Note: Where available, the PDF/Word icon below is provided to view the complete and fully formatted document

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices given for Thursday, 3 September 2020

    *1    Ms C. F. King : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Commonwealth Government is responsible for borders, quarantine, and assisting Australians in jeopardy and stranded overseas;

(b)         the Prime Minister agreed to cap international passenger arrivals on 13 July 2020;

(c)         since the cap was imposed, the number of stranded Australians overseas has risen dramatically, with 23,000 Aussies unable to get home;

(d)         some 15 per cent of these Australians are classified as vulnerable by the Government, including many with health and financial concerns that require urgent attention;

(e)         the Government of the United Kingdom says Australia is the only country in the world to have actively restricted its citizens returning; and

(f)          the Government has made no announcements to indicate they have a plan to lift flight caps or increase quarantine capacity, including identifying new quarantine facilities and training quarantine personnel; and

(2)         calls on the Government to take urgent steps to help every stranded Australian return home by:

(a)         increasing the number of permitted arrivals under international flight caps through using Commonwealth resources to increase quarantine capacity;

(b)         stopping price gouging by airlines flying into Australia; and

(c)         putting all options on the table to return stranded Australians, especially from places like the United Kingdom, India, Philippines and Lebanon - including charter flights.

              ( Notice given 2 September 2020. )

      *2    Mr Husic : To move—That the Australian Postal Corporation (Performance Standards) Amendment (2020 Measures No. 1) Regulations 2020 made under Australian Postal Corporation Act 1989 on 14 May 2020 and presented to the House on 10 June 2020, be disallowed.

              ( Notice given 2 September 2020. Regulations will be taken to have been disallowed unless disposed within 15 sitting days including today. )

Notices —continued

       1    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australian postage rates for standard letters have near doubled over the past decade;

(b)         Australia Post parcel delivery rates increased in October 2019;

(c)         increased postal rates directly impact on business viability and competitiveness with overseas suppliers;

(d)         higher postal charges are inevitably passed on to Australian households by providers of goods and services; and

(e)         high postal rates have a disproportionate impact on older Australians and migrants because they have a greater reliance on postal services; and

(2)         calls on the Government to consider the whole of society impact when considering future postage rate increases.

              ( Notice given 3 December 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. )

       2    Ms T. M. Butler : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the devastating effect of drought on water supplies in Australian local communities; and

(b)         that the recent bushfire crisis has compounded water insecurity in affected areas;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         the Eurobodalla Shire Council’s 2016 proposal for a second water storage facility in the southern part of the shire would add 3,000 mega litres of water storage to the region;

(b)         that the project has support from local and state governments, with the NSW state Government committing $26.3 million in October 2019;

(c)         that the Eurobodalla Shire Council has called for a $51 million commitment from the Government to build the dam, noting they will fund the rest of the $105 million project; and

(d)         all supporting parties should ensure the project is environmentally sound;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         Australians and regional communities are rightly sceptical about the Government’s track record on water infrastructure and drought policy;

(b)         in 2013, Prime Minister Abbott said he would build 100 dams across Australia—three terms later and in its seventh year of power, the Government has failed to fulfil its promise;

(c)         Prime Minister Morrison was caught out for being loose with the truth in October 2019 when he claimed his government was contributing more investment in NSW dam infrastructure than they actually were; and

(d)         more than two years after the announcement of the $2 billion National Water Infrastructure Facility, not a single dollar has been spent;

(4)         further notes that the Eurobodalla community has been waiting for a response from the Government since October 2019 in relation to their water storage proposal; and

(5)         calls on the Government to urgently respond to the Eurobodalla Shire Council’s request for funds for the Southern Water Supply Storage project.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       3    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         South Australia has had the highest unemployment rate in Australia;

(b)         the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for South Australia in December was 6.4 per cent;

(c)         the South Australian economy has stagnated since the closure of General Motors Holden and the associated auto industries; and

(d)         the recent bushfires and the coronavirus will further impact the South Australian economy; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         remain committed to the Murray Darling Basin Plan;

(b)         ensure federal fire assistance funding to South Australia is provided without delay or difficult processes; and

(c)         bring forward federal funding for South Australian infrastructure projects.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       4    Mrs Phillips : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the devastating impact of the bushfires on the Australian community;

(b)         the heartbreaking loss of 33 lives and more than one billion animals;

(c)         the loss of 2,439 homes, 265 facilities and 5,388 outbuildings in NSW; and

(d)         a further 1,024 homes, 197 facilities and 2,017 outbuildings damaged in NSW;

(2)         further notes the ongoing impact of the fires on:

(a)         the small businesses and tourism operators and their employees on the NSW South Coast and other bushfire areas; and

(b)         farmers and primary producers on the NSW South Coast and other bushfire areas that have also been impacted by the ongoing drought;

(3)         acknowledges that immediate action is needed to prevent the closure of hundreds of businesses on the NSW South Coast and other bushfire areas, and the loss of thousands of associated jobs;

(4)         calls on the Prime Minister to urgently visit the NSW South Coast to meet with local small business owners, primary producers and workers; and

(5)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         improve the speed and quality of the Government response to the bushfire crisis;

(b)         address gaps in the available financial assistance for casual workers employed during the tourist season; and

(c)         develop a plan to address the economic impact on businesses that have lost upwards of 80 per cent of their yearly income as a result of the bushfires.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       5    Mr Katter : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes with concern that, in 2015, the Northern Territory Government awarded a 99-year lease of the Port of Darwin to Shandong Landbridge Group, a privately-held company with ties to the Chinese Government and Communist Party of China;

(2)         affirms that foreign ownership of the Port of Darwin represents a significant threat to Australia’s strategic interests; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         prioritise Australia’s sovereignty and strategic interests;

(b)         take steps to purchase the Port of Darwin; and

(c)         ensure that the Port of Darwin stays in the hands of the Australian Government indefinitely.

