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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Wednesday, 26 May 2021

The Federation Chamber meets at 10 am

 

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2021-2022 ( Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Frydenberg —That the Bill be now read a second time— And on the amendment moved thereto by Dr Chalmers , viz. —That all words after “That” be omitted with a view to substituting the following words: “whilst not declining to give the bill a second reading, the House notes:

(1)         the 2021 Budget includes nearly $100 billion in new spending and racks up one trillion dollars in debt, but still delivers a real wage cut for Australian workers;

(2)         after eight long years of cuts to key services, increasing job insecurity, stagnant wages growth, weak business investment, weak productivity, waste and rorts, this Budget was designed to get through an election rather than outline a vision for Australia; and

(3)         that the 2021 Budget is a missed opportunity to shape a better, stronger post-pandemic Australia where no one is held back and no one is left behind.”

And on the amendment to the amendment moved thereto by Mr Bandt, viz.

“That the following words be added after paragraph (3):

(4)         the 2020-21 Budget delivered the publicly-funded Jobkeeper wage subsidy, that was received by many companies that enjoyed an increase in profits during the pandemic, resulting from changes in consumer spending;

(5)         the 2021-22 Budget does not include measures requiring such corporations to repay any Jobkeeper payments they received as a windfall; and

(6)         calls on the Government to require companies with an annual turnover of more than $50 million that received windfall Jobkeeper payments and in the last 12 months:

(a)         made increased profits; or

(b)         paid increased executive bonuses; or

(c)         issued increased dividends;

to repay to the Commonwealth an amount equal to the amount of Jobkeeper payments they received, up to the sum of increased profits made and increased executive bonuses paid”.

         2    Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2021-2022 ( Assistant Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 May 2021 —Mr Neumann ).

         3    Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Bill (No. 1) 2021-2022 ( Assistant Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  11 May 2021 —Mr Neumann ).

         4    Anniversary of the national apology to survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2020 —Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That this House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

       5    Fourth annual statement on veterans and their families—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 10 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr D. J. Chester —That the House take note of the document.

       6    Australia’s COVID-19 health response—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 June 2020—Mr Laming ) on the motion of

Mr Hunt —That the House take note of the document.

       7    Disaster risk reduction—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 March 2020—Mr Young ) on the motion of Mr Littleproud —That the House take note of the document.

       8    Closing the Gap—Report 2020—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 February 2020—Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr Porter —That the House take note of the document.

       9    VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 17 October 2019—Mr Ted O’Brien ) on the motion of

Mr D. J. Chester —That the House take note of the document.

      10    Anniversary of the national apology to victims and survivors of institutional child sexual abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2019 —Mrs Wicks ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That the House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

      11    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  23 March 2021 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Road Safety—Joint Select Committee Improving road safety in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Conaghan —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

       2    Employment, Education and Training—Standing Committee Education in remote and complex environments —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Laming —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

       3    Migration—Joint Standing Committee Final report of the inquiry into the Working Holiday Maker Program —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 December 2020— Mr Broadbent ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       4    National Disability Insurance Scheme—Joint Standing Committee NDIS Planning final report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 3 December 2020— Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       5    Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee Report 484: The administration of Government grants: Inquiry into Auditor-General’s reports 5, 12 and 23 (2019-20) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2020. )

       6    Indigenous Affairs—Standing Committee Report on food pricing and food security in remote Indigenous communities —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020— Mr Vasta ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       7    Industry, Innovation, Science and Resources—Standing Committee From rubbish to resources: Building a circular economy —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020— Mr Vasta ) on the motion of Mr Joyce —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       8    Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee Criminality, corruption and impunity: Should Australia join the Global Magnitsky movement?—An inquiry into targeted sanctions to address human rights abuses —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020— Dr Martin ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the date will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       9    Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee Report 483: Inquiry into the 2018-19 Defence Major Projects report and the Future Submarine Project—Transition to design: Auditor-General’s reports 19 and 22 (2019-20) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020— Dr Martin ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     10    National Disability Insurance Scheme—Joint Standing Committee NDIS workforce interim report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     11    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission annual report 2019 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     12    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority annual report 2019 (second report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     13    Infrastructure, Transport and Cities—Standing Committee Fairer funding and financing of faster rail: Inquiry into options for financing faster rail —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020 ) on the motion of

Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     14    Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee Inquiry into the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for Australia's foreign affairs, defence and trade —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 9 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     15    National Disability Insurance Scheme—Joint Standing Committee General issues —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 10 December 2020— Mr Alexander ) on the motion of Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     16    Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee Report 485: Cyber resilience: Inquiry into Auditor-General's reports 1 and 13 (2019-20) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 10 December 2020— Mr Alexander ) on the motion of

Mrs Wicks —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     17    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Report on the conduct of the 2019 Federal Election and matters related thereto —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 10 December 2020— Mr Stevens ) on the motion of —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     18    Northern Australia—Joint Standing Committee Never again: Inquiry into the destruction of 46,000 year old caves at the Juukan Gorge in the Pilbara region of Western Australia—Interim report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 2 February 2021— Mr Falinski ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     19    Agriculture and Water Resources—Standing Committee Growing Australia: Inquiry into growing Australian agriculture to $100 billion by 2030 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 February 2021— Mr Pasin ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     20    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Tackling the feral cat pandemic: a plan to save Australian wildlife: Report of the inquiry into the problem of feral and domestic cats in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 17 February 2021— Mr Leeser ) on the motion of

Mr Ted O’Brien —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     21    Australia’s Family Law System—Joint Select Committee Improvements in family law proceedings: Second interim report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 March 2021— Mr Thompson ) on the motion of

Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     22    Trade and Investment Growth—Joint Standing Committee Pivot: Diversifying Australia’s trade and investment profile —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 March 2021— Mr T. R. Wilson ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     23    Migration—Joint Standing Committee Interim report of the inquiry into Australia’s skilled migration program —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 23 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     24    Agriculture and Water Resources—Standing Committee Aussie logs for Aussie jobs: Inquiry into timber supply chain constraints in the Australian plantation sector —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 March 2021— Dr Martin ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

     25    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee Inquiry into family, domestic and sexual violence —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 May 2021— Ms McBain ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Electronic cigarettes and personal vaporisers: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Freelander —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health, Aged Care and Sport held an extensive inquiry into the use and marketing of electronic cigarettes and personal vaporisers in Australia, throughout the 45th Parliament;

(2)         notes that the inquiry did not find, nor recommend, that e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers be considered to be ‘health products’, nor that they reduced harm to users;

(3)         further notes that e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers:

(a)         are not universally considered to be an effective tool in helping smokers to quit smoking or reduce consumption of nicotine products;

(b)         may be considered to be a ‘gateway’ into the consumption of nicotine, tobacco and nicotine products; and

(c)         involve the use of flagrant advertising and enticing flavours, which allure consumers to consume their substance;

(4)         notes that the Senate is considering holding another superfluous inquiry into the use of such products, despite the House having held an extensive inquiry in the previous parliament;

(5)         condemns any attempt from vested interests to promote the use of e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers within this parliament; and

(6)         concurs with the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health, Aged Care and Sport in its findings, namely that independent experts at the Department of Health, the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Therapeutic Goods Administration are well-placed to review the use and regulation of electronic cigarettes and personal vaporisers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         2    Manufacturing businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Mrs McIntosh —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the role that Australian manufacturing businesses continue to play in ensuring our nation has vital supplies, including food and personal protective equipment, especially during the pandemic when global supply chains were disrupted;

(2)         recognises that a vibrant manufacturing sector is important for our economic security; and

(3)         congratulates Australian manufacturing businesses on their ongoing efforts to adapt to the current circumstances, keep people in jobs, support local supply chains and contribute to our national economic recovery.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         3    Tasmanian health system: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Mr Wilkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Tasmanian public health system is fundamentally broken and that is directly resulting in prolonged illnesses and avoidable deaths;

(b)         this dire situation is despite the Tasmanian health system receiving more funding from the Commonwealth Government than the national average;

(c)         independent Tasmanian public policy analyst Martyn Goddard estimates that, since the Tasmanian Government came to power in 2014, health and hospitals have been short-changed by $2 billion of GST money being diverted from Tasmania’s public health system;

(d)         Tasmanian hospitals are the worst-performing in the country, despite heroic efforts from staff;

(e)         the latest state government figures show that 11,342 people are waiting for elective surgery—the most urgent category one patients, who should be treated in 30 days, have to wait an average of 130 days for their procedure;

(f)          mental health services are another significant area of chronic under-investment, resulting in poorly treated and untreated illnesses causing great suffering and sometimes suicides; and

(g)         there is precedence for the Commonwealth Government to intervene in the Tasmanian health system, for instance the take-over and hand-back of the Mersey Hospital; and

(2)         calls on the Commonwealth Government to refer Tasmania’s failing health system to the Productivity Commission to:

(a)         conduct a public inquiry to identify the root causes of Tasmania’s failing health system; and

(b)         formulate a solution to fix the systemic and cultural problems within the Tasmanian health system.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         4    Australian National Audit Office: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of the Auditor-General, who is responsible for auditing Commonwealth entities and reporting to the Parliament, providing crucial accountability and transparency regarding Government administration, and scrutiny of the expenditure of public monies;

(b)         that as an independent officer of the Parliament with responsibilities under the Auditor-General Act 1997 , the Auditor-General reports not to a minister, but directly to the Parliament via the Joint Committee of Public Accounts and Audit;

