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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Thursday, 22 October 2020

The Federation Chamber meets at 10 am

 

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2020-2021 ( Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Frydenberg —That the Bill be now read a second time— And on the amendment moved thereto by Mr Jones , viz. —That all words after “That” be omitted with a view to substituting the following words: “whilst not declining to give the bill a second reading, the House notes the 2020-21 budget:

(1)         will deliver a decade of deficits and accrue one trillion dollars of debt;

(2)         spends $98 billion on unemployment, but keeps unemployment too high for too long;

(3)         continues to leave too many Australians behind without support;

(4)         fails to address key policy areas such as childcare, aged care and social housing;

(5)         prioritises the funnelling of billions of taxpayers’ dollars into funds for the Coalition Government to rort and pork barrel at the expense of hard-working Australians; and

(6)         fails to outline a vision for the country”.

         2    Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2020-2021 ( Assistant Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  6 October 2020 —Mr Perrett ).

         3    Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Bill (No. 1) 2020-2021 ( Assistant Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  6 October 2020 —Mr Perrett ).

       4    Australia’s COVID-19 health response—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 June 2020—Mr Laming ) on the motion of Mr Hunt —That the House take note of the document.

       5    Disaster risk reduction—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 March 2020—Mr Young ) on the motion of Mr Littleproud —That the House take note of the document.

       6    Closing the Gap—Report 2020—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 February 2020—Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr Porter —That the House take note of the document.

       7    VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 17 October 2019—Mr Ted O’Brien ) on the motion of Mr D. J. Chester —That the House take note of the document.

         8    Anniversary of the national apology to victims and survivors of institutional child sexual abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2019 —Mrs Wicks ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That the House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

         9    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  1 September 2020 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Not without your approval: a way forward for nuclear technology in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 February 2020— Ms Bird ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 26 October 2020. )

       2    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Report of the inquiry into vegetation and land management policy relating to bushfires —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 5 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       3    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee Protecting the age of innocence: Report of the inquiry into age verification for online wagering and online pornography —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 May 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       4    National Disability Insurance Scheme—Joint Standing Committee Report into supported independent living —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 May 2020 ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       5    Implementation of the National Redress Scheme—Joint Select Committee Implementation of the National Redress Scheme —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 14 May 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       6    Trade and Investment Growth—Joint Standing Committee Trade transformation: Supporting Australia’s export and investment opportunities —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 June 2020— Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       7    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Interim report on all aspects of the conduct of the 2019 Federal Election and matters related thereto—Delegation to the International Grand Committee, Dublin, Ireland —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Stevens —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       8    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering the Donation Disclosure Threshold) Bill 2019 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 June 2020— Mrs McIntosh ) on the motion of Mr Stevens —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

       9    Health, Aged Care and Sport—Standing Committee Walking the allergy tightrope: Addressing the rise of allergies and anaphylaxis in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 June 2020— Ms Bell ) on the motion of Mr Zimmerman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     10    Communications and the Arts—Standing Committee The next gen future: Inquiry into the deployment, adoption and application of 5G in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 June 2020— Mr Sharma ) on the motion of Dr Gillespie —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     11    Migration—Joint Standing Committee Report of the inquiry into migration in regional Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 25 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     12    Intelligence and Security—Parliamentary Joint Committee Inquiry into the impact of the exercise of law enforcement and intelligence powers on the freedom of the press —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     13    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Advisory report on the Electoral Legislation Amendment (Miscellaneous Measures) Bill 2020 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 2020— Ms Bird ) on the motion of Mr Stevens —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     14    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Advisory report on the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Amendment (Transparency in Carbon Emissions Accounting) Bill 2020 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 2 September 2020— Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr J. H. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     15    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Parliamentary delegation to India, 3 to 7 November 2019 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 2 September 2020— Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr J. H. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     16    Migration—Joint Standing Committee Interim report of the inquiry into the Working Holiday Maker Program —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 7 October 2020— Mr Falinski ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     17    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 190: Matters relating to two treaties with Hong Kong —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 7 October 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     18    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee Shelter in the storm—COVID-19 and homelessness: Interim report of the inquiry into homelessness in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 October 2020— Mr Alexander ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

     19    Australia’s Family Law System—Joint Select Committee Improvements in family law proceedings: Interim report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 October 2020— Mr Zimmerman ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY FOR Monday,

26 October 2020, PURSUANT TO STANDING ORDERS 35 AND 192

11 AM TO 1.30 PM

Orders of the day

      †1    Family Law Amendment (A Step Towards a Safer Family Law System) Bill 2020 ( Mr Perrett ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ).

              ( Time allowed—20 minutes. )

Notices

    †1    Mr Wallace : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that: 

(a)         10 October 2020 was World Mental Health Day;

(b)         World Mental Health Day aims to raise awareness of mental health issues worldwide and to encourage action to promote better mental health; and

(c)         this year’s theme for World Mental Health Day is ‘Mental health for all: Greater investment-Greater access. Everyone, everywhere’;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         45 per cent of Australians will experience a mental illness in their lifetime;

(b)         3.8 million Australians live with a mental illness while 65 per cent of all GP presentations are for mental health issues;

(c)         54 per cent of people with mental illness do not access any treatment; and

(d)         levels of anxiety, social isolation, and emotional distress have increased significantly worldwide during this year’s global health emergency;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s additional investment of more than $500 million in mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic; and

(4)         commends Mental Illness Fellowship Australia for their work supporting the mental health of more than 20,000 Australians each year.

              ( Notice given 6 October 2020. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †2    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that the Government has failed to manage critical infrastructure within the City Deals program;

(2)         notes that the Government:

(a)         will spend $4 billion more on the Western Sydney City Deal project, Sydney Metro-Western Sydney Airport;

(b)         has tried to disguise the $4 billion increase in cost as a ‘fast track’ when, in fact, the funding timeline and the scope from St Marys to the Western Sydney Aerotropolis via Western Sydney International has not changed;

(c)         has shifted responsibility for land acquisition to the NSW Government; and

(d)         failed to action a 2017 Infrastructure Australia report to strategically plan and acquire critical rail corridors which would have resulted in significant savings; and

(3)         further notes the abject failure of this Government to:

(a)         acquire land that delivers value for money to the Australian taxpayer, as evidenced by the Leppington Triangle purchase; and

(b)         learn the lessons of the COVID-19 pandemic and invest in critical social infrastructure within City Deals.

              ( Notice given 20 October 2020. Time allowed—30 minutes. )

    †3    Mr Stevens : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises the opportunities for Australian businesses, especially our advanced manufacturers, in the growing Australian space industry;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government has:

(a)         set a goal of tripling the size of the space sector to $12 billion by 2030;

(b)         established the Australian Space Agency to drive the sector forward; and

(c)         recently commenced groundworks on the new Space Discovery Centre at Lot 14 in Adelaide, which will engage and educate our next generation of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics leaders; and

(3)         welcomes the Government’s opening of Supply Chain Capability Improvement grants that will enable Australian businesses to become part of the international space supply chain and have a role in NASA’s Moon to Mars mission.

              ( Notice given 6 October 2020. Time allowed—30 minutes. )

    †4    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         2019 was the hottest and driest year ever recorded in Australia, resulting in catastrophic bushfires, extensive coral bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef and ever-increasing rates of extinction of our native flora and fauna;

(b)         in the face of runaway climate change, and according to the Bureau of Meteorology, Australia is on track to warm by 4.4 degrees Celsius;

(c)         the Government has just committed to new fossil fuel exploration and infrastructure which will lock in continued greenhouse gas emissions and global heating for years to come; and

(d)         gas is a fossil fuel, not a transition fuel, while carbon capture and storage has a long history of absorbing taxpayers money for little benefit to the climate; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         stop fossil fuel exploration and extraction of coal, oil and gas, including the Adani project and drilling off the New South Wales coast;

(b)         end direct and indirect taxpayer subsidies to the fossil fuel industry; and

(c)         invest in large-scale renewable energy generation, storage and transmission through community-owned solar, wind, tidal, wave, hydro, geothermal and green hydrogen.