              ( Notice given 11 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       6    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 11 February 2020 the interim report by the Senate Community Affairs References Committee inquiry into Centrelink’s compliance program was tabled in the Senate; and

(b)         the interim report recommended that there be laid on the table by the Minister representing the Minister for Government Services no later than 10 am on 24 February 2020, responses to all questions placed on notice by Senators Siewert and O’Neill relating to legal advice and Centrelink’s compliance program, including, but not limited to, questions about:

(i)           meetings and/or briefings between the Minister and Services Australia in relation to the current legal proceedings regarding Centrelink’s compliance program;

(ii)         the frequency and dates of legal advice obtained by Services Australia from the Solicitor-General, Australian Government Solicitor, departmental lawyers, and external counsel and/or solicitors in relation to any aspect of the compliance program and, specifically, whether a debt or debt components is able to be founded on extrapolations from Australian Taxation Office (ATO) records;

(iii)        legal advice about the lawfulness of debt or debt components solely based on extrapolations from ATO records;

(iv)       legal advice in relation to liability for the death of any Australian who received a debt notice under the compliance program; and

(v)         the cost of legal advice in relation to the compliance program;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         in relation to Government’s Income Compliance Program, or ‘robodebt’ scheme, the Federal Court made orders, agreed to by both parties, in the matter of Amato v the Commonwealth that the averaging process using ATO income data to calculate Deanna Amato’s robodebt was unlawful;

(b)         the outcome of the Amato case confirms that a compliance debt calculated using only averaging of ATO income data is unlawful;

(c)         the Government conceded its robodebt scheme is unlawful through its action to suspend income averaging as a sole proof point to raise debts in November 2019;

(d)         email correspondence between departmental legal counsel, made public through the Centrelink’s compliance program inquiry, confirms the Government is aware the robodebt scheme has no legal basis; and

(e)         the Government has failed to sufficiently outline grounds for public interest immunity on the basis of legal professional privilege, and should release legal advices obtained by the Commonwealth and related details in connection with the Income Compliance Program; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         acknowledge it made a mistake by designing and administering the robodebt scheme over the past three years without valid legal authority;

(b)         apologise to those affected by the unlawful aspects of the program; and

(c)         outline its plan to remediate those affected Australians.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       7    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 3 February 2020 changes to National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) transport funding were welcomed by the disability sector, including people with disability, service providers and carers;

(b)         there was insufficient information available about these changes in the immediate period following the announcement, including details about who was eligible, how providers would be able to process claims, and general implementation; and

(c)         the failure to provide supporting information is consistent with previous announcements made by the National Disability Insurance Agency and the Minister for the National Disability Insurance Scheme; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure that further information about these changes is made available as soon as possible; and

(b)         communicate supplementary information about future NDIS changes to providers, participants and disability sector stakeholders immediately following their announcement.

              ( Notice given 12 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       8    Mr Watts : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the role of Federal Government leadership in ensuring the productivity and liveability of Australian cities; and

(2)         notes:

(a)         the importance of public transport infrastructure in shaping cities and regions;

(b)         the record funding commitments for urban public transport infrastructure made under the previous Federal Labor Government, including $3.2 billion for the Regional Rail Link project and a further $3 billion committed to the Melbourne Metro Rail Tunnel;

(c)         the recent Infrastructure Australia report, Future Cities: Planning For Our Growing Population which highlights the need for Australian governments to increase investment in public transport in areas experiencing rapid population growth, including in Melbourne’s west;

(d)         that if an appropriate route is selected, the construction of an airport rail link to Melbourne Airport through Melbourne’s west has the potential to create social and economic benefits across the region; and

(e)         that further public transport infrastructure projects for fast growing regions like Melbourne’s west will be needed in the near future to meet the challenge of population growth.

              ( Notice given 27 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

       9    Mr Entsch : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March is World Tuberculosis (TB) Day;

(b)         TB is contagious and airborne and is the world’s leading infectious disease killer and kills more people than HIV/AIDS;

(c)         according to the World Health Organization, in 2018 alone, an estimated 10 million people became ill with TB;

(d)         according to estimates from Australian researchers, there are 1 million people in Australia infected with latent TB (dormant TB) and thus at risk of developing TB disease;

(e)         12 out of the 30 countries with the highest number of TB cases are in the Asia Pacific Region, accounting for more than 62 per cent of the world’s TB burden; and

(f)          Papua-New Guinea has one of the highest rates of TB infection in the Pacific, with an estimated 37,000 total cases including 2,000 drug-resistant cases, in 2018;

(2)         further notes with concern that drug-resistant forms of TB are a major contributor to deaths from antimicrobial resistance globally and anti-microbial resistance is a threat to achieving the health-related Sustainable Development Goals;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the impact of TB goes beyond death or illness for individuals, and includes effects on economies and communities, health systems, and threats to health security; and

(b)         committed funding for TB diagnosis and care fell short by US $3.3 billion in 2019;

(4)         recognises:

(a)         the Australian Government has contributed $242 million to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria for 2020 to 2022;

(b)         the provision of $75 million over five years for Product Development Partnerships in the Indo-Pacific Health Security initiative;

(c)         the provision of $13 million to help support global efforts in eradicating tuberculosis in the Pacific region; and

(d)         Australia and other countries committed at the UN High-Level Meeting on TB in September 2018 to mobilise sufficient and sustainable financing, with the aim of increasing overall global research and development investments to US$2 billion; and

(5)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         develop an action plan to demonstrate progress towards the targets and commitment made at the UN High-Level Meeting on TB; and

(b)         support the international adoption of the target to spend 0.1 per cent of its annual Gross Domestic Expenditure on Research and Development on TB research in order to close the global TB research and development funding gap.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    10    Mr Conaghan : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the heartfelt and touching support from across the Pacific including in fundraising, in assisting Australia during the recent bushfire season;

(2)         particularly acknowledges and thanks Papua New Guinea and Fiji for the military support provided, and notes the warm welcome they received from Australians as they assisted in the bushfire relief efforts; and

(3)         extends its warmest thanks to all of our Pacific family for the support and prayers offered to Australia.