(c)         that unlike similar entities such as the Parliamentary Budget Office, the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) sits within the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio, and the Prime Minister is responsible for administering the legislation and presenting budget bids for the ANAO, which is also subject to directions from the Minister for Finance as an entity under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 ; and

(d)         the potential conflicts inherent in these arrangements, given the Auditor-General exists to scrutinise the performance and actions of the executive;

(2)         declares that independent scrutiny of Government spending to get maximum value for every taxpayer dollar is more important now than ever, given:

(a)         the Government is racking up one trillion dollars in debt;

(b)         Australia’s budget deficit is now at a record high; and

(c)         Government spending has blown out to the highest percentage of gross domestic product since 1970, the earliest year that records are available in the budget papers;

(3)         further notes that:

(a)         the ANAO’s budget has been in structural deficit for years because of this Government’s cuts, recording unsustainable operating losses of $3.1 million in 2018-19 and $4.8 million in 2019-20;

(b)         the Auditor-General wrote to the Prime Minister prior to the 2020-21 Budget requesting $6.3 million in new funding so he could continue to undertake his role related to the accumulated budget pressures and COVID-19 cost pressures; and

(c)         without new funding the Auditor-General is forced to reduce his program of performance audits which is projected to fall rapidly below the longstanding target of 48 performance audits per annum to around 38 per annum;

(4)         condemns the Government for its ongoing efforts to hide rorts, waste and corruption from scrutiny and avoid accountability by:

(a)         taking revenge on the Auditor-General and making further cuts to the ANAO’s budget and staffing, with a $1.28 million cut to revenue, a reduction in resources of $14 million in 2020-21 and a reduction in the average staffing level allocation; and

(b)         failing for years to introduce a National Integrity Commission; and

(5)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately reverse its cuts to the ANAO’s budget and provide the Auditor-General with the funds he has requested, by having the Minister for Finance provide an immediate advance, and making a commitment to boost funding over the forward estimates in the mid-year economic and fiscal outlook;

(b)         apologise for the Prime Minister’s failure to protect and support the independent Auditor-General, as the Prime Minister has proven that he cannot be trusted to protect the integrity of the office;

(c)         consider introducing legislation to remove the ANAO from the Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio and establish the ANAO as a parliamentary department, cementing the Auditor-General as a truly independent officer of the Parliament; and

(d)         stop stalling and introduce legislation to establish a National Integrity Commission.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         5    COVID-19 vaccine: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the developments worldwide on vaccines for COVID-19; and

(b)         that the Government has announced a $1.7 billion agreement for two of the most promising COVID-19 vaccines, namely the University of Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine and the University of Queensland/CSL vaccine;

(2)         acknowledges that under the agreement, the Commonwealth has secured 84.8 million doses which will be almost entirely manufactured in Australia; and

(3)         recognises that the Government is contributing significantly to COVID-19 vaccine, treatment, research and development work in Australia and around the world with an investment of $362 million.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         6    National Water Safety Day: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that 1 December 2020 is National Water Safety Day where we highlight the importance of staying safe and acting responsibly around water;

(b)         that from 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020 some 248 people lost their lives to drowning across Australia;

(c)         that Royal Lifesaving estimates in its annual drowning report that an additional 504 people experienced a non-fatal drowning incident;

(d)         the drowning report indicates the total number of drowning deaths over the past year decreased by 8 per cent on the previous year;

(e)         people aged 25 to 34 years accounted for 17 per cent of the total number of drowning deaths, the most of any age group; and

(f)          despite still being the leading location for drowning, deaths in rivers and creeks decreased by 32 per cent, compared with the 10-year average;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         drowning and accidents in the water can be avoided if people act responsibly and follow the basic water safety rules:

(i)           always swim between the red and yellow flags at the beach and obey the instructions of lifesavers;

(ii)         alcohol and swimming or boating don’t mix;

(iii)        don’t swim at unpatrolled beaches;

(iv)       don’t swim alone; and

(v)         never take your eye off children around water; and

(b)         that too many avoidable drownings occur when rock fishing and rock fishers should:

(i)           stay alert to the weather conditions;

(ii)         learn how to swim;

(iii)        choose the safest possible location;

(iv)       wear the right gear;

(v)         never fish alone; and

(vi)       always wear a lifejacket; and

(3)         encourages:

(a)         all Australians to learn how to swim from a qualified instructor before they enter the water on their own; and

(b)         people who use our waterways regularly to take the opportunity to learn rescue techniques and resuscitation from organisations like Surf Life Saving Australia by joining your local surf club.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         7    NAIDOC Week: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         NAIDOC Week celebrations will be held across Australia from 8 to 15 November 2020 to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples;

(b)         NAIDOC Week is celebrated not only in Indigenous communities, but by Australians from all walks of life—the week is a great opportunity to participate in a range of activities and to support your local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community; and

(c)         the Government is supporting NAIDOC Week through a local grants round, with $1.4 million available to support local communities to host events and other activities during the week; and

(2)         commends the work of the Indigenous organisations in postponing NAIDOC Week events and organising COVID-safe functions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         8    Refugee resettlement: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         it has been seven years since New Zealand offered hope to those refugees in Papua New Guinea and Nauru to resettle them in New Zealand; and

(b)         more than 65,000 Australians have signed a petition organised by Amnesty International Australia with Craig Foster and Sonny Bill Williams urging the Government to accept the New Zealand Government’s generous offer to resettle those refugees; and

(2)         calls on the Government to accept the New Zealand offer to resettle refugees.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         9    Koala populations: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the koala is an iconic Australian species;

(b)         the Queensland, New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory koala populations have been listed as vulnerable under national environment law;

(c)         vast numbers of koalas were killed in last summer’s national bushfire crisis, including an estimated third of the New South Wales population;

(d)         in the wake of the fires the koala is being considered for up-listing (an increased threatened listing status);

(e)         habitat loss is among the most significant threats to koalas;

(f)          the Government is years overdue in making a Threatened Species Recovery Plan for the koala, which was initially due by 2015; and

(g)         the National Koala Conservation Strategy ran until 2014 and has yet to be replaced by this Government; and

(2)         therefore calls on the Government to prevent further habitat loss through yet-to-commence development in areas in which the koala is listed as vulnerable, pending the completion of the formal assessment for up listing, the making of a Threatened Species Recovery Plan, and the making of a new National Koala Conservation Strategy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      10    Scouting and guiding movement: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Young —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the enormous success the scouting and guiding movement has had around the world in promoting personal development programs for children and young adults from 5 to 25 years old; and

(b)         that the world scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden-Powell in 1907;

(2)         recognises that scouting is one of the most popular programs worldwide for personal development with over 500 million people going through the scouts and guides;

(3)         further notes that in 2007 the scouting movement celebrated its 100th anniversary since its founding; and

(4)         congratulates Scouts Australia, Girl Guides Australia and the World Organization of the Scout Movement for continuing to provide an outlet for children to channel their desire for adventure, education and fun, and for providing ongoing assistance around our communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      11    Australian Federal Integrity Commission Bill: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Haines —That this House:

(1)         agrees that effective politics requires constructive debate and consensus building on policy challenges and roadblocks that, if left unresolved, undermine the national interest;

(2)         commends the Menzies-Calwell club for facilitating consensus-driven, cross-parliamentary policy discussions that do not regress into ineffectual, politically polarised rhetoric;

(3)         reaffirms that establishing a robust Federal Integrity Commission during this parliament well before the next election is essential to arresting the declining public trust in institutions and restoring Australians’ faith in the democratic system;

(4)         notes that, according to the Beechworth Principles and the motion agreed to by the Senate on 9 November 2020, a Federal Integrity Commission must have:

(a)         broad jurisdiction to investigate corrupt conduct within the public sector;

(b)         common rules for all public officials;

(c)         strong investigative powers and procedural fairness safeguards;

(d)         an ability to hold public hearings when in the public interest;

(e)         direct avenues for public referrals and an ability to commence investigations independently based on those referrals;

(f)          strong whistleblower protections;

(g)         adequate and secure funding to be able to fulfil its purpose; and

(h)         oversight by a multi-party parliamentary committee, including of the appointment of commissioners, and an independent parliamentary inspector to ensure accountability to the people; and

(5)         encourages Members of Parliament to debate the Australian Federal Integrity Commission Bill 2020 and the Commonwealth Parliamentary Standards Bill 2020 as a robust consensus package that all parliamentarians can engage with, in good faith, as a non-aligned private member’s bill that answers the strong call from the Australian public for a robust federal integrity commission.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      12    COVID-19 and Victoria: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Dr Webster —That this House:

(1)         recognises that metropolitan and regional Victorians continue to face significant limitations to their freedoms due to COVID-19 restrictions;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the epidemiological data in Victoria is now at a point where many health experts consider it safe to reopen in a COVID-safe manner; and

(b)         the initial lockdowns in response to the COVID-19 pandemic were intended to build capacity in the health system, and the Victorian health system has done this;

(3)         commiserates with business owners that have been forced to shut their doors;

(4)         notes that many businesses will not survive continued lockdowns;

(5)         calls on the Victorian Government to give Victorians their freedom back;

(6)         further recognises the undue pain and distress facing regional communities around the nation due to ongoing state border restrictions;

(7)         further acknowledges that:

(a)         border communities are unique in their interdependency; and

(b)         regional and border communities are experiencing some of the most severe disruptions in the country, with impacts on healthcare, education, access to supplies, and the agriculture workforce;

(8)         further notes that seven out of eight states, through the National Cabinet, have agreed to seek a sustainable model for border restrictions by December 2020;

(9)         further calls on state governments to open their borders to allow for the free movement of Australians; and