              ( Notice given 20 October 2020. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 1.30 pm. )

4.45 PM TO 7.30 PM

Notices —continued

    †5    Mr B. K. Mitchell : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         exploitation of migrant workers on short-term visas in the Australian horticultural sector is an ongoing priority for the Fair Work Ombudsman and is the focus of a recent inquiry by the Joint Standing Committee on Migration; and

(b)         COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the reliance of the Australian horticultural sector on overseas workers, where up to 80 per cent of the harvest workforce comes from overseas on short-term visas;

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         identify and implement measures that will lead to a sustained improvement in the number of Australians who work in the Australian horticultural sector, including in seasonal work such as fruit-picking;

(b)         take immediate action to identify and eliminate exploitation, underpayment and mistreatment of seasonal horticulture workers, particularly migrant workers on short-term visas; and

(c)         take immediate action to properly regulate labour hire companies involved in the recruitment and management of migrant workers in Australian horticulture; and

(3)         further notes that workforce shortages are now so dire for the current harvest that without urgent action, growers face significant hardship and consumers face higher prices.

              ( Notice given 19 October 2020. Time allowed—35 minutes. )

    †6    Mr Young : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the renewed interest, both in Australia and overseas markets, in Australian made products in the wake of the global pandemic;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australian made products have a reputation for quality and value;

(b)         the changing global marketplace creates new opportunities for Australian manufacturers;

(c)         the Government has committed $5 million over the next four years to promote ‘Australian Made’ and expand its reach overseas; and

(d)         buying Australian Made supports local manufacturing businesses and local jobs; and

(3)         encourages all Australians to buy Australian Made where possible to support our local businesses as part of the national economic recovery.

              ( Notice given 6 October 2020. Time allowed—50 minutes. )

    †7    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health, Aged Care and Sport held an extensive inquiry into the use and marketing of electronic cigarettes and personal vaporisers in Australia, throughout the 45th Parliament;

(2)         notes that the inquiry did not find, nor recommend, that e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers be considered to be ‘health products’, nor that they reduced harm to users;

(3)         further notes that e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers:

(a)         are not universally considered to be an effective tool in helping smokers to quit smoking or reduce consumption of nicotine products;

(b)         may be considered to be a ‘gateway’ into the consumption of nicotine, tobacco and nicotine products; and

(c)         involve the use of flagrant advertising and enticing flavours, which allure consumers to consume their substance;

(4)         notes that the Senate is considering holding another superfluous inquiry into the use of such products, despite the House having held an extensive inquiry in the previous parliament;

(5)         condemns any attempt from vested interests to promote the use of e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers within this parliament; and

(6)         concurs with the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health, Aged Care and Sport in its findings, namely that independent experts at the Department of Health, the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Therapeutic Goods Administration are well-placed to review the use and regulation of electronic cigarettes and personal vaporisers.

              ( Notice given 3 September 2020. Time allowed—20 minutes. )

    †8    Mrs McIntosh : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the role that Australian manufacturing businesses continue to play in ensuring our nation has vital supplies, including food and personal protective equipment, especially during the pandemic when global supply chains were disrupted;

(2)         recognises that a vibrant manufacturing sector is important for our economic security; and

(3)         congratulates Australian manufacturing businesses on their ongoing efforts to adapt to the current circumstances, keep people in jobs, support local supply chains and contribute to our national economic recovery.

              ( Notice given 6 October 2020. Time allowed—35 minutes. )

Orders of the day continued

      †2    Young Australians: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth —That this House:

(1)         recognises that young Australians have disproportionately felt the economic and social pain that the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions and recession have brought;

(2)         notes that young people:

(a)         are facing an extraordinary jobs crisis, and:

(i)           in March 2020, 15 per cent of all jobs were filled by young people yet 40 per cent of all jobs lost since then were young Australians aged 14 to 24;

(ii)         there are now over 345,900 young Australians out of work; and

(iii)        nearly 2 in 5 young people are now unemployed or need more work;

(b)         are struggling to afford life’s essentials, and:

(i)           70 per cent of young Australians are now concerned about their financial wellbeing;

(ii)         young people have missed payments for household bills at a rate of 2 to 3 times the general population; and

(iii)        52 per cent of young renters and 45 per cent of young mortgage holders were concerned about their ability to make housing payments in July 2020;

(c)         are suffering severe social disruption, and:

(i)           many have missed out on once in a lifetime milestones and rites of passage;

(ii)         more feel isolated due to lockdowns with some schools closed, campus life extinguished, and social gatherings restricted or prohibited; and

(iii)        51 per cent of young people felt their mental health had worsened during the crisis;

(d)         are grappling with disruptions to education and training, and:

(i)           many feel their motivation and career plans have been dented; and

(ii)         53 per cent feel their study has been negatively affected; and

(e)         feel they don’t have a voice in politics—52 per cent of young people felt they had a say ‘none of the time’ in public affairs; and

(3)         calls on the Government to work with young people and urgently design a comprehensive COVID-19 youth recovery strategy that gets young Australians through this crisis and builds their futures.

              ( Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 7.30 pm. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Orders of the day continued

         1    Turkish military operations in Syria: Resumption of debate ( from  10 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That the House:

(1)         notes with great concern:

(a)         Turkey’s military operation targeting Kurds in northern Syria;

(b)         Turkey’s actions which are causing further destabilisation in the region, worsening the humanitarian disaster in Syria, and risk undermining progress against ISIS;

(c)         evidence that innocent civilians are being killed and injured by Turkey’s military operations and forces associated with Turkey in Syria;

(d)         reports of possible war crimes being committed by forces associated with Turkey; and

(e)         reports of Turkish intentions to resettle refugees from Turkey into northern Syria outside of UN-sponsored mechanisms;

(2)         recognises that the Kurdish forces in Syria have:

(a)         been instrumental in fighting Daesh as an ally of the Global Coalition to Defeat Daesh/ISIS; and

(b)         lost over 10,000 fighters in the fight against Daesh in Syria; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         urge Turkey to cease its unilateral military operations in Syria; and

(b)         support international efforts to hold Turkey to account for its actions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 26 October 2020. )

         2    Extradition of Malka Leifer: Resumption of debate ( from  10 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That this House:

(1)         notes that Malka Leifer, the former Principal of the Adass Israel Girls School in Melbourne, fled Australia in 2008 as child sexual abuse allegations against her surfaced;

(2)         reaffirms the formal extradition request that was filed by Australia in 2014 requesting she be returned to Victoria to face 74 charges of child sexual abuse;

(3)         acknowledges the bravery of Ms Leifer’s alleged victims - especially Dassi Erlich, Nicole Meyer and Elly Sapper for their tireless pursuit of justice;

(4)         further notes that over five years have elapsed, and over 60 court hearings have been held in Israel, since this extradition request was first lodged, without any significant progress having been made;

(5)         expresses regret and concern at the numerous attempts to prevent and delay Malka Leifer facing justice in Australia; and

(6)         calls for the immediate extradition of Malka Leifer to Australia to face 74 charges of child sexual abuse.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 26 October 2020. )

         3    Ovarian cancer: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Wells —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month in Australia; and

(b)         26 February 2020 is Teal Ribbon Day; and

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate of any women’s cancer;

(b)         every year, almost 1,600 Australian women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer;

(c)         every year, approximately 1,000 Australian women die from ovarian cancer;

(d)         in Australia, the overall five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is 46 per cent; and

(e)         there is currently no reliable screening test to aid detection and prevention.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

         4    Political protest in Chile: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Khalil —That this House:

(1)         notes with concern the ongoing violence and political instability in Chile, driven by rising economic inequality;