              ( Notice given 2 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    11    Mr Christensen : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         Mr Julian Assange is a citizen of Australia and not the United States of America or the United Kingdom;

(b)         foreign courts should not be determining whether or not Australian citizens should be extradited to other countries;

(c)         Mr Assange was not resident in the United States when he allegedly committed the crimes of which he has been accused;

(d)         foreign nations should not be seeking to extradite an Australian citizen to face charges for alleged crimes when that Australian is not a citizen or a resident of that foreign nation, nor have they committed any alleged crimes while physically in that foreign nation and, more so, when the alleged crimes are intrinsically linked to journalistic endeavours;

(e)         the conditions in which Mr Assange is currently being held are not appropriate for someone who has not been accused or convicted of a violent crime and are impeding his ability to adequately prepare his defence;

(f)          Mr Assange should not be held in prison in the United Kingdom as he has served his time for a bail violation (based on allegations which have since been dropped) and, more so, he has not been charged with any current crime committed within the United Kingdom;

(g)         according to both medical practitioners and the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture, Mr Assange has exhibited signs of being the victim of psychological torture as per the internationally-recognised Istanbul Protocol, and as such should not be held in conditions that exacerbate his impaired psychological state;

(h)         Mr Assange has been subjected to protracted and perhaps illegal surveillance, including privileged communications with his lawyers, and as such, his due process rights have been violated; and

(i)           the judicial authority overseeing the extradition matter has a conflict of interest, placing Mr Assange’s due process rights in jeopardy; and

(2)         calls upon:

(a)         the United States to drop its charges against Mr Assange;

(b)         the United Kingdom to terminate its extradition hearings against Mr Assange and release him from prison;

(c)         the Australian Government to urgently engage in diplomatic efforts to have the United States drop its charges against Mr Assange and have the United Kingdom terminate its extradition hearings against Mr Assange and release Mr Assange from prison.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    12    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         between 2013 and 2019 apprenticeship numbers fell by almost 140,000 from 412,787 to 276,248;

(b)         in 2018-19, Australia recruited around 110,000 skilled permanent migrants and 41,220 temporary skilled visa migrants to fill skills shortages;

(c)         around 730,000 people are unemployed and 1.2 million people are underemployed;

(d)         government funding cuts to skills and apprenticeship training are preventing Australians from pursuing skills and trade occupations;

(e)         the failure to invest in skills training will impact on future national capability; and

(f)          claims are being made that there is a shortage of skilled workers for the submarine replacement program; and

(2)         calls on the Government to invest in Australian skills training and reverse the loss of Australian trade and skills training opportunities.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    13    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the trial and extradition of Mr Julian Assange are inconsistent with international law, and Australian legal standards, and contravene the individual rights and protections for which these laws and standards provide;

(b)         the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment has found that Mr Assange ‘showed all symptoms typical for prolonged exposure to psychological torture, including extreme stress, chronic anxiety and intense psychological trauma’;

(c)         several medical reports find that Mr Assange is in ill-health due to prolonged arbitrary confinement, and indeed the United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention ruled that the 50-week sentence of Mr Assange for bail violation, which formally ended on 21 September 2019, was punitive and disproportionate given the nature of the offence and usual sentences;

(d)         Mr Assange is facing extradition for an alleged political offence, which is expressly prohibited by Article 4(1) of the Anglo-US Extradition Treaty and an abuse of power; and

(e)         Mr Assange is an Australian citizen and, if convicted in the US, faces 175 years in prison, which would be in effect a death sentence;

(2)         acknowledges that Mr Assange is a publisher and journalist, as recognised by his 2011 Walkley award and 17 other awards for excellence in journalism and promoting human rights, and that his charges:

(a)         are a direct assault on press freedom; and

(b)         threaten the protection of others who publish classified information in the public interest; and

(3)         calls for Mr Assange to be allowed to return to Australia.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    14    Dr Haines : To move—That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on its 2018 commitment and 2019 election promise to introduce a Federal Integrity Commission;

(2)         notes with dismay that the Government has missed its own deadline for releasing legislation to establish such a commission;

(3)         recognises that establishing a robust Federal Integrity Commission is essential to arresting the declining public trust in institutions and restoring Australians’ faith in the democratic system;

(4)         recognises that in 1853, a group of miners gathered in Beechworth to protest against corruption in the colonial government, and to launch Australia’s first petition calling for the right for people of all races to vote;

(5)         celebrates Australia’s long history of democratic reform of which the 1853 Beechworth protest forms a part, and invokes this same tradition to call for a Federal Integrity Commission;

(6)         affirms that in order to fulfil its purpose, a Federal Integrity Commission must have:

(a)         broad jurisdiction to ensure that everyone involved in Federal public service is subject to independent scrutiny and that federal public servants, politicians, their staff and any private entity carrying out public functions is obliged to report corruption and wrongdoing and be protected when they do;

(b)         common rules to ensure that all persons are held to a single, high standard of behaviour and to ensure that the commission is able to investigate any behaviour, whether criminal or not, which does or could adversely affect public confidence in the honest, open and fair exercise of public power;

(c)         appropriate powers for the commission to be able to properly do its job, including the ability to receive referrals from the public, government agencies and whistle-blowers, carry out corruption-prevention activity and coordinate with state and other bodies, protecting individuals from arbitrary use of coercive powers, initiate its own investigations, use search and surveillance powers, subpoena documents, compel witnesses, investigate past misconduct, make recommendations, and refer criminal conduct for prosecution;

(d)         fair hearings such that investigations are conducted openly when in the public interest and subject to ensuring natural justice for those under investigation and due process of law, and ensuring that the commission can publicly report its findings of fact and recommendations when in the public interest; and

(e)         accountability to the people so that the commission remains accountable to public, not political interests including by ensuring that the Commissioner be independent officer of the Parliament appointed only on recommendation of a cross-parliamentary standing committee of Members and Senators; and

(7)         calls on the Government to introduce a Federal Integrity Commission consistent with these Beechworth principles.