(10)     acknowledges that the continued lockdowns and border restrictions will continue to cause significant mental health, wellbeing, and economic issues, particularly in Victoria, but also in other affected parts of the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      13    Expulsion of Hugh Mahon from the House: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         prior to the passage of the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987 the houses of the Australian Parliament had the power to expel a senator, or member of the House of Representatives;

(b)         the expulsion of a member of this House is the most drastic of sanctions;

(c)         on 11 November 1920, the Honourable Member for Kalgoorlie, Hugh Mahon, was expelled from this House; and

(d)         the Honourable Member for Kalgoorlie is the only member to have ever been expelled from this House;

(2)         acknowledges that the Honourable Member for Kalgoorlie, Hugh Mahon, was expelled:

(a)         by a motion brought on hastily and with limited time for debate;

(b)         by a vote of the House on party lines; and

(c)         without the due process and procedural fairness that such an important issue deserves; and

(3)         further recognises that:

(a)         it was unjust on the limited evidence for the institution to which Hugh Mahon had been democratically elected to reverse the decision of his constituents;

(b)         the expulsion of the Honourable Member for Kalgoorlie, Hugh Mahon, was therefore a misuse of the power then invested in the House; and

(c)         for a century the Mahon family has endured this injustice and it is time that the Parliament revisit the matter of the Honourable Member for Kalgoorlie, Hugh Mahon’s, expulsion.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      14    Child care subsidy system: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of

Ms Templeman —That this House:

(1)         notes that under the Government’s child care subsidy system:

(a)         fees and out of pocket costs are out of control, with the Department of Education predicting that fees will increase by 5.3 per cent in 2020-21;

(b)         fees have increased by more than 35 per cent since the election of the Government in 2013;

(c)         Australian families contribute 37 per cent of early education and child care costs, compared to the OECD average of 18 per cent;

(d)         there is an annual subsidy cap which is a significant barrier to work for many families; and

(e)         secondary income earners earn very little take home pay if they go back to work full time;

(2)         further notes that recent reports by the Grattan Institute, KPMG, and PwC have found that increased investment in early education and child care would boost Australia’s gross domestic product by between $4 billion and $11 billion through increased workforce participation; and

(3)         calls on the Government to fix its broken child care subsidy system that has failed to keep a lid on costs and has failed to support working parents, particularly women, to work full time or increase their hours.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      15    Returned and Services League of Australia: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)         notes the Returned and Services League of Australia (RSL) was founded in 1916 to ensure a unified approach to address the lack of organised repatriation facilities and medical services available to those returning from the Great War;

(2)         recognises there are RSL branches and sub-branches in every state and territory, and most local communities have a RSL club;

(3)         further notes the motto of the RSL is ‘The Price of Liberty is Eternal Vigilance’;

(4)         acknowledges that RSL clubs help veterans and communities right around Australia in many and varied ways; and

(5)         congratulates the many hard-working volunteers and community-minded citizens who help make the RSL the success that it is.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      16    Charities and not-for-profit organisations: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         notes that: 

(a)         charities are the most trusted sector in Australian public life;

(b)         charities employ over one million Australians and contribute nearly one-tenth of Australia’s national income;

(c)         charities are the first line of support for the most vulnerable in our communities during times of economic and social upheaval;

(d)         meeting the requirements of Australia’s seven different fundraising regimes is wasting the time and energy of Australian charities and not-for-profit organisations; and

(e)         the Government’s failure to act on fundraising reform is costing Australian charities over $1 million every month;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         for several years, the charity and not-for-profit sector has been calling for reform of Australia’s fundraising laws;

(b)         Treasury’s 5 year review of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, delivered on 31 May 2018, identified fundraising law as the major reporting burden on charities and recommended that fundraising law be harmonised across the country;

(c)         on 14 February 2019, the Senate Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century called on parliament to harmonise fundraising law within two years;

(d)         that inquiry, chaired by Labor Senator Catryna Bilyk, delivered a unanimous report, with its recommendations being supported by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert, Liberal Senators Eric Abetz and Amanda Stoker, former Labor Senator David Smith, and former United Australia Party Senator Brian Burston;

(e)         throughout 2020, the National COVID-19 Coordination Commission’s Not for Profit Working Group, the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements, and the Charities Crisis Cabinet have all identified harmonisation of fundraising laws as a key initiative in helping Australian charities provide strong support for our communities; and 

(f)          failure to deliver fundraising reform has significant costs to the charity and not-forĀ­-profit sector, with the Senate Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century report estimating that the annual cost to charities and their donors is around $15 million; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         apologise to Australian charities for failing to meet the two-year timeframe set out in the Senate Select Committee on Charity Fundraising in the 21st Century report;

(b)         now commit to support Australian charities and the communities they serve by ending unnecessary waste of their precious resources;

(c)         support the generous Australian donors who donate money to our charities, by ensuring their donations are not needlessly eroded by redundant administrative and regulatory costs; and

(d)         confirm a timeline for the commencement of a consistent national model for regulating not-for-profit and charitable fundraising activities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      17    Humanitarian assistance to Bangladesh and Myanmar: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Bell —That this House notes that:

(1)         25 August 2020 marked three years since over 700,000 Rohingya, including more than 400,000 children, fled from targeted violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine State, to Bangladesh;

(2)         the camps in Bangladesh now host over 850,000 refugees in crowded conditions which is also impacting the lives of over 400,000 local Bangladeshis;

(3)         an estimated 600,000 Rohingya remain in Rakhine State;

(4)         since 2017, the Australian Government has provided over $260 million in lifesaving humanitarian assistance for displaced and conflict-affected communities in Bangladesh and Myanmar, working through UN agencies, international and national NGOs such as BRAC, Save the Children, CARE, World Vision, Plan International and Oxfam and their local partners to deliver food, shelter, water and sanitation, health and education services, and targeted support for women and girls to help combat risks including gender-based violence and trafficking;

(5)         annual monsoons and cyclones have brought additional risks, and the COVID-19 virus has now arrived, with 88 confirmed cases to date in the Cox’s Bazar camps and over 80 active cases in Rakhine State; and

(6)         Australia remains committed to supporting Myanmar to create conditions on the ground conducive to voluntary, safe, dignified and sustainable returns for all displaced peoples.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      18    Buy Now Pay Later industry: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of

Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in November 2020, the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) released a report entitled, Buy now pay later: an industry update , which set out the key observations about the Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) industry, the experiences of consumers and recent regulatory developments;

(b)         the report found that:

(i)           more than 1 in 5 BNPL consumers surveyed missed a payment in the past 12 months, resulting in over $43 million in late fees for the 2018-19 financial year;

(ii)         most BNPL consumers who had missed a payment had used multiple BNPL providers in the past six months;

(iii)        nearly 40 per cent of BNPL consumers surveyed who had missed a payment in the past 12 months also had a payday loan or similar; and

(iv)       20 per cent of all BNPL consumers surveyed said they had cut back, or went without, essentials, like meals, to make their payments;

(c)         BNPL providers have stated no more than 1 per cent of their consumers have been in financial hardship during COVID-19, and that this is inconsistent with the observations contained in the ASIC report for the 2018-19 financial year; and

(d)         BNPL providers are not regulated by the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 and are therefore not bound by responsible lending obligations; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         respond to the report of the Senate Standing Committee on Economics entitled Credit and Financial Services Targeted at Australians at Risk of Financial Hardship tabled in the Parliament in February 2019 as a matter of urgency;

(b)         introduce a bill that would amend the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 to enact the recommendations of the Government’s Review of Small Amount Credit Contract Laws;

(c)         extend the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 to BNPL providers; and

(d)         ensure no changes are made to the National Consumer Credit Protection Act 2009 that would undermine or weaken responsible lending obligations as per the recommendations of Commissioner Kenneth Hayne.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      19    Home ownership and superannuation: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the benefits of home ownership are enjoyed during the working life of Australians, and in retirement;

(b)         home ownership is more critical for a secure retirement than a large superannuation balance, as income can be supplemented by the pension;

(c)         there is a disturbing rise of Australians who are entering retirement in poverty because of a lack of home ownership, particularly amongst separated and divorced women;

(d)         currently Australians are forced to save for superannuation first and a home second;

(e)         young Australians are struggling to save enough for a home deposit because their savings are locked away in superannuation;

(f)          Australians only benefit from superannuation for about 20 years; and

(g)         Australians draw the benefits of home ownership for around 50 years—both while working and in retirement; and

(2)         recognises and acknowledges that:

(a)         the order should be reversed: home first, super second;

(b)         if young Australians could use their superannuation with other savings for a home deposit, they could buy a home both earlier and more cheaply; and

(c)         by owning a home, young Australians will have a better life and a better retirement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      20    Australia’s relationship with the Philippines: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr J. H. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         affirms the longstanding, important, and respectful relationship between Australia and the Philippines, and supports the ongoing cooperation between our countries in key areas like regional development, maritime security, and disaster risk and reduction management;

(2)         expresses its opposition to the recently intensified repression directed at human rights and labour rights defenders in the Philippines, evident by the:

(a)         International Trade Union Confederation listing the Philippines in the top ten worst countries for workers’ rights as a result of the extrajudicial killings of forty-six union members and officials in the last three years;

(b)         deteriorating human rights environment and the rise in unlawful killings by state agencies which means that workers, civil servants, trade union organisations, and labour activists fear for their safety;

(c)         nearly three-year extension of martial law in Mindanao, after it was initially approved for sixty days, and which only ended in December 2019; and

