That there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Home Affairs, by not later than 14 days after each:

(a)              31 January;

(b)              28 February;

(c)               31 March;

(d)              30 April;

(e)              31 May;

(f)                30 June;

(g)              31 July;

(h)              31 August;

(i)                30 September;

(j)                31 October;

(k)              30 November; and

(l)                31 December, a monthly update of onshore protection visa lodgements.

(3)              Each monthly update must include:

(a)              the total number of protection visa lodgements made onshore during the period;

(b)              the total number of protection visa lodgements made onshore at airports, by airport and state, during the period;

(c)               the total number of individuals, by country of origin, that made a lodgement for a protection visa onshore during the period;

(d)              the total number of individuals, by age and gender, that made a lodgement for a protection visa onshore during the period;

(e)              the total number of refugee status determinations made during the period;

(f)                the total number of individuals granted a Final Protection Visa during the period;

(g)              the total number of individuals, by country of origin, granted a Final Protection Visa during the period, and the grant rate;

(h)              the total number of individuals, by age and gender, granted a Final Protection Visa during the period, and the grant rate;

(i)                the total number of individuals that were not granted a Final Protection Visa during the period, and the grant rate;

(j)                the total number of individuals, by country of origin, that were not granted a Final Protection Visa during the period, and the grant rate;

(k)              the total number of individuals, by age and gender, that were not granted a Final Protection Visa during the period, and the grant rate;

(l)                the total number of individuals that were not granted a Final Protection Visa that were deported during the period, and the deportation rate;

(m)           the total number of refugee status determinations awaiting a decision at the end of the period; and

(n)              the total number of individuals that were not granted a Final Protection Visa that have yet to be deported at the end of the period.

(4)             If the Senate is not sitting when a monthly update is ready for presentation, the statement is to be presented to the President under standing order 166.

(5)              This order is of continuing effect.

( Agreed to 14 November 2019 )

 

Contingent notices of motion

Conduct of business

1          Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann): To move (contingent on the Senate on any day concluding its consideration of any item of business and prior to the Senate proceeding to the consideration of another item of business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent a minister moving a motion to provide for the consideration of any matter.

2         Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on the Senate on any day concluding its consideration of any item of business and prior to the Senate proceeding to the consideration of another item of business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving a motion relating to the conduct of the business of the Senate or to provide for the consideration of any matter.

Formal business

3         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann)

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator objecting to a motion being taken as formal)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion being moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

4         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann)

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator being refused leave to move an amendment to a motion discovered during formal business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent that senator moving the amendment to the motion.

Limitation of time

5         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann): To move (contingent on the chair declaring that the time allotted for the consideration of a bill, or any stage of a bill, has expired)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent further consideration of the bill, or the stage of the bill, without limitation of time or for a specified period.

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

6         To move (contingent on a minister moving a motion that a bill be considered an urgent bill)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent debate taking place on the motion.

7         To move (contingent on a minister moving a motion to specify time to be allotted to the consideration of a bill, or any stage of a bill)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent the motion being debated without limitation of time and each senator speaking for the time allotted by standing orders.

8         To move (contingent on the chair declaring that the time allotted for the consideration of a bill, or any stage of a bill, has expired)—That so much of standing order 142 be suspended as would prevent further consideration of the bill, or the stage of the bill, without limitation of time or for a specified period.

Matters of urgency

9         Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann): To move (contingent on the moving of a motion to debate a matter of urgency under standing order 75)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent a minister moving an amendment to the motion.

10        Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on the moving of a motion to debate a matter of urgency under standing order 75)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent a senator moving an amendment to the motion.

Order of business

11        Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on the Senate on any day concluding its consideration of any item of business and prior to the Senate proceeding to the consideration of another item of business)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving a motion relating to the order of business on the Notice Paper .

Questions without notice

12         Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on a minister at question time on any day asking that further questions be placed on notice)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving a motion that, at question time on any day, questions may be put to ministers until 30 questions, including supplementary questions, have been asked and answered.

Statements

13        Leader of the Government in the Senate (Senator Cormann)

Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator being refused leave to make a statement to the Senate)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent that senator making that statement.

Tabling of documents

14         Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (Senator Wong)

Leader of the Australian Greens (Senator Di Natale)

Leader of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (Senator Hanson)

Senator Bernardi

Senator Patrick

To move (contingent on any senator being refused leave to table a document in the Senate)—That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the senator moving that the document be tabled.

Appointments to statutory authorities

National Archives of Australia Advisory Council

Senator Carr ( appointed 1 August 2019, for a period of 3 years ).

Council of the National Library of Australia

Senator Bilyk ( appointed 1 August 2019, for a period of 3 years ).

Parliamentary Retiring Allowances Trust

Senators Abetz and Carr (appointed 1 August 2019 ).

Temporary chairs of committees

Senators Askew, Bernardi, Bilyk, Brockman, Brown, Faruqi, Fawcett, Fierravanti-Wells, Gallacher, Griff, Kitching, Polley, Sterle and Stoker

 

 

Richard Pye

Clerk of the Senate



 

 

Ministerial representation

 

 

 

Ministers

Representing

 

Senator the Honourable Mathias Cormann

Minister for Finance

   Vice-President of the Executive Council

   Leader of the Government in the Senate

 

 

Prime Minister

Minister for the Public Service

Minister Assisting the Prime Minister for the Public Service and Cabinet

Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure

Treasurer

Assistant Treasurer

Minister for Housing

 

 

Senator the Honourable Bridget McKenzie

Minister for Agriculture

 

Minister for Water Resources, Drought, Rural Finance, Natural Disaster and Emergency Management

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Simon Birmingham

Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment

   Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate

 

 

Assistant Trade and Investment Minister

Minister for Education

Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction

Minister for the Environment

 

 

Senator the Honourable Marise Payne

Minister for Foreign Affairs

Minister for Women

 

 

Minister for International Development and the Pacific

Attorney-General

Minister for Industrial Relations

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Richard Colbeck

Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians

Minister for Youth and Sport

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Michaelia Cash

Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business

 

Minister for Health

Minister for Home Affairs

Minister for Immigration, Citizenship, Migrant Services and Multicultural Affairs

 

Senator the Honourable Matt Canavan

Minister for Resources and Northern Australia

 

Deputy Prime Minister

Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development

Minister for Regional Services, Decentralisation and Local Government

Minister for Industry, Science and Technology

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Linda Reynolds, CSC

Minister for Defence

 

Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts

Assistant Defence Minister

Minister for Veterans and Defence Personnel

Minister for Defence Industry

 

 

 

 

Senator the Honourable Anne Ruston

Minister for Families and Social Services

   Manager of Government Business in the Senate

 

 

Minister for Indigenous Australians

Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme

Minister for Government Services

 

 

Assistant Ministers - designated as Parliamentary Secretaries under the Ministers of State Act 1952

 

Senator the Honourable Jane Hume

Assistant Minister for Superannuation, Financial Services and Financial Technology

 

 

Senator the Honourable Zed Seselja

Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters

 

 

Senator the Honourable Jonathon Duniam

Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries

Assistant Minister for Regional Tourism

 

 

 



 

Senate sittings and estimates hearings for 2019

 

July

 

 

August

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September

 

 

October

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November

 

 

December

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Key

" Date of Senate ⅔ Cut-Off

S—Senate sitting week only

—Supplementary Budget estimates

*—Cross portfolio estimates hearings on Indigenous matters, and Murray-Darling Basin Plan matters