(2)         condemns the use of lethal force against peaceful protesters and calls on all parties to refrain from violence;

(3)         recognises the importance and right to peaceful protest in any democracy and condemns the use of violence to repress the democratic right of Chilean citizens to protest;

(4)         calls on the Chilean Government to include all parties, namely, civil society, unions and indigenous peoples in addition to business leaders in the process for drafting a new constitution;

(5)         encourages the work of the Chilean National Human Rights Institute and authorities to investigate human rights abuses and hold those responsible to account; and

(6)         calls on Australian companies that do business in Chile to play a constructive role in the solution to end the political instability.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

         5    Backbone Youth Arts: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of grassroots youth arts organisations, including Backbone, based in the electoral division of Griffith;

(b)         that for thirty years Backbone has helped young people find purpose, develop skills and contribute to our nation’s culture; and

(c)         that despite Backbone’s success, the Government has cut its funding, and the organisation now faces closure; and

(2)         calls on the Government to urgently commit to restore funding to Backbone.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

         6    Aged Care Assessment Teams: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Aged Care Assessment Teams (ACAT) are teams of medical professionals which run clinical and psychological checks on older Australians who have applied for home or residential aged care;

(b)         based in hospitals across the country, ACAT are ultimately responsible for assessing which older Australians should receive government-funded care;

(c)         teams usually include a nurse, plus another healthcare worker such as a physiotherapist, occupational therapist or social worker;

(d)         the Government has announced that it will privatise the ACAT workforce from April 2021, when a tender will be put out for organisations to deliver this vital assessment; and

(e)         on 14 January 2020 the Chair of the Royal Commission into Aged Care, Mr Gaetano Pagone QC, issued a statement saying the Royal Commission’s interim report ‘did not endorse the Government’s stated position’ on privatising the ACAT;

(2)         supports the retention of ACAT as a publicly provided service;

(3)         commends the Health Services Union, United Workers Unions and Australian Nurses and Midwifery Federation for their continued advocacy on behalf of working people in healthcare across Australia, and particularly in the aged care sector; and

(4)         condemns the Government for its continued failings across aged care policy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

         7    Black Spot Program: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr L. S. O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         notes the important, practical contribution the Black Spot Program makes in addressing the nation’s road toll under the National Road Safety Action Plan 2018-2020;

(2)         recognises the need for the Government to continue to invest in the Black Spot Program to improve road safety and reduce the death toll;

(3)         commends the Government for putting road safety at the forefront of infrastructure investment, with further commitments to providing an additional $50 million per year from 2019-20 to 2022-23 to the Black Spot Program; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s Black Spot Program reduces on average at the treated sites, death and serious injury from crashes by 30 per cent according to data from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

         8    Climate emergency: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Bandt —That this House:

(1)         declares an environment and climate emergency;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         the recent report of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Special Report: Global Warming of 1.5°C , indicates that we are facing a climate emergency, and as a result, meaningful action on climate change is urgent, at home and internationally;

(b)         this IPCC report has found that the world is not on track to limit global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius;

(c)         at a national level, England, France, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and Canada have all declared a climate emergency; and

(d)         extreme weather events will devastate large parts of Australia and radically impact food production, water availability, public health, infrastructure, the community and the financial system;

(3)         notes that the Government has acknowledged urgent action is required to address climate change; and

(4)         calls on the Government to take urgent action consistent with the internationally accepted science.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

         9    Captioned telephone handsets: Resumption of debate ( from  24 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Gorman —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the captioned telephone handset, CapTel, is a popular service amongst the Australian deaf and hard of hearing community;

(b)         according to the Department of Communications there are approximately 4,000 CapTel handset users in Australia;

(c)         the average age of people using the service is 80; and

(d)         with an increasing aging population, it can be expected more and more Australians will need to rely on this service to communicate;

(2)         acknowledges the distress and loss that CapTel users and their families are experiencing due to the planned discontinuation of the CapTel service in February 2020;

(3)         condemns the Government for its decision to:

(a)         remove the CapTel service without any consultation with its users; and

(b)         purchase an inferior, outdated, and less user-friendly product, forcing often elderly users to learn a new piece of technology or lose the ability to communicate; and

(4)         encourages CapTel users and their families to contact their federal member of parliament to explain to them the importance of the CapTel service for the deaf and hard of hearing community of Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      10    Review of the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Shorten —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 20 January 2020 the final report from the review of the National Disability Insurance Scheme Act 2013 was handed down by Mr David Tune AO PSM; and

(b)         the report made 29 recommendations that have been endorsed by the disability sector, including people with disability, service providers and carers; and

(2)         calls on the Government to act on the recommendations of the review as soon as possible.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      11    Disability related health supports: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr C. Kelly —That this House:

(1)         notes the Council of Australian Governments Disability Reform Council met on 28 June 2019 and resolved a number of long-standing issues, including the interaction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) with the health system;

(2)         welcomes the council’s agreement to a range of disability-related health supports that will be provided through the NDIS; and

(3)         notes the:

(a)         NDIS will fund disability-related health supports where the supports are required as a result of the participant’s disability and assist the participant to undertake activities of daily living;

(b)         types of health supports that will be funded by the NDIS include continence supports, dysphagia and nutrition supports, respiratory supports and supports for wound and pressure care; and

(c)         approach agreed to by the council to fund disability related health supports under the NDIS recognises participants need to be placed at the centre of all decisions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      12    The Honourable John Cain: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House expresses its sincere sorrow at the death of the Honourable John Cain, and acknowledges his extraordinary contribution to public life and to the State of Victoria, in particular as Premier from 1982 to 1990.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      13    Medicare: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Gillespie —That this House:

(1)         notes the Government’s commitment to Medicare;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         the record level of funding to Medicare in 2018-19 of $24.1 billion, which is an increase of 3.5 per cent in benefits paid in the 2017-18 financial year;

(b)         that the national GP bulk billing rate of 86.2 per cent is a four percentage point increase on the 2012-13 figure of 82.2 per cent when Labor were last in office; and

(c)         that patients made 136.5 million bulk billed GP visits in 2018-19, up 3.3 million visits on the previous financial year;

(3)         acknowledges that on 1 July 2019, the Government increased the patient rebate for further GP items on the Medicare Benefits Schedule, and that specialist procedures, allied health services and other GP services such as mental health and after hours services, were indexed; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for ensuring the Medicare Benefits Schedule Review will continue to ensure that Medicare services are effective and appropriate for patients now and into the future

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      14    Australian Broadcasting Corporation emergency broadcasts: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         thanks the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) for its service in delivering vital emergency broadcasts and comprehensive coverage during the catastrophic fires;

(2)         acknowledges the dramatic rise in emergency broadcasts—from 256 in 2017 to 371 in 2018-19 and 673 so far this year, which have been delivered without additional funding to cover the resources which have been poured into the emergency broadcast effort;

(3)         recognises that since Boxing Day, as bushfires raged across Victoria, New South Wales and South Australia, the ABC handled more than 100 emergency broadcasts in a single week, receiving widespread praise for the practical, life-saving information and the professionalism on display;

(4)         notes the heavy damage sustained to ABC radio and television network infrastructure during the bushfires, particularly at Bateman’s Bay in New South Wales and East Gippsland in Victoria;

(5)         commends the ABC for mobilising to restore local radio stations as a priority because of their critical role in providing information to communities during disasters;

(6)         acknowledges that the ABC should not be put into a position of having to economise on its emergency broadcasting due to Government funding cuts; and

(7)         calls on the Government to reverse the $83.7 million paused in indexation funding as a matter of urgency.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      15    Online safety: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that society is more connected online than ever before in history; and

(b)         the importance of keeping Australians safe online;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Government established the world’s first Children’s eSafety Commissioner in 2015, and expanded this role to cover all Australians in 2017;

(b)         in 2018 the Office of the eSafety Commissioner undertook research to examine some of the challenges faced by young people aged 8 to 17 in Australia online; and