(d)         UN Human Rights Council’s adoption of resolution 41/2 expressing concern over human rights violations and requesting the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights to prepare a comprehensive report on the human rights situation in the Philippines that was due in June 2020;

(3)         supports recommendations put forward by the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Conference Committee on the Application of Standards to:

(a)         oppose any language that creates a negative stigmatisation of those defending the rights of workers and human rights; and

(b)         oppose any military intervention in industrial disputes, as such interventions in trade union affairs can only occur with approval of the Government, which constitutes a grave violation of human rights and the principles of freedom of association; and

(4)         calls on the Government to support the upholding of labour and human rights, in line with international standards, by endorsing:

(a)         the ILO’s resolution to send a high-level tripartite mission to the Philippines to conduct an open, transparent, and robust investigation of the human rights situation; and

(b)         any auditing process of Australian security engagements in the Philippines, such as the Enhanced Defence Cooperation Program, as a way of ensuring we are not indirectly supporting human rights violations in the Philippines.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      21    Maritime Union of Australia: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         condemns:

(a)         lawless activity on workplaces in Australia;

(b)         the use of vessel bans, overtime bans, acting up bans, shift bans, and stop work meetings by the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) that has created chaos on Australian wharves;

(c)         the use of industrial action in support of pay increases of over 30 per cent for people earning over $300,000 while damaging the capacity of so many other businesses to pay workers on much lower salaries and create jobs; and

(d)         industrial action that threatens supply of critical medical supplies in the middle of a pandemic;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         many industry sectors including agriculture and road transport have reported supply chain problems which are linked to the MUA’s actions;

(b)         it is estimated that $165.6 million of imports and $66.9 million of exports per day were disrupted; and

(c)         vital medical supplies are being disrupted, at a time when they are needed the most;

(3)         further notes that this industrial action is:

(a)         not in support of any safety or other related issue but rather pay increases for many people who are earning over $300,000 a year;

(b)         supported by many other associated entities of the labour movement such as the Australian Labor Party, industry super owned proxy adviser Australian Council of Superannuation Investors, industry super owned media companies such as The New Daily , class action law firms, and others; and

(c)         consistent with previous actions that have hurt our national interests such as during World War I, World War II, the Vietnam War and other times; and

(4)         notes the failure of the interest based bargaining that has handed over management control to the MUA and still resulted in out of control industrial action and disempowered workplaces, and threatens the Australian dream.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      22    Urban infrastructure projects: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         substantial investment the Government has made since 2013 in funding urban infrastructure projects to reduce congestion and improve quality of life for people living in urban areas; and

(b)         significant role the Government has played in partnering with state governments and private enterprise to ensure these essential projects are carried forward;

(2)         acknowledges the positive impact these projects have had on the Australian economy through boosting productivity and creating jobs;

(3)         commends the Government for its ongoing commitment to reducing traffic congestion and improving road safety through a record $110 billion transport infrastructure program, boosting the economy, creating jobs and getting Australians home sooner and safer; and

(4)         congratulates the Government on the recent completion of numerous major infrastructure projects, including NorthConnex, which is enabling drivers to travel between Newcastle and Melbourne without stopping at a single traffic light, boosting productivity as well as improving traffic flow and pedestrian safety on Pennant Hills Road.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      23    Australian Centre to Counter Child Exploitation: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)         recognises that the Government has established the Australian Centre to Counter Child Exploitation (ACCCE) as the frontline defence in the Government’s fight to protect children from predators online, in Australia and across the world;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         ACCCE brings together the specialist expertise and skills from government agencies, law enforcement and advocacy groups, in a central hub, to investigate cases of child exploitation and to implement prevention strategies;

(b)         in the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020, the ACCCE received more than 21,000 incoming reports of child exploitation, compared with 14,000 in 2018-2019, from this, 134 children were removed from harm; and

(c)         recent operations by the ACCCE removed 16 children in Australia from harm and arrested 44 offenders with 350 charges collectively;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s significant investment in establishing the ACCCE, with $68.6 million committed over four years to further the crucial work they do to protect children;

(4)         notes the recent opening of the new purpose-built facility and thanks all the Australian Federal Police and state police officers for their selfless work in tracking and apprehending predators; and

(5)         commits to the ongoing safety of all Australian children, both online and in our communities, by continuing the Government’s recent investment in anti-exploitation measures.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      24    COVID-19 and the economy: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of

Ms Murphy —That this House:

(1)         notes that in July 2020, the UN Sustainable Development Goals index ranked Australia third globally for our management of the COVID-19 crisis, but 37th for our long-term direction;

(2)         acknowledges that prior to 2020, Australia experienced 28 years of economic growth, where annual GDP growth peaked at 5 per cent and troughed at 2 per cent—but notwithstanding that GDP growth, inequality has increased, wages have stagnated, more people on low and precarious incomes are being left behind and the natural environment is in a fragile state;

(3)         recognises that COVID-19 has illustrated that it’s impossible to separate the wellbeing of our people from the health of our economy, society and environment; and

(4)         calls on the Government to consider developing a national account of wellbeing in order to judge the success of recovery from the global pandemic, not just by how swiftly the economy rebounds, but also by whether our country is meeting measures of what Australians value as contributing to a ‘good society’.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      25    Gambling: Speech by mover ( from  15 February 2021 —Mr Wallace, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australian Institute for Family Studies research shows that more than half a million Australian adults regularly bet on sports;

(b)         41 per cent of these gamblers, or 234,000 Australians, experience serious gambling related problems;

(c)         in total, Australians spend more than $24.8 billion a year on gambling;

(d)         research from the Australian Institute for Family Studies shows that Australians who gamble have on average increased the frequency of their gambling and their amount spent during the COVID-19 pandemic;

(e)         the same research identifies that half of gamblers have experienced a deterioration in their mental and physical health during the pandemic; and

(f)          professional players in the NRL and AFL are increasingly experiencing online harassment and threats from gamblers who have lost money through betting on matches in which they participated;

(2)         commends the Government on its action to date to restrict the level of gambling advertising broadcast during live sports; and

(3)         encourages the Government to continue to explore options to further reduce the harm caused by problem gambling.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      26    Jobkeeper program: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         notes that the Jobkeeper program is the most expensive one-off program ever implemented by an Australian Government, estimated to cost around $100 billion—it has been effective in supporting jobs, but the unprecedented spending requires close scrutiny;

(2)         acknowledges that millions of Australians were excluded from Jobkeeper, including short-term casuals, arts sector workers, and the entire university sector;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         the Jobkeeper program is scheduled to be terminated at the end of March 2021, despite severe problems in many sectors and regions across Australia, and the warnings from economists that support should not be withdrawn prematurely;

(b)         while many were left out of Jobkeeper, the program provided support to firms that:

(i)           recorded record profits in 2020; and

(ii)         paid executive bonuses; and

(c)         the practice of paying executive bonuses by firms receiving Jobkeeper has been criticised by the Australian Taxation Office, the Business Council of Australia, former Liberal Premier of Victoria Jeff Kennett and the Australian Labor Party, but not the Government; and

(4)         calls on the Treasurer to make a statement to the Parliament no later than 25 February 2021 revealing how much Jobkeeper support was paid to firms that:

(a)         saw their profits increase from 2019 to 2020; and

(b)         paid executive bonuses.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      27    Horticulture industry: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Drum —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         horticulture is essential to the Australian economy and is critical for the nation’s food security;

(b)         the gross value of horticultural production in Australia was forecast by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) to be $12.6 billion in 2020-21, of which the value of fruit and tree nut production was forecast to be $5.3 billion; and

(c)         the Victorian Goulburn Valley region produces almost 50 per cent of the value of Victoria’s fruits, excluding grapes, worth $337 million;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         ABARES estimated in the 2019 peak harvest months from February onwards that there were 63,300 overseas workers in Australia; and

(b)         international travel restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic has left a massive shortfall in available labour for fruit growers;

(3)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the Government developed a pathway for 20,000 Pacific Islanders to be available for seasonal work; and

(b)         the Queensland and Northern Territory Governments acted to support producers by bringing in Pacific Islanders for harvest; and

(4)         condemns the Victorian Government for its delay in delivering a means for Victorian producers to access Pacific Island workers while fruit goes unpicked and vegetables are ploughed into the ground.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      28    Family support: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Steggall —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are around 2.6 million families with dependent children aged under 15 in Australia;

(b)         Australia has one of the least generous paid parental leave schemes in the OECD;

(c)         the McKinsey Global Institute found that in Australia, participation in early childhood education is lower than the OECD average and costs over 40 per cent more than the OECD average; and

(d)         perinatal discrimination is the top discrimination complaint in Australian workplaces;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia lags behind other developed countries in the provision of best practice, evidence-based policies that support families and children; and

(b)         there is significant economic benefit to Australia from increasing female workforce participation, gender equity and outcomes for children; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         increase health and wellbeing support for parents and children by amending parental leave legislation and providing for a year of paid parental leave to be shared by both parents;

(b)         lower the cost of early childhood education for all families; and

(c)         improve access to paid carers’ leave for parents of sick children.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      29    Order of Australia honours: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         places on record its support for recipients of the Order of Australia;

(2)         acknowledges the Order of Australia is the highest national honour awarded to Australian citizens for outstanding contributions to our communities and country, and to non-citizens who have given extraordinary service to Australia;

(3)         notes that since being established by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1975, there have been more than 600 recipients of the Companion of the Order of Australia, over 3,300 awarded Officers of the Order of Australia, more than 11,600 inducted as Members of the Order of Australia and more than 26,800 honoured as recipients of the Medal of the Order of Australia;

