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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Monday, 25 October 2021

The Federation Chamber meets at 10.30 am

 

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY FOR THIS SITTING

11 AM TO 1.30 PM

Notices

    †1    Ms McBain : To move—That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         Australia has a severe timber shortage;

(b)        a report by the Master Builders Association and the Australian Forest Products Association concludes Australia is heading towards a deficit of 250,000 house frames by 2035;

(c)         the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment states numerous studies show the need for 400,000 hectares of new plantations over the next decade to meet Australia’s demand for timber;

(d)        data from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences reveals there are only 2,750 hectares of new plantations of softwood;

(e)         the Government first promised to expand Australia’s timber plantations by 1 billion trees in 2018; and

(f)          answers to questions in the Senate reveal the concessional loan program set up to help meet the 1 billion trees target is yet to even open after the Government promised $500 million before the last election;

(2)        acknowledges the impact the timber shortage is having on the construction and forestry industries and those Australians undertaking building and do-it-yourself projects; and

(3)        conveys its disappointment that the Government has failed to do the necessary work for Australia to have sovereign capability to provide softwood and to grow jobs across the forestry and construction sectors.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2021. Time allowed—35 minutes. )

    †2    Mr Leeser : To move—That this House:

(1)        recognises the critical work of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) in safeguarding Australia’s security and national interests;

(2)        notes that ASIO Director-General Mike Burgess recently observed that ‘Australia’s threat environment is complex, challenging and changing’;

(3)        commends the Government for providing $1.3 billion over ten years in the 2021-22 Budget to help further improve ASIO’s capabilities; and

(4)        thanks the men and women who work in ASIO and our other national security agencies for their dedication to keeping Australians safe from a range of threats and to protecting our national sovereignty.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2021. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †3    Ms Claydon : To move—That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s social security system is a proud Labor legacy;

(b)        social security payments provide economic stability, fostering smooth transitions during times of economic uncertainty; and

(c)         Centrelink has provided critical support to many Australians over the course of the pandemic;

(2)        recognises that:

(a)         the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic serves as a reminder for all governments about the importance of robust local public services;

(b)        there are many people who do not have internet and rely on local Centrelink branch access to conduct their Centrelink business;

(c)         the closure of face-to-face Centrelink services will force many vulnerable Australians, carers, people with disability and students to travel excessive lengths to access the services they need;

(d)        many people who rely upon Centrelink services live well below the poverty line and have zero capacity to pay more for travel or parking; and

(e)         the Government’s secret plan to close or reduce access to Centrelink shopfronts across Australia is unconscionable; and

(3)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         terminate any plans to consolidate, close or reduce access to the Mornington, Newcastle, Tweed Heads, Yarra and Abbotsford Centrelink offices once and for all;

(b)        cease the impending closure of the face-to-face Centrelink service in Braddon; and

(c)         reinstate all Centrelink shopfronts which have been closed in the last two years, including the services located in Benalla and Newport, Victoria.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2021. Time allowed—35 minutes. )

    †4    Mr Wallace : To move—That this House:

(1)        notes:

(a)         a number of Australian businesses have been impacted by cyber-attacks including by ransomware in 2021; and

(b)        ransomware is a common and dangerous type of malware employed by cyber-criminals that can affect both individuals and organisations, and cause severe damage to reputation, and business bottom lines;

(2)        records its concern at the impact and frequency of cyber-attacks on Australian individuals and businesses;

(3)        further notes the significant investment by the Government of $15 billion in cyber and defence capabilities, including $1.35 billion through the Australian Signals Directorate/Australian Cyber Security Centre (ACSC), to keep Australians safe online;

(4)        recognises the important work done by the ACSC providing advice and technical support to individuals and businesses affected by cyber incidents;

(5)        urges all Australians to implement good cyber hygiene measures across their home and business networks; and

(6)        encourages all Australians to visit cyber.gov.au and take the steps to protect themselves, their businesses, their families, and Australia’s digital sovereignty.

              ( Notice given 18 October 2021. Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 1.30 pm. )

4.45 PM TO 7.30 PM

Notices —continued

    †5    Mr Burns : To move—That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         asylum seekers are still being held in alternative places of detention, such as hotels, in Australia;

(b)        many of these individuals have now been detained for over eight years and have suffered significant psychological harm as result of their prolonged and indefinite detention;

(c)         this program costs taxpayers tens of millions of dollars each year and continues despite:

(i)          the impact on the physical and mental health of detainees; and

(ii)        repeated offers to resettle asylum seekers from New Zealand; and

(d)        the Minister for Home Affairs acknowledged in comments on 21 January 2021 that ‘it’s cheaper for people to be in the community than it is to be at a hotel or for us to be paying for them to be in detention and if they’re demonstrated not to be a threat’;

(2)        applauds the significant contribution migrants and asylum seekers make to our economy, our democracy, and our vibrant, multicultural community; and

(3)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         address the issue of the indefinite detention of asylum seekers in hotels in Australia;

(b)        honour the Minister for Home Affairs’ previous comments and ensure that Australians will no longer see an expensive and cruel program of indefinite detention inflicted on people in our care; and

(c)         immediately release Priya, Nades, Kopika and Tharaunicaa from detention on Christmas Island and allow them to return to their home in Biloela, Queensland to the community who loves and supports them, and wants them home.

              ( Notice given 23 March 2021. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †6    Dr Webster : To move—That this House:

(1)        recognises the Government’s commitment to ensuring there is a strong, skilled and sustainable National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) workforce by launching the NDIS National Workforce Plan;

(2)        acknowledges that the disability workforce will require an additional 83,000 workers over the next few years to strengthen the responsiveness, quality and capability of the NDIS workforce and complements other Government reforms to build a simpler, fairer, faster and more flexible NDIS; and

(3)        recognises the Government’s 2021-22 budget investment of $12.3 million in the Care and Support Workforce Package over the next two years to cut red tape and promote regulatory alignment across the aged care, disability and veterans’ care sectors.

              ( Notice given 23 June 2021.  Time allowed—45 minutes. )

    †7    Mr Gorman : To move—That this House notes that:

(1)        dementia is the leading cause of death of women in Australia;

(2)        over 42,000 Western Australians are living with dementia and some 242 new diagnoses are made each day;

(3)        472,000 Australians live with dementia and almost 1.6 million people are involved in their care;

(4)        it is expected that the number of people living with dementia in Australia is likely to increase to over 1 million by 2058;

(5)        we all have a role to play in building dementia-friendly communities such as the initiative of the Memory Cafe in Cambridge;

(6)        Western Australians are fortunate to be served by Alzheimer’s WA which was founded 40 years ago in Inglewood and has just opened their new base in Subiaco; and

(7)        the 42,000 Western Australians suffering from dementia deserve local, well-funded care, support and research.

              ( Notice given 22 June 2021. Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †8    Mr Pasin : To move—That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         on average, 2.5 million containers, 122,000 air and sea vessels, 22 million passengers and 144 million mail items arrive in Australia each year;

(b)        around 35,000 pest and disease border detections are recorded across biosecurity regulated pathways each year; and

(c)         the global and regional spread of pests and diseases is accelerating and trade volumes are growing; and

(2)        further notes that:

(a)         Australia has one of the most robust and effective biosecurity systems in the world, which is essential to keeping our nation safe from exotic pests and diseases;

(b)        a strong biosecurity system protects and empowers Australia’s reputation as a clean and green producer of food and fibre, ensuring primary producers can maintain their production levels and attain premiums for their product in our international export markets; and

(c)         the agricultural industry’s ambitious goal of $100 billion by 2030 is only attainable through substantial continued investment in biosecurity;

(3)        acknowledges and welcomes the Government’s history of investment in biosecurity, which saw investment in biosecurity and export services increase from $630 million in 2014-15 to a record 1 billion in 2021-22; and

(4)        welcomes the additional $400 million in new funding announced through the 2021-22 budget to further expand biosecurity systems and safeguard Australian agriculture and our environment from exotic pests and diseases.