              ( Notice given 3 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    15    Ms Stanley : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         the importance of South-Western Sydney to the Australian economy;

(b)         the importance of the Western Sydney International Airport and aerotropolis to the region and to Australia; and

(c)         the critical nature of appropriate planning, budgeting and forecasting of the supporting infrastructure, including adequate transportation, for the operation of Western Sydney International Airport; and

(2)         notes the:

(a)         consistent budgetary and completion time blow-outs of the NSW State Government in delivering infrastructure projects;

(b)         significant investment in the Western Sydney International Airport precinct;

(c)         revelation that there will be no public transport rail service to Western Sydney International Airport when it commences operation; and

(d)         significant impact the failure to deliver this vital public transport rail service will have on congestion of surrounding roads; and

(3)         calls on the Commonwealth and NSW State Governments to have completed, before the operation of Western Sydney International Airport commences:

(a)         a south-west rail line extension from Leppington through to Western Sydney International Airport;

(b)         a north-south rail link from Western Sydney Airport to Macarthur;

(c)         a rapid transit link along 15th Avenue from the Liverpool CBD to Western Sydney International Airport; and

(d)         the construction of a fuel pipeline to the airport.

              ( Notice given 4 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    16    Ms Thwaites : To move—That this House notes that:

(1)         the closure of the AAP newswire means the loss of an independent and trusted news source and further consolidation of the Australian media landscape; and

(2)         the Government’s failure to support independent news and public interest journalism has serious consequences for Australia’s democracy.

              ( Notice given 5 March 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    17    Mr Gorman : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that Australia’s arts sector is an essential part of our economy, our community and our identity;

(2)         recognises that the impacts of coronavirus COVID-19 has destroyed the livelihoods of thousands of working artists in a diverse range of arts including, but not limited to performers, writers, designers, illustrators, musicians, fine artists, filmmakers and children’s entertainers;

(3)         further notes that many of the existing support mechanisms, including JobKeeper and JobSeeker, do not recognise the unique needs or economics of the arts sector;

(4)         believes that protecting our arts sector now is vital for Australia to achieve a sustainable economic recovery from COVID-19; and

(5)         calls on the national cabinet to work urgently in collaboration with the arts sector to:

(a)         enact a tailored package of support to the arts sector;

(b)         ensure that working artists are able to access appropriate income support; and

(c)         consider how commonwealth, state, territory and local governments can assist the arts sector for the medium to long term economic impacts of COVID-19.

              ( Notice given 12 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    18    Mr J. H. Wilson : To move—That this House:

(1)         affirms the longstanding, important, and respectful relationship between Australia and the Philippines, and supports the ongoing cooperation between our countries in key areas like regional development, maritime security, and disaster risk and reduction management;

(2)         expresses its opposition to the recently intensified repression directed at human rights and labour rights defenders in the Philippines, evident by:

(a)         the International Trade Union Confederation listing the Philippines in the top ten worst countries for workers’ rights as a result of the extrajudicial killings of forty-six union members and officials in the last three years;

(b)         the deteriorating human rights environment and the rise in unlawful killings by state agencies which means that workers, civil servants, trade union organisations, and labour activists fear for their safety;

(c)         the nearly three-year extension of martial law in Mindanao, after it was initially approved for sixty days, and which only ended in December 2019; and

(d)         the UN Human Rights Council’s adoption of resolution 41/2 expressing concern over human rights violations and requesting the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to prepare a comprehensive report on the human rights situation in the Philippines that was due in June 2020;

(3)         supports recommendations put forward by the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Conference Committee on the Application of Standards to:

(a)         oppose any language that creates a negative stigmatisation of those defending the rights of workers and human rights; and

(b)         oppose any military intervention in industrial disputes, as such interventions in trade union affairs can only occur with approval of the Government, which constitutes a grave violation of human rights and the principles of freedom of association; and

(4)         calls on the Government to support the upholding of labour and human rights, in line with international standards, by endorsing:

(a)         the ILO’s resolution to send a high-level tripartite mission to the Philippines to conduct an open, transparent, and robust investigation of the human rights situation; and

(b)         any auditing process of Australian security engagements in the Philippines, such as the Enhanced Defence Cooperation Program, as a way of ensuring we are not indirectly supporting human rights violations in the Philippines.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    19    Ms Stanley : To move—That this House:

(1)         extends its condolences to the family of Mr Jack Mundey AO, on the event of his recent passing;

(2)         acknowledges the significant contribution Mr Mundey made to Australia, including:

(a)         his commitment to workers’ rights and the Australian union movement;

(b)         environmental conservation policy and activism;

(c)         the conservation of Australia’s history through heritage protection; and

(d)         his term of office as councillor at the City of Sydney between 1984 and 1987; and

(3)         extends its thanks to Mr Mundey, in memoriam, for his life-long dedication to protecting and improving the Australian way of life.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    20    Ms Kearney : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the latest Government report indicates around 104,000 older Australians are waiting for their approved home care package;

(b)         more than 58,000 older Australians on the waiting list have no home care package at all; and

(c)         this waiting list is after the Government’s response to the Interim Report of the Royal Commission into Safety and Quality of Aged Care;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         these older Australians waiting for packages did so during the ‘stay at home’ public health orders during the COVID-19 outbreak, without the care they needed and had been approved for; and

(b)         the long waiting time for home care is affecting the health of older Australians and their families and loved ones; and

(3)         calls on the Government to respond properly to the interim report from its own Royal Commission and stop the ‘neglect’ that is the home care package waiting list.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    21    Ms C. F. King : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the critical role that Australia’s aviation sector plays in the lives of all Australians;

(b)         that 45,000 Australians work directly for airlines in Australia. and hundreds of thousands more in related industries including aviation and tourism; and

(c)         that the response to the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a huge toll on the aviation industry in Australia and around the world;