(4)         recognises the recipients in the General Division of the Order of Australia on Australia Day in 2021 come from an array of fields including science, education, governance and sport; and

(5)         encourages all Members to congratulate recipients from their electorates on this immense achievement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      30    Perth Freight Link project: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr J. H. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Perth Freight Link, announced by then Treasurer the Hon Joe Hockey in 2014, was comprehensively rejected by the people of Western Australia at the state election in March 2017, when it was the most prominent point of difference in terms of transport infrastructure policy between Liberal and Labor;

(b)         in addition to a lack of any credible evidence to suggest it would improve road connectivity, the project which included the road reserves for Roe Highway Stage 8 and 9, did not actually reach the port of Fremantle, had no detailed planning or cost benefit analysis, was to be operated as a private toll road, and was designed to facilitate the privatisation of Fremantle Port;

(c)         encouraged by federal Liberals, the Western Australian Government of the then Premier Barnett, ignored the advice of Main Roads Western Australia and in the shadow of an election wasted $20 million of taxpayers’ funds in the pointless and bloody-minded smashing down of more than 100 hectares of fragile habitat, including hundred year-old heritage trees, in the Beeliar Wetlands;

(d)         after the election, at the behest of the current Western Australian Government of Premier McGowan, $1.2 billion in federal funding that had been put aside for the so-called Perth Freight Link was redirected to a number of sensible and well-designed road, rail and public transport projects in the south-metro region, including the widening of the Kwinana Freeway and other freeway works, the new Armadale Road-North Lake Road bridge, the High Street Upgrade, and the Thomlie-Cockburn Metronet rail link; and

(e)         the Commonwealth Government has since 2017, allocated a further $1.2 billion to fund what it describes as Roe 8/9, a project that no longer exists, while denying the people of Western Australia the much-needed funds to deliver properly planned transport infrastructure; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         respect the wishes of the Western Australian public and the mandate of the Western Australian Government as clearly expressed at the election in March 2017;

(b)         stop holding the people of Western Australia to ransom for a dead and discredited project; and

(c)         work with the McGowan Labor Government if re-elected on 13 March 2021 to support jobs, business activity, transport infrastructure, and economic recovery as Western Australia seeks to emerge from the pandemic.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      31    Polio: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Allen —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) leads the world’s efforts to end polio, bringing together Rotary International, the World Health Organization, the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) and many others including in the private sector with a common objective to eradicate polio once and for all;

(b)         when GPEI commenced, more than 350,000 cases of polio paralysed and killed children in 125 countries annually;

(c)         in 2020, polio was 99 per cent eradicated and wild polio remains in only two countries, Pakistan and Afghanistan, with the entire African continent certified as polio-free on 25 August 2020;

(d)         since the onset of COVID-19, the GPEI’s extensive resources and infrastructure used to fight polio has been adapted to ensure that COVID-19 does not spread out of control in the developing world;

(e)         the work of the Australian Polio Advocacy and Communications Team provides important support for eradication efforts by bringing together Australian advocates including Rotary International Australia, UNICEF Australia, Global Citizen and RESULTS Australia; and

(f)          polio eradication efforts have slowed, and the progress made so far is now at risk; and

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         investment in completing polio eradication will benefit future generations of children who will be free of this devastating disease, and other health programs and initiatives will benefit from the knowledge and experience gained through polio eradication;

(b)         efforts to eradicate polio have been extremely successful and demonstrate the effectiveness of widely available vaccination programs;

(c)         the GPEI’s COVID-19 response has been instrumental in ensuring that COVID-19 does not spread out of control in much of the developing world, including in the Pacific;

(d)         Australia is a long-term champion of polio eradication along with many other Commonwealth nations including the United Kingdom and Canada; and

(e)         the current parliaments of Australia and other countries have the opportunity to be recognised as the elected representatives who ensured that polio was completely eradicated.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      32    Tourism industry: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the dire financial situation facing travel agents and the tourism industry in general as a result of Australia’s current health and economic crisis;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         travel agents play a significant role in our tourism industry, sustaining businesses and employing thousands of people across Australia;

(b)         tourism was one of the first industries to be hit and will likely be one of the last to recover;

(c)         for many of our approximately 40,000 travel agents, the cost of staying open in order to reimburse customers who were forced to cancel holidays is contributing to significant losses; and

(d)         with international travel restrictions likely to remain in place for the foreseeable future, travel agents need urgent assistance; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         develop a comprehensive industry-specific support package for the tourism industry, which acknowledges the important contribution this sector makes to the economy; and

(b)         provide an urgent lifeline for travel agents on the brink of collapse, instead of the inadequate loss carry-back scheme, for which the vast majority of travel agents appear to be ineligible.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      33    Income Management for Youth Allowance: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Laming —That this House:

(1)         extends its condolences to the Field and Leadbetter families for their tragic loss in Alexandra Hills on 26 January 2021;

(2)         supports the trial of earlier detection, drug-testing and intervention in crystal methamphetamine addiction for new recipients of Youth Allowance and Jobseeker who are not meeting their activity requirements by identifying those with substance abuse issues and supporting them to gain employment;

(3)         places on record its support for Income Management for Youth Allowance (Other) recipients who fail to adhere to activity requirements or face court for drug and related offences, and supports ear-marked and fully funded rehabilitation for anyone who fails a drug test;

(4)         further supports deferral of payments where drug tests are refused, to ensure service providers are engaged; and

(5)         explores enhanced information sharing between Services Australia, employment services providers and authorised officers in respective police, corrections, social services and child protection agencies, in dealing with these high addiction-risk cohorts who evade mandatory activity requirements.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      34    Foreign owned data centres: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Katter —That this House:

(1)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately terminate all contracts with foreign owned external data storage centres, in particular, the Chinese owned facility, Global Switch; and

(b)         immediately and securely transfer all externally stored government data to Australian owned data centres;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the recent contract extension between the Department of Defence and the Chinese-owned data centre, Global Switch, threatens our national security; and

(b)         this continued relationship was formed without due process or public tender;

(3)         condemns the Government and the Department of Defence for seemingly placing cost savings above national security; and

(4)         further acknowledges that having any government data stored by Global Switch is a national security risk.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      35    Myanmar: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the actions of the Myanmar military is a direct assault on Myanmar’s transition to democracy and the rule of law; and

(b)         Australia is a great friend of Myanmar and is deeply concerned for the welfare and wellbeing of the people of Myanmar;

(2)         condemns the Myanmar military for:

(a)         seizing control of Myanmar; and

(b)         the detention of numerous political and civil society leaders in Myanmar; and

(3)         calls on the:

(a)         Myanmar military to immediately relinquish the power they have seized and release the activists and officials they have detained; and

(b)         Government to review Australia’s defence cooperation program with Myanmar in light of the Myanmar military’s seizure of power and consider additional targeted sanctions as appropriate.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      36    International arrival caps: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Laming —That this House:

(1)         recognises the economic and personal impact of state government international arrival caps, including;

(a)         economic costs of skilled visa workers and international students; and

(b)         personal and mental health costs for stranded Australian citizens; and

(2)         urges state governments to review their caps on a weekly basis and initiate training of quarantine staff, so that industry-led, large-scale quarantine arrangements can be in place before the next calendar year.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      37    Closing the Gap: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Albanese —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         that on 13 February 2008 the then Prime Minister made a national apology to the Stolen Generations on behalf of the Parliament and the nation; and

(b)         the importance of Closing the Gap; and

(2)         reaffirms its commitment to Closing the Gap.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      38    Australian made products: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of

Ms Hammond —That this House:

(1)         notes the longevity of the ‘Australian Made, Australian Grown’ logo since its creation more than 30 years ago as Australia’s most trusted, recognised and widely used country of origin symbol to promote authentic Australian brands all around the world;

(2)         commends the Government for providing the Australian Made Campaign Ltd, the not-for-profit public company which administers the logo, with $5 million to promote the logo in key export markets as well as establishing trademark registration in the United Kingdom, the European Union and Canada;

(3)         further commends the Government for its $5 million investment in the ‘Go Local First’ campaign, which is run by the Council of Small Business Organisations Australia and is encouraging all Australians to promote and support our local small and family businesses through the COVID-19 pandemic; and

(4)         encourages all Australians to recognise the importance of local industry, manufacturers, producers, and businesses to our economy, and the quality of Australian made products and Australian grown produce.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      39    Video game industry: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         video games are a large and growing market—Australians spent $3.6 billion on games in 2019, more than double the amount they spent in 2012;

(b)         video gaming is a mainstream activity—two thirds of Australians play video games with an average age of 37; and

(c)         globally, the video game industry generates more than double the revenue of the music and film industries combined; and

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australia is home to a talented community of game developers and publishers, but proportionately the Australian industry is much smaller than its peers in New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom;

(b)         video game development provides remote working opportunities and jobs for the regions—in the UK, 55 per cent of video game industry employment is outside of London and the south-east;

(c)         the video game industry provides a variety of jobs—in Australia, 34 per cent are software programmers, 19 per cent are artists and 11 per cent are business or marketing professionals;

(d)         the skills developed in our domestic video game industry are transferrable into roles in adjacent innovative and growth industries like cyber security, software engineering and data analytics; and

(e)         video games could help drive the post-COVID economic recovery in Australia, creating jobs and expanding a significant export market.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      40    Tuberculosis: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March 2021 is World Tuberculosis (TB) Day, a day to commemorate precious lives lost and recognise the serious impacts COVID-19 is having on TB services globally;