              ( Notice given 23 June 2021; amended 18 October 2021.  Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 7.30 pm. )

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

      *1    Anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2021 —Mr Dutton ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That this House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

         2    Anniversary of the national apology to survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2020 —Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That this House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

       3    Fourth annual statement on veterans and their families—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 10 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr D. J. Chester —That the House take note of the document.

       4    Australia’s COVID-19 health response—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 11 June 2020—Mr Laming ) on the motion of

Mr Hunt —That the House take note of the document.

       5    Disaster risk reduction—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 March 2020—Mr Young ) on the motion of Mr Littleproud —That the House take note of the document.

       6    Closing the Gap—Report 2020—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 February 2020—Mr C. Kelly ) on the motion of Mr Porter —That the House take note of the document.

       7    VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 17 October 2019—Mr Ted O’Brien ) on the motion of

Mr D. J. Chester —That the House take note of the document.

         8    Anniversary of the national apology to victims and survivors of institutional child sexual abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2019 —Mrs Wicks ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That the House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

         9    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  19 October 2021 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Australia’s Family Law System—Joint Select Committee Improvements in family law proceedings: Second interim report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 March 2021— Mr Thompson ) on the motion of

Mr K. J. Andrews —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

       2    Trade and Investment Growth—Joint Standing Committee Pivot: Diversifying Australia’s trade and investment profile —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 March 2021— Mr T. R. Wilson ) on the motion of Mr Christensen —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

       3    Migration—Joint Standing Committee Interim report of the inquiry into Australia’s skilled migration program —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 23 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

       4    Agriculture and Water Resources—Standing Committee Aussie logs for Aussie jobs: Inquiry into timber supply chain constraints in the Australian plantation sector —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 March 2021—

Dr Martin ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

       5    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee Inquiry into family, domestic and sexual violence —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 13 May 2021— Ms McBain ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

       6    Electoral Matters—Joint Standing Committee Report of the inquiry on the future conduct of elections operating during times of emergency situations —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Conaghan —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

       7    Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade—Joint Standing Committee Australia’s response to the coup in Myanmar: Interim report for the inquiry into certain aspects of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Annual Report 2019-20 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

       8    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Advisory report on the Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) Bill 2020 and Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2020 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 3 August 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

       9    Social Policy and Legal Affairs—Standing Committee Final report: Inquiry into homelessness in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 4 August 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     10    Intelligence and Security—Parliamentary Joint Committee Advisory report on the Surveillance Legislation Amendment (Identify and Disrupt) Bill 2020 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 5 August 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Dreyfus —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     11    Tax and Revenue—Standing Committee Owning a share of your work: tax treatment of employee share schemes —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 23 August 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Liu —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     12    Law Enforcement—Parliamentary Joint Committee Examination of the Australian Federal Police annual report 2019-20 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 August 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Conaghan —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     13    Law Enforcement—Parliamentary Joint Committee Vaccine related fraud and security risks —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 26 August 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Conaghan —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     14    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 193: Strengthening the trade agreement and treaty-making process in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 31 August 2021 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     15    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 197: OCCAR Managed Programmes Participation Agreement; Minamata Convention on Mercury —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr T. R. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     16    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 196: Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 September 2021 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

     17    Northern Australia—Joint Standing Committee A way forward: Final report into the destruction of Indigenous heritage sites at Juukan Gorge —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 18 October 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Entsch —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Orders of the day

         1    Video game industry: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         video games are a large and growing market—Australians spent $3.6 billion on games in 2019, more than double the amount they spent in 2012;

(b)        video gaming is a mainstream activity—two thirds of Australians play video games with an average age of 37; and

(c)         globally, the video game industry generates more than double the revenue of the music and film industries combined; and

(2)        recognises that:

(a)         Australia is home to a talented community of game developers and publishers, but proportionately the Australian industry is much smaller than its peers in New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom;

(b)        video game development provides remote working opportunities and jobs for the regions—in the UK, 55 per cent of video game industry employment is outside of London and the south-east;

(c)         the video game industry provides a variety of jobs—in Australia, 34 per cent are software programmers, 19 per cent are artists and 11 per cent are business or marketing professionals;

(d)        the skills developed in our domestic video game industry are transferrable into roles in adjacent innovative and growth industries like cyber security, software engineering and data analytics; and

(e)         video games could help drive the post-COVID economic recovery in Australia, creating jobs and expanding a significant export market.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         2    Tuberculosis: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         24 March 2021 is World Tuberculosis (TB) Day, a day to commemorate precious lives lost and recognise the serious impacts COVID-19 is having on TB services globally;

(b)        TB remains one of the world’s deadliest airborne infectious diseases, killing more than 4,000 people every day, among them 700 children, and close to 15 million people in the last decade;

(c)         COVID-19 is exacerbating inequalities, making it difficult to reach people with life-saving TB prevention and treatment;

(d)        five to eight years of global progress in the fight against TB is likely to be lost due to disruption of services resulting from COVID-19—1.4 million more people are likely to die from TB in the next five years if urgent action is not taken;

(e)         Australia committed to the targets agreed in the Political Declaration of the United Nations High Level Meeting (UNHLM) on TB in 2018; and

(f)          the UN Secretary-General’s 2020 report found that progress in meeting the UNHLM targets on TB is far too slow to meet the 2022 deadline;

(2)        acknowledges that the:

(a)         Government’s series of announcements of $1.1 billion to support global and regional COVID-19 response and recovery will save millions of lives;

(b)        Government pledge of $242 million to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) will save millions of lives;

(c)         investment of $13.3 million from the Government in 2019 will support antimicrobial resistance and drug-resistant TB research in Pacific island countries;

(d)        Government’s investment in TB research and development has resulted in the development of a new, six-month, all-oral TB drug therapy thereby reducing the previous 18-month long treatment for drug resistant TB that consisted of multiple injections and thousands of pills; and

(e)         Government’s investments in multilateral agencies such as the Global Fund has supported countries’ responses to the COVID-19 crisis; and

(3)        calls on the Government to increase:

(a)         our TB investment in the Asia-Pacific region to sustain routine TB services and safeguard the progress made so far; and

(b)        investment in TB research and development to meet the commitments made by Australia at the 2018 UNHLM on TB.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         3    Gas sector: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that, gas:

(a)         will be central to our ongoing economic recovery;

(b)        is a crucial input in our manufacturing sector, which employs over 850,000 Australians; and

(c)         provides the firmed electricity generation needed to balance Australia’s record levels of renewable investment; and

(2)        calls on all Members of the House to support the Australian gas sector and the important role it plays in creating jobs, providing affordable energy and reducing emissions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         4    Corporations and billionaires: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Bandt —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         during the pandemic the wealth of Australia’s billionaires grew by 25 per cent;

(b)        the Prime Minister’s 2020 Budget contained $99 billion a year in subsidies to big corporations and the very wealthy; and

(c)         one in three big corporations in Australia pays no tax; and

(2)        calls on the Government to ensure the big corporations and billionaires pay their fair share of tax.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         5    Road safety: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Conaghan —That this House:

(1)        notes that the Government is providing record funding for road safety measures around the nation through the:

(a)         $2 billion Road Safety Program delivering low cost road safety improvements such as better road markings, shoulder sealing, new barriers, better signage and other technologies building on the $500 million Targeted Road Safety Works Program;