(2)         notes the:

(a)         Government’s ad-hoc and piecemeal approach to Australia’s aviation sector during the COVID-19 response, putting thousands of jobs at risk;

(b)         Government’s failure to take an equity stake in Virgin resulting in the company collapsing into voluntary administration, putting at risk the livelihoods of almost 16,000 workers; and

(c)         inequitable treatment of the 5,500 workers of aviation support company dnata, who were told on 1 May 2020 that they would not be eligible for Job Keeper payments; and

(3)         calls on the Government to outline a comprehensive plan for aviation to ensure the best outcome for both the travelling public and the thousands of workers whose jobs depend on a vibrant aviation industry.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    22    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         disability support workers are among the lowest paid workers in the country;

(b)         as essential workers during the Coronavirus pandemic, they represent the front line of the pandemic, while supporting Australians with disability and their families; and

(c)         the commitment of these workers is crucial to the resilience of the economy, especially as we move through the crisis into recovery; and

(2)         calls on the Government to recognise the importance of disability support workers and take action to ensure they are supported.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    23    Mr Shorten : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that during the earliest onset of the coronavirus pandemic, many Australian families found themselves unexpectedly in need of government support; and

(2)         pays its deepest gratitude and thanks to all the women and men of Services Australia for their efforts in supporting their fellow Australians during this time of crisis.

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

  24    Ms Wells : To move—That this House places on record:

(1)         its concerns about the consequences and impact of the relief package provided to the child care sector in response to COVID-19;

(2)         that the Government’s response has in fact made many childcare centres financially unviable; and

(3)         this situation is proving untenable for many childcare centres and family day cares, placing the livelihoods of early educators at risk with subsequent impacts on families and their ability to place their children in available, quality care. 

              ( Notice given 13 May 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    25    Ms Collins : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         at least 23 women have been murdered so far this year at the hands of an intimate partner in Australia;

(b)         on average, more than one woman a week is murdered by a current or former partner;

(c)         violence against women and their children is worsening in the face of job losses, stand-downs and financial stress and uncertainty; and

(d)         domestic and family violence services funding was inadequate before the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact of the associated restrictions will affect rates of violence for a significant time; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         follow Labor’s call to convene a national summit on violence against women and their children; and

(b)         urgently provide more support for frontline services.

              ( Notice given 10 June 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    26    Ms Coker : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that since the establishment of the Commonwealth Organ and Tissue Authority under the Government of Prime Minister Rudd, the authority has seen a 40 per cent increase in the number of people who have signed up as organ donors, as well as an 80 per cent increase in transplant recipients;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         notwithstanding this earlier progress, donation rates have not improved significantly in the last four years;

(b)         research indicates that one organ donation can save up to nine lives; and

(c)         there are approximately 1,500 Australians who are waiting for an organ donation and that, due to COVID-19, the unavoidable cancellation of transplant operations has exacerbated this backlog;

(3)         encourages all Australians to have a conversation with their loved ones about their wishes should they pass away, and to participate in the Australian Organ Donor Register by going to www.donatelife.gov.au/decide;

(4)         further notes proposals to improve organ donation rates in Australia, including by learning from international best practice, and considering an opt-out system such as those implemented in Spain and the United Kingdom; and

(5)         calls on the Government to take steps to improve organ donation rates in Australia, including through the consideration of international best practice, and to implement an improved education strategy for the community about the importance of organ donation.

              ( Notice given 10 June 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

  27    Mr J. H. Wilson : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         6 and 9 August 2020 will mark, respectively, the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki;

(b)         by the end of 1945, it is estimated that 213,000 people had died in those communities, and the legacy of chronic and terminal illness, stillbirths, birth defects, survivor discrimination, and acute environmental harm and contamination continues to the present day;

(c)         2020 also marks the 50th anniversary of the coming into force of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty;

(d)         the ongoing work of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, an initiative founded in Australia that received the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize for advancing a Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons; and

(e)         since 2017, 81 countries have signed and 38 have ratified the United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which will enter into force after the 50th ratification;

(2)         further notes with concern:

(a)         a number of recent developments that weaken the international system of weapons monitoring, impair progress towards nuclear disarmament, and undermine agreements to prevent nuclear proliferation and explosive testing;

(b)         the fact that the hands of the Doomsday Clock have been moved to within 100 seconds of midnight, representing the greatest yet marked risk of nuclear conflict; and

(c)         a 2019 report by the United Kingdom Parliamentary Committee on International Relations that warns the risk of nuclear weapons is now as great as it was during the height of the Cold War; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         voice its concern about the deterioration in the multilateral framework for achieving nuclear disarmament and for minimising the risk of nuclear conflict;

(b)         voice its concern at indications the United States:

(i)           intends to withdraw from the Treaty on Open Skies;

(ii)         may allow the START agreement to expire in February 2021; and

(iii)        has abandoned the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty; and

(c)         increase our diplomatic focus and the resources needed to play a greater role in global efforts to reduce conflict, build regional and international cooperation, resist the further proliferation of nuclear weapons, and progress their, ultimate elimination.

              ( Notice given 15 June 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    28    Ms Stanley : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         15 October 2020 is International Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day;

(b)         on this day, parents, families, friends and healthcare workers will memorialise babies they have lost through miscarriage, stillbirth and infant death;

(c)         infant loss is a tragic and terrible event to go through for families, healthcare workers and friends, and International Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day provides an opportunity to mark their shared loss; and

(d)         direct support for persons affected by pregnancy and infant loss is difficult at the current time considering the local health environment;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         each year around 150,000 women in Australia experience some form of pregnancy or infant loss;

(b)         further issues are commonly faced by those close to these tragic events such as depression, anxiety, changes in relationships, development of unhealthy coping mechanisms and post-traumatic stress disorder;

(c)         these effects, amongst others, are often underestimated and overlooked by healthcare professionals, friends, and even family members, especially concerning pregnancy loss related bereavement and subsequent grief;

(d)         greater research and understanding is required to aide in the creation and establishment of programs, resources and services that support and provide assistance to survivors of baby loss and their families, and enable them to overcome their trauma and integrate their bereavement into their life in a healthy, helpful, healing manner; and

(e)         services for people affected by pregnancy or infant loss have been continuing, as best as possible, their necessary and significant work during this recent and difficult period;

(3)         expresses sympathy to all families who have suffered a miscarriage, a stillbirth or infant death; and

(4)         commends every person who has supported parents and families through their journey from the loss of a baby.