(c)         this research indicated that:

(i)           25 per cent of young people have been contacted by strangers/someone they did not know;

(ii)         13 per cent of young people reported receiving repeated unwanted online messages from someone; and

(iii)        13 per cent of young people reported having lies or rumours spread about them;

(3)         further notes the bipartisan support for the work of the Office of the eSafety Commissioner; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for this world first initiative.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      16    Home care packages: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Templeman —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are 120,000 older Australians waiting for their approved home care package, with many waiting more than two years for the care they have been approved for;

(b)         more than 16,000 older Australians died waiting for their approved home care package they were assessed for in 2017-18—sadly, that was around 300 older Australians that died each week in that year waiting for care;

(c)         there are around 14,000 older Australians who entered residential aged care prematurely because they couldn’t get the care they were assessed and approved for in 2017-18—sadly, that was around 200 older Australians each week having no other choice but to enter residential aged care; and

(d)         the number of older Australians waiting for home care grew from 88,000 to 120,000 since 2017; and

(2)         condemns the Government for its inadequate response to the Royal Commission’s interim report and not providing the home care older Australians need.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      17    Employment, education and training: Resumption of debate ( from  2 March 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         creation of 1.2 million jobs since the Coalition Government was elected, with 140,000 young Australians securing employment over that time period;

(b)         strong commitment of the Government to reform the vocational education and training sector to better meet the demands of the modern Australian economy; and

(c)         leadership of the Government in November 2018 to commission the Joyce Review, a comprehensive expert review of the Australian vocational education and training system which was delivered in March 2019;

(2)         welcomes the implementation of the Skills Package, a $525 million suite of measures that includes:

(a)         a National Careers Institute and the appointment of a National Careers Ambassador;

(b)         the Foundation Skills for Your Future program—an initiative which will support workers by improving literacy, numeracy, and digital literacy;

(c)         a streamlined Incentives for Australian Apprenticeships program, which will encourage employers to take on apprentices and trainees;

(d)         additional incentives to both employers and apprentices in areas affected by skills shortages under the Additional Identified Skills Shortage Payment measure;

(e)         establishing ten industry training hubs in areas of high unemployment;

(f)          further addressing youth unemployment in regional areas by funding 400 Commonwealth Scholarships for Young Australians;

(g)         a National Skills Commission and pilot skills organisations that will promote a nation-wide approach to skills development and enhance the role of industry in designing training courses;

(h)         an extension of the National Rugby League’s VET Apprenticeship Awareness Program; and

(i)           Energising Tasmania—a partnership between the Commonwealth and the Tasmanian Government to train a skilled workforce for jobs for the future in pumped hydro and energy infrastructure; and

(3)         welcomes the prospect of creating a further 80,000 apprenticeships in occupations with skills shortages over the coming five years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      18    University jobs: Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Plibersek —That this House acknowledges that:

(1)         during the COVID-19 crisis, Labor has been urging the Government to act to help universities and save jobs, while:

(a)         the Prime Minister has done nothing, and now jobs are being lost; and

(b)         it has been reported that hundreds of jobs will go at universities in Rockhampton, Geelong, and suburban Melbourne;

(2)         without serious Government help, universities have predicted 21,000 jobs will be lost in the next six months alone, meaning:

(a)         tens of thousands of livelihoods could be destroyed, including those of academics, tutors, administrative staff, library staff, catering staff, grounds staff, cleaners, security and many others—all with families, trying to make ends meet; and

(b)         the impact on regional communities will be devastating (universities support 14,000 jobs in country Australia);

(3)         to save university jobs, the Government must take serious action now, and that the Treasurer could have acted to solve this problem, but hasn’t—instead, the Treasurer has been deliberately moving the goal posts to ensure universities are excluded from government support;

(4)         the Government cannot explain why a university student working a $100 shift per week receives the full $1500 JobKeeper wage subsidy, while their full-time university tutor, with three kids to support, is not eligible; and

(5)         Labor believes it is a big mistake for the Prime Minister to abandon university staff during the COVID-19 crisis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      19    Fundraising laws: Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         charities are the most trusted sector in Australian public life; and

(b)         the Government’s failure to act on fundraising reform is costing Australian charities over $1 million every month;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s current framework of fundraising regulation creates unnecessary problems for charities and organisations who rely on donations from Australian supporters;

(b)         current fundraising laws no longer meet the objectives that guided the decision to regulate donations;

(c)         current fundraising compliance regimes do not allow charities to cultivate donor activity and make optimal use of the resources donors provide;

(d)         meeting the requirements of Australia’s seven different fundraising regimes is causing needless productivity loss for thousands of Australian charities and not-for-profits;

(e)         Australia’s current frameworks for investigation and enforcement have failed to adapt to the contemporary fundraising environment;

(f)          current fundraising laws do not meet the donor-focused expectations and requirements that should govern fundraising regulation in the 21st century; and

(g)         the mechanisms that regulate third party fundraisers should ensure the culture of third party fundraisers matches community perceptions of their clients;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         for several years, the charity and not-for-profit sector has been calling for reform of Australia’s fundraising laws;

(b)         Treasury’s five year review of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, delivered on 31 May 2018, identified fundraising law as the major reporting burden on charities and recommended that fundraising law be harmonised across the country;

(c)         in February 2019, the Senate Select Committee into Charitable Fundraising in the 21st Century called on Parliament to harmonise fundraising law within two years;

(d)         that inquiry, chaired by Labor Senator Catryna Bilyk, delivered a unanimous report, with its recommendations being supported by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert, Liberal Senators Eric Abetz and Amanda Stoker, former Labor Senator David Smith, and former United Australia Party Senator Brian Burston; and

(e)         postponing fundraising reform has had significant costs to the charity and not-for profit sector, with the committee estimating that the annual cost to charities and their donors is around $15 million; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         support Australian charities by ending unnecessary waste of their precious resources;

(b)         support the generous Australian donors who donate money to our charities, by ensuring their donations are not needlessly eroded by redundant administrative and regulatory costs;

(c)         work with state and territory governments and the not-for-profit sector to deliver a consistent national model for regulating not-for-profit and charitable fundraising activities before February 2021; and

(d)         immediately provide a public response to the recommendations made in the review panel’s report, Strengthening for Purpose: Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Legislation Review , which was provided to the Government on 31 May 2018.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      20    Country Women’s Association: Resumption of debate ( from  10 June 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Webster —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of the Country Women’s Association (CWA) in the lives of rural and regional towns across Australia;

(2)         notes that the mission statement of the CWA is ‘to advance the rights and equity of women, families and communities in Australia through advocacy and empowerment, especially for those living in regional, rural and remote Australia’;

(3)         acknowledges the:

(a)         CWA has over 44,000 members in 1855 branches across Australia; and

(b)         vision of the founder of the CWA, Ruth Fairfax OBE; and

(4)         congratulates the CWA on almost a centenary of service to rural and regional Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      21    Chinese-Australians: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the significant contribution made by Chinese-Australians to Australia;

(b)         that all people in Australia, regardless of their ethnicity, cultural or religious background, deserve to be respected in our society;

(c)         that Australia is the most successful multicultural society in the world and that Australia is strengthened by our diversity; and

(d)         the important role our multicultural communities have played in stopping the spread of the coronavirus;

(2)         notes that the COVID-19 crisis has seen a number of appalling racist attacks on Chinese-Australians;

(3)         condemns these shocking racist attacks; and

(4)         supports promoting a zero tolerance approach to racism in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      22    Diabetes: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         notes that there are:

(a)         1.3 million Australians with diabetes registered on the National Diabetes Services Scheme, with over 280 new people diagnosed and registered each day and an estimated 500,000 Australians with type 2 diabetes which remain undiagnosed; and