(b)         TB remains one of the world’s deadliest airborne infectious diseases, killing more than 4,000 people every day, among them 700 children, and close to 15 million people in the last decade;

(c)         COVID-19 is exacerbating inequalities, making it difficult to reach people with life-saving TB prevention and treatment;

(d)         five to eight years of global progress in the fight against TB is likely to be lost due to disruption of services resulting from COVID-19—1.4 million more people are likely to die from TB in the next five years if urgent action is not taken;

(e)         Australia committed to the targets agreed in the Political Declaration of the United Nations High Level Meeting (UNHLM) on TB in 2018; and

(f)          the UN Secretary-General’s 2020 report found that progress in meeting the UNHLM targets on TB is far too slow to meet the 2022 deadline;

(2)         acknowledges that the:

(a)         Government’s series of announcements of $1.1 billion to support global and regional COVID-19 response and recovery will save millions of lives;

(b)         Government pledge of $242 million to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) will save millions of lives;

(c)         investment of $13.3 million from the Government in 2019 will support antimicrobial resistance and drug-resistant TB research in Pacific island countries;

(d)         Government’s investment in TB research and development has resulted in the development of a new, six-month, all-oral TB drug therapy thereby reducing the previous 18-month long treatment for drug resistant TB that consisted of multiple injections and thousands of pills; and

(e)         Government’s investments in multilateral agencies such as the Global Fund has supported countries’ responses to the COVID-19 crisis; and

(3)         calls on the Government to increase:

(a)         our TB investment in the Asia-Pacific region to sustain routine TB services and safeguard the progress made so far; and

(b)         investment in TB research and development to meet the commitments made by Australia at the 2018 UNHLM on TB.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      41    Gas sector: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that, gas:

(a)         will be central to our ongoing economic recovery;

(b)         is a crucial input in our manufacturing sector, which employs over 850,000 Australians; and

(c)         provides the firmed electricity generation needed to balance Australia’s record levels of renewable investment; and

(2)         calls on all Members of the House to support the Australian gas sector and the important role it plays in creating jobs, providing affordable energy and reducing emissions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      42    Corporations and billionaires: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Bandt —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         during the pandemic the wealth of Australia’s billionaires grew by 25 per cent;

(b)         the Prime Minister’s 2020 Budget contained $99 billion a year in subsidies to big corporations and the very wealthy; and

(c)         one in three big corporations in Australia pays no tax; and

(2)         calls on the Government to ensure the big corporations and billionaires pay their fair share of tax.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      43    Road safety: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Conaghan —That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government is providing record funding for road safety measures around the nation through the:

(a)         $2 billion Road Safety Program delivering low cost road safety improvements such as better road markings, shoulder sealing, new barriers, better signage and other technologies building on the $500 million Targeted Road Safety Works Program;

(b)         $12 million for the Road Safety Innovation Fund to support road safety research and the development of new technologies;

(c)         $4 million Road Safety Awareness and Enablers Fund, with 20 projects already underway to improve education and promotion of road safety matters;

(d)         $8 million Driver Reviver Site Upgrades Program;

(e)         $5.5 million for a new Road Safety Data Hub, to better collate data on a national level and inform future infrastructure investment decisions; and

(f)          broader $110 billion infrastructure pipeline, upgrading roads across Australia; and

(2)         recognises there is more to do but congratulates the Government for its commitment to improving road safety around the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      44    Travel agents: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 28 March 2021 the Government intends to cease the Jobkeeper scheme, despite widespread calls from economists and businesses alike to extend the scheme as the economy continues to suffer;

(b)         travel agents have been pleading for more targeted support given the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 has had on their businesses, and the brutal reality that there is no snap-back for their industry;

(c)         the Australian Federation of Travel Agents, the peak body representing the nation’s travel industry, has highlighted multiple flaws in the Government’s $128 million support package for embattled travel agents, which has provoked confusion and uncertainty; and

(d)         travel agents say they’ll be forced to close because the Government’s support package is so poorly designed it won’t help them;

(2)         acknowledges that Jobkeeper has been a lifeline for travel agents, and has allowed them to keep their doors open to continue to assist their clients with refund recoveries and those seeking to return home; and

(3)         urges the Government to:

(a)         listen to the travel sector and respond to their calls for more targeted support to help them survive the detrimental impacts of COVID-19; and

(b)         extend ongoing support to those sectors of the Australian economy who are most impacted by COVID-19 and who will be amongst the last to recover.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      45    National waste legislation: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Zimmerman —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that in December 2020 the Government passed Australia’s first ever national waste legislation, the Recycling and Waste Reduction Act 2020 , through the Parliament and that this legislation implemented a waste export ban; and

(b)         measures introduced by the Government to increase recycling, including the Recycling Modernisation Fund and the National Waste Action Plan; and

(2)         commends the Government for providing national leadership on this important issue and for working with state and territory governments and industry to boost onshore recycling processing, providing economic reform and effective environmental management.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      46    Diversity and inclusion: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         15 to 21 March 2021 marks Harmony Week, a time to recognise and celebrate diversity and inclusion in Australia; and

(b)         21 March 2021 is International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, a call for the international community to increase its efforts to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination; and

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         Australia’s diversity is our greatest strength, we should celebrate this, defend this, and strive to strengthen it; and

(b)         at a time of rising racism around the globe and in Australia, we must commit to a zero-tolerance approach to racism, and to working to end all forms of racial discrimination.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      47    Homebuilder: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Thompson —That this House notes:

(1)         the construction industry:

(a)         employs over one million Australians;

(b)         consists of 390,000 small and family businesses; and

(c)         generates more than $100 billion, or around five per cent of our annual economic output;

(2)         the Government’s HomeBuilder grant has provided critical support to the residential construction sector during the COVID-19 pandemic; and

(3)         that Treasury estimates that HomeBuilder is underpinning $18 billion worth of construction projects.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      48    Human rights in Cambodia: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)         notes with approval, the resolution of the European Parliament in March 2021 regarding the mass trials of members of the opposition and other civil society activists in Cambodia;

(2)         condemns the Cambodian Government for the politically motivated mass trials of members of the Cambodian diaspora based on fake and spurious criminal charges, including Australian citizens, as an authoritarian tactic to silence dissent and global criticism of the Hun Sen regime;

(3)         calls on the Minister for Foreign Affairs to:

(a)         break her silence and speak out publicly against the Cambodian Government for their flagrant disregard for human rights, democracy and the rule of law; and

(b)         work with like-minded countries to protect the Cambodian diaspora and support human rights and democracy in Cambodia;

(4)         calls on the Government of Cambodia to:

(a)         put an end to all forms of harassment, intimidation and politically motivated criminal charges against members of the opposition, trade unionists, human rights defenders, the media and civil society actors in and outside Cambodia;

(b)         ensure Cambodian security forces refrain from unnecessary and excessive force against those engaged in peaceful protests;

(c)         proceed with the immediate and unconditional annulment of the sentences against Sam Rainsy, Mu Sochua, Eng Chhay Eang, Ou Chanrith, Ho Vann, Long Ry, Men Sothavrin, Tiolung Saumura and Nuth Romduol;

(d)         initiate a process of national reconciliation through genuine and inclusive dialogue with the political opposition parties and civil society;

(e)         release, without delay, all persons who have been detained for exercising their human rights, and to drop all charges against them that are politically motivated and aimed at eradicating any dissent;

(f)          drop all charges against members of diaspora communities, including Australian citizens Hong Lim, Hemara In and others being charged and tried in absentia;

(g)         respect the rights of all citizens to a fair trial, freedom of expression and freedom of association and peaceful assembly;

(h)         immediately cease all forms of harassment, including judicial harassment and intimidation of opposition members in the country; and

(i)           restore democracy and the right of opposition political parties to organise and express the views of citizens and ensure that the application of the law respects human rights and fundamental freedoms;

(5)         notes that the European Commission:

(a)         recently withdrew tariff preferences for Cambodia in response to the Cambodian Government’s failure to meet their obligations to overcome serious and systematic violations of political participation, freedom of expression and freedom of association;

(b)         is of the view that the Asia-Europe Meeting Summit should not be held in Phnom Penh this year unless democracy is restored to Cambodia; and

(c)         recently called on European Union member states to suspend all bilateral financial support to the Cambodian Government and instead focus on civil society organisations and opposition parties;

(6)         insists that the Cambodian Government cooperate with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and United Nations Special Procedures in order to allow them to fulfil their mandates without interference;

(7)         reiterates the call on the Cambodian authorities by Rhona Smith, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia, to open up civic space, protect and promote fundamental freedoms, including the rights to assembly and of expression, and to ensure the right to a fair trial for all, as guaranteed by international human rights norms and standards and Cambodian laws; and

(8)         calls on the Australian Government to examine the imposition of targeted sanctions, including travel bans and asset freezes, against Cambodian political and military leaders who are responsible for serious human rights violations.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      49    Support for Australians: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 —Ms McBride, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Young —That this House:

(1)         notes that Government is committed to ensuring that all Australians, including young Australians, have every opportunity to succeed in post-pandemic Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government has over 200 initiatives that directly and indirectly benefit young Australians;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         the Government’s $1 billion JobTrainer Fund will provide over 300,000 vocational education and training places for school leavers and job seekers; and

(b)         the JobMaker Hiring Credit scheme is encouraging businesses to hire young Australians; and

(4)         notes that the Government is investing an additional $1.2 billion to support businesses to employ 100,000 new apprentices.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      50    Resources industry: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Ms M. M. H. King —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the extraordinary value of the resources industry to the Australian economy and Australians’ livelihoods;