              ( Notice given 24 August 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      29    Mr M. C. Butler : To move—That the Industry Research and Development (Bankable Feasibility Study on High-Efficiency Low-Emissions Coal Plant in Collinsville Program) Instrument 2020 made under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 on 18 June 2020 and presented to the House on 24 August 2020, be disallowed.

              ( Notice given 25 August 2020. Instrument will be taken have been disallowed unless disposed of within 10 sitting days including today. )

    30    Mr Ramsey : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         Patrick Ryan, aged 16 years, from Port Lincoln South Australia died in February 2020 at a party with friends as a result of inhaling Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) from a barbecue gas bottle;

(b)         a number of young Australians have died from intentionally inhaling LPG; and

(c)         inhaling LPG can cause dizziness, coughing, nausea, vomiting, skin irritation, fever, numbness and death;

(2)         notes that there is presently no label on LPG bottles warning inhalation may cause death;

(3)         calls on the relevant Minister to:

(a)         establish an inquiry to investigate the circumstances of such deaths; and

(b)         develop recommendations to ensure LPG bottles are required to display a warning label which explains the gas is poisonous and of the dangers of inhalation; and

(4)         asks that the relevant Minister consider the recommendations and urgently bring forward legislation, that if passed, will ensure all LPG cylinders in Australia carry the recommended warnings.

              ( Notice given 25 August 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

    31    Mr Falinski : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the Government’s commitment to protecting Australia’s marine environment including the Great Barrier Reef through the:

(a)         Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan ;

(b)         $1.2 billion investment to ensure the health of the reef; and

(c)         $100 million Environment Restoration Fund which supports cleaner oceans and waterways;

(2)         opposes oil or gas drilling off the coast of Sydney, including by:

(a)         recognising that through Advent Energy’s own admission on 29 December 2010, the exploratory well had failed to find gas; and

(b)         not renewing the Petroleum Exploration Permit 11 licence; and

(3)         notes the importance of Sydney’s coastline and waterways to the ecosystem as well as tourism and investment.

              ( Notice given 25 August 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

  32    Ms Steggall : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         as a result of the 2019-20 bushfires more than 400 people died of smoke inhalation and over 4,000 people were hospitalised;

(b)         the Australian Medical Association warns that global warming will lead to significant health impacts, including but not limited to, rise in respiratory illnesses, heat-related illnesses, cardiovascular disease mortality, asthma, spread of disease vectors, reduced labour productivity, food insecurity and under-nutrition, displacement, and mental ill-health;

(c)         the interim report of the Royal Commission into Natural Disasters Arrangements states that further warming is inevitable and that Australia is likely to experience more frequent and intense extreme weather events such as floods, bushfires and drought;

(d)         University of Melbourne modelling projects that if we fail to meet the temperature goals of the Paris Agreement, the Australian economy will suffer an estimated $2.7 trillion in cumulative damages over the next three decades; and

(e)         that the 2019-20 bushfires resulted in an estimated $20 billion in lost economic output and over $2.4 billion in insured losses;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         Australia is in recession for the first time in 30 years;

(b)         the effective unemployment rate is at 13.3 per cent and may remain over 10 per cent for the next several years;

(c)         that young people will now face the dual challenges of climate change and the economic recovery from this pandemic, which will limit their quality of life and future employment;

(d)         before COVID-19, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation estimated that limiting emissions to net zero by 2050, amongst other factors, could result in 2.75 to 2.8 per cent GDP growth annually—as opposed to 2.1 per cent under less ambitious scenarios;

(e)         that acting on climate change will lead to a jobs boom in clean technologies like energy efficiency, manufacturing, renewable energy, and electric vehicles; and

(f)          in order to unleash investment in clean technologies, investors need a bipartisan climate change framework and policy certainty;

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         countries and jurisdictions such as the United Kingdom, Germany, Fiji and the State of Victoria have enacted framework climate change legislation;

(b)         in the United Kingdom, there are now more than 396,000 jobs in low-carbon businesses and their supply chains with the low carbon economy growing at 11 per cent, per year—four times faster than the rest of the economy;

(c)         framework climate change legislation supports reducing emissions, protecting against climate risks to health, and accelerates investment in a growth economy; and

(d)         Australia has no Commonwealth framework climate change legislation; and

(4)         calls on the Government to adopt framework climate change legislation.

              ( Notice given 1 September 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      33    Dr Haines : To present a Bill for an Act to establish the Australian Federal Integrity Commission, and for related purposes. ( Australian Federal Integrity Commission Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 1 September 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      34    Dr Haines : To present a Bill for an Act to enhance the integrity of the Parliament of Australia, and for related purposes. ( Commonwealth Parliamentary Standards Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 1 September 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

Orders of the day

         1    Australian Banks (Government Audit) Bill 2019 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. )

         2    Live Animal Export Prohibition (Ending Cruelty) Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. )

         3    Climate Change Authority Amendment (Impact of 3 Degrees of Global Warming on Australia) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. )

         4    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering the Donation Disclosure Threshold) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. On 5 February 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters, and the Committee reported on 11 June 2020. )

         5    People with disability: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Stanley —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         3 December 2019 is International Day of People with Disability; and

(b)         the Human Rights Commission estimates the number of Australians with a disability to be around four million;

(2)         respects the rights of all:

(a)         people with disability in Australia, including having access to services and freedom from discrimination;

(b)         persons with a disability to be welcomed as equal and positive contributors to Australian society; and