(b)        $12 million for the Road Safety Innovation Fund to support road safety research and the development of new technologies;

(c)         $4 million Road Safety Awareness and Enablers Fund, with 20 projects already underway to improve education and promotion of road safety matters;

(d)        $8 million Driver Reviver Site Upgrades Program;

(e)         $5.5 million for a new Road Safety Data Hub, to better collate data on a national level and inform future infrastructure investment decisions; and

(f)          broader $110 billion infrastructure pipeline, upgrading roads across Australia; and

(2)        recognises there is more to do but congratulates the Government for its commitment to improving road safety around the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         6    Travel agents: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         on 28 March 2021 the Government intends to cease the Jobkeeper scheme, despite widespread calls from economists and businesses alike to extend the scheme as the economy continues to suffer;

(b)        travel agents have been pleading for more targeted support given the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 has had on their businesses, and the brutal reality that there is no snap-back for their industry;

(c)         the Australian Federation of Travel Agents, the peak body representing the nation’s travel industry, has highlighted multiple flaws in the Government’s $128 million support package for embattled travel agents, which has provoked confusion and uncertainty; and

(d)        travel agents say they’ll be forced to close because the Government’s support package is so poorly designed it won’t help them;

(2)        acknowledges that Jobkeeper has been a lifeline for travel agents, and has allowed them to keep their doors open to continue to assist their clients with refund recoveries and those seeking to return home; and

(3)        urges the Government to:

(a)         listen to the travel sector and respond to their calls for more targeted support to help them survive the detrimental impacts of COVID-19; and

(b)        extend ongoing support to those sectors of the Australian economy who are most impacted by COVID-19 and who will be amongst the last to recover.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         7    National waste legislation: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Zimmerman —That this House:

(1)        notes:

(a)         that in December 2020 the Government passed Australia’s first ever national waste legislation, the Recycling and Waste Reduction Act 2020 , through the Parliament and that this legislation implemented a waste export ban; and

(b)        measures introduced by the Government to increase recycling, including the Recycling Modernisation Fund and the National Waste Action Plan; and

(2)        commends the Government for providing national leadership on this important issue and for working with state and territory governments and industry to boost onshore recycling processing, providing economic reform and effective environmental management.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 25 October 2021. )

         8    Diversity and inclusion: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         15 to 21 March 2021 marks Harmony Week, a time to recognise and celebrate diversity and inclusion in Australia; and

(b)        21 March 2021 is International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, a call for the international community to increase its efforts to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination; and

(2)        recognises that:

(a)         Australia’s diversity is our greatest strength, we should celebrate this, defend this, and strive to strengthen it; and

(b)        at a time of rising racism around the globe and in Australia, we must commit to a zero-tolerance approach to racism, and to working to end all forms of racial discrimination.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

         9    Homebuilder: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Thompson —That this House notes:

(1)        the construction industry:

(a)         employs over one million Australians;

(b)        consists of 390,000 small and family businesses; and

(c)         generates more than $100 billion, or around five per cent of our annual economic output;

(2)        the Government’s HomeBuilder grant has provided critical support to the residential construction sector during the COVID-19 pandemic; and

(3)        that Treasury estimates that HomeBuilder is underpinning $18 billion worth of construction projects.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      10    Human rights in Cambodia: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)        notes with approval, the resolution of the European Parliament in March 2021 regarding the mass trials of members of the opposition and other civil society activists in Cambodia;

(2)        condemns the Cambodian Government for the politically motivated mass trials of members of the Cambodian diaspora based on fake and spurious criminal charges, including Australian citizens, as an authoritarian tactic to silence dissent and global criticism of the Hun Sen regime;

(3)        calls on the Minister for Foreign Affairs to:

(a)         break her silence and speak out publicly against the Cambodian Government for their flagrant disregard for human rights, democracy and the rule of law; and

(b)        work with like-minded countries to protect the Cambodian diaspora and support human rights and democracy in Cambodia;

(4)        calls on the Government of Cambodia to:

(a)         put an end to all forms of harassment, intimidation and politically motivated criminal charges against members of the opposition, trade unionists, human rights defenders, the media and civil society actors in and outside Cambodia;

(b)        ensure Cambodian security forces refrain from unnecessary and excessive force against those engaged in peaceful protests;

(c)         proceed with the immediate and unconditional annulment of the sentences against Sam Rainsy, Mu Sochua, Eng Chhay Eang, Ou Chanrith, Ho Vann, Long Ry, Men Sothavrin, Tiolung Saumura and Nuth Romduol;

(d)        initiate a process of national reconciliation through genuine and inclusive dialogue with the political opposition parties and civil society;

(e)         release, without delay, all persons who have been detained for exercising their human rights, and to drop all charges against them that are politically motivated and aimed at eradicating any dissent;

(f)          drop all charges against members of diaspora communities, including Australian citizens Hong Lim, Hemara In and others being charged and tried in absentia;

(g)        respect the rights of all citizens to a fair trial, freedom of expression and freedom of association and peaceful assembly;

(h)        immediately cease all forms of harassment, including judicial harassment and intimidation of opposition members in the country; and

(i)          restore democracy and the right of opposition political parties to organise and express the views of citizens and ensure that the application of the law respects human rights and fundamental freedoms;

(5)        notes that the European Commission:

(a)         recently withdrew tariff preferences for Cambodia in response to the Cambodian Government’s failure to meet their obligations to overcome serious and systematic violations of political participation, freedom of expression and freedom of association;

(b)        is of the view that the Asia-Europe Meeting Summit should not be held in Phnom Penh this year unless democracy is restored to Cambodia; and

(c)         recently called on European Union member states to suspend all bilateral financial support to the Cambodian Government and instead focus on civil society organisations and opposition parties;

(6)        insists that the Cambodian Government cooperate with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and United Nations Special Procedures in order to allow them to fulfil their mandates without interference;

(7)        reiterates the call on the Cambodian authorities by Rhona Smith, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia, to open up civic space, protect and promote fundamental freedoms, including the rights to assembly and of expression, and to ensure the right to a fair trial for all, as guaranteed by international human rights norms and standards and Cambodian laws; and

(8)        calls on the Australian Government to examine the imposition of targeted sanctions, including travel bans and asset freezes, against Cambodian political and military leaders who are responsible for serious human rights violations.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      11    Support for Australians: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 —Ms McBride, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Young —That this House:

(1)        notes that Government is committed to ensuring that all Australians, including young Australians, have every opportunity to succeed in post-pandemic Australia;

(2)        acknowledges that the Government has over 200 initiatives that directly and indirectly benefit young Australians;

(3)        recognises that:

(a)         the Government’s $1 billion JobTrainer Fund will provide over 300,000 vocational education and training places for school leavers and job seekers; and

(b)        the JobMaker Hiring Credit scheme is encouraging businesses to hire young Australians; and

(4)        notes that the Government is investing an additional $1.2 billion to support businesses to employ 100,000 new apprentices.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      12    Resources industry: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Ms M. M. H. King —That this House:

(1)        notes:

(a)         the extraordinary value of the resources industry to the Australian economy and Australians’ livelihoods;

(b)        Australia’s mining and energy sectors such as iron ore, coal, gas, gold, uranium, bauxite and alumina, copper, nickel, zinc and lithium are world class;

(c)         these sectors continue to provide quality jobs for Indigenous Australians and opportunities for training and apprenticeships for all;

(d)        the resources industry provided half of Australia’s total export share in 2019-20, worth $238 billion to our economy; and

(e)         around the nation, the resources industry provides 238,000 direct jobs for Australians;