(b)         Australia’s mining and energy sectors such as iron ore, coal, gas, gold, uranium, bauxite and alumina, copper, nickel, zinc and lithium are world class;

(c)         these sectors continue to provide quality jobs for Indigenous Australians and opportunities for training and apprenticeships for all;

(d)         the resources industry provided half of Australia’s total export share in 2019-20, worth $238 billion to our economy; and

(e)         around the nation, the resources industry provides 238,000 direct jobs for Australians;

(2)         congratulates the resources industry for its ongoing support of communities, regional

towns and essential fly-in fly-out workers living in metropolitan areas; and

(3)         recognises the tireless efforts and sacrifices of workers and industry that has allowed the resources industry to thrive despite the immense challenges presented by COVID-19.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      51    Foreign interference in universities : Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs McIntosh —That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government is committed to safeguarding Australians from foreign interference in our universities and protecting government funded research from being compromised;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government convened the world’s first Universities Foreign Interference Taskforce in 2019;

(3)         recognises:

(a)         the Universities Foreign Interference Taskforce produced the Guidelines to Counter Foreign Interference in the Australian University Sector to ensure due diligence and to have conflict of interest polices in place to identify and mitigate risks of any foreign affiliations; and

(b)         there are examples of intimidation, threats and coercion towards researchers and their families; and

(4)         further notes that the Government has invested $145 million to combat foreign interference, including $1.6 million to strengthen cybersecurity in universities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      52    Distilleries: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Wilkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are 300 locally owned distilleries spread across 84 federal electoral divisions, which directly support over 5,000 Australian jobs, with a further 15,000 jobs created through the supply chain including across primary producers, hospitality and tourism sectors;

(b)         more than 65 per cent of Australian distillers are in regional and rural areas which bring economic benefits through farm production, manufacturing, regional tourism and hospitality;

(c)         Australia has the third highest spirit tax in the world, with spirits taxed up to three times more than wine, cider and beer, disproportionately impacting craft and boutique distilleries;

(d)         it makes no sense to tax grain-based spirits, like gin, vodka and whisky, up to $6 per litre more than grape-based spirits like brandy; and

(e)         given the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the industry, it makes practical sense to support our local craft distillers; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         cut the spirits excise rate to the brandy rate;

(b)         freeze spirits and brandy CPI indexation for three years; and

(c)         provide much needed relief to local craft distillers by increasing the current excise refund scheme limit from $100,000 to $350,000 for two years, bringing it into line with the rebate offered to small wine producers under the wine equalisation tax.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      53    Emissions targets: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the Government is taking real and practical action to reduce emissions while protecting our economy, jobs and investment; and

(2)         welcomes that the Government’s plan is driven by technology not taxes, and the plan is working, for instance:

(a)         we beat the 2020 target by 459 million tonnes;

(b)         updated forecasts show Australia is on track to meet and beat its 2030 Paris target; and

(c)         over the past two years, our position against our 2030 target has improved by 639 million tonnes—equivalent to taking all of Australia’s 14.7 million cars off the road for 15 years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      54    Childcare: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Allen —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government’s childcare support during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in Victoria, ensured childcare was available to families who needed it; and

(b)         nearly $3 billion was provided to support the early childhood education and care sector during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic—protecting the sector from imminent collapse;

(2)         acknowledges a record $10.3 billion is being provided to subsidise childcare fees, putting more money back in the pockets of Australian families; and

(3)         recognises that quality, affordable childcare is available for families now because of the Government’s efforts to back the sector in 2020.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      55    Economic and social measures: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)         recognises that after over seven years of this Government, Australia is falling behind the rest of the world on numerous key measures of economic and social success;

(2)         notes that, in relation to:

(a)         the economy, even before the COVID-19 pandemic the Government had badly mismanaged the economy with reputable data and global rankings showing that:

(i)           real wages in Australia were 0.7 per cent lower in 2019 compared to 2013, with Australia ranked third last out of 35 OECD countries to wage growth;

(ii)         over eight years of the current Government, Australia’s productivity rate has been steadily declining, from 2013 when Australia ranked tenth among 34 OECD nations, to 2018 when Australia ranked fifth last;

(iii)        Australian household debt as a share of GDP sits at 119.4 per cent of GDP, the second highest rate out of 41 countries assessed;

(iv)       Australia is now the third most unaffordable housing market within the OECD; and

(v)         Australia is lagging behind in the jobs recovery from this recession;

(b)         education outcomes:

(i)           Australian children’s educational outcomes have slipped in both national and international terms, with Australia slipping in science and mathematics outcomes; and

(ii)         OECD data confirms Australia has high tertiary tuition costs by global standards with the average annual borrowing by Australian students in tertiary programs rising by 36.7 per cent in just four years;

(c)         environmental outcomes:

(i)           Australia’s rate of greenhouse gas emissions per capita has been the highest in the world;

(ii)         Australia ranks second worst globally for government climate policy;

(iii)        by 2018 Australia ranked 18 out of 25 of the world’s top energy-consuming countries with sharp declines from 2014 and 2016; and

(iv)       Australia has the second highest level of biodiversity deterioration in the world; and

(d)         numerous other measures, Australia is falling behind and ranks poorly, for instance:

(i)           First Nations Australians have the lowest life expectancy amongst First Nations people globally;

(ii)         Australia now ranks only 8 out of 11 high-income countries for healthcare affordability;

(iii)        Australia now ranks sixth worst in the OECD for obesity rates;

(iv)       Australia’s global ranking for the proportion of women in the lower house of the national parliament fell from a high of thirty-second place in 2010 to forty-eighth place in 2019, noting that only 23 per cent of the entire coalition Government party room are women;

(v)         Australia is ranked sixty-first globally for fixed broadband speeds;

(vi)       investment in research and development in Australia has fallen significantly as a percentage of GDP under the current Government; and

(vii)      Australia has become more corrupt under this Prime Minister, slipping to eleventh place on the Corruption Perception Index;

(3)         acknowledges that with a possible federal election this year, Australians have a right to question:

(a)         how well they are doing under this visionless Government; and

(b)         whose side the Government is on; and

(4)         condemns the Government for spending $1 billion of taxpayer funds on government advertising, racking up over one trillion dollars’ worth of debt with nothing to show for it and wasting the economic recovery.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      56    Renewable energy: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         welcomes that:

(a)         Australia strengthened its position as a renewable energy powerhouse in 2020; and

(b)         the Clean Energy Regulator estimates that a record 7.0 gigawatts of new renewable capacity was installed in 2020; and

(2)         acknowledges that Australia is a world leader in renewable energy with:

(a)         one in four Australian homes having solar—the highest uptake of household solar in the world; and

(b)         $7.7 billion, or $299 per person, invested in 2020 in renewable energy—placing us ahead of countries like Canada, Germany, Japan, Korea, New Zealand and the United States on a per person basis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      57    Regional Australia White Paper: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Dr Haines —That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         report, Regions at the Ready: Investing in Australia’s Future , by the House of Representatives Select Committee on Regional Development and Decentralisation, and presented to the House on 28 June 2018, called on the Government to develop, by July 2020, a comprehensive Regional Australia White Paper, following a Green Paper public consultation process;

(b)         Strategic Regional Growth Expert Panel’s report Australia’s Regions: Investing in Their Future , delivered to the Government on 29 March 2019, re-iterated the call for the Government to produce this Regional Australia White Paper by July 2020;

(c)         Government refused to publicly release the Australia’s Regions: Investing in Their Future report for over a year until forced to do so through a Senate order in July 2020;

(d)         Government has made no commitment and no progress to developing such a White Paper and that therefore the Government still lacks any comprehensive strategy for the development of regional Australia;

(e)         Charter of Budget Honesty Act 1998 involves no requirement for the Government to systematically assess the impact of its policies and initiatives on regional Australia; and

(f)          Charter of Budget Honesty Amendment (Rural and Regional Australia Statements) Bill 2021 would establish a requirement for the Treasurer to:

(i)           publicly release and table a rural and regional Australia statement, outlining key challenges and opportunities for rural and regional Australia, with each budget economic and fiscal outlook report and each mid-year economic and fiscal outlook report; and

(ii)         publish a national White Paper for rural and regional Australia within 24 months of the commencement of the Bill; and

(2)         calls on the Government to immediately commence a process for a Regional Australia White Paper, which will:

(a)         involve deep and broad public consultation through a Green Paper process;

(b)         involve cross-parliamentary engagement with a view to securing broad parliamentary support;

(c)         outline a long-term vision for rural and regional Australia to capture significant opportunities including, but not limited to, agriculture, tourism, renewable energy, manufacturing, health and social care, and education and training; and

(d)         be completed, and released publicly, by no later than 1 July 2022.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      58    Ocean management: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs Archer —That this House:

(1)         notes that as an island nation, Australians have a deep affinity to our oceans and waterways and that the ocean shapes our climate and weather, provides us with natural resources, and is essential to our wellbeing;

(2)         acknowledges that when our ocean is protected and sustainably managed, it has the potential to deliver significant economic and social benefits and that by 2025, ocean industries are projected to contribute around $100 billion each year to our economy;

(3)         further notes that the 2020-21 Budget contained a new Oceans Package made up of:

(a)         $14.8 million to tackle the marine impacts of ghost nets and plastic litter;

(b)         $28.3 million to enhance management of Australian marine parks;

(c)         $20 million through the Relief and Recovery Fund to re-establish native oyster reefs at 11 sites across the country; and

(d)         $4.2 million for international blue carbon and rainforest partnerships; and