(c)         people with disability to have choice and control in relation to any support services they receive; and

(3)         encourages all:

(a)         persons with disability as their own self-advocates;

(b)         groups and individuals that advocate on behalf of people with disabilities; and

(c)         Australians to respect the basic rights of all persons with disabilities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. )

         6    The Honourable Dr Brendan Nelson AO: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of the Australian War Memorial to our nation in commemorating, acknowledging and recording the service of our defence force personnel; and

(b)         that after seven years of service to the Australian War Memorial, the Hon Dr Brendan Nelson AO is retiring as its director;

(2)         acknowledges the outstanding leadership Dr Nelson has provided at the Australian War Memorial, including:

(a)         introducing the daily Last Post ceremony;

(b)         leading the Memorial through the:

(i)           Centenary of ANZAC and World War I commemorations; and

(ii)         50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War commemorations;

(c)         renovating the First World War galleries;

(d)         recognising the need to incorporate the service of our 100,000 younger veterans and therefore introducing the Afghanistan exhibition;

(e)         advocating for and securing, with Australian War Memorial Chairman Mr Kerry Stokes AC, a $500 million investment to expand the memorial to enable the stories of younger veterans to be told; and

(f)          strengthening the relationship the Australian people have with the memorial and the men and women who have served our nation; and

(3)         congratulates and sincerely thanks Dr Nelson for his service to the Australian War Memorial and the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 19 October 2020. )

         7    Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Amendment (ACT Integrity Commission Powers) Bill 2020 ( Dr Leigh ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

         8    National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Amendment (Transparency in Carbon Emissions Accounting) Bill 2020 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. On 27 February 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy, and the Committee reported on 31 August 2020. )

         9    Liability for Climate Change Damage (Make the Polluters Pay) Bill 2020 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      10    Representation Amendment (6 Regions Per State, 2 Senators Per Region) Bill 2020 ( Mr Joyce ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      11    Foreign Acquisitions and Takeovers Amendment (Strategic Assets) Bill 2020 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      12    Economy: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Mulino —That this House notes the Government’s economic mismanagement and its sustained failure to deliver improved economic outcomes for Australians during its seven year term in office, measured by:

(1)         wage stagnation;

(2)         near record levels of underemployment;

(3)         high and rising rates of labour underutilisation, particularly for young people and in regional areas;

(4)         high levels of youth unemployment;

(5)         Australia’s higher unemployment relative to peer nations;

(6)         weak consumption growth;

(7)         weak business investment; and

(8)         weak and declining productivity growth.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      13    Climate Emergency Declaration Bill 2020 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

  14    Gender equality: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         International Women’s Day will be held on Sunday, 8 March 2020; and

(b)         the theme for 2020 is ‘Each for Equality’, which calls on all of us to ‘Celebrate women’s achievement. Raise awareness against bias. Take action for equality’;

(2)         recognises that entrenched gender inequities remain, including:

(a)         high rates of family and domestic violence, sexual violence and harassment;

(b)         the under-representation of women in leadership roles; and

(c)         pay inequity and the undervaluation of work in traditionally female industries; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         make gender equality a central priority;

(b)         commit to urgent action to improve Australian women’s:

(i)           safety and physical security;

(ii)         economic security and retirement incomes;

(iii)        health and reproductive rights; and

(iv)       representation in Australian parliaments; and

(c)         reinstate the Women’s Budget Statement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      15    Boxer Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles Project: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)         notes that new Defence projects such as the Boxer Combat Reconnaissance Vehicles built under the $5 billion LAND 400 Phase 2 Mounted Combat Reconnaissance Capability program support the development of defence industry and small business in electorates across Australia;

(2)         supports job creation in construction and sustainment;

(3)         recognises this project presents an exciting opportunity for Australian industry to play a vital role in delivering leading-edge capability and technology to Australia’s army; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s significant $200 billion investment in Australia’s defence capability.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      16    Jewish Australian Internet Radio: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Jewish Australian Internet Radio (J-AIR) is an outstanding broadcasting service that brings together Jewish culture, news, analysis, music, comedy, personalities and performers for audiences in Melbourne and through the internet;

(b)         since 2014, the volunteers at J-AIR have worked tirelessly to give Jewish people a voice and provide awareness of the ongoing safety and security challenges faced by Melbourne’s Jewish community;

(c)         as demonstrated by the 2019 Executive Council of Australian Jewry report, the character of anti-Semitism has worsened in Australia and services like J-AIR play a crucial security role;

(d)         J-AIR has begun working closely with the Community Security Group (CSG) to combat the rise of anti-Semitism and ensure the safety and security of the Jewish community in Victoria; and

(e)         the absence of a community broadcasting licence limits the capacity of J-AIR to fulfil these critical functions; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Communications and Media Authority to consider the new relationship with the CSG and allocate J-AIR a community broadcasting licence in the Melbourne Radio Licence Area.

          ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      17    Green New Deal (Quit Coal and Renew Australia) Bill 2020 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      18    Interactive Gambling Amendment (Banning Social Casinos and Other Measures) Bill 2020 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 Octobert 2020. On 11 June 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill referred to the Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs. )

      19    Mental health: Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ) on the motion of Ms McBride —That this House: 

(1)         notes that the COVID-19 health emergency will have significant and ongoing mental health impacts for Australians; 

(2)         recognises:

(a)         that financial hardship should be no barrier to getting the health treatment people need; and

(b)         the important role that mental health practitioners have played during this crisis and will continue to play in Australia’s health system;

(3)         acknowledges that the Productivity Commission is due to hand its report on mental health to the Government in June 2020; and

(4)         calls on the Government to respond to the Productivity Commission’s report into mental health as a matter of urgency, incorporating the anticipated impacts of COVID-19 in their response.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      20    General Motors: Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         recognises the long-term business investment General Motors has made in Australia over 72 years and the impact its decision to withdraw from the Australian market will have on more than 200 Holden dealerships across Australia;

(2)         asks that as General Motors terminates Holden sales in Australia it demonstrates the respect the Holden brand deserves;

(3)         acknowledges General Motors has been the beneficiary of more than $2 billion of Australian taxpayers subsidies;

(4)         recognises the potential job impact on Holden dealerships who employ around 9,000 people, including sales people, service technicians, finance and insurance professionals and back office functions and calls on General Motors to ensure that adequate compensation is offered to Holden dealers around the country who have invested significant capital in showroom facilities, service and repair equipment, stock and parts and ensure also that dealerships have assistance for redundancy payments;

(5)         notes that when General Motors ceased vehicle and engine production in Australia in 2017, the company committed to retaining 1000 direct staff plus 6000 people across the 200 strong national dealer network; and

(6)         further recognises there are 1.6 million Holdens currently on Australia’s roads and customers deserve to have confidence they will have ongoing support from General Motors in servicing and spare parts for the future.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

  21    Fair Work Amendment (One in, All in) Bill 2020 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ).

          ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      22    Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Amendment (Sustainable Procurement Principles) Bill 2020 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      23    Family Law Amendment (A Step Towards a Safer Family Law System) Bill 2020 ( Mr Perrett ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      24    Ordinary Seaman Edward (Teddy) Sheean: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr B. K. Mitchell —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in 2019 the independent 11-member Defence Honours and Awards Appeals Tribunal did unanimously recommend that the extraordinary bravery of Ordinary Seaman Edward ‘Teddy’ Sheean should be recognised with the posthumous awarding of the Victoria Cross; and

(b)         the Government rejected the Defence Honours and Awards Appeals Tribunal’s unanimous recommendation; and

(2)         calls on the Prime Minister to take immediate action to reverse the Government’s rejection of the tribunal’s recommendation, and take the actions necessary to progress the tribunal’s recommendation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      25    Social housing: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         more than 140,000 Australians were on social housing waitlists in June 2018;

(b)         the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute has identified a shortfall of 433,000 social housing dwellings over the next 20 years;

(c)         much of Australia’s existing social housing stock is in dire need of maintenance and repairs; and

(d)         the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has urged the Government to consider investment in social housing as a means of protecting Australia’s economy from the impacts of COVID-19;

(2)         recognises the success of Labor’s $5.638 billion investment to build 20,000 new social housing dwellings and renovate a further 80,000, as a key economic stimulus measure during the global financial crisis; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure that stimulus measures are focused on delivering maximum ongoing public benefit; and

(b)         work with the private and community sectors and superannuation funds to invest in more social housing and repair existing social housing.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      26    Tourism and the arts: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 —Ms Templeman, in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes that cultural and creative activity plays an important role in:

(a)         the lives of 98 per cent of Australians, who engage with the arts by making art, viewing, attending or going online to experience arts and culture;

(b)         Australia’s international tourism industry, with 43 per cent of all international tourists engaging with the arts while in Australia, who are travelling further, staying longer and spending more than other tourists;

(c)         Australia’s domestic tourism industry, with Australians taking 12.3 million arts day trips and 13.4 million arts overnight trips within Australia that include arts activities—this travel will play a role in helping communities rebuild and recover from disasters by supporting local jobs and economies; and

(d)         Australia’s economy, contributing more than $112 billion to our economy this year, or over 6 per cent of our gross domestic product, and this has increased by 30 per cent since 2008-09; and

(2)         further notes that the Government is providing a record amount of funding to the arts, of around $750 million.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      27    Competition and Consumer Amendment (Exploitation of Indigenous Culture) Bill 2020 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      28    Ordinary Seaman Edward (Teddy) Sheean: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)         notes the decision to award Ordinary Seaman Edward ‘Teddy’ Sheean our highest military honour, the Victoria Cross for Australia;

(2)         recognises that the heroic acts of Ordinary Seaman Edward ‘Teddy’ Sheean on 1 December 1942 will see him be the first Australian Navy sailor to receive the Victoria Cross; and

(3)         acknowledges that an investiture ceremony that befits the magnitude of the award and its significance to Australia will be held at an appropriate time, noting current COVID-19 restrictions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

      29    Environment and jobs: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         welcomes the release of the Auditor-General’s report, Referrals, Assessments and Approvals of Controlled Actions under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act);

(2)         notes that Australia is currently experiencing an environmental crisis and jobs crisis, and the Auditor-General’s report confirms that the Government has failed on both counts;

(3)         further notes the damning findings from the Auditor-General, including that:

(a)         there has been a 510 per cent increase in the average delays for approval decisions since the Liberals and Nationals were elected (between 2014-15 and 2018-19);

(b)         between 2014-15 and 2018-19, delays to environmental approvals for jobs and investment from major projects exploded from 19 days on average to 116 days;

(c)         79 per cent of approvals assessed were non-compliant or contained errors;

(d)         in 2018-19, 95 per cent of key decisions (referral, assessment method, approval), were made outside the statutory time frames, with just 5 per cent of decisions being made on time;

(e)         conflicts of interest are not managed;

(f)          reporting arrangements are not consistent with the EPBC Act; and

(g)         projects or environmental outcomes are not being monitored;

(4)         acknowledges the extraordinary nature of these findings, which make up one of the most damning reports published by the Auditor-General to date;

(5)         notes that:

(a)         the report reveals the extent to which Government cuts to the environment department, which are estimated to be 40 per cent since 2013, has smashed the department’s capacity to make good, timely decisions to create jobs and protect the environment; and

(b)         Government cuts and mismanagement (Liberal party blue-tape) is at the heart of job and investment delays, poor quality decisions and legal challenges; and

(6)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         take responsibility for their abject failure on the environment and jobs; and

(b)         stop tying up projects and strangling the environment with Liberal party blue tape which is delaying jobs and investment, putting a handbrake on our economy, failing to protect iconic Australian species like the koala, and allowing the state of our natural environment to rapidly decline.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 19 October 2020. )

 

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).