(b)         an estimated 2 million Australians with pre-diabetes and at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the next 5-10 years;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder, which if not diagnosed early and treated well may lead to serious health complications such as blindness, limb amputation, heart disease and stroke, and kidney disease; and

(b)         the Government’s long standing commitment to improving the treatment and care of people with diabetes through establishing the Australian National Diabetes Strategy, the roll out of continuous glucose monitors and flash monitors to children, young adults, health care card holders and women with type 1 diabetes who are pregnant, while noting the need for all type 1 diabetics to have affordable access to this important technology, as well as the recently launched Diabetes in Schools program, the KeepSight program, and programs to prevent diabetes related amputations;

(3)         congratulates Australian of the Year 2020, Dr James Muecke AM for his work as an ophthalmologist working in many poor and developing nations, and for raising public awareness of the need to prevent type 2 diabetes through encouraging healthier lifestyles and healthier environments; and

(4)         calls on all state and federal governments to re-commit to a refreshed Australian National Diabetes Strategy and to fund and develop a national diabetes prevention program.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      23    Water rights: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         water is a scarce and highly valuable resource in Australia; and

(b)         Australia is prone to droughts and many parts of our country have recently experienced their worst droughts in living memory;

(2)         registers its concern that:

(a)         foreign entities, some implicitly backed by foreign governments, are substantially increasing their holdings of Australian water rights;

(b)         Australian agriculturalists are increasingly competing with these foreign entities to secure the water rights upon which their livelihoods depend; and

(c)         the acquisition of water rights is not directly subject to the approval of the Foreign Investment Review Board;

(3)         congratulates the Government on committing to reform the legislation governing the Foreign Investment Review Board; and

(4)         calls upon the Government to, in those reforms:

(a)         ensure that water rights are directly subject to Foreign Investment Review Board approval, independent to the acquisition of agricultural land to which those rights sometimes attach; and

(b)         lower the threshold for Foreign Investment Review Board approval for agricultural and water rights to $5 million.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      24    Australia and the Pacific: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Young —That this House:

(1)         commends the Government’s Pacific Step-up and its focus on building prosperity across the regions, including by encouraging close links between Australian business and investors with the Pacific;

(2)         recognises that the Pacific is part of Australia’s family and that we have a special relationship with our Pacific neighbours; and

(3)         notes that the significant Australian investment in key infrastructure projects, such as the Coral Sea Cable, is providing positive economic and social opportunities to communities in the Pacific.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      25    Aged care workers: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Collins —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on older Australians, their families, their carers and the aged care workforce;

(b)         the valuable contributions made by the more than 360,000 aged care workers who have continued to deliver care and support to older Australians during the COVID-19 pandemic;

(c)         all aged care workers play a valuable role to deliver care and support to older Australians in residential and home care;

(d)         many aged care workers are low paid and around 87 per cent of them are women;

(e)         the Government’s decision to exclude a large proportion of aged care workers from receiving the retention bonus;

(f)          excluded aged care workers who will not receive the retention bonus include those delivering services under the Commonwealth Home Support Program as well as in-direct care workers in residential aged care facilities including lifestyle and leisure therapists, cleaners, hospitality workers and gardeners;

(g)         the exclusion of any aged care worker from receiving the retention bonus is unwarranted and unfair;

(h)         on 20 March 2020 the Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians issued a media release that stated the retention bonus payment would be ‘after tax’; and

(i)           on 5 June 2020 the Department of Health’s retention bonus guidelines stated the payment would be ‘subject to income tax’;

(2)         conveys its disappointment that the Government made:

(a)         a decision to exclude about 40 per cent of aged care workers from receiving the retention bonus; and

(b)         a late decision to switch the retention bonus from being after tax to being before tax that will see aged care workers lose hundreds of dollars they were previously promised;

(3)         calls on the Government, as a matter of urgency, to reconsider its decision and pay the retention bonus to all aged care workers irrespective of their role or where they work and to explain why it changed the rules around the payment being after tax to the payment now being subject to income tax; and

(4)         acknowledges the work all aged care workers undertake each and every day and thanks them for their continued dedication to care and support older Australians in residential and home care.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      26    Veteran suicides: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Thompson —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the work the Government is doing to address the issue of veteran suicide with the announcement of an independent National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide;

(b)         that a new independent National Commissioner will be appointed to identify and investigate suicide amongst Australian Defence Force and veteran population; and

(c)         that a new Veteran Family Advocate will be appointed to lead engagement, liaison and advocacy amongst families and will be at the heart of policy and decision making with the Department of Veterans’ Affairs; and

(2)         recognises mental health and suicide are complex issues, but issues that are everyone’s business—families, friends, employers, community organisations, governments and the ex-service community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      27    Public service contractors: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         an effective public service relies on skilled public servants who have fair and equitable conditions of employment and job security;

(b)         the Government’s arbitrary average staffing level (ASL) policy is:

(i)           driving privatisation as it forces agencies to outsource their core functions;

(ii)         causing a blowout in spending on contractors, consultants and labour hire; and

(iii)        leading to a hollowing out of the public service; and

(c)         evidence to the Australian Public Service (APS) Review indicates that contractors cost 40 per cent more than permanent APS employees;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian National Audit Office Information Report No. 19 of 2017-18, Australian Government Procurement Contract Reporting , indicates that in 2016-17:

(i)           Government spending on consultants was close to $700 million, up from around $380 million in 2013; and

(ii)         “the big four” had 1,617 consultancy contracts worth $502.1 million since 2012-13;

(b)         more than $400 million has been spent on privatising Department of Human Services call centres, including a $135 million contract for Stellar Asia Pacific, $132 million to Concentrix Services, $120 million to Datacom Connect and $36 million to Serco Citizen Services;

(c)         the National Disability Insurance Agency:

(i)           recorded a 600 per cent increase in consultants and contractors over two years—from $70 million in 2016 to $430 million in 2018; and

(ii)         has previously stated its staffing levels would be 10,595 staff in 2018-19—this is now capped at 3,230 in the 2019-20 budget with core functions such as local area coordinators outsourced; and

(d)         the Government’s billion dollar plan to privatise Australia’s visa system will lead to increased visa costs, data and national security risks and job losses; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         abolish the arbitrary and damaging ASL policy;

(b)         ensure that workers doing the same job get the same pay to stop the use of labour hire from undermining the pay and conditions of existing workers; and

(c)         end the secrecy on government spending on contractors, consultants and labour hire firms.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      28    Australia and the United States of America: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mrs McIntosh —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that this year marks the 80th anniversary of the establishment of formal diplomatic relations between the Commonwealth of Australia and the United States of America;

(2)         recognises the diplomatic relationship is the foundation of the broader strategic, defence and economic partnerships between Australia and the United States;

(3)         acknowledges the:

(a)         significance of the recent state dinner between President Trump and Prime Minister Morrison on 20 September 2019; and

(b)         appointment of United States Ambassador to Australia, Mr Arthur Culvahouse Jnr, on 19 February 2019;

(4)         encourages that the anniversary be a reaffirmation of our shared commitment to promote and uphold democratic values, freedoms and the rule of law at home and abroad;

(5)         further acknowledges that a strong, bilateral relationship is vital for our continued shared economic prosperity and national security, as Australia and the United States:

(a)         face increasingly complex and frequent threats that aim to undermine the integrity of democratic institutions and national sovereignty; and

(b)         share the benefits of a robust trade and investment relationship valued at US $1.1 trillion that creates and sustains jobs; and

(6)         commemorates the bravery, service and sacrifice of United States firefighters Captain Ian H. McBeth, First Officer Paul Clyde Hudson, and Flight Engineer Rick A. DeMorgan Jnr who tragically lost their lives while fighting bushfires in the Snowy Monaro area, New South Wales, on 23 January 2020.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      29    Heart failure: Resumption of debate ( from  15 June 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That this House:

(1)         notes that between 1 and 2 per cent of the Australian population suffers from heart failure, with this proportion higher in Indigenous communities;

(2)         acknowledges with concern the rising cost of care for the growing number of Australians with heart failure, including the duration and frequency of hospitalisation, medical management and health complications;

(3)         further notes that research from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare states that over 60,000 heart failure hospital admissions, amounting to over 400,000 bed days and a cost to the healthcare system of $3.9 billion are potentially preventable;

(4)         welcomes the arrival of proven technologies, including transcatheter mitral valve repair, which have demonstrated transformative improvements in addressing underlying causes of heart failure including functional and degenerative mitral regurgitation;

(5)         commends the support given by clinicians, advocates, carers and families of Australians suffering from heart failure;

(6)         welcomes with appreciation the announcement of the Government’s commitment of $220 million over 10 years for the Cardiovascular Mission under the Medical Research Fund;

(7)         acknowledges the Government’s commitment to address all forms of heart disease under the National Action Plan for Heart and Stroke;

(8)         notes the current consideration by the Medical Services Advisory Committee of transcatheter mitral valve repair; and

(9)         calls on the Government to ensure all Australians have early access to proven procedures and technologies, such as transcatheter mitral valve repair, where indicated, to address the rising healthcare burden and premature mortality represented by heart failure.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      30    Renewable energy: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Haines —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         in the 19th century it was regional Australia that led the transition from gas to electricity and that in the 21st century it is again regional Australia that is leading Australia’s transition to renewable energy; and

(b)         according to the Australian Energy Market Operator’s Integrated System Plan, around 15 gigawatts of coal-fired power will retire over the next 20 years;

(2)         recalls the analysis from the leaked report of the National COVID-19 Coordination Commission Manufacturing Taskforce indicated that renewables plus storage are the lowest cost form of new electricity generation, and therefore a lowest-cost energy transition will be based on significant investment in renewables;

(3)         welcomes the recent comments from the International Energy Agency that ‘governments have the opportunity to accelerate renewables deployment by making investment in renewables a key part of stimulus packages designed to reinvigorate their economies. This offers the prospect of harnessing the structural benefits that increasingly affordable renewables can bring, including opportunities for creating jobs and economic development, while reducing emissions and fostering innovation’;

(4)         notes analysis by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation that projects that up to $1,000 billion will be spent on Australia’s electricity system until 2050 and that local communities should benefit from this investment boom;

(5)         acknowledges that ‘community energy’, which is where a renewable energy project is developed by, owned by or delivers benefit to local communities, offers a compelling model for capturing the immense benefits of renewable energy, including jobs and investment, for local communities in regional Australia;

(6)         further welcomes the findings of Sustainability Victoria into the Victorian Community Power Hub pilot program which found that Government investment into community energy of $1.16 million created 15 projects delivering economic benefits worth $25.6 million; and

(7)         calls on the Government to support the development of community-owned renewable energy projects across regional Australia through:

(a)         direct financial support for regional communities in the form of grants and concessional loans;

(b)         technical support for local communities to develop renewable energy projects based on the Community Power Hub model successfully deployed in Victoria; and

(c)         a dedicated national community energy agency to enable capacity-building across the regional community energy network and to administer financial and technical support over the medium-term.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      31    2021 census: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)         notes the Census and Statistics Amendment (Statistical Information) Regulations 2020 tabled in Parliament on 11 February 2020 seek to ask a question in the 2021 census about whether someone has served in the Australian Defence Force (ADF); and

(2)         recognises that having a census question around the ADF service will:

(a)         for the first time, give a complete picture of the number of veterans in Australia; and

(b)         allow governments of all levels to deliver the right services in the right areas to support veterans and their families.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      32    Superannuation: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Jones —That this House notes:

(1)         the purpose of superannuation is to enable Australians to save for a dignified retirement;

(2)         superannuation has made an enormous contribution to converting Australia from a nation that borrows to a nation that lends, creating a pool of funds to invest locally and abroad;

(3)         Australia is the 16th largest economy in the world, but because of universal superannuation has a pool of savings owned by Australian workers worth $2.8 trillion, which is the fourth largest pool of retirement savings in the world;

(4)         before universal superannuation, 68 per cent of Australians and 85 per cent of all women had no retirement savings;

(5)         the average superannuation balance at retirement is now approximately $160,000 for women and $280,000 for men;

(6)         under current policy settings, the median balance on retirement for full-time workers will be $310,819 for women and $628,634 for men;

(7)         over the past decade the average rate of return has been between 6 and 8 per cent—last year it grew by 9.2 per cent and Australia was among only a handful of countries that saw pension fund growth; and

(8)         superannuation is critical to Australia’s economic growth and resilience and must be strengthened so it can play a pivotal role in Australia’s economic recovery from COVID-19

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      33    Roads to Recovery Program: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that from 2013-14 to 2023-24, the Government will provide a record $6.2 billion under the Roads to Recovery Program, with an ongoing commitment of $500 million each year following; and

(b)         the significant benefits to the 128 Local Government Areas which will receive an additional $138.9 million in Roads to Recovery drought support funding; and

(2)         recognises the real and meaningful difference Roads to Recovery is making to communities right across the country

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      34    Precision medicine: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)         recognises that precision medicine, enabled by advances in genomics, data analysis and artificial intelligence represents an exciting leap in healthcare that will improve the outcomes of preventative and targeted medicine for countless Australians and their families;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         our world class healthcare system ensures Australia is well placed to lead the world in precision medicine innovations;

(b)         Australian researchers, including those at the University of Queensland, are world leaders in their field and their work is at the forefront of precision medicine; and

(c)         research in precision medicine stimulates the economy, leads to growth in highly skilled jobs and supports Australia’s $185 billion healthcare industry;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s significant investment in precision medicine research including as part of the recently announced $440 million in National Health and Medical Research Council grants; and

(4)         encourages the Government and private enterprise to continue to invest in the genomics, data analysis and artificial intelligence research required to grow the precision medicine sector in Australia in order to create jobs, keep Australia at the forefront of medical advances and improve the healthcare outcomes for everyday Australians

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      35    Tourism: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Gorman —That this House:

(1)         recognises that Australia’s tourism sector is vital to a strong, growing economy;

(2)         notes:

(a)         that 2020 has seen an incredibly tough start to the year for tourism operators with devastating bushfires, an inevitable Coronavirus pandemic and a sluggish domestic economy; 

(b)         Australia is a tourism dependent economy with the Australian Bureau of Statistics noting a $60 billion contribution to gross domestic product; and

(c)         666,000 people worked in tourism in Australia in 2018-19;

(3)         encourages Australians to support our local tourism operators and where possible holiday here, at home, in the best country in the world;

(4)         commits Members of this House to work with members of the tourism industry and local operators and encourage the development of new tourism businesses and assets; and

(5)         agrees that Australia is the best country in the world and a must visit country for any international tourist.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      36    Pacific Maritime Security Program : Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of working with our Pacific neighbours to deliver a region that is secure and sovereign; and

(2)         notes the:

(a)         Government’s Pacific Maritime Security Program is providing the region with a modern and coordinated security capability; and

(b)         Government is delivering important infrastructure projects that will enhance their security capability—this includes:

(i)           Fiji’s Blackrock Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Camp;

(ii)         gifting of Guardian Class Patrol Boats; and

(iii)        the joint initiative with Papua New Guinea and the Lombrum Naval Base.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      37    Environmental management and conservation: Resumption of debate ( from  24 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mrs McIntosh —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of environmental management and conservation in our local communities;

(2)         acknowledges the importance of local environmental volunteer groups who devote their time to look after our natural environment;

(3)         congratulates our local volunteers on their dedication to supporting our local communities and our environment; and

(4)         further acknowledges the Government’s continued support of environmental groups through the Communities Environment Program, which provides each of the 151 electorates across Australia with up to $150,000 to fund small, community-led environment projects, totalling $22.65 million.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      38    Partner and spouse visa applications: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)         reaffirms that:

(a)         Australians love who they love, and the community must have confidence that the partner and spouse visa provisions in the Migration Act 1958 (the Act) are administered lawfully, fairly, impartially and with integrity;

(b)         while the Minister generally has the power to limit the number of visas in particular classes and subclasses by using the program management provisions in s86 of the Act, s87, of the Act explicitly prevents the ‘capping’ of visas to people who apply for a visa on the grounds that they are the spouse or de facto partner of an Australian citizen or permanent resident;

(c)         the Parliament has voted twice to reject legislative amendments to give the Minister a power to cap these visa classes, preferring the processing of spouse visa applications to occur on a demand-driven basis; and

(d)         inexplicable and unconscionable delays by the Department of Home Affairs in processing thousands of partner visa applications continues to result in significant harm to, and consequences for, Australian citizens and permanent residents;

(2)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         using the administrative tool of migration program planning levels to unlawfully override the legislated program management tools in s86 and s87 thus effectively ‘capping’ partner visas against the intent of s87 of the Act;

(b)         refusing to release advice on the legality of their actions to restrict partner visa grants;

(c)         presiding over an extraordinary blow out to 91,717 as at 31 March 2020 in the number of partner visa applications on hand, an increase of almost 30 per cent in under three years;

(d)         unacceptably high and deteriorating processing times for partner visa applications, with the Department’s website indicating that:

(i)           subclass 300—75 per cent of applications are processed within 16 months and 90 per cent of applications are processed within 29 months;

(ii)         subclass 309—75 per cent of applications are processed within 15 months and 90 per cent of applications are processed within 20 months;

(iii)        subclass 100—75 per cent of applications are processed within 20 months and 90 per cent of applications are processed within 24 months;

(iv)       subclass 820—75 per cent of applications are processed within 20 months and 90 per cent of applications are processed within 25 months; and

(v)         subclass 801—75 per cent of applications are processed within 13 months and 90 per cent of applications are processed within 25 months;

(e)         cutting the number of partner visas granted by 8,000 per annum which will mean the backlog and processing times continue to grow;

(f)          allowing a blowout in the backlog of cases to 5,556 cases at the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) as at 31 July 2020 with:

(i)           an average processing time for partner cases of 726 calendar days; and

(ii)         a partner visa set aside rate at the AAT of around 60 per cent;

(g)         failing to address the perverse consequences of COVID-19 related border restrictions for partner visa applicants including:

(i)           refusing to let numerous partner and prospective marriage visa holders enter Australia before their visas expire, or at least to extend their visa expiry date or refund their money; and

(ii)         refusing to let people who are currently in Australia on a temporary visa and who are granted an offshore partner visa to activate that visa without having to fly overseas; and

(h)         attempting to silence Australians who speak up publicly about the delays in processing and growing problems in the partner visa program; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         acknowledge the devastating human impact of delays and uncertainty on affected couples whose lives are in limbo, whose mental health is suffering, and whose relationships are being destroyed through separation from their partner for many years;

(b)         apologise for the unacceptable delays in processing partner visa applications and take immediate action to process the backlog noting the Government has collected massive levels of visa application revenue that should be used to process applications in a timely way;

(c)         urgently address the perverse consequences of COVID-19 related border restrictions on partner visas; and

(d)         publicly commit to affected people and the wider community that partner visa processing will in future be administered lawfully, fairly, impartially and expeditiously.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      39    Recycling: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Allen —That this House:

(1)         recognises the imperative of improving waste management, reducing unnecessary packaging and boosting recycling in Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australians generate about 67 million tonnes of waste each year, of which 37 million tonnes are recycled;

(b)         only 12 per cent of the 103 kilograms of plastic waste generated per person in Australia each year is recycled, mostly overseas;

(c)         for every 10,000 tonnes of waste recycled, more than nine jobs are created; and

(d)         waste related activities add $6.9 billion to the economy annually;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s recent $20 million commitment for innovative projects under round 8 of the Cooperative Research Centres Program grants to grow our domestic plastics recycling industry; and

(4)         notes that this is part of the Government’s Australian Recycling Investment Plan, a package of initiatives totalling $167 million designed to grow and strengthen Australia’s domestic recycling industry, and to support industry and community initiatives to lift recycling rates in Australia

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      40    Small business and the defence industry: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Thompson —That this House:

(1)         notes the important role Australian small business has in the future of our national and economic security through its integral role in our defence industry;

(2)         recognises the defence industry’s potential for growth in electoral divisions like Herbert and other regional electoral divisions across Australia;

(3)         supports opportunities to maximise the participation of Australian companies in all facets of defence procurement; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s commitment to deliver a robust, resilient and internationally competitive Australian defence industry

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      41    Canberra’s national institutions: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr D. P. B. Smith —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         in April 2019 the Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories tabled a report on its inquiry into Canberra’s national institutions, titled Telling Australia’s Story—and why it is important ;

(b)         the report made 20 recommendations and was informed by some 83 submissions and several public hearings with witnesses from every major cultural institution;

(c)         the report’s conclusions and recommendations were supported across the political spectrum;

(d)         unfortunately, 16 months on from the tabling of the report the Government is yet to respond to its recommendations;

(e)         Government inaction on these recommendations is having a detrimental effect on the operation of these national treasures, including but not limited to the:

(i)           National Gallery, which is expected to lose about 10 per cent of their workforce;

(ii)         National Library, which has modified its collecting strategy to remove Japan, Korea, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar from its list of priority countries from its Asia Collection; and

(iii)        National Archives, which is preparing to lose large sections of its 117,000 hours of magnetic tape archives unless additional resources for digitisation are provided; and

(f)          these challenges outlined in the report are being further amplified by current COVID-19 restrictions;

(2)         recognises that Canberra’s cultural institutions play a critical role in telling our collective national story; and

(3)         calls on the Government to immediately table a substantive and detailed response to the report’s recommendations.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      42    National Police Remembrance Day : Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that National Police Remembrance Day will be observed on 27 September 2020;

(2)         acknowledges the crucial role police officers across Australia play in our local communities and the tremendous risk and sacrifice that comes with their duty;

(3)         honours the lives and memories of those police officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the course of their duty and specifically honours the tragic loss of four members of the Victorian Police Force, namely, Leading Senior Constable Lynette Rosemary Taylor, Senior Constable Kevin Neil King, Constable Glen Andrew Humphris and Constable Joshua Andrew Prestney, who tragically lost their lives in a multi-vehicle collision on Melbourne’s Eastern Freeway;

(4)         pays tribute to the families and friends of police officers who have been killed in the line of duty throughout our nation’s history;

(5)         commends the valuable work of Police Legacy, who look after the loved ones of police officers who have fallen; and

(6)         reaffirms its support for the nation’s police officers and honours their courage, commitment and dedication in ensuring the peace and safety of our communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      43    Hydrogen industry: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)         recognises that with research like that occurring at the CSIRO Advanced Research Facility in the electoral division of Ryan, Australia has the potential to be a world leader in hydrogen development, production and export which will create highly paid jobs and an industry potentially worth billions to the Australian economy;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s availability of land, high quality renewable energy resources and fossil energy resources, as well as our well-established reputation for undertaking large-scale resource projects, position Australia well for becoming a key exporter in a future global hydrogen market;

(b)         the combined direct and indirect benefits of establishing a hydrogen production and export industry in Australia under a medium demand scenario will deliver to the Australian economy $4.2 billion and over 7,100 jobs by 2040;

(c)         greater use of hydrogen is one way that Australia can contribute to global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, if Australian produced hydrogen replaces traditional fossil fuel sources in end user nations; and

(d)         the National Hydrogen Strategy is to be released by the end of 2019, providing the Government with an opportunity to signal its long term policy and commitment to this industry;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s significant investment of more than $140 million into hydrogen projects, partnering with industry to develop tangible solutions that are important for bringing down energy prices for Australian households and small businesses; and

(4)         encourages the Government to utilise the opportunity of the release of the National Hydrogen Strategy to confirm its long term commitment to the development of our hydrogen capability in order to encourage private investment in the sector, create jobs, create export capability and reduce global carbon emissions

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      44    Women’s economic security: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Collins —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted women’s economic security, and that:

(i)           in April over half a million Australians lost their jobs, of which 55 per cent were women;

(ii)         women’s underemployment ratio now sits at an unprecedented 16 per cent, compared to 14 per cent for men; and

(iii)        modelling has estimated that more than 200,000 women casual workers in the accommodation, food services, and retail trade sectors alone will miss out on the Jobkeeper wage subsidy;

(b)         women typically retire with half the superannuation balance as men and if they choose to withdraw funds, women will suffer a significantly greater impact on their retirement income than men;

(c)         Australian women have been on the frontline of the COVID-19 crisis in Australia in underpaid and undervalued roles—women account for:

(i)           87 per cent of registered nurses and midwives;

(ii)         87 per cent of aged care workers; and

(iii)        96 per cent of early childhood educators; and

(d)         as a result of COVID-19, mothers are spending an extra hour each day on unpaid housework and four extra hours on childcare; and

(2)         calls on the Government to recognise that women have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 crisis and deliver a plan to reduce gender inequality

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      45    Headspace: Resumption of debate ( from  31 August 2020 ) on the motion of Mrs Archer —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that Headspace was established by the Howard Government in 2006;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         there are currently 113 Headspace services operating nationally, including 54 services located in rural and regional Australia; and

(b)         in 2018-19, the Government provided $95.7 million to commission Headspace services in rural areas;

(3)         further acknowledges that in the 2019-20 Budget, the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan was outlined with funding of $509 million; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for announcing a further $64 million to provide suicide prevention and mental health initiatives

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      46    Aviation industry: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Ms C. F. King —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the critical role that Australia’s aviation sector plays in the lives of all Australians;

(b)         that 45,000 Australians work directly for airlines in Australia and hundreds of thousands more in related industries including aviation and tourism; and

(c)         that the response to the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a huge toll on the aviation industry in Australia and around the world;

(2)         notes the:

(a)         Government’s ad-hoc and piecemeal approach to Australia’s aviation sector during the COVID-19 response, putting thousands of jobs at risk;

(b)         Government’s failure to take an equity stake in Virgin resulting in the company collapsing into voluntary administration, putting at risk the livelihoods of almost 16,000 workers; and

(c)         inequitable treatment of the 5,500 workers of aviation support company dnata, who were told on 1 May 2020 that they would not be eligible for Jobkeeper payments; and

(3)         calls on the Government to outline a comprehensive plan for aviation to ensure the best outcome for both the travelling public and the thousands of workers whose jobs depend on a vibrant aviation industry.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      47    Diabetes: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 120,000 Australians live with type 1 diabetes, and the:

(a)         cause of the disease is unknown; and

(b)         majority of people with the condition are diagnosed before they are 19 years of age;

(2)         acknowledges the many Australian families raising children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and the incredible efforts they make to support their loved ones;

(3)         supports the important work of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) in raising awareness and funds for vital research and prevention of the disease, which includes $152 million invested in Australian research to date; and

(4)         notes that:

(a)         1 October 2020 marked the beginning of the JDRF One Walk Step Challenge, encouraging participants to raise funds by walking 120,000 steps in October for the 120,000 Australians living with the disease; and

(b)         14 November 2020 is World Diabetes Day, promoting the role of nurses in the prevention and management of diabetes.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      48    Climate change and the economy: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Steggall —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         as a result of the 2019-20 bushfires more than 400 people died of smoke inhalation and over 4,000 people were hospitalised;

(b)         the Australian Medical Association warns that global warming will lead to significant health impacts, including but not limited to, rise in respiratory illnesses, heat-related illnesses, cardiovascular disease mortality, asthma, spread of disease vectors, reduced labour productivity, food insecurity and under-nutrition, displacement, and mental ill-health;

(c)         the interim report of the Royal Commission into Natural Disaster Arrangements states that further warming is inevitable and that Australia is likely to experience more frequent and intense extreme weather events such as floods, bushfires and drought;

(d)         University of Melbourne modelling projects that, if we fail to meet the temperature goals of the Paris Agreement, the Australian economy will suffer an estimated $2.7 trillion in cumulative damages over the next three decades; and

(e)         that the 2019-20 bushfires resulted in an estimated $20 billion in lost economic output and over $2.4 billion in insured losses;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         Australia is in recession for the first time in 30 years;

(b)         the effective unemployment rate is at 13.3 per cent and may remain over 10 per cent for the next several years;

(c)         that young people will now face the dual challenges of climate change and the economic recovery from this pandemic, which will limit their quality of life and future employment;

(d)         before COVID-19, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation estimated that limiting emissions to net zero by 2050, amongst other factors, could result in 2.75 to 2.8 per cent GDP growth annually—as opposed to 2.1 per cent under less ambitious scenarios;

(e)         that acting on climate change will lead to a jobs boom in clean technologies like energy efficiency, manufacturing, renewable energy, and electric vehicles; and

(f)          in order to unleash investment in clean technologies, investors need a bipartisan climate change framework and policy certainty;

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         countries and jurisdictions such as the United Kingdom, Germany, Fiji and the State of Victoria have enacted framework climate change legislation;

(b)         in the United Kingdom, there are now more than 396,000 jobs in low-carbon businesses and their supply chains with the low carbon economy growing at 11 per cent, per year—four times faster than the rest of the economy;

(c)         framework climate change legislation supports reducing emissions, protecting against climate risks to health, and accelerates investment in a growth economy; and

(d)         Australia has no Commonwealth framework climate change legislation; and

(4)         calls on the Government to adopt framework climate change legislation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      49    Don Burrows AO MBE: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Bell —That this House:

(1)         recognises the passing of Don Burrows AO MBE on 12 March 2020, especially noting his:

(a)         lifetime contribution to the Australian music industry; and

(b)         contribution to music education and Indigenous communities; and

(2)         further recognises the:

(a)         contribution that creative arts and culture make to Australian society; and

(b)         impact of COVID-19 on the creative arts sector.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      50    Marine environment: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         recognises the Government’s commitment to protecting Australia’s marine environment including the Great Barrier Reef through the:

(a)         Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan ;

(b)         $1.2 billion investment to ensure the health of the reef; and

(c)         $100 million Environment Restoration Fund which supports cleaner oceans and waterways;

(2)         opposes oil or gas drilling off the coast of Sydney, including by:

(a)         recognising that, through Advent Energy’s own admission on 29 December 2010, the exploratory well had failed to find gas; and

(b)         not renewing the Petroleum Exploration Permit 11 licence; and

(3)         notes the importance of Sydney’s coastline and waterways to the ecosystem as well as tourism and investment

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )

      51    Liquefied petroleum gas inhalation: Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         Patrick Ryan, aged 16 years, from Port Lincoln South Australia died in February 2020 at a party with friends as a result of inhaling Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) from a barbecue gas bottle;

(b)         a number of young Australians have died from intentionally inhaling LPG; and

(c)         inhaling LPG can cause dizziness, coughing, nausea, vomiting, skin irritation, fever, numbness and death;

(2)         notes that there is presently no label on LPG bottles warning inhalation may cause death;

(3)         calls on the relevant Minister to:

(a)         establish an inquiry to investigate the circumstances of such deaths; and

(b)         develop recommendations to ensure LPG bottles are required to display a warning label which explains the gas is poisonous and the dangers of inhalation; and

(4)         asks that the relevant Minister consider the recommendations and urgently bring forward legislation that, if passed, will ensure all LPG cylinders in Australia carry the recommended warnings.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 26 October 2020. )