(2)        congratulates the resources industry for its ongoing support of communities, regional

towns and essential fly-in fly-out workers living in metropolitan areas; and

(3)        recognises the tireless efforts and sacrifices of workers and industry that has allowed the resources industry to thrive despite the immense challenges presented by COVID-19.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      13    Foreign interference in universities : Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs McIntosh —That this House:

(1)        notes that the Government is committed to safeguarding Australians from foreign interference in our universities and protecting government funded research from being compromised;

(2)        acknowledges that the Government convened the world’s first Universities Foreign Interference Taskforce in 2019;

(3)        recognises:

(a)         the Universities Foreign Interference Taskforce produced the Guidelines to Counter Foreign Interference in the Australian University Sector to ensure due diligence and to have conflict of interest polices in place to identify and mitigate risks of any foreign affiliations; and

(b)        there are examples of intimidation, threats and coercion towards researchers and their families; and

(4)        further notes that the Government has invested $145 million to combat foreign interference, including $1.6 million to strengthen cybersecurity in universities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      14    Distilleries: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Wilkie —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         there are 300 locally owned distilleries spread across 84 federal electoral divisions, which directly support over 5,000 Australian jobs, with a further 15,000 jobs created through the supply chain including across primary producers, hospitality and tourism sectors;

(b)        more than 65 per cent of Australian distillers are in regional and rural areas which bring economic benefits through farm production, manufacturing, regional tourism and hospitality;

(c)         Australia has the third highest spirit tax in the world, with spirits taxed up to three times more than wine, cider and beer, disproportionately impacting craft and boutique distilleries;

(d)        it makes no sense to tax grain-based spirits, like gin, vodka and whisky, up to $6 per litre more than grape-based spirits like brandy; and

(e)         given the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the industry, it makes practical sense to support our local craft distillers; and

(2)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         cut the spirits excise rate to the brandy rate;

(b)        freeze spirits and brandy CPI indexation for three years; and

(c)         provide much needed relief to local craft distillers by increasing the current excise refund scheme limit from $100,000 to $350,000 for two years, bringing it into line with the rebate offered to small wine producers under the wine equalisation tax.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      15    Emissions targets: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that the Government is taking real and practical action to reduce emissions while protecting our economy, jobs and investment; and

(2)        welcomes that the Government’s plan is driven by technology not taxes, and the plan is working, for instance:

(a)         we beat the 2020 target by 459 million tonnes;

(b)        updated forecasts show Australia is on track to meet and beat its 2030 Paris target; and

(c)         over the past two years, our position against our 2030 target has improved by 639 million tonnes—equivalent to taking all of Australia’s 14.7 million cars off the road for 15 years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      16    Childcare: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Allen —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         the Government’s childcare support during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly in Victoria, ensured childcare was available to families who needed it; and

(b)        nearly $3 billion was provided to support the early childhood education and care sector during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic—protecting the sector from imminent collapse;

(2)        acknowledges a record $10.3 billion is being provided to subsidise childcare fees, putting more money back in the pockets of Australian families; and

(3)        recognises that quality, affordable childcare is available for families now because of the Government’s efforts to back the sector in 2020.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      17    Economic and social measures: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)        recognises that after over seven years of this Government, Australia is falling behind the rest of the world on numerous key measures of economic and social success;

(2)        notes that, in relation to:

(a)         the economy, even before the COVID-19 pandemic the Government had badly mismanaged the economy with reputable data and global rankings showing that:

(i)          real wages in Australia were 0.7 per cent lower in 2019 compared to 2013, with Australia ranked third last out of 35 OECD countries to wage growth;

(ii)        over eight years of the current Government, Australia’s productivity rate has been steadily declining, from 2013 when Australia ranked tenth among 34 OECD nations, to 2018 when Australia ranked fifth last;

(iii)      Australian household debt as a share of GDP sits at 119.4 per cent of GDP, the second highest rate out of 41 countries assessed;

(iv)       Australia is now the third most unaffordable housing market within the OECD; and

(v)        Australia is lagging behind in the jobs recovery from this recession;

(b)        education outcomes:

(i)          Australian children’s educational outcomes have slipped in both national and international terms, with Australia slipping in science and mathematics outcomes; and

(ii)        OECD data confirms Australia has high tertiary tuition costs by global standards with the average annual borrowing by Australian students in tertiary programs rising by 36.7 per cent in just four years;

(c)         environmental outcomes:

(i)          Australia’s rate of greenhouse gas emissions per capita has been the highest in the world;

(ii)        Australia ranks second worst globally for government climate policy;

(iii)      by 2018 Australia ranked 18 out of 25 of the world’s top energy-consuming countries with sharp declines from 2014 and 2016; and

(iv)       Australia has the second highest level of biodiversity deterioration in the world; and

(d)        numerous other measures, Australia is falling behind and ranks poorly, for instance:

(i)          First Nations Australians have the lowest life expectancy amongst First Nations people globally;

(ii)        Australia now ranks only 8 out of 11 high-income countries for healthcare affordability;

(iii)      Australia now ranks sixth worst in the OECD for obesity rates;

(iv)       Australia’s global ranking for the proportion of women in the lower house of the national parliament fell from a high of thirty-second place in 2010 to forty-eighth place in 2019, noting that only 23 per cent of the entire coalition Government party room are women;

(v)        Australia is ranked sixty-first globally for fixed broadband speeds;

(vi)       investment in research and development in Australia has fallen significantly as a percentage of GDP under the current Government; and

(vii)     Australia has become more corrupt under this Prime Minister, slipping to eleventh place on the Corruption Perception Index;

(3)        acknowledges that with a possible federal election this year, Australians have a right to question:

(a)         how well they are doing under this visionless Government; and

(b)        whose side the Government is on; and

(4)        condemns the Government for spending $1 billion of taxpayer funds on government advertising, racking up over one trillion dollars’ worth of debt with nothing to show for it and wasting the economic recovery.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      18    Renewable energy: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)        welcomes that:

(a)         Australia strengthened its position as a renewable energy powerhouse in 2020; and

(b)        the Clean Energy Regulator estimates that a record 7.0 gigawatts of new renewable capacity was installed in 2020; and

(2)        acknowledges that Australia is a world leader in renewable energy with:

(a)         one in four Australian homes having solar—the highest uptake of household solar in the world; and

(b)        $7.7 billion, or $299 per person, invested in 2020 in renewable energy—placing us ahead of countries like Canada, Germany, Japan, Korea, New Zealand and the United States on a per person basis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      19    Regional Australia White Paper: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Dr Haines —That this House:

(1)        notes that the:

(a)         report, Regions at the Ready: Investing in Australia’s Future , by the House of Representatives Select Committee on Regional Development and Decentralisation, and presented to the House on 28 June 2018, called on the Government to develop, by July 2020, a comprehensive Regional Australia White Paper, following a Green Paper public consultation process;

(b)        Strategic Regional Growth Expert Panel’s report Australia’s Regions: Investing in Their Future , delivered to the Government on 29 March 2019, re-iterated the call for the Government to produce this Regional Australia White Paper by July 2020;

(c)         Government refused to publicly release the Australia’s Regions: Investing in Their Future report for over a year until forced to do so through a Senate order in July 2020;

(d)        Government has made no commitment and no progress to developing such a White Paper and that therefore the Government still lacks any comprehensive strategy for the development of regional Australia;

(e)         Charter of Budget Honesty Act 1998 involves no requirement for the Government to systematically assess the impact of its policies and initiatives on regional Australia; and

(f)          Charter of Budget Honesty Amendment (Rural and Regional Australia Statements) Bill 2021 would establish a requirement for the Treasurer to:

(i)          publicly release and table a rural and regional Australia statement, outlining key challenges and opportunities for rural and regional Australia, with each budget economic and fiscal outlook report and each mid-year economic and fiscal outlook report; and

(ii)        publish a national White Paper for rural and regional Australia within 24 months of the commencement of the Bill; and

(2)        calls on the Government to immediately commence a process for a Regional Australia White Paper, which will:

(a)         involve deep and broad public consultation through a Green Paper process;

(b)        involve cross-parliamentary engagement with a view to securing broad parliamentary support;

(c)         outline a long-term vision for rural and regional Australia to capture significant opportunities including, but not limited to, agriculture, tourism, renewable energy, manufacturing, health and social care, and education and training; and

(d)        be completed, and released publicly, by no later than 1 July 2022.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      20    Ocean management: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs Archer —That this House:

(1)        notes that as an island nation, Australians have a deep affinity to our oceans and waterways and that the ocean shapes our climate and weather, provides us with natural resources, and is essential to our wellbeing;

(2)        acknowledges that when our ocean is protected and sustainably managed, it has the potential to deliver significant economic and social benefits and that by 2025, ocean industries are projected to contribute around $100 billion each year to our economy;

(3)        further notes that the 2020-21 Budget contained a new Oceans Package made up of:

(a)         $14.8 million to tackle the marine impacts of ghost nets and plastic litter;

(b)        $28.3 million to enhance management of Australian marine parks;

(c)         $20 million through the Relief and Recovery Fund to re-establish native oyster reefs at 11 sites across the country; and

(d)        $4.2 million for international blue carbon and rainforest partnerships; and

(4)        commends the Government for reaffirming Australia’s status as a global leader on ocean management.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      21    Out-of-pocket health expenses: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Dr Freelander —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         under this Government, out-of-pocket expense for patients accessing healthcare have soared;

(b)        out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing a general practitioner have increased by 37.18 per cent Australia-wide since the Coalition came into office;

(c)         out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing specialists have increased by 54.14 per cent;

(d)        out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing anaesthetics have increased by 51.84 per cent; and

(e)         out of hospital, out-of-pocket costs for patients accessing radiotherapy and therapeutic nuclear medicine have increased by 195.96 per cent;

(2)        condemns the Government for allowing out-of-pocket health expenses to soar; and

(3)        calls on the Government to act urgently to address the inequity of access to high level healthcare in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      22    Technology Investment Roadmap: Resumption of debate ( from  12 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that Australia’s Technology Investment Roadmap:

(a)         is a comprehensive plan to invest in the technologies we need to bring emissions down, here and around the world;

(b)        will accelerate technologies like hydrogen, carbon capture and storage, soil carbon measurement, low-carbon materials like steel and aluminium and long duration energy storage; and

(c)         will support 130,000 new jobs by 2030 and maintain Australia’s position as a world leading exporter of food, fibre, minerals and energy; and

(2)        welcomes the Government’s focus on technology, not taxes, to secure affordable, reliable energy while at the same time reducing emissions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      23    Territory rights on euthanasia: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of

Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         the Euthanasia Laws Act 1997 (known as the Andrews Bill) amended the Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Act 1988 and the Northern Territory (Self-Government) Act 1978 to deprive these two legislative assemblies of the power to make laws relating to euthanasia;

(b)        the Government of Prime Minister Howard justified this at the time as a constraint on young jurisdictions that were seen to be moving ahead of the broader public mood;

(c)         when the Andrews Bill curtailed the right of territories to make laws relating to euthanasia, no other state or territory legislature had conducted a debate on similar laws;

(d)        polls of public attitudes to doctor-led voluntary assisted dying suggest that support was in the high sixties in the 1980s, in the mid to high seventies in the 1990s, and in the low eighties in the past two decades;

(e)         in recent years all state legislatures have debated legislation around voluntary assisted dying, with Victoria and Western Australia legalising voluntary assisted dying, and New South Wales and South Australia rejecting legalisation, while Queensland and Tasmania have processes ongoing;

(f)          the anachronistic Andrews Bill means that a quarter of a century since it was passed, 700,000 Australians who live in the Northern Territory or the Australian Capital Territory are still unable to participate in a democratic process to resolve community approaches to euthanasia;

(g)        repealing the Andrews Bill would return to territories legal powers that are held by other Australian jurisdictions; and

(h)        restoring territory rights does not direct that either territory legislature should consider legislating on euthanasia, it merely allows them to do so if their properly elected representatives decide it appropriate;

(2)        acknowledges that:

(a)         in each of the last two terms of parliament the Government has blocked debate on private Members’ bills that would restore territory rights; and

(b)        while senators have debated and voted on related legislation, members of the House of Representatives have been prevented from expressing their views on this issue; and

(3)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         explain why, in 2021, two mature legislative jurisdictions are still singled out as unworthy of legislative self-determination;

(b)        commit to introduce legislation into the House of Representatives that would grant territorians legislative equality with Australians in other jurisdictions; and

(c)         restore the right of territories to determine their own laws on euthanasia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      24    Electricity prices: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs Archer —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that under the Government, we have seen:

(a)         a record eight consecutive quarters of year-on-year consumer price index reductions in retail electricity prices; and

(b)        wholesale electricity prices fall for 17 months in a row; and

(2)        welcomes the Government’s strong action to ensure that Australian households and businesses have access to affordable, reliable and secure electricity.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      25    Housing: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Burns —That this House:

(1)        recognises that every Australian should have access to safe and secure housing;

(2)        notes that:

(a)         the rate of home ownership continues to decline due to this Government’s inaction and lack of leadership on federal housing policy;

(b)        the rising cost of rent is pushing more Australians into rental stress;

(c)         more investment in social housing is needed immediately to address the growing waitlists and increasing number of people facing homelessness; and

(d)        the homelessness sector is desperate for more funding to support those needing crisis accommodation, especially women fleeing domestic and family violence; and

(3)        calls on the Government to take responsibility and implement policies that respond to the serious issues facing access to safe and secure housing in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      26    Proposed Joint Select Committee on Oversight of the Implementation of Recommendations of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That:

(1)        a joint select committee, to be known as the Joint Select Committee on Oversight of the Implementation of Recommendations of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety be established to inquire into and report upon:

(a)         the Government response to the recommendations of the Royal Commission, including the development of a new Act to replace the Aged Care Act 1997 and the establishment and operation of a new person-centred Aged Care system which focuses on the safety, health and wellbeing of older people; and

(b)        any matter in relation to the Royal Commission’s recommendations referred to the committee by a resolution of either House of the Parliament;

(2)        the committee present its final report on or before the final sitting day of the 46th Parliament;

(3)        the committee consist of nine members—four senators, and five members of the House of Representatives, as follows:

(a)         two members of the House of the Representatives to be nominated by the Government Whip or Whips;

(b)        two members of the House of Representatives to be nominated by the Opposition Whip or Whips;

(c)         two senators to be nominated by the Leader of the Government in the Senate;

(d)        one senator to be nominated by the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate;

(e)         one senator to be nominated by any minority party or independent senator; and

(f)          one member of the House of Representatives nominated by any minority party or independent member;

(4)        participating members may:

(a)         be appointed to the committee on the nomination of the Government Whip in the House of Representatives, the Opposition Whip in the House of Representatives, the Leader of the Government in the Senate, the Leader of the Opposition in the Senate or any minority party or independent senator or member of the House of Representatives; and

(b)        participate in hearings of evidence and deliberations of the committee, and have all the rights of members of the committee, but may not vote on any questions before the committee;

(5)        every nomination of a member of the committee be notified in writing to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives;

(6)        the members of the committee hold office as a joint select committee until presentation of the committee’s final report or until the House of Representatives is dissolved or expires by effluxion of time, whichever is the earlier;

(7)        the committee may proceed to the dispatch of business notwithstanding that all members have not been duly nominated and appointed and notwithstanding any vacancy;

(8)        the committee elect:

(a)         a Government member as its chair; and

(b)        a non-Government member as its deputy chair who shall act as chair of the committee at any time when the chair is not present at a meeting of the committee; and

(c)         at any time when the chair and deputy chair are not present at a meeting of the committee, the members present shall elect another member to act as chair at that meeting;

(9)        in the event of an equally divided vote, the chair, or the deputy chair when acting as chair, shall have a casting vote;

(10)     three members of the committee constitute a quorum of the committee provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member of either House and one non-Government member of either House;

(11)     the committee have power to:

(a)         appoint subcommittees consisting of three or more of its members, and to refer to any such subcommittee any of the matters which the committee is empowered to examine; and

(b)        appoint the chair of each subcommittee who shall have a casting vote only;

(12)     two members of a subcommittee constitute the quorum of that subcommittee, provided that in a deliberative meeting the quorum shall include one Government member of either House and one non-Government member of either House;

(13)     the committee have power to send for and examine persons and documents, to move from place to place, to sit in public or in private, notwithstanding any prorogation of the Parliament and have leave to report from time to time its proceedings and the evidence taken and such interim recommendations as it may deem fit;

(14)     the committee be provided with all necessary staff, facilities and resources and be empowered to appoint persons with specialist knowledge for the purposes of the committee with the approval of the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives;

(15)     the committee be empowered to print from day to day such papers and evidence as may be ordered by it, and a daily Hansard be published of such proceedings as take place in public;

(16)     the committee have power to adjourn from time to time and to sit during any adjournment of the Senate and the House of Representatives;

(17)     the provisions of this resolution, so far as they are inconsistent with the standing orders, have effect notwithstanding anything contained in the standing orders; and

(18)     a message be sent to the Senate seeking its concurrence in this resolution.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      27    Indigenous tourism: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         Indigenous tourism plays a vital role in supporting businesses, creating jobs and driving economic empowerment of Indigenous Australians;

(b)        the Government’s $40 million Indigenous Tourism Fund announced on Friday, 19 February 2021 will support Indigenous tourism businesses and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community organisations; and

(c)         the establishment of the National Indigenous Tourism Advisory Group will advise the Government on strategic priorities for the growth of Australia’s Indigenous tourism sector in a way which best supports the broader tourism sector’s recovery; and

(2)        recognises and acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s Indigenous culture, country, art and history are unique in today’s competitive international tourism market, and are equally attractive to our domestic audience; and

(b)        employment in the Indigenous tourism sector provides the opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians to stay on country while maintaining and sharing their culture and traditions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      28    Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Bursary: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges the launch of the Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Bursary on 18 March 2021 at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra;

(2)        notes that the bursary is:

(a)         a contribution by members of the Australian-Turkish community to the Gallipoli Scholarship, which supports the descendants of Anzacs to study at university or TAFE; and

(b)        part of the new Ataturk Scholarship, which will support Turkish Australians to study at university or TAFE from 2022; and

(3)        recognises that the donation of this bursary is an act of friendship by Turkish Australians, who have made enormous contributions to our country and community, helping to forge the strong and lasting bond between Australia and Turkey.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      29    Supporting universities: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Martin —That this House:

(1)        notes that the Government is:

(a)         supporting universities through the COVID-19 pandemic and creating more opportunities for young people to study; and

(b)        investing $20 billion in the higher education sector in 2021;

(2)        recognises that $1 billion has been provided to university research this year;

(3)        acknowledges that the Government has provided $903.5 million over the next four years for more domestic places and to ensure our universities are financially stable; and

(4)        congratulates the Government for its Job Ready Graduates package which is providing up to 30,000 additional university places in 2021.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      30    Israeli Palestinian conflict: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         recent violence in Israel and the Palestinian territories has resulted in the deaths of at least 222 Palestinians in Gaza, including 63 children, and 12 Israelis, including two children;

(b)        a ceasefire was declared on 20 May 2021; and

(c)         according to the United Nations, more than 74,000 Palestinians in Gaza were displaced from their homes during the conflict;

(2)        recognises that the impact of this violence is far-reaching, and that many in the Australian community are hurting at this difficult time; and

(3)        calls on the Government to ensure Australia is working constructively to support security and human rights in advance of a just and enduring two-state solution in the Middle East.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      31    Diabetes and insulin: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         2021 marks 100 years since the discovery of insulin by Canadian surgeon Frederick Banting;

(b)        Frederick Banting along with his colleagues Professor John McLeod, medical student Charles Best and researcher Dr James Collip, solved the problem of how extracted insulin could be used to treat a person with diabetes;

(c)         insulin was first administered to a 14 year old boy, Leonard Thompson at the Toronto General Hospital—it was lifesaving for Leonard and for millions of others diagnosed with diabetes over the ensuing years; and

(d)        for their discovery, Banting and McLeod won the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1923 and shared their prize money with Best and Collip;

(2)        recognises that:

(a)         diabetes is a serious and complex metabolic disease that affects the lives of many Australians;

(b)        more than 1.4 million Australians currently have diabetes and are registered with the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS); and

(c)         Australians like Anna Moresby, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a child during World War 2, can live long and productive lives because of the discovery of insulin—Anna has just received a Kellion Victory Medal for living with diabetes for 80 years; and

(3)        acknowledges that:

(a)         the Government has a long-standing commitment to the NDSS, established in 1987, which assists people with diabetes to self-manage their diabetes through provision of subsidised insulin pen needles and pump consumables, glucose monitoring strips, continuous glucose monitors and flash monitors, and important information, resources, education and support programs and other services;

(b)        there has been strong bi-partisan support for the NDSS; and

(c)         since its inception the NDSS supports all people with diabetes all over Australia, including children with type 1 diabetes and families, young adults, women with diabetes in pregnancy and over 450,000 people who currently use insulin to help manage their diabetes.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      32    Volunteer organisations: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of

Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges the almost 6 million Australian volunteers who contribute 600 million hours each year to help others through secular and faith-based volunteering organisations;

(2)        notes that:

(a)         in early 2020, two out of every three volunteers cut back their hours, including many older volunteers who had to self-isolate, leaving charities short by an estimated 12.2 million hours per week; and

(b)        only around one in four volunteer organisations managed to get volunteer participation back to pre-pandemic levels of activity by the start of 2021;

(3)        recognises that while volunteering organisations have been supporting much greater numbers of people in need with fewer resources during the coronavirus pandemic, there was nothing in the Government’s latest budget for volunteers; and

(4)        calls on the Government to get behind our volunteer organisations and make sure they have the resources they need to continue their important work.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      33    Rotary Australia and New Zealand: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that Rotary Australia and New Zealand celebrates its centenary anniversary and first 100 years of service in 2021;

(2)        recognises over 100 years, the strong trust, confidence and worldwide recognition developed through the actions of Rotarians in support of communities;

(3)        notes:

(a)         Rotary’s important work partnering the Global Polio Eradication Initiative and its involvement in the End Trachoma project; and

(b)        there are approximately 30,000 members who belong to one of the 1,052 charter Rotary clubs established throughout Australia; and

(4)        congratulates Rotary on its participation in global initiatives that have fostered peace, changed the world, helped communities and families, and fundamentally made a measurable difference to the unique lives of millions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      34    Consumer protections for travellers: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         the COVID-19 crisis has caused the cancellation or delay of flights and other travel for many Australians;

(b)        many Australians have experienced considerable difficulty in obtaining the refund of monies paid for travel, accommodation and other tourist activities;

(c)         while many travel agents have acted with integrity and fairness, some have not done so; and

(d)        the COVID-19 crisis has exposed the absence of consumer protections for Australian travellers; and

(2)        urges Australian governments to enact legislation that:

(a)         provides consumers with a right to a refund if the service they paid for hasn’t been fulfilled due to situations outside of human control;

(b)        establishes mandatory trust accounts for all travel agents, including online travel agents;

(c)         provides for transparent fee for service for all travel agents with no hidden costs; and

(d)        ensures that supplier terms and conditions are provided to customers by travel agents.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      35    Wage growth: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Coker —That this House:

(1)        recognise that under this Government, Australia has experienced near stagnant wage growth;

(2)        notes that:

(a)         low wages are a deliberate design feature of this Government’s economic policy;

(b)        the budget showed real wages for Australian workers are expected to fall under this Government;

(c)         budget figures show that Australia is wealthier than we expected but there will be no meaningful benefit of that higher wealth to the wages and salaries of Australians; and

(d)        while all Australians deserve a pay rise, women, especially suffer under this Government’s wage-failure due to the enormous 13.4 per cent gender wage gap; and

(3)        calls on the Government to put the Australian people at the centre of their economic decision making and get wages moving again, starting with an increase to the minimum wage.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      36    Defence industry: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         the Government’s $270 billion investment in Australia’s defence capability is creating thousands of jobs and opportunities for small businesses across Australia, particularly in the state of Western Australia;

(b)        it is only because of the Government’s continued investment that we are able to guarantee that the men and women of the Australian Defence Force receive the defence capabilities they need to keep Australians safe; and

(c)         a key pillar of our economic recovery plan to get Australians in jobs is getting more Australian businesses in our defence industry to deliver the essential capability our Defence Force relies on; and

(2)        recognises that because of the support measures the Government has introduced to help Australian defence:

(a)         businesses remain in business and are recovering from COVID-19; and

(b)        our defence industry is not only recovering, but thriving as we come back from the COVID-19 recession.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      37    Reopening Australian borders: Resumption of debate ( from  2 June 2021 —Mr Thistlethwaite, in continuation ) on the motion of Ms Steggall —That this House:

(1)        notes:

(a)         Australia’s borders have been closed for over a year to both inbound and outbound travel as an emergency measure;

(b)        the Government has not disclosed or provided any credible timeline or roadmap to reopen the borders;

(c)         many Australian citizens are struggling with disconnection from family members, partners and loved ones overseas and unable to see one another;

(d)        there has been no extension of travel exemptions to family members or visa holders despite repeated calls;

(e)         many Australian business sectors, like tourism, entertainment, agriculture, universities and industry are pleading for a roadmap to safely reopen the borders; and

(f)          communities and businesses are continually exposed to quarantine leakages and pay the price with lockdowns; and

(2)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         double the capacity of national quarantine facilities using best practice purpose-built facilities such as Howard Springs;

(b)        prioritise expenditure to accelerate the rollout of the vaccine with a goal of achieving vaccination of at least 80 per cent of the population before the end of the year; and

(c)         establish a clear roadmap for safely reopening Australian borders and clearly communicate goals and timeframes by reporting back to this Parliament and the Australian people without delay.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      38    Refugee resettlement: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Burns —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         refugees transferred to Australia from Nauru and Papua New Guinea for medical treatment are still being held in immigration detention centres and alternative places of detention, such as hotels, in Australia;

(b)        many of these individuals have now been detained for over eight years and have suffered significant psychological harm as result of their prolonged and indefinite detention;

(c)         the offshore detention program will cost taxpayers $811 million alone in the 2021-22 financial year despite:

(i)          the impact on the physical and mental health of detainees; and

(ii)        repeated offers to resettle asylum seekers from New Zealand; and

(d)        there is overwhelming community support for the fair and humane treatment of Medevac refugees, including their release from detention, as evidenced by the #TimeForAHome campaign of over 160 civil society groups and organisations; and

(2)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately accept New Zealand’s offer to resettle 150 refugees per year;

(b)        work towards resettling people languishing in indefinite detention; and

(c)         move refugees transferred to Australia from Nauru and Papua New Guinea for medical treatment still being held in immigration detention centres and alternative places of detention into the community recognising that ‘it’s cheaper for people to be in the community than it is to be at a hotel or for us to be paying for them to be in detention and if they’re demonstrated not to be a threat’.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      39    His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)        notes the death of His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh;

(2)        remembers his extraordinary life of service and sacrifice on behalf of the Commonwealth;

(3)        acknowledges his important contribution to Australia, through his visits, patronage of numerous organisations and establishment of the Duke of Edinburgh Awards; and

(4)        offers condolences to Her Majesty The Queen and members of the Royal Family.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      40    Nuclear weapons: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that July 2021 marks the 30th anniversary of South Africa’s dismantling of its nuclear arsenal in early July 1991;

(2)        notes that:

(a)         this represents the only instance in history when a nuclear power has voluntarily renounced nuclear weapons; and

(b)        the decision to create nuclear weapons was made in the early 1980s, and the decision to terminate the program (which then included six weapons) was made by President FW de Klerk in 1989, and implemented over the following years;

(3)        commends South Africa on this momentous decision, which stands as a proud example to other nuclear weapon states; and

(4)        calls on:

(a)         all states that possess nuclear weapons to take measures that will lower the chance of nuclear war, including reducing the size of their stockpiles, taking weapons off hair-trigger alert, installing kill switches in all missiles, and committing to a no-first-use policy; and

(b)        the Government to work in international forums to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      41    In Vitro Fertilisation: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges that 1 in 6 Australian families face difficulty when trying to start a family and for many this is not straightforward;

(2)        notes that this is a very distressing time for couples who face both emotional and financial strain throughout this journey;

(3)        further acknowledges the significant investment made by the Government in helping Australian couples start a family using In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) by:

(a)         the establishment of the Your IVF Website which helps couples navigate the complicated process of IVF, have an informed understanding of their chance of success and enable them to make the right decisions for them; and

(b)        investing $95.9 million for new tests on the Medicare Benefits Schedule for pre-IVF genetic testing for embryos for specific genetic or chromosomal abnormalities prior to implantation and pregnancy; and

(4)        affirms the commitment of the House to help Australian couples achieve their goal of experiencing the joys of parenthood.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      42    Family Law Amendment (A Step Towards a Safer Family Law System) Bill 2020

( Mr Perrett ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 —Mr Ted O’Brien ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      43    Catholic schools: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)        acknowledges the bicentenary of Catholic education in Australia;

(2)        notes that:

(a)         the first official Catholic school was founded by Fr John Therry in Parramatta in 1820;

(b)        Catholic schools have educated millions of Australians over the past 200 years; and

(c)         today, Catholic schools are the largest provider of schooling in Australia (outside of government) educating one in five Australian school-age children; and

(3)        congratulates Catholic schools and their teachers, staff and students on this incredible achievement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      44    Veterans and their families: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Thompson —That this House:

(1)        recognises the service and sacrifice of those who have served in the Australian Defence Force, along with that of their families;

(2)        notes:

(a)         the Government’s 2019 election commitment to establish a network of Veteran Wellbeing Centres in Townsville, Perth, Wodonga, Darwin, Adelaide and Nowra;

(b)        that these centres, which are being developed in partnership with the ex-service community and state governments, will bring together a range of critical services relied upon by veterans and their families, including the health treatment, mental health support, employment and transition assistance and advocacy support; and

(c)         that the Government committed an additional $10.7 million in the 2021-22 Budget towards expansion of the wellbeing centre network into south-east Queensland and Tasmania; and

(3)        acknowledges the critical importance of such partnerships between governments and the ex-service community in supporting the health and wellbeing of Australia’s veterans and their families.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      45    Port of Darwin: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Katter —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         in 2015, the Northern Territory Government foolishly awarded a 99-year lease of the Port of Darwin to Shandong Landbridge Group, a privately held company with ties to the Chinese Government and Communist Party of China; and

(b)        the foreign ownership of the Port of Darwin represents a significant threat to Australia’s strategic interests; and

(2)        calls on the Commonwealth Government to:

(a)         immediately prioritise Australia’s sovereignty and strategic interests;

(b)        take steps to force the immediate sale of the Port of Darwin to an Australian-owned company; and

(c)         ensure that the Port of Darwin stays in the hands of the Australians serving our national interest.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      46    Space industry: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 ) on the motion of Mrs McIntosh —That this House:

(1)        notes that the Government has recognised the value of Australia’s growing space sector by including space as one of the six national priority manufacturing sectors in the $1.5 billion Modern Manufacturing Strategy;

(2)        welcomes the Government’s goal of tripling the space industry by 2030 to $12 billion;

(3)        congratulates the new head of the Australian Space Agency, Mr Enrico Palermo on his appointment and notes his significant industry and corporate experience in the sector;

(4)        commends the Government for enabling Australian businesses to become part of the international space supply chain and have a role in NASA’s Moon to Mars mission; and

(5)        further welcomes the release of the Space Sector Industry Road Map and the opening of grants for this sector under the Modern Manufacturing Initiative’s Translation and Integration streams.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      47    Member for Bowman: Resumption of debate ( from  23 June 2021 —Ms Kearney, in continuation ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)        notes:

(a)         it has now been more than two months since the Member for Bowman said he would step down from all of his parliamentary positions;

(b)        the Member for Bowman remains the Chair of the Standing Committee on Education, Employment and Training, a role for which he is paid an additional amount in the order of $23,000 per annum;

(c)         the Prime Minister and his government have repeatedly voted to protect the Member for Bowman’s position despite the Prime Minister’s acknowledgement that the Member for Bowman’s conduct had been inappropriate; and

(d)        that by protecting the Member for Bowman, the Prime Minister is tacitly endorsing his inappropriate conduct, and the Prime Minster is also putting his own political interests ahead of his responsibility to show leadership; and

(2)        calls on the Prime Minister to unequivocally reject the Member for Bowman’s conduct by ensuring his removal from his lucrative committee chair role.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      48    Labour hire companies: Resumption of debate ( from  18 October 2021 ) on the motion of

Ms Swanson —That this House:

(1)        notes that:

(a)         many Australian workers are being employed by labour hire companies on low wages and without access to entitlements such as annual leave, sick leave and parental leave;

(b)        these workers are often working alongside other workers doing the same job, with the same roster who are employed on higher wages and with access to leave entitlements;

(c)         the use of labour hire to avoid paying fair wages and conditions by Australian companies is growing, particularly in Australia’s mining industry;

(d)        the Federal Court of Australia in the Workpac v Rossato case determined that a worker who was defined as a casual employee by labour hire company Workpac was in fact a full time employee working a full time roster and therefore entitled to leave entitlements; and

(e)         Workpac have appealed this decision in the High Court of Australia and the Government has intervened in the case to support the submission of Workpac that Mr Rossato is a casual employee and should not receive leave entitlements;

(2)        recognises that the increasing use of labour hire companies by employers to avoid paying fair wages and conditions is reducing the incomes of workers and families, and is having a detrimental impact on their livelihoods, particularly in regional Australia; and

(3)        calls on the Government to support Labor’s policy and legislation in the Parliament that will ensure workers who do the same job receive the same pay

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      49    Black Spot Program: Resumption of debate ( from  18 October 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)        notes the vital nature of Black Spot Program (BSP) funding in reducing death and serious injury on Australian roads;

(2)        recognises that BSP projects target those road locations where crashes are occurring, which are a major cost to Australians every year;

(3)        commends the Government for its extensive commitment to road safety through infrastructure investment, by providing $1.1 billion to the BSP from 2013-14 to 2023-24, with an ongoing commitment of $110 million each year following; and

(4)        acknowledges research from the Bureau of Infrastructure and Transport Research Economics that the Government’s BSP reduces death and serious injury from crashes by 30 per cent, on average at treated sites.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      50    Youth mental health services: Resumption of debate ( from  18 October 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Templeman —That this House:

(1)        notes with dismay that suicide is the leading cause of death among Australians aged 15 to 24 years;

(2)        recognises that for young people the decision to access mental health care is fragile, and if they do not have a positive experience they may not make another attempt to seek help;

(3)        further notes that youth-friendly mental health services are not available uniformly to young people; and

(4)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         increase access to effective mental health services and supports for young people across all stages of mental ill-health; and

(b)        build a youth mental health workforce to meet the current and future needs

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      51    Integrity commission: Resumption of debate ( from  18 October 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Wilkie —That this House:

(1)        notes that the:

(a)         Government has failed to establish a strong independent federal integrity commission, and on 8 September 2021 it will be 1,000 days since the Prime Minister promised to pass legislation to create one; and

(b)        Government’s proposed Commonwealth Integrity Commission is half-baked, creating the weakest watchdog in the country with hearings for all politicians and public servants held behind closed doors, no transparency on findings and penalties for whistle-blowers; and

(2)        calls on the Government to:

(a)         abandon its deeply unpopular Commonwealth Integrity Commission proposal which in its current form is beyond effective amendment and should be scrapped;

(b)        establish a strong, well-funded, wide-ranging and independent integrity commission through the Australian Federal Integrity Commission Bill put forward by the Member for Indi that can launch its own inquiries into criminal, corrupt and unethical behaviour by politicians and their staff, hold public hearings and make public findings; and

(c)         commit to passing such legislation as a matter of urgency.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      52    Australian Reading Hour: Resumption of debate ( from  18 October 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)        recognises that:

(a)         books can be an escape from the worries of everyday life;

(b)        reading reduces stress by 68 per cent;

(c)         reading makes your world bigger and makes more things possible;

(d)        literacy and reading are tools that can help you achieve your goals and help others;

(e)         reading helps your mind grow;

(f)          by reading other people’s stories you can walk in their shoes; and

(g)        books build empathy, connection and help you feel less lonely;

(2)        notes that:

(a)         the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted many literary activities;

(b)        major writers’ festivals have been interrupted;

(c)         schools have moved to online learning for weeks at a time; and

(d)        libraries and adult education forums around the country closed their doors to in-person attendees; and

(3)        acknowledges:

(a)         Tuesday, 14 September 2021 is Australian Reading Hour and this year’s theme is Stories that Matter;

(b)        Australian Reading Hour is in its tenth year and is a showcase for Australia Reads; and

(c)         Australian Reading Hour highlights the importance of reading in transforming lives.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )

      53    Australian Defence Force Cadets: Resumption of debate ( from  18 October 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House notes that:

(1)        membership of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) Cadets:

(a)         gives young people the opportunity to be members of a team, develop their skills as leaders and develop an individual’s capacity to contribute to society; and

(b)        fosters an interest in Defence Force careers, and is important in developing ongoing support for Defence; and

(2)        ADF Cadets contribute greatly to the community and Australian society.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 25 October 2021. )