(4)         commends the Government for reaffirming Australia’s status as a global leader on ocean management.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      59    Out-of-pocket health expenses: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Dr Freelander —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         under this Government, out-of-pocket expense for patients accessing healthcare have soared;

(b)         out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing a general practitioner have increased by 37.18 per cent Australia-wide since the Coalition came into office;

(c)         out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing specialists have increased by 54.14 per cent;

(d)         out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing anaesthetics have increased by 51.84 per cent; and

(e)         out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing radiotherapy and therapeutic nuclear medicine have increased by 195.96 per cent;

(2)         condemns the Government for allowing out-of-pocket health expenses to soar; and

(3)         calls on the Government to act urgently to address the inequity of access to high level healthcare in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      60    Technology Investment Roadmap: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that Australia’s Technology Investment Roadmap:

(a)         is a comprehensive plan to invest in the technologies we need to bring emissions down, here and around the world;

(b)         will accelerate technologies like hydrogen, carbon capture and storage, soil carbon measurement, low-carbon materials like steel and aluminium and long duration energy storage; and

(c)         will support 130,000 new jobs by 2030 and maintain Australia’s position as a world leading exporter of food, fibre, minerals and energy; and

(2)         welcomes the Government’s focus on technology, not taxes, to secure affordable, reliable energy while at the same time reducing emissions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      61    Territory rights on euthanasia: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Euthanasia Laws Act 1997 (known as the Andrews Bill) amended the Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Act 1988 and the Northern Territory (Self-Government) Act 1978 to deprive these two legislative assemblies of the power to make laws relating to euthanasia;

(b)         the Government of Prime Minister Howard justified this at the time as a constraint on young jurisdictions that were seen to be moving ahead of the broader public mood;

(c)         when the Andrews Bill curtailed the right of territories to make laws relating to euthanasia, no other state or territory legislature had conducted a debate on similar laws;

(d)         polls of public attitudes to doctor-led voluntary assisted dying suggest that support was in the high sixties in the 1980s, in the mid to high seventies in the 1990s, and in the low eighties in the past two decades;

(e)         in recent years all state legislatures have debated legislation around voluntary assisted dying, with Victoria and Western Australia legalising voluntary assisted dying, and New South Wales and South Australia rejecting legalisation, while Queensland and Tasmania have processes ongoing;

(f)          the anachronistic Andrews Bill means that a quarter of a century since it was passed, 700,000 Australians who live in the Northern Territory or the Australian Capital Territory are still unable to participate in a democratic process to resolve community approaches to euthanasia;

(g)         repealing the Andrews Bill would return to territories legal powers that are held by other Australian jurisdictions; and

(h)         restoring territory rights does not direct that either territory legislature should consider legislating on euthanasia, it merely allows them to do so if their properly elected representatives decide it appropriate;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         in each of the last two terms of parliament the Government has blocked debate on private Members’ bills that would restore territory rights; and

(b)         while senators have debated and voted on related legislation, members of the House of Representatives have been prevented from expressing their views on this issue; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         explain why, in 2021, two mature legislative jurisdictions are still singled out as unworthy of legislative self-determination;

(b)         commit to introduce legislation into the House of Representatives that would grant territorians legislative equality with Australians in other jurisdictions; and

(c)         restore the right of territories to determine their own laws on euthanasia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      62    Electricity prices: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs Archer —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that under the Government, we have seen:

(a)         a record eight consecutive quarters of year-on-year consumer price index reductions in retail electricity prices; and

(b)         wholesale electricity prices fall for 17 months in a row; and

(2)         welcomes the Government’s strong action to ensure that Australian households and businesses have access to affordable, reliable and secure electricity.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    *63    Housing: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Burns —That this House:

(1)         recognises that every Australian should have access to safe and secure housing;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the rate of home ownership continues to decline due to this Government’s inaction and lack of leadership on federal housing policy;

(b)         the rising cost of rent is pushing more Australians into rental stress;

(c)         more investment in social housing is needed immediately to address the growing waitlists and increasing number of people facing homelessness; and

(d)         the homelessness sector is desperate for more funding to support those needing crisis accommodation, especially women fleeing domestic and family violence; and

(3)         calls on the Government to take responsibility and implement policies that respond to the serious issues facing access to safe and secure housing in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      64    Defence industry: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government’s $270 billion investment in Australia’s defence capability is creating thousands of jobs and opportunities for small businesses across Australia, particularly in the state of Western Australia;

(b)         it is only because of the Government’s continued investment that we are able to guarantee that the men and women of the Australian Defence Force receive the defence capabilities they need to keep Australians safe; and

(c)         a key pillar of our economic recovery plan to get Australians in jobs is getting more Australian businesses in our defence industry to deliver the essential capability our Defence Force relies on; and

(2)         recognises that because of the support measures the Government has introduced to help Australian defence:

(a)         businesses remain in business and are recovering from COVID-19; and

(b)         our defence industry is not only recovering, but thriving as we come back from the COVID-19 recession.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      65    Proposed Joint Select Committee on Oversight of the Implementation of Recommendations of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That:

(1)         a joint select committee, to be known as the Joint Select Committee on Oversight of the Implementation of Recommendations of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety be established to inquire into and report upon:

(a)         the Government response to the recommendations of the Royal Commission, including the development of a new Act to replace the Aged Care Act 1997 and the establishment and operation of a new person-centred Aged Care system which focuses on the safety, health and wellbeing of older people; and

(b)         any matter in relation to the Royal Commission’s recommendations referred to the committee by a resolution of either House of the Parliament;

(2)         the committee present its final report on or before the final sitting day of the 46th Parliament;

(3)         the committee consist of nine members—four senators, and five members of the House of Representatives, as follows:

(a)         two members of the House of the Representatives to be nominated by the Government Whip or Whips;

(b)         two members of the House of Representatives to be nominated by the Opposition Whip or Whips;

(c)         two senators to be nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate;

(d)         one senator to be nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate;

(e)         one senator to be nominated by any minority party or independent senator; and

(f)          one member of the House of Representatives nominated by any minority party or independent member;

(4)         participating members may:

(a)         be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Government Whip in the House of Representatives, the Opposition Whip in the House of Representatives, the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator or member of the House of Representatives; and

(b)         participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee;

(5)         every nomination of a member of the committee be notified in writing to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives;

(6)         the members of the committee hold office as a joint select committee until presentation of the committee’s final report or until the House of Representatives is dissolved or expires by effluxion of time, whichever is the earlier;

(7)         the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that all members have not been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy;

(8)         the committee elect:

(a)         a Government member as its chair; and

(b)         a non-Government member as its deputy chair who shall act as chair of the committee at any time when the chair is not present at a meeting of the committee; and

(c)         at any time when the chair and deputy chair are not present at a meeting of the committee, the members present shall elect another member to act as chair at that meeting;

(9)         in the event of an equally divided vote, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, shall have a casting vote;

(10)     three members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member of either House and one non-Government member of either House;

(11)     the committee have power to:

(a)         appoint subcommittees consisting of three or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to examine; and

(b)         appoint the chair of each subcommittee who shall have a casting vote only;

(12)     two members of a subcommittee constitute the quorum of that subcommittee, provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member of either House and one non-Government member of either House;

(13)     the committee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings and the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit;

(14)     the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives;

(15)     the committee be empowered to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public;

(16)     the committee have power to adjourn from time to time and to sit during any adjournment of the Senate and the House of Representatives;

(17)     the provisions of this resolution, so far as they are inconsistent with the standing orders, have effect notwithstanding anything contained in the standing orders; and

(18)     a message be sent to the Senate seeking its concurrence in this resolution.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      66    Indigenous tourism: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Indigenous tourism plays a vital role in supporting businesses, creating jobs and driving economic empowerment of Indigenous Australians;

(b)         the Government’s $40 million Indigenous Tourism Fund announced on Friday, 19 February 2021 will support Indigenous tourism businesses and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community organisations; and

(c)         the establishment of the National Indigenous Tourism Advisory Group will advise the Government on strategic priorities for the growth of Australia’s Indigenous tourism sector in a way which best supports the broader tourism sector’s recovery; and

(2)         recognises and acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s Indigenous culture, country, art and history are unique in today’s competitive international tourism market, and are equally attractive to our domestic audience; and

(b)         employment in the Indigenous tourism sector provides the opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to stay on country while maintaining and sharing their culture and traditions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      67    Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Bursary: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the launch of the Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Bursary on 18 March 2021 at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra;

(2)         notes that the bursary is:

(a)         a contribution by members of the Australian-Turkish community to the Gallipoli Scholarship, which supports the descendants of Anzacs to study at university or TAFE; and

(b)         part of the new Ataturk Scholarship, which will support Turkish Australians to study at university or TAFE from 2022; and

(3)         recognises that the donation of this bursary is an act of friendship by Turkish Australians, who have made enormous contributions to our country and community, helping to forge the strong and lasting bond between Australia and Turkey.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      68    Supporting universities: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Martin —That this House:

(1)         notes that the Government is:

(a)         supporting universities through the COVID-19 pandemic and creating more opportunities for young people to study; and

(b)         investing $20 billion in the higher education sector in 2021;

(2)         recognises that $1 billion has been provided to university research this year;

(3)         acknowledges that the Government has provided $903.5 million over the next four years for more domestic places and to ensure our universities are financially stable; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for its Job Ready Graduates package which is providing up to 30,000 additional university places in 2021.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      69    Family Law Amendment (A Step Towards a Safer Family Law System) Bill 2020

( Mr Perrett ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )