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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

The Federation Chamber meets at 4 pm

 

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Appropriation Bill (No. 3) 2016-2017 ( Assistant Minister to the Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  23 March 2017 —Mr Pasin ).

         2    Appropriation Bill (No. 4) 2016-2017 ( Assistant Minister to the Treasurer ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  9 February 2017 —Mr Giles ).

       3    Last veterans’ mission to Korea—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 22 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS

Orders of the day

     *1    Agriculture and Water Resources—Standing Committee Safe keeping: Inquiry into the biosecurity of Australian honey bees —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr R. J. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS— continued

Orders of the day continued

         4    address in reply to the governor-general’s speech : Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2017 ) on the proposed Address in Reply.

      *5    Death of the Honourable Ian Louis Robinson Condolence Motion: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 Mr Pyne ) on the motion of Mr Turnbull .

       6    Agreement to amend the Singapore-Australia Free Trade Agreement—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2017—Mr Falinski ) on the motion of Mr Ciobo —That the House take note of the document.

       7    Recent military commemorations—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2017—Mr Crewther ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

       8    Closing the Gap—Prime Minister’s Report 2017—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr C. A. S. Laundy —That the House take note of the document.

       9    Auditor-General—Audit report No. 38 of 2016-2017—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 15 February 2017—Mr Albanese, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

      10    Domestic and family violence: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2016 —Mr Littleproud ) on the motion of Mr Turnbull —That the Parliament:

(1)         acknowledge that violence against women is a national issue that requires a whole of community response;

(2)         acknowledge Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 34 times more likely to experience violence;

(3)         call on all men to take action, call out violence, and link arms and say ‘No More’ to domestic violence; and

(4)         stand united in its commitment to eliminate violence against women.

     11    Infrastructure—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 30 November 2016—Mr Morton ) on the motion of Mr Fletcher —That the House take note of the document.

     12    Investment—Working in the national interest—Ministerial statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 24 November 2016—Mr Drum ) on the motion of Mr Ciobo —That the House take note of the document.

     13    National Security—Ministerial Statement—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 23 November 2016—Mr Drum ) on the motion of Ms Ley —That the House take note of the document.

      14    Equal rights for all Australians: Resumption of debate ( from  23 November 2016 —Mr Alexander ) on the motion of Mr Turnbull —That this House: 

(1)         reaffirms its commitment to the right of all Australians to enjoy equal rights and be treated with equal respect regardless of race, colour, creed or origin;

(2)         reaffirms its commitment to maintaining an immigration policy wholly non-discriminatory on grounds of race, colour, creed or origin;

(3)         reaffirms its commitment to the process of reconciliation with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, in the context of redressing their profound social and economic disadvantage;

(4)         reaffirms its commitment to maintaining Australia as a culturally diverse, tolerant and open society, united by an overriding commitment to our nation, and its democratic institutions and values; and

(5)         denounces racial intolerance in any form as incompatible with the kind of society we are and want to be.

     15    National security—Statement by the Prime Minister, 1 September 2016—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 12 September 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Pyne —That the House take note of the document.

      16    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  21 March 2017 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS— continued

Orders of the day continued

       2    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Living with fruit bats: Inquiry into flying-fox management in the eastern states —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 21 March 2017— Ms M. M. H. King ) on the motion of Mr Broad —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       3    Human Rights—Parliamentary Joint Committee Freedom of speech in Australia: Inquiry into the operation of Part IIA of the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth) and related procedures under the Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 (Cth) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 1 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Goodenough —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       4    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 165: Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 February 2017— Mr Hastie ) on the motion of Mr Robert —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       5    Infrastructure, Transport and Cities—Standing Committee Harnessing value, delivering infrastructure: Inquiry into the role of transport connectivity on stimulating development and economic activity —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 February 2017— Mr Hastie ) on the motion of Mr Alexander —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       6    Economics—Standing Committee Report on the inquiry into home ownership —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 February 2017— Mr Gee ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       7    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 167: Nuclear Cooperation-Ukraine; Extradition-China —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 7 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Robert —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       8    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the four major banks: First report —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 30 November 2016— Dr McVeigh ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

       9    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority annual report 2015 (Second report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2016 )on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

     10    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission annual report 2015 (Second report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

     11    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission annual report 2015 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 22 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

     12    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 163: Paris Agreement, Kyoto Protocol—Doha Amendment —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Robert —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

     13    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Reserve Bank of Australia annual report 2015 (Second report) —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 8 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Coleman —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Orders of the day

      *1    Illegal firearms trafficking: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 —Ms O’Neil, in continuation ) on the motion of Mr Goodenough —That this House:

(1)         notes that while Australia has some of the strongest firearm controls in the world, illicit firearms continue to remain a threat to community safety;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government has:

(a)         introduced legislation which doubles the maximum penalties for firearms trafficking offences, including mandatory minimum sentences of five years imprisonment;

(b)         invested:

                                                          (i)       $88 million to increase screening and examination of international mail, air and sea cargo to detect illicit firearms and firearms parts at our borders; and

                                                        (ii)       $116 million in the National Anti-Gangs Squad which has been successful in getting illegal guns off our streets; and

(c)         provided an additional $25.4 million to fund the expansion of the Australian Federal Police’s (AFP’s) National Forensics Rapid Lab to enhance the AFP’s capacity to detect and seize illegal firearms and target the criminal syndicates that peddle them;

(3)         notes that the Australian Labor Party and the Australian Greens have opposed mandatory minimum sentences for illegal firearms trafficking; and

(4)         calls on Members to support tougher sentences for illegal firearms trafficking, including the need for mandatory minimum sentences.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *2    Hazelwood power station closure: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the Hazelwood power station is scheduled to close on 26 March 2017;

(b)         its closure will affect 750 direct jobs in Gippsland;

(c)         unemployment is already at 8.1 per cent in the Latrobe Valley;

(d)         the Victorian Government has created a $266 million transition package for workers affected by the Hazelwood closure; and

(e)         the Australian Government has only contributed $43 million to this transition package;

(2)         acknowledges that government plays an important role in creating policy settings to attract new investment and jobs, both in the Latrobe Valley and across regional Australia in general;

(3)         condemns the Australian Government’s:

(a)         inaction in not meeting with affected workers; and

(b)         failure to act in setting policies that give business the confidence to invest and create jobs; and

(4)         calls on Australian Government Ministers to meet with affected workers and their unions and to start investing in industry and jobs across regional Australia in the upcoming federal budget.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *3    Australia and United States alliance relationship: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         notes that a simple resolution is currently before the United States Senate in the name of Senator Benjamin Cardin of Maryland and 13 other United States Senators reaffirming a strong commitment to the United States-Australia alliance relationship;

(2)         reaffirms the strong alliance relationship between Australia and the United States;

(3)         supports continued diplomatic, military and economic cooperation between Australia and the United States; and

(4)         reaffirms the importance of a United States-Australia relationship based on mutual respect befitting a close and longstanding alliance partner crucial to the preservation of Australia’s national interests in the Asia-Pacific region and around the world.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *4    Proposed Minister for Young People: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the first Minister for Employment and Youth Affairs was appointed by the Fraser Government in 1978;

(b)         subsequent Labor and Coalition Australian Governments have appointed Ministers with a portfolio concerned with youth, and the Howard Government had three different Ministers who held the youth affairs portfolio;

(c)         in 2013 the Abbott Government abolished the youth portfolio;

(d)         in May 2014, the Government advised it was planning a ‘focused and targeted approach’ to consult with young people, yet this year is likely to have the last National Youth Week with no funding in the forward estimates;

(e)         the Deloitte 2017 Millennial Survey suggests that young people struggle to engage with major political parties—not having a Youth Minister acts as a clear signal that engagement with young people is not a priority for this Government; and

(f)          Australia’s youth unemployment and underemployment are an increasingly systemic concern, with the current youth unemployment rate sitting at 13.3 per cent and the youth underemployment rate sitting at 18.3 per cent; and

(2)         calls on the Government to appoint a Minister for Young People, sitting within the Cabinet, having a particular focus on youth engagement, youth employment and transition to work.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *5    Victoria and law and order: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Crewther —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Victorian Labor Government was elected on 29 November 2014 and the Premier was sworn in on 4 December 2014;

(b)         the Premier:

                                                          (i)       in his election platform stated: ‘More young people are turning to a life of crime. Crime has increased every year...Courts and prison systems are under huge pressure’; and

                                                        (ii)       took only one promise to that election in regards to law and order—$148.6 million to free up some of the 400 officers who supervise prisoners in holding cells;

(c)         since being elected, the Victorian Government has seen prison riots, millions of dollars in damage to prison facilities, and a total loss of control over the justice system;

(d)         when the Premier was elected, the crime rate was 7,869 offences per 100,000 Victorians, and Victoria’s crime rate two years later is now 8,975 offences per 100,000 Victorians;

(e)         between October 2015 and September 2016 this crime rate includes 12.6 per cent more assaults, 21.5 per cent more robberies, 13.7 per cent more burglaries and break and enters, 17.5 per cent more thefts, and 75.3 per cent more justice procedures;

(f)          the Victorian Government is unable to control the criminals in prison let alone the criminals on the streets of Victoria; and

(g)         under the Victorian Government, Victorians are just less safe;

(2)         further notes that the Australian Government supports the fight against crime in Victoria, more broadly and specifically in the electoral division of Dunkley, through measures such as $925,150 from the Safer Streets Programme (SSP);

(3)         calls on:

(a)         the Federal Opposition to support measures that allow the Government to achieve savings to ensure even more funding for programmes like the SSP; and

(b)         Members of the Victorian Parliament to ensure that Victoria has stronger policies on law and order including less bail and more jail for criminals who would pose a risk to the community; and

(4)         condemns the Victorian Government for a lack of action on law and order and failing to protect Victorians.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *6    Global Gag Rule: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Global Gag Rule (GGR), as implemented by the United States, will prove detrimental to millions of women and girls around the world;

(b)         the GGR has expanded to an unprecedented degree, applying to 15 times more funding as a consequence of its extension into all global health funding, which will result in roughly $9.5 billion dollars in global health funding being affected;

(c)         the GGR will result in the targeting of some of the most effective health organisations in the world, operating in 60 low and middle income countries;

(d)         a study by researchers at Stanford University found that after the GGR came into effect in 2001, the abortion rate increased sharply in sub-Saharan African countries that had been dependent on such funding;

(e)         the funding cuts will likely prevent many global health organisations from offering HIV prevention and treatment services, maternal health care and even Zika virus prevention; and

(f)          it is possible that as many as 21,700 maternal deaths could occur in the next four years as a consequence of this executive order, which is in addition to 6.5 million unintended pregnancies and 2.1 million unsafe abortions from 2017 to 2020, according to Marie Stopes International;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         when Labor was in government, overseas development assistance increased from 0.28 per cent of Gross National Income in 2007-08 to 0.37 per cent in 2013-14, and was on track to reach 0.50 per cent in 2017-18; and

(b)         under the Coalition, development assistance is now just 0.23 per cent of national income, the lowest level since comparable records began in the 1970s, and well below the OECD average of 0.30 per cent; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to join the Dutch, Belgian, Swedish and Canadian governments in filling the gap in development assistance funding left by the United States Government’s imposition of the GGR.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *7    Supporting small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Evans —That this House:

(1)         recognises that the last two budgets demonstrate the Government’s achievements in supporting small businesses;

(2)         notes that the Government has delivered:

(a)         a Ten Year Enterprise Tax Plan to reduce the tax rate to 27.5 per cent, commencing on 1 July 2016, with the tax rate to progressively reduce to 25 per cent by 1 July 2026, noting that the lower rate will apply to businesses with annual turnover of less than $10 million from 1 July 2016;

(b)         an immediate tax deduction for small businesses when purchasing assets up to $20,000;

(c)         a more than $4.8 billion reduction in red tape and compliance costs for business;

(d)         simplified business activity statement reporting requirements to reduce compliance costs for small business;

(e)         improved access to digital services for small businesses through the rollout and pilot of the Single Touch Payroll system; and

(f)          an extension of the unfair contract term provisions to create a level playing field for small businesses when entering standard form contracts;

(3)         acknowledges the Government’s efforts to boost innovation, open markets and grow businesses through:

(a)         delivering the $1.1 billion National Innovation and Science Agenda, which includes key measures to promote a dynamic culture of entrepreneurship, changes to insolvency reform and access to finance;

(b)         signing new trade agreements with Korea, Japan, China and Singapore and committing resources to help small and medium businesses access new export opportunities;

(c)         creating an advocate for small business with the appointment of the Australian Small Business and Family Enterprise Ombudsman in March 2016;

(d)         strengthening our competition laws to protect small businesses against anticompetitive

behaviour and the misuse of market power;

(e)         helping small businesses gain greater access to finance through innovative solutions and diverse funding options with the release of the Fintech statement; and

(f)          making it easier for small businesses to access Commonwealth procurement opportunities; and

(4)         encourages the Government to continue to pursue cutting red tape and compliance costs while implementing a rigorous policy agenda which supports Australian small businesses.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *8    Penalty rates and low paid workers: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Lamb —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are over 90,000 people employed in the accommodation sector of the hospitality industry and many of these are women;

(b)         full time workers will have their take home pay cut because of the Fair Work Commission’s (FWC’s) decision to cut Sunday and public holiday penalty rates for the hospitality award;

(c)         the base wage for a Level 1 guest service worker is less than $700 a week;

(d)         the cut to Sunday penalty rates for these workers is $4.55 an hour, which is more than a fortnight’s pay per year; and

(e)         those affected are among our most industrially powerless workers in the economy and they have been made poorer;

(2)         condemns Government Members and Senators who called for cuts to penalty rates and their continuous pressuring of the FWC to reduce penalty rates; and

(3)         calls on:

(a)         Government Members and Senators to stand with Labor to protect low paid workers take home pay; and

(b)         the House to support Labor’s Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take Home Pay) Bill 2017, to amend the Fair Work Act 2009 .

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      *9    Water infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms M. L. Landry —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Government is committed to providing water infrastructure to increase agricultural production and irrigation potential across Australia;

(b)         the Australian Government has committed funding to the following projects, which are examples of how the Coalition is serious about jobs and growth in this country, promising:

                                                          (i)       $130 million to cover 50 per cent of the cost of building Rookwood Weir, near Rockhampton, with a further $2 million to ensure that the Queensland Government can complete the final business case required for Rookwood to proceed;

                                                        (ii)       $225,000 to secure water infrastructure for Clermont and Theresa Creek Dam in Queensland; and

                                                       (iii)       $3 million towards a feasibility study for Urannah Dam near Mackay in Queensland, benefiting an area from Eungella to Collinsville and the northern tropics;

(2)         notes the failure of Federal Labor and Queensland Labor to financially commit to projects such as Rookwood Weir; and

(3)         commends the Australian Government for recognising the potential of Australia by investing in water infrastructure.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

    *10    Multiculturalism: Resumption of debate ( from  27 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australia has had a policy on multiculturalism since 1973; and

(b)         Australia’s multicultural policy demonstrates our shared values and cultural traditions and complements our national characteristics of equality and a fair go for all;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         our diversity:

                                                          (i)       makes us a richer, more vibrant and creative country; and

                                                        (ii)       brings economic and social benefits and gives us a competitive edge in a globalised world;

(b)         multiculturalism:

                                                          (i)       is in our best interest and speaks to fairness and inclusion; and

                                                        (ii)       enhances respect and support for cultural, religious and linguistic diversity;

(c)         we are committed to a just, inclusive and socially cohesive society where everyone can participate in the opportunities our country offers;

(d)         promoting understanding and acceptance is important;

(e)         racism is harmful to individuals and to the community; and

(f)          racist behaviour should not be tolerated in a civil society; and

(3)         calls on the Government to reaffirm its commitment to Australia’s culturally diverse and socially cohesive society and to condemn those who are actively seeking to incite division. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      11    Queensland infrastructure : Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         denounces the Queensland Government’s underinvestment in infrastructure throughout the state;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Queensland Government:

                                                          (i)       has savagely cut infrastructure spending in Queensland, sapping confidence and costing jobs; and

                                                        (ii)       slashed infrastructure spending by more than $2 billion in its first year in office;

(b)         over the next four years, infrastructure spending has been cut by almost $3 billion; and

(c)         the Queensland Government:

                                                          (i)       has not funded one new major infrastructure project in two years in office; and

                                                        (ii)       is more interested in political point scoring than working collaboratively with the Australian Government on new infrastructure projects; and

(3)         calls on the Queensland Government to reverse this concerning trend and deliver infrastructure that the people of Queensland require and the Queensland economy desperately needs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      12    Citizenship applications: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that Australian citizenship is precious and the community must have confidence that the Australian Citizenship Act 2007 is administered fairly, impartially and with integrity;

(b)         that the law provides that Australian citizenship by conferral is available to everyone who meets the legislated criteria, regardless of visa class; and

(c)         the enormous, inexplicable and unconscionable delays by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection in processing thousands of citizenship applications;

(2)         acknowledges the devastating impact of delays and uncertainty on affected people, whose lives are in limbo, whose mental health is suffering, who are often unable to travel and who have been separated from their family for many years;

(3)         notes the Federal Court of Australia in BMF v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2016] case which:

(a)         found that there had been unreasonable delays in the department’s processing of citizenship applications of two men on protection visas who had been waiting 18 months and 23 months, respectively;

(b)         received evidence from the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection that more than 10,000 applications requiring ‘further assessment’ were outstanding as of July 2016, yet only 12 officers in the department were even trained to assess these applications; and

(c)         noted that the evidence provided suggested that something beyond resourcing of the citizenship program had caused very significant delays, and that the possibility of applications being ordered by reference to an ‘unreasonable rationale’ could not be excluded; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         admit to and apologise for these delays;

(b)         take immediate action to process the full backlog of citizenship applications this year; and

(c)         publicly assure affected people and the wider community that the citizenship function will be administered fairly, impartially and expeditiously in the future.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      13    Small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are 2.1 million small businesses in Australia, accounting for 97 per cent of businesses in Australia;

(b)         the small business sector employs almost five million Australians;

(c)         Australia’s small businesses are at their best when Australians shop locally;

(d)         the Government has:

                                                          (i)       a plan to cut taxes for Australia’s small businesses;

                                                        (ii)       backed small business with access to the $20,000 instant asset write-off programme;

                                                       (iii)       a plan to increase by 90,000, the number of small businesses to which this programme applies; and

                                                      (iv)       levelled the playing field for small businesses online through changes to GST on purchases from overseas; and

(e)         small business confidence was at a six-year high in January 2017; and

(2)         calls on all Australians to:

(a)         continue to support Australia’s small business sector by shopping locally;

(b)         use local providers of goods and services—including those online—to drive future job creation, higher wages and better opportunities for Australians;

(c)         take advantage of changes to Australia’s Country of Origin labelling system to buy Australian products; and

(d)         think local first with every dollar they spend.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      14    Penalty rates and retail workers: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr B. K. Mitchell —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the retail trade industry is the second largest employment category in Australia;

(b)         one third of workers in the retail trade industry are between 15 to 24 years of age;

(c)         the Fair Work Commission’s (FWC’s) decision to cut penalty rates in the retail trade will disproportionately affect young people;

(d)         the take home pay of young retail workers will be severely hit as a result of the FWC’s decision to cut Sunday and public holiday penalty rates for young retail workers;

(e)         cutting penalty rates for young retail workers increases cost of living pressures as many are studying during the week; and

(f)          young retail workers will have to work longer hours for the same pay, with less time to study;

(2)         condemns Government Members and Senators who called for cuts to penalty rates and their continuous pressuring of the FWC to reduce penalty rates; and

(3)         calls on:

(a)         Government Members and Senators to stand with Labor to protect low paid workers take home pay; and

(b)         the House to support Labor’s Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Take Home Pay) Bill 2017, to amend the Fair Work Act 2009 .

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      15    Trade unions: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Mr L. S. O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the findings of the Royal Commission into Trade Union Governance and Corruption, which found ‘widespread and deep-seated’ misconduct by union officials;

(2)         recognises the outstanding work of the Trade Union Joint Police Taskforce (Taskforce) in NSW, Queensland, Victoria and the ACT, which are investigating 34 referrals of alleged criminal breaches from the Royal Commission;

(3)         calls on the Queensland Government to overturn the decision to withdraw from participating in the Taskforce; and

(4)         condemns the Queensland Government and Australian Labor Party for putting their union mates before Queensland’s lowest paid and most vulnerable workers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      16    Rakhine State in Myanmar: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         commends the work funded by the Australian Development Assistance program through bilateral, multilateral and non-government organisation partners like Save the Children, to strengthen governance, democracy and vulnerable communities across Myanmar;

(2)         is cognisant of and concurs with international concern about the marginalisation and displacement of Muslims in Rakhine State in Myanmar, particularly since 2012;

(3)         expresses its grave concern about the coordinated attacks on Border Guard Police posts of 9 October 2016, at three locations in northern Rakhine State, and:

(a)         offers its condolences to the families of the nine police officers who were killed and to the Myanmar people;

(b)         abhors the violence and the theft of guns and ammunition; and

(c)         asserts that those responsible for such a heinous crime should be brought to justice;

(4)         observes also that in the interests of democracy, peace, security and human rights, the rule of law should be upheld in Rakhine State, and calls on security forces to conduct security operations in a manner that does not marginalise or displace people in Rakhine State;

(5)         notes:

(a)         the very real risk that excessive use of force may have on the effect of radicalising and further marginalising the Muslim community in Rakhine State, increasing conflict and hampering efforts to achieve peaceful outcomes; and

(b)         with deep concern, the report on 3 February 2017 from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on reported human rights violations occurring in northern Rakhine State;

(6)         acknowledges:

(a)         the national-level bodies established to investigate reports of human rights abuses in northern Rakhine State and urges them to undertake credible, thorough and impartial investigations;

(b)         the work of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar, and commends the Myanmar State Counsellor (MSC) for meeting with the Special Rapporteur; and

(c)         also the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State, and commends the MSC for having established that Commission; and

(7)         calls upon the civilian government, military, and parliament of Myanmar to redouble their efforts to end the marginalisation and displacement of Muslims in Rakhine State, and to seek to create conditions in which all residents of Rakhine State can live peacefully, can have access to education and healthcare, and can have freedom of movement.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      17    Coal industry: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms M. L. Landry —That this House notes that:

(1)         the Australian coal industry plays a vital role in the creation of jobs and investment in this country, particularly in central Queensland;

(2)         coal-fired power stations have an ongoing role in Australia in ensuring consistent, affordable and safe supply of electricity for all Australians;

(3)         while acknowledging the current and future growth of renewable energy sources in Australia, energy sourced from coal will continue to be a major contributor to our national energy output for the foreseeable future; and

(4)         major resource company directors in Australia have flagged concerns that a lack of ‘energy security’ in Australia would make major minerals and resources projects unviable, deterring future international investment and harming jobs and growth.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      18    International Women’s Day: Resumption of debate ( from  20 March 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that International Women’s Day:

(a)         was celebrated on Thursday 8 March, with this year’s theme being Be Bold for Change; and

(b)         is an important time to reflect on Australia’s achievements in advancing gender equality, but also recommit to action to break through remaining barriers, including:

                                                          (i)       gender pay inequity, which has remained unbalanced for two decades and currently sits at 17 per cent;

                                                        (ii)       representation of women in leadership, with gender equality in the Federal Parliament not likely to be achieved until 2046 on the current trajectory; and

                                                       (iii)       violence against women, which results in one Australian woman being killed by a partner or former partner on average every week; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         stand up for female workers and oppose cuts to penalty rates that will exacerbate the existing gender pay gap;

(b)         abandon plans to cut Paid Parental Leave which will see 70,000 new mothers worse off each year;

(c)         rule out cuts to women’s refuges currently funded through the National Affordable Housing Agreement; and

(d)         abandon cuts to community legal centres that assist women and children escaping family violence.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      19    Funding for schools: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Plibersek —That this House:

(1)         notes the Government’s failure in school education policy, including:

(a)         a cut of $30 billion from schools ( Budget 2014-15 Overview , 13 May 2014, page 7), breaking an election promise to match Labor’s funding plan dollar for dollar;

(b)         a proposal to cut all federal funding from public schools; and

(c)         tearing up agreements negotiated by the previous Labor Government, that required states and territories to:

                                                          (i)       maintain and grow their funding for schools, in return for increased Commonwealth funding; and

                                                        (ii)       improve teaching quality, literacy and numeracy; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         urgently share a detailed plan for future funding of our schools, including the funding each state, system and school will receive from 2018 onwards;

(b)         reverse the cut of $30 billion from schools;

(c)         explain why they tore up agreements that required states and territories to increase funding for schools as Commonwealth contributions increased, and improve teaching, literacy and numeracy; and

(d)         prioritise funding for disadvantaged schools and introduce a proper students with disabilities loading, so all schools and students have the resources they need for a great education.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      20    Remembrance Day: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on Friday 11 November, Australia commemorates Remembrance Day;

(b)         the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month is a significant anniversary for this country as it signifies the ending of a war where over 60,000 Australians lost their lives;

(c)         of these 60,000, over 16,900 Australians remain unknown or unaccounted for on the Western Front;

(d)         it is on Remembrance Day that the body of an unknown Australian soldier from the Western Front was laid to rest in the Hall of Memories at the Australian War Memorial; and

(e)         in July 2016 six formerly unknown Australian soldiers were given headstone dedications at the Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) Military Cemetery;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         that many communities across the country pause to remember the sacrifice of Australian service men and women; and

(b)         the significance of this day to all unknown Australians killed in action; and

(3)         notes that during the ‘Century of Service’ that is occurring between 2014 and 2018 Australians are given a chance to remember the service and sacrifice of all who fought during World War I.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      21    Queensland Working Women’s Service: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Ms T. M. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes the decision of the Fair Work Ombudsman not to fund the work of the Queensland Working Women’s Service (QWWS) for vulnerable workers;

(2)         recognises that the QWWS has:

(a)         been providing free, specialist information, advice and representation to vulnerable women about work related problems since 1994;

(b)         assisted thousands of women to access information, advice and advocacy in relation to employment matters or concerns, including over 4,000 specialist advisory sessions to vulnerable workers during 2016; and

(c)         negotiated over $770,000 by way of settlements for outstanding entitlements or compensation for alleged breaches of industrial and discrimination laws for clients during the 2016 financial year; and

(3)         recognises the important work that the QWWS has been providing to vulnerable Queensland women for over 20 years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      22    People with disability: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mrs Sudmalis —That this House:

(1)         recognises the important work being done in Australia to support people with disability;

(2)         celebrates the winners of the Tenth National Disability Awards 2016; and

(3)         notes that International Day of People with Disability was on Saturday 3 December 2016.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      23    Australian aid: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges Australia’s important role in building a fairer and more equal world through its contribution to international aid;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         while the global community is making progress towards ending poverty, hunger and the worst epidemics, global inequality remains a problem with many millions still living in extreme poverty;

(b)         challenges such as the threat of global unrest and conflict, human slavery, refugees, terrorism and radicalisation, mass migration, humanitarian crises and climate change, all require global solutions and cooperation;

(c)         Australian aid makes a significant contribution to addressing the root causes of conflict, helps prevent the factors that drive people to seek asylum and helps create stronger democracies, stable states and strengthen communities and economies; and

(d)         nations that were once aid recipients such as China and South Korea now have fewer people living in extreme poverty and are now major economies and trading partners for Australia; and

(3)         acknowledges the continuing need for Australian aid to increase to advance our common goal to eliminate poverty around the world in line with the United Nations Millennium Development Goals signed by former Prime Minister John Howard in 2000, and reconfirmed by the Minister for Foreign Affairs through the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals in 2015.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      24    Poverty: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hart —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         poverty is an ongoing and serious problem in Australia;

(b)         recent figures by ACOSS found that 13.3 per cent of the population is living below the poverty line of 50 per cent of median household income;

(c)         Tasmania has the highest proportion of Australians living in poverty;

(d)         poverty among Australians is on the rise and is a consequence of structural inequality;

(e)         despite Australia’s extensive and well-targeted social safety net, over 2.5 million Australians continue to face serious financial hardship, impacting their quality of life;

(f)          the gap between rich and poor in Australia has been steadily rising—since 1975, earnings have risen three times as fast for the top tenth of wage earners as for the bottom tenth;

(g)         poverty is associated with worse health and education outcomes and a higher risk of exposure to both violence and prison; and

(h)         the government’s cuts to welfare payments and inaction on housing affordability and equitable tax reform are likely to increase Australia’s poverty and inequality levels; and

(2)         calls on the Government to explain to the House how it intends to reduce inequality and poverty in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      25    National Stronger Regions Fund and Western Australia: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Ms Marino —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on the success of the National Stronger Regions Fund (NSRF);

(2)         acknowledges the significant and positive impact that the NSRF is having in rural, remote and disadvantaged regions around Australia; and

(3)         notes that the:

(a)         Government is investing $66,336,110 in 34 projects around Western Australia under 3 rounds of the NSRF; and

(b)         NSRF is delivering infrastructure projects to create jobs in regional areas, improve community facilities and support stronger and more sustainable communities across Western Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      26    Automotive production: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House:

(1)         notes that on:

(a)         20 October 2017 General Motors Holden will end automotive production at the Elizabeth plant; and

(b)         3 October 2017 Toyota will end automotive production at the Altona plant; and

(2)         acknowledges the devastating impact the end of automotive production in Australia will have on:

(a)         workers and their families;

(b)         the communities around Elizabeth and Altona;

(c)         support industries;

(d)         the national economy, and in particular the economies of South Australia and Victoria; and

(e)         Australian manufacturing as a whole.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      27    Australia and the European Union: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the ‘EU-Australia Leadership Forum’ was launched by Minister Bishop at Parliament House on 18 October 2016 following the European Union in Brussels, presented by Minister Bishop and European Union High Representative Federica Mogherini on 8 September 2016;

(b)         the Forum will bring together a broad representation of talented individuals in government, business, academic and civil society from both Australia and the European Union to discuss common challenges and opportunities;

(c)         Australia and the European Union are liberal democracies that share unwavering commitment to the rule of law and open markets to secure peace and prosperity for their citizens; and

(d)         the Australian Government intends to encourage closer economic cooperation with the European Union through the negotiation of a European Union-Australia Free Trade Agreement; and

(2)         welcomes these positive developments in the European Union-Australia relationship.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      28    Wodonga-Melbourne rail line: Resumption of debate ( from  27 February 2017 ) on the motion of Ms McGowan —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         for more than eight years, regional communities in northeast Victoria have been frustrated by significant engineering failings on the Wodonga-Melbourne rail line;

(b)         in 2016 the trains were on time 79.7 per cent of the time, with the rate dropping to 55.2 per cent in November, the train now takes half an hour longer to get from Southern Cross to Albury than 10 years ago;

(c)         the Australian Rail Track Corporation (ARTC) maintains that it is meeting performance obligations under the terms of the 44 year lease agreement with the Victorian Government and under its charter;

(d)         the ARTC has spent $134 million on remediation works that have not improved passenger rail services, with trains regularly slowed or replaced by buses; and

(e)         the current arrangements are not meeting the need for reliable passenger rail services, instead regional communities are viewed as freight corridors; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government:

(a)         as the sole shareholder of the ARTC, to update the ARTC Statement of Corporate Intent to ensure that passenger services and the transport needs of regional communities are considered core business;

(b)         to direct the ARTC to release and review the current agreement between the ARTC and the Victorian Government for the Wodonga-Melbourne rail line, giving due consideration to the passenger rail services and the transport needs of regional communities; and

(c)         to develop a long-term plan for passenger rail services that meets the economic, social and environmental needs of regional Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      29    Safe Schools Declaration: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         children in conflict zones around the world are in danger and live in fear within their schooling environments as schools are being attacked or occupied by military forces;

(b)         classrooms are being used to house munitions and sports fields are becoming battlefields, denying children their right to education;

(c)         57 countries have already endorsed the Safe Schools Declaration to protect education in armed conflict situations; and

(d)         the Safe Schools Declaration aims to build an international community committed to respecting the civilian nature of schools and to develop the best practices for protecting schools from attack and military use; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         work with governments internationally to discourage the military use of schools, and promote security force policies and practices that better protect schools;

(b)         consider Australia’s participation at the Safe Schools Conference to be held in Buenos Aires on 28 and 29 March 2017; and

(c)         condemn attacks on schools and education, particularly the recent incidents in Nigeria, Syria and Yemen.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      30    National Stronger Regions Fund: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Gee —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on the success of the National Stronger Regions Fund (NSRF);

(2)         acknowledges the significant and positive impact that the NSRF is having in rural, remote and disadvantaged regions around Australia; and

(3)         notes that the:

(a)         Government is investing $205,622,942 in 70 projects around NSW under 3 rounds of the NSRF; and

(b)         NSRF is delivering infrastructure projects to create jobs in regional areas, improve community facilities and support stronger and more sustainable communities across NSW.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      31    National Swimming and Water Safety Framework: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that Australians live by the water, and being in and around water is part of our nation’s culture and our identity, but this regular exposure to water brings risks that can be fatal;

(b)         that so far this summer in Australia, 69 people have drowned on our coastline and in our pools and waterways, and paramedics report responding to 225 drownings or near drownings in November and December 2016;

(c)         that in 2015-16, 280 people drowned in Australia, a 5 per cent increase in drownings from 2014-15;

(d)         with concern that there is no national approach to swimming and water safety education in Australia, and that:

                                                          (i)       the water safety education Australian children receive depends on where they live and in some cases on their parents income level;

                                                        (ii)       not every Australian child is receiving the necessary instruction in swimming and water safety; and

                                                       (iii)       in some states and territories there is no swimming and water safety program at schools; and

(e)         studies have consistently shown a concerning trend in children starting secondary school without the ability to swim and research shows that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are less likely to achieve identified benchmarks for water safety competence compared to non-indigenous students and this is also the case for children not born in Australia; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         implement the National Swimming and Water Safety Framework (the Framework) and ensure every child has access to water safety and swimming education by the time they complete primary school with every child given access to instruction in swimming and water safety in accordance with the Framework;

(b)         conduct a parliamentary inquiry to investigate why many Australian children are not receiving adequate swimming and water safety education consistent with the Australian Water Safety Strategy and what measures it can adopt to improve access to swimming and water safety education;

(c)         establish a national water safety education fund to provide support to the states and territories, water safety organisations and communities to ensure access to swimming pools, accredited trainers and water safety education for schools in communities which lack such facilities and services; and

(d)         provide water and surf safety messages in foreign languages via tourism operators, flights, hotels and tours across Australia highlighting the importance of swimming and water safety on beaches, rivers, lakes and swimming pools.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      32    Northern Australia Beef Roads Programme: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Ms M. L. Landry —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government has committed $700 million to improve roads in Northern Australia including $100 million through the Northern Australia Beef Roads Programme (BRP) to improve roads essential to cattle transportation and to help producers to transport cattle to market more safely and efficiently;

(b)         upgrades under the BRP will be delivered to many areas including the:

                                                          (i)       City of Rockhampton (upgrading between Gracemere saleyards and the Rockhampton abattoirs to provide access for Type 1 Road Trains), as well as upgrades to the Hann Highway, Barkly Highway, Flinders Highway, Capricorn Highway and Clermont to Alpha Road in Queensland;

                                                        (ii)       Great Northern Highway and Marble Bar Road in Western Australia; and

                                                       (iii)       Outback Way, Arnhem Highway and Keep River Road in the Northern Territory; and

(c)         under the BRP the Government recently committed to further upgrades including to the:

                                                          (i)       Peak Downs Highway (Clermont-Nebo, Logan Creek to Nine Mile Creek), Port Alma Access Road near Rockhampton, Bowen Developmental Road and Landsborough Highway (Longreach-Winton) in Queensland;

                                                        (ii)       Tablelands Highway, Barkly Stock Route and Buntine Highway in the Northern Territory; and

                                                       (iii)       Cape Leveque Road and Great Northern Highway in Western Australia; and

(2)         commends the Government for recognising the potential of Northern Australia and investing in these key transport links.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      33    Australia Day 2017 honours list: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the Order of Australia is the highest national honour awarded to Australian citizens for outstanding contributions to our country or humanity at large;

(2)         notes that since being established by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1975, there have been more than 30,000 recipients of awards in the Order of Australia;

(3)         recognises the almost one thousand recipients of awards in the General Division of the Order announced in the Australia Day 2017 Honours List who come from an array of fields including science, education, governance, business, community service and sport; and

(4)         congratulates all the recipients of awards in the 2017 Australia Day Honours List.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      34    Robo-debt system: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr B. K. Mitchell —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         it has been 41 days since the Opposition formally requested that the robo-debt system be suspended while it was fixed;

(b)         the Minister for Human Services says that the system is working well despite reports of innocent people being targeted, Centrelink staff at breaking point and widespread concern outside this place;

(c)         the robo-debt system has seen hundreds of people issued with debt notices which are either false or grossly inflated; and

(d)         the robo-debt system is due to target Age Pension and Disability Support Pension recipients this year;

(2)         condemns the Minister for Human Services for his failure to respond to growing community concern and calls from welfare groups to act; and

(3)         calls on the Prime Minister to intervene to halt the system and fix it before age pensioners and those with disabilities are terrorised for debt they may not owe.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      35    Government technology reform agenda: Resumption of debate ( from  13 February 2017 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government for pursing an extensive technology reform agenda that will change the way Australians interact with Government services for the better;

(2)         recognises the:

(a)         actions the Government is taking to renew Centrelink’s aging information technology system through the Welfare Payment Infrastructure Transformation program, which will improve the user experience for the many Australians who access these services each week, and ensure the long term sustainability of our welfare system;

(b)         actions the Government is taking to upgrade and modernise the health and aged care payment system, and improve the services offered by Medicare to all Australians; and

(c)         investment the Government is making in digital services such as myGov, to further improve this service which is now used by more than ten million Australians; and

(3)         congratulates the Government on pursuing a courageous reform agenda which is sorely needed to correct six successive years of under-investment by Labor.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      36    NBN and rural and regional Australia: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms McGowan —That this House:

(1)    notes that:

(a)     the NBN Fair Use Policy is unfair for rural and regional Australia;

(b)     rural NBN users have restricted data speeds, limits on capacity and have to pay more for a poorer service;

(c)     under the NBN Interim Satellite Service, rural users had ‘off peak’ data from 11 pm to 2 pm;

(d)     on the new NBN Sky Muster Satellite Service, the ‘off peak’ data has now changed to between 1 am and 7 am; and

(e)     the consequence of the NBN Fair Use Policy is that businesses, students, home workers and farmers have reduced Internet access and pay comparatively more; and

(2)    calls on the Government to:

(a)     implement the recommendations of the 2015 Regional Telecommunications Review and review the NBN Fair Use Policy in light of the impact on rural families and businesses;

(b)     maximise the amount of data available under the satellite service; and

(c)     revert the off-peak period in the NBN Fair Use Policy to 11 pm to 2 pm, to accommodate the realities of rural life. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      37    Central Italy Earthquakes: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That this House:

(1)         expresses its deepest condolences for the victims of the devastating earthquakes that hit Central Italy on 24 August and 30 October 2016;

(2)         recognises the:

(a)         ongoing suffering and displacement that the earthquakes have caused to the residents of the affected towns; and

(b)         courageous and tireless work of the emergency and medical workers, and volunteers to save lives and prevent further tragedies; and

(3)         expresses our sincere thanks to the Australian communities who have rallied to show their support and solidarity in the face of this tragedy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      38    Strzelecki Track: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         the Strzelecki Track is a vital freight and tourist route connecting Adelaide to the Moomba Gas fields in South Australia’s far north-east and South East Queensland;

(b)         the route is used extensively by pastoralists, mining vehicles and tourists and is no longer fit for purpose due to pot holes, bulldust and closures from flooding;

(c)         it can take more than 12 hours for heavy transport to negotiate 338 kilometres from Lyndhurst to Moomba;

(d)         the Track is used by many tourists heading into the heart of Australia and visiting some of the wonders of outback South Australia and Queensland and with a proper standard road there is great potential to grow this industry; and

(e)         the Track is also used by heavy transport which supports the exploitation of the Moomba Gas Fields and trucks carrying supplies to, and cattle from, properties and they are totally reliant on this route;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Track cuts through remote and inhospitable country where emergency services are reliant on the Royal Flying Doctor Service;

(b)         more than 30 road trains navigate the Track each day carrying vital equipment for the gas industry and thousands of dollars of damage is done to each of these trucks on a daily basis; and

(c)         rain can close the road for up to six weeks as it did in 2010 when large sections were washed away or left underwater and on average shuts the road for 45 days a year; and

(3)         calls on the state and federal governments to work together in an urgent manner to bring about the sealing of this vital route.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      39    Perfluorinated and polyfluorinated alkyl substances contamination: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Swanson —That this House:

(1)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         establish a national inter-governmental taskforce to co-ordinate the response of state/territory and federal government agencies to the perfluorinated and polyfluorinated (per- and poly-fluoro) alkyl substances contamination on and around Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) bases at Williamtown and Oakey, and throughout Australia;

(b)         develop a nationally consistent approach for screening and health guidelines, assessments, containment, management standards and remediation protocols for Commonwealth sites and their surroundings that are identified as being contaminated with per- and poly-fluoro alkyl substances;

(c)         provide:

                                                          (i)       a breakdown and schedule of spending of the $55 million allocated from the Defence budget to deal with contamination at and around RAAF bases caused by per- and poly-fluoro alkyl substances;

                                                        (ii)       transparency into the Government’s per- and poly-fluoro alkyl substances interdepartmental committee, including a breakdown of its composition, terms of reference and meeting schedule; and

                                                       (iii)       a timeline for when, how, and by whom the issue of per- and poly-fluoro alkyl substances will be brought to the COAG; and

(d)         inform Williamtown residents when its proposed dialogue will begin on buybacks of properties contaminated by per- and poly-fluoro alkyl substances; and

(2)         while welcoming the New South Wales Environmental Protection Agency’s lifting of fishing bans implemented as a result of the contamination, calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure income support is available to affected commercial fishers through to March 2017; and

(b)         advocate for leniency by lending institutions with respect to business and home loan repayments and lending practices involving properties in the Williamtown investigation zone.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      40    National Stronger Regions Fund: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr L. S. O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on the success of the National Stronger Regions Fund (NSRF);

(2)         acknowledges the significant and positive impact that the NSRF is having in rural, remote and disadvantaged regions around Australia; and

(3)         notes that the:

(a)         Government is investing $125,286,955 in 40 projects around Queensland under 3 rounds of the NSRF; and

(b)         NSRF is delivering infrastructure projects to create jobs in regional areas, improve community facilities and support stronger and more sustainable communities across Queensland. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      41    Da'esh atrocities in Syria and Iraq: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         since 2014, Da’esh (also known as ISIL) has been carrying out terror campaigns against Christians, Assyrians, Mandaeans, Yazidis, and other ethnic and religious minorities in Iraq and Syria;

(b)         these campaigns have taken the form of mass murders, torture, rape, kidnappings, sexual enslavement and other crimes; and

(c)         these atrocities constitute war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide;

(2)         noting that the United Nations mandated Independent International Commission of Inquiry on Syria has declared that Da’esh’s actions against the Yazidi people amount to genocide, calls on the:

(a)         Australian Government to refer to the Da’esh atrocities as war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide; and

(b)         United Nations and Member States to co-ordinate measures to prevent further atrocities occurring in Syria and Iraq and take all necessary action to hold those responsible to account; and

(3)         commends:

(a)         the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, the Lebanese Republic, the Republic of Turkey and the Kurdistan Regional Government in Iraq, for their ongoing support and efforts to shelter and protect those fleeing the violence in Syria and Iraq; and

(b)         those nations that are providing a permanent home for Syrian and Iraqi refugees who are escaping persecution and violence.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      42    Australia and the Netherlands: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the ‘Declaration of Intent on a Strategic Dialogue’ between the Government of Australia and the Government of the Netherlands was signed by Foreign Minister Bishop and Foreign Minister Koenders on 2 November 2016, in Canberra;

(b)         the Declaration has been updated from the one signed in February 2014 by Foreign Minister Bishop and the then Foreign Minister Timmermans to reflect current events and increased closeness between our two countries through our shared commitment to achieve accountability with respect to the downing of MH17; and

(c)         the Declaration commits Australia and the Netherlands to enhanced cooperation on international security, trade and investment, human rights and development issues; and

(2)         welcomes enhanced economic and security cooperation between Australia and the Netherlands.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      43    Marine parks: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr J. H. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that in 2012, following a comprehensive and rigorous process, the then Labor Government declared 40 marine parks in Commonwealth waters, creating the world’s first and largest comprehensive national network of marine parks;

(2)         notes with concern that there is increasing pressure on Australia’s marine environment, as indicated by frequent and severe bleaching of coral reefs across Australia’s northern waters, extensive and unprecedented dieback of mangroves, and the loss of large areas of kelp forests in southern Australian waters;

(3)         notes that Australia’s marine environment is the most biologically diverse in the world according to the 2010 Census of Marine Life, with our oceans spanning tropical, temperate and sub-Antarctic waters, and where at least 33,000 marine species have been identified (many of which are found nowhere else on earth);

(4)         notes that Australia is a signatory to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and as such is required to both conserve as well as sustainably utilise its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ);

(5)         notes the economic opportunity that marine parks bring regional communities as evidenced by long standing marine parks in Australia, including the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park which is worth over $6 billion to the Queensland economy, and others including Ningaloo Marine Park, the Great Australian Bight, Lord Howe Island, Solitary Islands Marine Park and Maria Island National Park;

(6)         notes the clear evidence that marine parks play an important economic role in accelerating the recovery of depleted fisheries, and that the long term net effect on fisheries of increased resilience and sustainability from highly protected marine reserves is positive;

(7)         notes that in the 1990s the then Coalition Government put in place a systematic approach for declaring a comprehensive, adequate, and representative network of marine parks in Australia’s EEZ, and proceeded to declare 22 marine parks in Commonwealth waters;

(8)         notes with concern that:

(a)         in December 2013 the incoming Coalition Government suspended Labor’s marine parks from operation by re-declaring the parks in order to set aside their management arrangements and commencement date, pending the conduct of a politically motivated and unnecessary review; and

(b)         after almost 3 years, these 40 marine parks have not been implemented, existing in statute only—leaving 5 of Australia’s 6 marine regions with little to no protection at a time when the threats to Australia’s valuable and important marine environment are increasing;

(9)         notes that in the May 2016 budget the Coalition Government committed to completing the re-development of the management plans for the new parks within 12 months;

(10)     notes that in the recent consultation by Parks Australia, over 50,000 submissions were received from around Australia, including from more than 5,000 recreational fishers, calling for the reinstatement of the marine parks and their high level marine national park zoning, without further delay or loss of protection;

(11)     notes that the Expert Science Panel of the Coalition Government’s own review recognises both the extensive science that went into the development of the marine parks developed by the Labor Government and the scientifically proven benefits of marine national parks;

(12)     notes the Bioregional Advisory Panel of the Coalition Government’s own review recognised the extensive consultation that has occurred in developing the marine reserves developed by the Labor Government, stating that there was in fact a considerable amount of ‘consultation fatigue’ expressed by many stakeholders;

(13)     notes the increasing move by other countries to put in place large and highly protected marine parks in their EEZs, including action taken by the United States, Palau, Chile, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and, most recently, the declaration in October 2016 by 24 nations, including Australia, of the Ross Sea marine park in the Antarctic high seas; and

(14)     calls on the Coalition Government to bring the Commonwealth network of marine parks that were declared in 2012 into operation without further delay, and with no loss of marine national park protection.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      44    Road safety: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         urges all Australians to drive safely and with consideration for fellow road users over the upcoming summer holidays;

(2)         notes the Government has made significant investments in road safety including:

(a)         $500 million from 2014-15 to 2018-19 in the Black Spot Program (BSP);

(b)         an additional $200 million from 2015-16 that makes an important contribution to reducing the national road toll under the National Road Safety Strategy and Action Plan; and

(c)         completing 977 projects under the BSP which has saved an estimated 116 lives and prevented 5,959 injuries from crashes over 10 years;

(3)         encourages all state and territory governments to address the over-representation of men in road fatalities through improved driver information and education; and

(4)         calls on all Australians to drive carefully over the summer period.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      45    International Day of People with Disability: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Husar —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Saturday 3 December 2016 is International Day of People with Disability (IDPwD);

(b)         the United Nations proclaimed IDPwD for the first time in 1992 as a way of promoting better understanding of disability issues and as a sign of support for the dignity, rights and wellbeing of people with disabilities; and

(c)         each year, the United Nations chooses a theme for IDPwD and this year’s theme is ‘Achieving 17 Goals for the Future We Want’, which draws attention to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and how these goals can create a more inclusive and equitable world for people with disabilities;

(2)         encourages all Members of Parliament to support IDPwD in their electorates; and

(3)         reaffirms its commitment to:

(a)         ensuring Australians with a disability get the support they need; and

(b)         an adequately funded and resourced National Disability Insurance Scheme.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      46    Commonwealth Redress Scheme: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Irons —That this House:

(1)         recognises the actions this Government has taken to establish the Commonwealth Redress Scheme (CRS) for survivors of institutional child sexual abuse;

(2)         congratulates this Government for leading by example by establishing the CRS for survivors of institutional child sexual abuse and for inviting other governments and institutions to ‘opt in’ to the scheme on the responsible ‘entity pays basis’ recommended by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse;

(3)         acknowledges the courage of the survivors who presented evidence to the Royal Commission and that their past and continuing advocacy for redress is vital to the successful implementation of the CRS; and

(4)         recognises that this Government acknowledges that survivors of institutional child sexual abuse need and deserve equal access and treatment.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      47    Dismissal of Whitlam Government, correspondence: Resumption of debate ( from  28 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Hill —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there is a current controversy pertaining to the so called ‘Palace Letters’ between the then Governor-General Sir John Kerr and Her Majesty The Queen in the months leading up to the dismissal of the Whitlam Government; and

(b)         this correspondence has been declared ‘personal’ and therefore secret at ‘Her Majesty the Queen’s instructions’;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         these letters are a matter of our national history which should be made available to the Australian people;

(b)         regardless of the merits or otherwise of the dismissal, Australians deserve to know the extent to which The Queen involved herself in the sacking of an elected Australian Government; and

(c)         the very notion of ‘personal’ letters between the Monarch and the Governor-General offends all concepts of transparency and democracy that we hold dear; and

(3)         calls on the Australian Government to take steps to have the documents released.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      48    White Ribbon Day: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that White Ribbon:

(a)         is a male led campaign to end male violence against women;

(b)         is now active in over 60 countries around the world; and

(c)         has ambassadors around Australia who are working to engage men and encourage them to take a leadership role in ending violence against women;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         in 2016 in Australia, each week approximately one woman is murdered by a partner or former partner;

(b)         one in four Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner;

(c)         men’s violence against women is a symptom of gender inequality in our society; and

(d)         social policy initiatives and law refom addressing gender inequality are central to reducing attitudes that support violence against women;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         25 November is White Ribbon Day; and

(b)         the white ribbon is the symbol of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women; and

(4)         supports White Ribbon and other organisations to eliminate violence against women.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      49    Battle of Long Tan: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Littleproud —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 8 November at Government House the Governor-General awarded ten soldiers with military awards for actions at the Battle of Long Tan; and

(b)         these soldiers received these awards 50 years after the Battle of Long Tan:

                                                          (i)       which was the most costly single battle fought by Australian soldiers in the Vietnam War, involving 105 Australians and three New Zealanders from D Company 6RAR and more than 2,000 enemy troops; and

                                                        (ii)       where a total of 17 Australians were killed in action and 25 were wounded, one of whom later died from his wounds; and

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the ten soldiers who received an award, some posthumously, including Lieutenant Adrian Roberts, Sergeant Frank Alcorta, Lance Corporal Barry Magnussen (deceased), Second Lieutenant Gordon Sharp (deceased), Privates Neil Bextrum, Ron Brett (deceased), Ian Campbell, William Roche, Geoffrey Peters and Noel Grimes;

(b)         the service and sacrifice of all those who served their country in Vietnam; and

(c)         all of Australia’s service men and women who display courage, bravery and mateship above and beyond the call of duty.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      50    Income inequality: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         notes with deep concern that:

(a)         income inequality in Australia is growing such that currently the top 20 per cent of households receive half of Australia’s income while the bottom 20 per cent receive just four per cent; and

(b)         in 2013 the top 1 per cent of Australian earners received 9 per cent of Australia’s income, and the top 0.1 per cent received 2.5 per cent, in both cases representing the highest proportion since the 1950s, and a proportion which continues to increase;

(2)         notes rapidly increasing executive and, in particular, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) remuneration, for example between 1971 and 2008, real CEO pay grew by nearly five times, while the real average weekly earnings grew just over one and a half times despite:

(a)         research showing that executive pay increases are not closely related to company performance;

(b)         the belief that large disparities between executive pay and average earnings might actually demotivate a company’s employees and adversely affect priorities, as reported in the 2009 Productivity Commission inquiry into executive remuneration in Australia; and

(c)         the belief that poor remuneration arrangements can promote inappropriate, risky short term decision making, carrying wider economic ramifications including a negative impact on productivity growth;

(3)         notes the positive effect of past legislative efforts on ensuring corporate executive remuneration is transparent, particularly the ‘two strikes’ legislation which came into effect in 2011, acknowledging that mandatory disclosure of CEO pay ratios, as required in the United Kingdom and more recently in the United States, would:

(a)         provide:

                                                          (i)       important information to shareholders voting on executive remuneration; and

                                                        (ii)       a more accurate measure of an important aspect of income inequality in Australia; and

(b)         improve the health of our democracy by making important information more accessible to the public; and

(4)         calls on the Government to consider following the lead of the United States in its Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in mandating that public companies disclose the ratio of a CEO’s annual total remuneration to the average annual total of all company employees.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      51    National security challenges: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Hastie —That this House:

(1)         notes that as the terrorist group, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, comes under increasing pressure in Iraq and Syria, there is the risk that more foreign fighters will seek to leave, with some trying to return to their home countries, including Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government:

(a)         has given greater support, funding and legislative powers to law enforcement and security agencies; and

(b)         continues to work in close partnership with international partners to counter the terrorism risk; and

(3)         notes that the national security challenges facing Australia continue to evolve.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      52    Palestinian children: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Vamvakinou —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         500 to 700 Palestinian children are arrested, detained and prosecuted in the Israeli military court system each year;

(b)         Human Rights Watch reported in April that arrests of Palestinian children by Israeli forces had doubled in the preceding six months;

(c)         Defence for Children International research, based on 429 affidavits from Palestinian children, indicates that 97 per cent of children had no parent or legal counsel available during interrogation and 75 per cent endured some form of physical violence following arrest;

(d)         the United States State Department’s 2014 human rights report on Israel states that military courts have more than a 99 per cent conviction rate for Palestinian defendants;

(e)         UNICEF has reported that ill-treatment in the Israeli military detention system remains widespread, systematic, and institutionalised throughout the process; and

(f)          Australia raised concerns with Israel about the treatment of Palestinian minors in 2011 and 2014, however there has been little improvement concerning the treatment of Palestinian children by Israeli forces; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to raise concerns with the Israeli Government about the treatment of Palestinian children.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      53    417 visa program: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the Fair Work Ombudsman’s (FWO’s) report Inquiry into the wages and conditions of people working under the 417 Working Holiday Visa Program (October 2016) found that more than one third of 417 visa holders claimed that they were paid less than the minimum wage;

(b)         the inquiry found that the 417 visa program created an environment where unreasonable and unlawful requirements are being imposed on visa holders by unscrupulous businesses;

(c)         the FWO, Ms Natalie James, said in a statement that the inquiry confirms that overseas workers seeking regional work to satisfy the 88 day requirement and obtain a second-year 417 visa are particularly vulnerable to exploitation;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         that in 2015-16, 76 per cent of litigations filed by the FWO involved visa holder workers;

(b)         that the inquiry found instances of employers engaging in sophisticated labour supply chains involving sham contracting, where workers were in fact employees, to exploit vulnerable 417 visa holders to gain a competitive or commercial advantage through the reduction of labour costs; and

(c)         findings from the inquiry found that the 417 visa program has been used to source an unpaid workforce, thus facilitating an unfair commercial advantage to these employers, distorting the market place and placing pressure on the domestic employment market;

(3)         expresses its disappointment in the Government for announcing yet another taskforce, the Migrant Workers Taskforce, to look at the issue of worker exploitation, while there is still no legislation that has been presented to the Parliament that will change the law to protect exploited workers; and

(4)         calls on the Government to join the Opposition in preventing workers from being exploited by supporting its legislation before the Parliament, the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Australian Workers) Bill 2016.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      54    Cashless debit card: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that reducing social harm caused by welfare-fuelled alcohol, drug and gambling abuse is a key priority nationally and for local communities;

(2)         recognises that the Government is currently trialling the cashless debit card in two communities—Ceduna in South Australia, and the East Kimberley in Western Australia—in partnership with local community leaders in those communities; and

(3)         acknowledges the:

(a)         hard work, dedication and commitment of community leaders in Ceduna and the East Kimberley in co-designing the trials with Government, and their leadership in its implementation and delivery in their communities; and

(b)         positive initial results of the cashless debit card model in the two trial communities, including the strong positive feedback from the community on the ground.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      55    Unemployment: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Dr Freelander —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that the unemployment rate in Australia has barely fallen from immediate post Global Financial Crisis levels;

(b)         Treasury projections that the unemployment in Australia is unlikely to improve in the next three years under current policy settings; and

(c)         significant labour market indicators such as rate of under-employment and levels of long term and youth unemployment, are continuing concerns within the community and amongst economic commentators, as is the comparative decline in the availability of full time jobs;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         rates on unemployment in many OECD countries have fallen significantly since 2012 while Australia’s unemployment rate has remained stagnant; and

(b)         Reserve Bank of Australia observations about the likely limited effect on economic activity of further interest rate cuts;

(3)         recognises:

(a)         the negative impact on the federal budget in continuing high levels of unemployment;

(b)         the cost to individuals, the community and the economy in people not being able to find work; and

(c)         the Government’s failure to grow full-time employment opportunities; and

(4)         urges the Government to give higher priority to addressing labour market stagnation and take whatever steps it can through fiscal policy and selective initiatives to address this ongoing blight on Australian society.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      56    The job of governing: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Zimmerman —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that the Government won the election and has been getting on with the job of governing; and

(2)         congratulates the Government for the following achievements:

(a)         securing Australia’s 25 consecutive years of economic growth;

(b)         protecting our borders and making our nation more secure with over 800 days having passed without a successful people smuggling venture;

(c)         delivering:

                                                          (i)       a personal tax cut to 500,000 middle income Australians;

                                                        (ii)       a fairer and more flexible superannuation system; and

                                                       (iii)       $11 billion of budget repair;

(d)         establishing a process which makes bank Chief Executive Officers answerable to the public through appearances before Parliament;

(e)         legislating to protect volunteer firefighters from union takeovers;

(f)          reintroducing bills to restore the rule of law on the nation’s construction sites;

(g)         securing the naval shipbuilding industry and jobs for the future;

(h)         strengthening:

                                                          (i)       trade and defence ties with Singapore, creating thousands of new jobs; and

                                                        (ii)       the United States alliance in defence, counter-terrorism and cyber security;

(i)           reintroducing legislation to crack down on illegal firearms trafficking;

(j)          increasing protection for women and children against domestic violence;

(k)         growing our industries with record commodity prices and a $2.5 billion water infrastructure rollout to support farmers and the resource sector;

(l)           fixing the problems in Vocational Education and Training and cracking down on dodgy providers;

(m)       increasing digital literacy and improved school resourcing;

(n)         supporting more Indigenous Australians through skills, jobs and language;

(o)         signing new City Deals to improve housing and expand public transport;

(p)         accelerating the broadband build and connecting rural Australia;

(q)         securing an agreement with the states and territories on energy security and reforms for affordable, reliable power;

(r)          protecting Medicare, improving primary health care, making over 2,000 medicines cheaper and simplifying private health care;

(s)          saving lives through a National Cancer Screening Register;

(t)          supporting the South Australian steel sector and jobs by providing a $49.2 million loan to Arrium;

(u)         addressing long term welfare dependence;

(v)         delivering better:

                                                          (i)       tax arrangements for working holiday makers and backpackers; and

                                                        (ii)       child care for 1 million Australians and lifting immunisation rates;

(w)        showing a commitment to new resettlement programs for genuine refugees as a result of strong border policies; and

(x)         boosting Australia’s place in the workforce with access to new markets and stronger ties including with East Asia, Europe, and the United Kingdom.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      57    Expulsion of Mr Hugh Mahon from the House: Resumption of debate ( from  21 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House: 

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         prior to the passage of the Parliamentary Privileges Act 1987 the Houses of the Australian Parliament had the power to expel a Senator or Member of the House of Representatives;

(b)         the expulsion of a Member of this House is the most drastic of sanctions;

(c)         on 11 November 1920, the then Member for Kalgoorlie, Mr Hugh Mahon, was expelled from this House; and

(d)         Mr Mahon is the only Member to have ever been expelled from this House;

(2)         acknowledges that Mr Mahon was expelled:

(a)         by a motion brought on hastily and with limited time for debate;

(b)         by a vote of the House on party lines; and

(c)         without the due process and procedural fairness that such an important issue deserves; and

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         it was unjust on the limited evidence for the institution to which Mr Mahon had been democratically elected to reverse the decision of his constituents; and

(b)         the expulsion of Mr Mahon was a misuse of the power then invested in the House.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      58    Gambling advertising: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Wilkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         more than $800 million was lost by Australians on legal sports betting in 2014-15, an increase of more than 30 per cent from 2013-14;

(b)         while some restrictions on gambling advertising exist, there is an exemption that allows gambling advertising during televised sporting events at children’s viewing times; and

(c)         research shows that children are especially susceptible to such advertising;

(2)         recognises the pressing need to act to reduce the level of gambling advertising, particularly during children’s viewing times;

(3)         calls on the Government to amend the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 to ban gambling advertising during sporting broadcasts; and

(4)         further notes community concern about the recent increased level of gambling advertising on the SBS, and calls on the Minister for Communications to issue a directive under section 11 of the Special Broadcasting Service Act 1991 to limit the amount of such advertising.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      59    Housing: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         having safe and affordable housing is a basic human right and the absence of which has a huge human, social and economic cost;

(b)         housing stress and homelessness are serious issues in Australia—first-home buyers are having difficulty entering the market, rental affordability in cities is at a crisis point, waiting lists for social housing continue to grow, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians are disproportionately represented in homelessness and housing stress and there are rising levels of homelessness with 105,000 people designated as homeless on any given night; and

(c)         there are often complex social, financial and medical issues that cause housing stress and homelessness that are beyond an individual’s direct control; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         appoint a Minister for Housing and Homelessness to provide the necessary focus and leadership required to address the housing issues being experienced in Australia; and

(b)         develop and implement a national housing strategy to ensure a sufficient, modern and equitable housing system for all Australians.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      60    Palm oil and labelling laws: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 —Mr Wood ) on the motion of Mr Wood —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that palm oil, because of its low cost, is a common ingredient in many packaged foods, often supplementing vegetable oil; and

(b)         the misleading labelling of palm oil in Australian products, often labelled as vegetable oil, with 50 per cent of products sold in supermarkets containing palm oil;

(2)         further notes that palm oil has high levels of saturated fat with over 50 per cent of its composition being saturated fat, which is very dangerous to consumers with heart or other conditions;

(3)         recognises the damage to the environment and endangered animals as a result of mass deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia which has led to the exponential threat of extinction to animals such as orangutans, tigers, elephants and rhinoceroses, all of which are already critically endangered; and

(4)         calls on the Government to change the labelling laws on products sold in Australia to require products to clearly state when they contain palm oil.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      61    Adelaide plains floods and assistance to growers: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         widespread flooding has devastated large food growing areas in the Adelaide plains;

(b)         the Adelaide plains are a major economic driver for South Australia, producing hundreds of millions of dollars of fruit and vegetables each year;

(c)         the collective losses sustained by growers have run into tens of millions of dollars; and

(d)         many of the producers affected by the floods are family enterprises with limited financial capacity to withstand the losses and damage; and

(2)         calls on the Government to report back to the House on what assistance measures will be provided to growers seriously affected by the floods.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      62    Northern Australian tourism industry and small businesses: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms M. L. Landry —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the northern Australians working within the tourism industry, which plays a vital role in supporting the northern Australian economy;

(2)         recognises that tourist spending provides further opportunities for local small businesses within the community; and

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the Government is investing in small businesses through its Jobs and Small Business Package released in the 2015 budget; and

(b)         this package provides small businesses, including most businesses within the tourism industry, with much needed assistance to grow and create jobs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      63    Forced marriage: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         some young Australians are being forced into marriage against their will;

(b)         child marriage and forced marriage are forms of slavery; and

(c)         the Labor Government in 2013 introduced into the Criminal Code Act 1995  specific offences for forced marriage;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         there has been a gradual increase in people referring to community services for forced marriage since the law was introduced in 2013;

(b)         investigations of forced marriage by the Australian Federal Police (AFP) have increased from 3 in 2012-13 to 69 in 2015-16;

(c)         the Australian Red Cross and the AFP consider that part of the increase in identifications of forced marriage is due to better community awareness and access to help; and

(d)         it is crucial that community awareness continues to be raised so that young people know their right to refuse to be forced into marriage;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian Catholic Religious Against Trafficking in Humans produced curriculum materials for the Australian forced marriage Pilot Program for Australian schools;

(b)         in every school that participated in the Pilot Program, girls at risk of forced marriage were identified;

(c)         funding for the Pilot Program ceased in 2015; and

(d)         it is crucial that the Pilot Program is continued as teachers are often the first person a child will tell of their fear of being forced to marry; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately renew funding to further provide awareness of child marriage and forced marriage in Australian schools and the broader community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      64    Remembrance Day: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Rishworth —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         11 November is Remembrance Day;

(b)         on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month Australians observe one minute’s silence in memory of those who died or suffered in all wars and armed conflicts;

(c)         2016 marks the 98th anniversary of the Armistice which ended World War I; and

(d)         on Remembrance Day we pay our respects and honour the memory of those who have served in our country’s defence forces;

(2)         encourages all Australians to attend a commemoration ceremony in their local community, and to pause for a minute of silence to remember those who have served in the Australian Defence Force and made the ultimate sacrifice;

(3)         remembers:

(a)         those who lost their lives serving their country; and

(b)         all who came home, wounded, or bearing the hidden scars of war; and

(4)         recognises that the return to life in Australia, the journey from battlefield to towns and suburbs, can be a difficult one for those who serve and for the people who love and care for them.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      65    Western Australia and Commonwealth infrastructure funding: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Keogh —That this House:

(1)         recognises the parlous state of Western Australia’s finances, brought on by the economic mismanagement of the Western Australian Government and a record low share of GST revenue, which was foreseeable;

(2)         acknowledges the importance of Commonwealth infrastructure funding and state infrastructure spending for creating employment and driving economic growth;

(3)         notes that $1.54 billion of Commonwealth infrastructure funding has been allocated to the Perth Freight Link (PFL) and Oakajee Port over the forward estimates, in circumstances where:

(a)         the Western Australian Government has not committed to stage two of the PFL, a contract for which will be required before Commonwealth funding flows to Western Australia, and the Western Australian Opposition is opposed to the project; and

(b)         the Turnbull Government has kept a $339 million allocation to Oakajee Port in the federal budget for more than two years after the project was abandoned;

(4)         notes that although Western Australia takes up one third of Australia’s land mass and holds 10.4 per cent of the population, the loss of Commonwealth funding for the PFL and Oakajee would cause Western Australia’s share of the Commonwealth infrastructure budget to drop to just 9.5 per cent; and

(5)         calls on the Australian Government to redirect funding allocated to the PFL to the infrastructure projects that Western Australians actually want and need—the Armadale/North Lake Road Bridge, an Outer Harbour and METRONET.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      66    Stroke: Resumption of debate ( from  7 November 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Banks —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         National Stroke Week:

                                                          (i)       ran from 12 to 18 September 2016; and

                                                        (ii)       is about raising awareness to prevent stroke in Australia; and

(b)         the National Stroke Foundation encourages all Australians to:

                                                          (i)       be aware of what stroke is, how to recognise a stroke and what to do;

                                                        (ii)       live healthy to reduce the risk of stroke; and

                                                       (iii)       get a regular health check;

(2)         acknowledges the:

(a)         launch by the Minister for Health in June 2015 of the Acute Stroke Clinical Care Standard; and

(b)         bi-partisan work done by past governments in the area of stroke; and

(3)         notes the requirement for greater awareness and promotion of the prevention of stroke within the Australian community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 22 May 2017. )

      67    Welfare: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of a generous social safety net;

(2)         further recognises that it is essential that welfare is targeted to achieve better lifetime outcomes for recipients;

(3)         welcomes the release of data that will help the Government to target interventions to Australians who need it most;

(4)         congratulates the Government’s Try, Test and Learn Fund, with $96.1 million allocated to it which will:

(a)         bring together stakeholders, academics, the states and territories and any relevant parties in the non-government sector, to trial new policies and initiatives to help achieve better lifetime outcomes for target cohorts; and

(b)         ensure new, bold and innovative ideas are trialled which will help to reduce long term and inter-generational welfare dependence; and

(5)         looks forward to the first round of funding under the program which will improve lifetime outcomes and increase the self-reliance of young parents, young carers and young students.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 May 2017. )

      68    Murder of Mrs Jo Cox: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         condemns the murder of Mrs Jo Cox, Member of Parliament in the House of Commons for the constituency of Batley and Spen, killed in the course of performing her responsibilities to her constituents;

(2)         expresses its deepest sympathies to Mrs Cox’s family, colleagues, and to all who knew her; and

(3)         pays tribute to Mrs Cox’s extraordinary contribution to public life. 

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 May 2017. )

      69    Cyber security: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Ms Marino —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 10 to 14 October was Stay Smart Online Week, which saw the Government educate businesses and individuals on the importance of cyber security, including how to protect themselves online;

(2)         further recognises that this year’s theme of ‘Cyber safety from the lounge room to the board room’ focuses on the importance of good online security habits at home and at work;

(3)         congratulates the Government on launching Stay Smart Online Small Business Guide and Stay Smart Online My Guide for individuals which:

(a)         provides:

                                                          (i)       advice on vital areas of online security including aspects of privacy, passwords, suspicious messages, surfing safely; and

                                                        (ii)       information on cyber security when accessing online finances and making payments; and

(b)         gives advice on security solutions for tablets and mobiles;

(4)         welcomes the Government’s free Alert Service, which has online safety information and solutions to help people protect themselves online; and

(5)         congratulates the Prime Minister on launching the National Cyber Security Strategy which sets out the Government’s vision for meeting the dual challenges of advancing and protecting Australia’s interests in the digital age.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 May 2017. )

      70    Light it Red for Dyslexia: Resumption of debate ( from  17 October 2016 ) on the motion of Mr Champion —That this House notes that:

(1)         on Saturday 15 October 2016 significant monuments and landmarks will be lit red across Australia as part of Light it Red for Dyslexia; and

(2)         Light it Red for Dyslexia:

(a)         is an initiative to increase dyslexia awareness;

(b)         coincides with international World Dyslexia Day; and

(c)         is a prelaunch of Dyslexia Empowerment Week in Australia, running from 16 to 22 October 2016.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless re-accorded priority on 22 May 2017. )