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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Notices given for Tuesday, 11 February 2020

      *1    Mr Joyce : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Representation Act 1983 , and for related purposes. ( Representation Amendment (6 Regions Per State, 2 Senators Per Region) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 10 February 2020. )

    *2    Dr Mulino : To move—That this House notes the Government’s economic mismanagement and its sustained failure to deliver improved economic outcomes for Australians during its seven year term in office, measured by:

(a)         wage stagnation;

(b)         near record levels of underemployment;

(c)         high and rising rates of labour underutilisation, particularly for young people and in regional areas;

(d)         high levels of youth unemployment;

(e)         Australia’s higher unemployment relative to peer nations;

(f)          weak consumption growth;

(g)         weak business investment; and

(h)         weak and declining productivity growth.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2020. )

    *3    Ms T. M. Butler : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the devastating effect of drought on water supplies in Australian local communities; and

(b)         that the recent bushfire crisis has compounded water insecurity in affected areas;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         the Eurobodalla Shire Council’s 2016 proposal for a second water storage facility in the southern part of the shire would add 3,000 mega litres of water storage to the region;

(b)         that the project has support from local and state governments, with the NSW state Government committing $26.3 million in October 2019;

(c)         that the Eurobodalla Shire Council has called for a $51 million commitment from the Government to build the dam, noting they will fund the rest of the $105 million project; and

(d)         all supporting parties should ensure the project is environmentally sound;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         Australians and regional communities are rightly sceptical about the Government’s track record on water infrastructure and drought policy;

(b)         in 2013, Prime Minister Abbott said he would build 100 dams across Australia—three terms later and in its seventh year of power, the Government has failed to fulfil its promise;

(c)         Prime Minister Morrison was caught out for being loose with the truth in October 2019 when he claimed his government was contributing more investment in NSW dam infrastructure than they actually were; and

(d)         more than two years after the announcement of the $2 billion National Water Infrastructure Facility, not a single dollar has been spent;

(4)         further notes that the Eurobodalla community has been waiting for a response from the Government since October 2019 in relation to their water storage proposal; and

(5)         calls on the Government to urgently respond to the Eurobodalla Shire Council’s request for funds for the Southern Water Supply Storage project.

              ( Notice given 10 February 2020. )

Notices —continued

       1    Mr Dreyfus : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the Prime Minister and the Attorney-General announced on 13 December 2018 that a Commonwealth Integrity Commission would be established;

(b)         on 13 December 2018, the Prime Minister said on 2GB the decision to establish a Commonwealth Integrity Commission ‘was something I had to resolve by the end of the year’;

(c)         on 26 May 2019, the Attorney-General said a Commonwealth Integrity Commission was a ‘priority’; and

(d)         the Government has not established a Commonwealth Integrity Commission; and

(2)         calls on the Government to keep its promise to establish its Commonwealth Integrity Commission.

              ( Notice given 31 July 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

       2    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         delegation from the Regional, Rural and Remote Communications Coalition (RRRCC) has approached Members of the 46th Parliament to highlight priorities for improving regional telecommunications;

(b)         the RRRCC is a group of 22 volunteer-run organisations and advocacy bodies which have joined together to highlight their collective concern about the lack of equitable access to reliable and quality telecommunication in regional Australia;

(c)         telecommunications is an essential service in a modern world, supporting social connectivity, business activity, and the delivery of health and education services;

(d)         every Australian, irrespective of where they live or work, should have access to quality, reliable, and affordable voice and data services with customer support guarantees;

(e)         there is ongoing inequity in the access to telecommunications experienced by Australians living in regional, rural and remote areas, compared to their urban counterparts;

(f)          the 2018 Australian Digital Inclusion Index revealed substantial differences between rural and urban areas across all of its three indicators—access, affordability and digital ability;

(g)         all of Australia 's least digitally included regions are outside the major cities, reporting scores well below the national average of 62 out of 100, including Eyre (45.0), south east SA (48.6), north Victoria (50.8), and Murray and Murrumbidgee (51.0); and

(h)         the opportunities for connectivity to support economic development in regional Australia are significant, including for agriculture, with the Australian Farm Institute predicting that widespread adoption of digital agriculture could increase the gross value of Australian agricultural production by $20.3 billion, a 25% increase over 2014-15 levels; and

(2)         further notes that to ensure regional, rural and remote Australia is best positioned to retain people and grow in the long term, the Government needs to:

(a)         establish a:

(i)           universal service obligation that is technology neutral and ensures access to both voice and data; and

(ii)         Rural, Regional and Remote Telecommunications Fund to resource ongoing mobile network expansion;

(b)         ensure NBN Co is fully resourced to maintain and upgrade NBN satellite and fixed wireless networks;

(c)         introduce adequate performance quality metrics for all services, including Sky Muster, monitored against independent benchmarks;

(d)         extend the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s Measuring Broadband Australia program to fixed wireless and Sky Muster services; and

(e)         create a targeted concessional broadband service to support low income residents, particularly low income residents in regional, rural and remote areas.

              ( Notice given 9 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       3    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         declares an environment and climate emergency;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         the recent report of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Special Report: Global Warming of 1.5 °C , indicates that we are facing a climate emergency, and as a result, meaningful action on climate change is urgent, at home and internationally;

(b)         this IPCC report has found that the world is not on track to limit global warming to less than 1.5 degrees Celsius;

(c)         at a national level, England, France, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and Canada have all declared a climate emergency; and

(d)         extreme weather events will devastate large parts of Australia and radically impact food production, water availability, public health, infrastructure, the community and the financial system;

(3)         notes that the Government has acknowledged urgent action is required to address climate change; and

(4)         calls on the Government to take urgent action consistent with the internationally accepted science.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       4    Mr Jones : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there have been 7 quad bike deaths in 2019 alone and 230 quad bike related deaths since 2001;

(b)         rollovers account for 60 per cent of quad bike fatalities;

(c)         children below the age of 16 account for approximately 14 per cent of all recorded fatalities;

(d)         in August 2017, the Australian Ministers for Consumer Affairs agreed to an expedited process to introduce new safety standards for quad bikes;

(e)         the Assistant Treasurer has the power to ban a product or make a mandatory safety standard under Australian Consumer Law;

(f)          in February 2019, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission gave the then Assistant Treasurer, the Hon Stuart Robert MP, a report recommending a new mandatory safety standard to require overhead protective devices in new vehicles; and

(g)         these standards are supported by the National Farmers Federation, the Australian Workers Union, the Country Women's Association and the Rural Doctors Association; and

(2)         calls on the Assistant Treasurer to use his power under Australian consumer law to issue new safety standards for quad bikes.

              ( Notice given 11 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       5    Dr Aly : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 28 June 2018, the Parliamentary Joint Standing Committee on Law Enforcement tabled its report Inquiry into crystal methamphetamine (ice): Final Report ;

(b)         this report found that the National Ice Action Strategy Funding had failed to target areas of most need in Western Australia (WA) which receive approximately 11 per cent of the total funding despite usage figures in WA being double the national average; and

(c)         subsequently, Recommendation 11 of that report states ‘The committee recommends that the Department of Health consider using 2016 Census and National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program data to determine the allocation of National Ice Action Strategy funding for 2019-20’;

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         the Government has failed to adequately fund drug rehabilitation services in WA in line with the findings and recommendations of the report;

(b)         the figures used for the current level of funding are based on outdated and incomplete 2011 census data that does not reflect usage figures or rehabilitation needs; and

(c)         this places significant strain on drug rehabilitation services in WA;

(3)         considers that the choice to use Mandurah in WA as a suggested trial zone for drug testing does not reflect the regional areas identified by the report and the National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program as subjected to abnormally high concentrations of trace drugs;

(4)         recognises that, as a result, the Government’s decision to attempt to drug test recipients of Newstart is an attack on those receiving welfare, rather than assisting those afflicted by drug addiction; and

(5)         calls on the Government to implement the recommendations of the report, including enacting Recommendation 11, with urgent attention to addressing the inadequate funding to WA.

              ( Notice given 17 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       6    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         tens of thousands of children in Australia are cared for by grandparents;

(b)         many grandparents are elderly and need care for themselves;

(c)         most grandparents rely partly or wholly on a pension;

(d)         grandparents caring for grandchildren saves society millions of dollars;

(e)         grandparents give children a good start to life; and

(f)          children placed in grandparents’ care often have special needs; and

(2)         calls on the Government to recognise the financial, physical and emotional burden on

grandparents caring for grandchildren and provide greater assistance to them.

              ( Notice given 17 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       7    Mr Dick : To move—That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Queensland Government and the Australian delegation who met with President Thomas Bach and the International Olympic Committee in Lausanne, Switzerland;

(2)         notes that the delegation represented all levels of government and both sides of politics and was welcomed by the International Olympic Committee;

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         the Queensland 2032 Taskforce for their work to prepare Queensland for a potential bid for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games; and

(b)         that if a bid were to be successful it would likely provide economic stimulus across a range of sectors including new infrastructure and jobs; and

(4)         further notes that if there is to be a bid to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games it will need to have strong backing, including financial support, from all levels of government, and strong community support.

              ( Notice given 17 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       8    Mr Burns : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         climate change is one of the great moral challenges of our times and is having and will continue to have significant adverse consequences on life as we know it in Australia, our pacific neighbours and around the world;

(b)         man-made carbon emissions contribute to the climate emergency and the need to reduce our carbon emissions to tackle the effects of climate change;

(c)         future generations will be forced to deal with the consequences of inaction and failures to reduce our carbon emissions; and

(d)         young Australians are crying out for leadership from this Parliament in tackling climate change;

(2)         notes with alarm that:

(a)         Australia’s carbon emissions have risen continuously since 2014 after coming down more than 10 per cent in the previous Government;

(b)         the Government’s own projections show that: (i) Australia will fail to meet the 2020 Kyoto target of a 5 per cent reduction in emissions from 2000 levels; and (ii) emissions are projected to continue to rise until 2030, failing to meet its own 2030 targets; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         take action to actually reduce our carbon emissions, to meet its own targets without using ‘carryover credits’; and

(b)         adopt more ambitious targets which actually meet Australia’s obligations to play a part in the global effort to keep global warming below 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels.

              ( Notice given 17 September 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       9    Ms Claydon : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         an effective public service relies on skilled public servants who have fair and equitable conditions of employment and job security;

(b)         the Government’s arbitrary average staffing level (ASL) policy is:

(i)           driving privatisation as it forces agencies to outsource their core functions;

(ii)         causing a blowout in spending on contractors, consultants and labour hire; and

(iii)        leading to a hollowing out of the public service; and

(c)         evidence to the Australian Public Service (APS) Review indicates that contractors cost 40 per cent more than permanent APS employees;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Australian National Audit Office Information Report No 19 of 2017-18, Australian Government Procurement Contract Reporting , indicates that in 2016-17:

(i)           Government spending on consultants was close to $700 million, up from around $380 million in 2013;

(ii)         ‘the big four’ had 1,617 consultancy contracts worth $502.1 million since 2012-13;

(b)         more than $400 million has been spent on privatising Department of Human Services call centres, including a $135 million contract for Stellar Asia Pacific, $132 million to Concentrix Services, $120 million to Datacom Connect and $36 million to Serco Citizen Services;

(c)         the National Disability Insurance Agency:

(i)           recorded a 600 per cent increase in consultants and contractors over two years—from $70 million in 2016 to $430 million in 2018; and

(ii)         has previously stated its staffing levels would be 10,595 staff in 2018-2019—this is now capped at 3,230 in the 2019-20 budget with core functions such as local area coordinators outsourced; and

(d)         the Government’s billion dollar plan to privatise Australia’s visa system will lead to increased visa costs, data and national security risks and job losses; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         abolish the arbitrary and damaging ASL policy;

(b)         ensure that workers doing the same job get the same pay to stop the use of labour hire from undermining the pay and conditions of existing workers; and

(c)         end the secrecy on government spending on contractors, consultants and labour hire firms.

              ( Notice given 15 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    10    Mr Katter : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that the Australian dairy industry is facing decimation as a result of the failure of government deregulation;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         successive governments have contributed to failure in the dairy industry and that the dairy industry will continue its decline if policy is driven by ideology;

(b)         the time is up for our Australian dairy industry with national herds being sold for slaughter, farm foreclosures and employees now trapped in destitution in rural towns;

(c)         in Queensland, the number of dairy farms has dropped from 1,305 in 2000-01 to 393 in 2017-18;

(d)         Australia had 12,896 dairy farms in the year 2000 and as of 2018 there were just 5,699, a reduction of 57 per cent;

(e)         farmers are, in general, not receiving the full 10 cent levy promised by the supermarkets; and

(f)          in 2001-02 our national herd produced 11.3 billion litres of whole milk, and in 2017-18 Australia produced 8.8 billion litres, a 22 per cent reduction of 2.5 billion litres; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         reintroduce the minimum price scheme, which delivered orderly marketing and fairness for nearly a century to Australia’s farmers, contractors and employees; or

(b)         secure from supermarket chains a 25 cent price rise (since they are able to set a 10 cent price rise), and oversee the mechanics of ensuring that this 25 cents goes back to the farm gate.

              ( Notice given 15 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    11    Mr Gorman : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that all Australian school students should have the same opportunity of access to the nation’s democratic, cultural and historical institutions; and

(b)         Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial are nationally significant institutions which all Australian school students should visit;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         the Parliament and Civics Education Rebate (PACER) program provides inadequate financial support for Australian students to travel to Canberra to engage in civics education in the nation’s capital;

(b)         the rebate provides schools with no more than $340 to cover flights, accommodation and transport per student;

(c)         such a rebate is dramatically insufficient for students travelling extensive distances from regional Australia and from Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory;

(d)         students from Western Australia, South Australia and the Northern Territory are underrepresented in the PACER program; and

(e)         in 2018-19, fewer than four per cent of the students who visited the Federal Parliament were from Western Australia, despite Western Australia representing more than ten per cent of the national student population; and only 0.5 per cent of students visited from the Northern Territory, despite the Northern Territory accounting for one per cent of Australian students;

(3)         notes that:

(a)         more than 1.5 million enrolled electors failed to vote at the federal election on 18 May 2019;

(b)         fewer than 41 per cent of Australian citizens are satisfied with the way democracy works in Australia, according to research from the University of Canberra; and

(c)         it is essential that the Parliament promote democratic values to future generations and engage them in their democracy; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         review and increase the Parliament and Civics Education Rebate to cover the total cost of school travel to the capital including Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial;

(b)         ensure equal access for all Australian students to observe Australia’s political system; and

(c)         invest in Australia’s democratic institutions to build trust amongst young Australians.

              ( Notice given 22 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    12    Dr Leigh : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         charities are the most trusted sector in Australian public life; and

(b)         the Government’s failure to act on fundraising reform is costing Australian charities over $1 million every month;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s current framework of fundraising regulation creates unnecessary problems for charities and organisations who rely on donations from Australian supporters;

(b)         current fundraising laws no longer meet the objectives that guided the decision to regulate donations;

(c)         current fundraising compliance regimes do not allow charities to cultivate donor activity and make optimal use of the resources donors provide;

(d)         meeting the requirements of Australia’s seven different fundraising regimes is causing needless productivity loss for thousands of Australian charities and not-for-profits;

(e)         Australia’s current frameworks for investigation and enforcement have failed to adapt to the contemporary fundraising environment;

(f)          current fundraising laws do not meet the donor-focused expectations and requirements that should govern fundraising regulation in the 21st century; and

(g)         the mechanisms that regulate third party fundraisers should ensure the culture of third party fundraisers matches community perceptions of their clients;

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         for several years, the charity and not-for-profit sector has been calling for reform of Australia’s fundraising laws;

(b)         Treasury’s five year review of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission, delivered on 31 May 2018, identified fundraising law as the major reporting burden on charities and recommended that fundraising law be harmonised across the country;

(c)         in February 2019, the Senate Select Committee into Charitable Fundraising in the 21st Century called on Parliament to harmonise fundraising law within two years;

(d)         that inquiry, chaired by Labor Senator Catryna Bilyk, delivered a unanimous report, with its recommendations being supported by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert, Liberal Senators Eric Abetz and Amanda Stoker, former Labor Senator David Smith, and former United Australia Party Senator Brian Burston; and

(e)         postponing fundraising reform has had significant costs to the charity and not-for profit sector, with the committee estimating that the annual cost to charities and their donors is around $15 million; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         support Australian charities by ending unnecessary waste of their precious resources;

(b)         support the generous Australian donors who donate money to our charities, by ensuring their donations are not needlessly eroded by redundant administrative and regulatory costs;

(c)         work with state and territory governments and the not-for-profit sector to deliver a consistent national model for regulating not-for-profit and charitable fundraising activities before February 2021; and

(d)         immediately provide a public response to the recommendations made in the review panel’s report, Strengthening for Purpose: Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Legislation Review , which was provided to the Government on 31 May 2018.

              ( Notice given 22 October 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    13    Ms Swanson : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the rampant use of casual labour hire in Australia’s coal mining industry, in some areas up to half the workforce;

(b)         the impact of the increasing use of labour hire by the coal mining industry in driving down wages and conditions;

(c)         that many labour hire mineworkers are employed as casuals for years on end; and

(d)         that labour hire mineworkers employed as casuals are often paid much less than permanent employees for doing the same work;

(2)         condemns the Government for failing to act in support of permanent coal mining industry jobs, and;

(3)         calls on the Government to legislate to ensure that workers employed through a labour hire company will receive the same pay and conditions as people employed directly.

              ( Notice given 25 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    14    Ms Templeman : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are 120,000 older Australians waiting for their approved home care package, with many waiting more than two years for the care they have been approved for;

(b)         more than 16,000 older Australians died waiting for their approved home care package they were assessed for in 2017-18—sadly, that was around 300 older Australians that died each week in that year waiting for care;

(c)         there are around 14,000 older Australians who entered residential aged care prematurely because they couldn’t get the care they were assessed and approved for in 2017-18—sadly, that was around 200 older Australians each week having no other choice but to enter residential aged care; and

(d)         the number of older Australians waiting for home care grew from 88,000 to 120,000 since 2017; and

(2)         condemns the Government for its inadequate response to the Royal Commission’s interim report and not providing the home care older Australians need.

              ( Notice given 25 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    15    Mr O’Connor : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the tragic and premature death of Mr David Smith, National Secretary of the Australian Services Union on 22 November 2019; and

(2)         extends its sympathies to Mr Smith’s family and friends, and the broader union movement.

              ( Notice given 25 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    16    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the life work of Professor Colin Tatz AO, who sadly passed away on 19 November 2019;

(2)         notes Professor Colin Tatz’s contributions to society in:

(a)         promoting health and welfare in Indigenous communities;

(b)         promoting sporting prowess in Indigenous communities, including through publications such as his book, Obstacle Race: Aborigines in Sport; and

(c)         his activism against racism, specifically through his work as a director of the Australian Institute for Holocaust and Genocide Studies; and

(3)         expresses its sympathy and condolences to the family and loved ones of Professor Tatz, who will be sorely missed.

              ( Notice given 26 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    17    Mr Khalil : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes with concern the ongoing violence and political instability in Chile, driven by rising economic inequality;

(2)         condemns the use of lethal force against peaceful protesters and calls on all parties to refrain from violence;

(3)         recognises the importance and right to peaceful protest in any democracy and condemns the use of violence to repress the democratic right of Chilean citizens to protest;

(4)         calls on the Chilean Government to include all parties, namely, civil society, unions and indigenous peoples in addition to business leaders in the process for drafting a new constitution;

(5)         encourages the work of the Chilean National Human Rights Institute and authorities to investigate human rights abuses and hold those responsible to account; and

(6)         calls on Australian companies that do business in Chile to play a constructive role in the solution to end the political instability.

              ( Notice given 26 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    18    Mr Wilkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Tasmanian public health system is fundamentally broken;

(b)         Tasmanian hospitals are the worst-performing in the country, despite heroic efforts of staff;

(c)         the Richardson Report (2004), Tasmania’s Health Plan (2007), Report of the Commission on Delivery of Health Services in Tasmania (2013) and the One State, One Health System, Better Outcomes reform package (2015) all found that, compared to the rest of Australia, Tasmania has the most rapidly ageing, geographically-dispersed population with the highest rates of chronic disease, rising costs and the worst performing public health system;

(d)         in April 2019, emergency doctors highlighted that bed-block and ambulance ramping at the Royal Hobart Hospital is injuring and killing patients;

(e)         in 2018-19 more than 1,800 patients waited longer than 24 hours in the emergency department at the Royal Hobart Hospital;

(f)          the 2018 Report on Government Services by the Productivity Commission found that in 2016-17 the percentage of people on waiting lists for elective surgery in Tasmania was 11.12 per cent higher than the national average;

(g)         Tasmania has the lowest percentage of acute mental health beds in the country;

(h)         in 2016 the Tasmanian Government reduced the number of mental health beds from 42 to 32, despite calls from health professionals for an increase;

(i)           on 15 November 2019, 17 people in mental health crises were waiting in the emergency department at the Royal Hobart Hospital, some whom had been waiting more than three days;

(j)          in July 2018 a suicidal man chopped off his own finger so that he would be admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital because the hospital had refused to admit him as a mental health patient on two previous occasions;

(k)         independent Tasmanian public policy analyst Martyn Goddard estimates that, since the Tasmanian Government came to power in 2014, health and hospitals have been short-changed by approximately $2 billion, including diverting $1.6 billion of GST money from Tasmania’s health system;

(l)           the Tasmanian health system has received more funding from the federal government than the national average, but still underperforms;

(m)       the Australian College for Emergency Medicine has said that throwing more money at hospitals in Tasmania is not necessarily the solution because there are deep systemic cultural and management issues that must be addressed;

(n)         there is precedence for the federal government to intervene in the Tasmanian health system, for instance the take-over and hand-back of the Mersey Hospital; and

(o)         people are dying because of the failings of the Tasmanian public health system;

(2)         calls on the Government to refer Tasmania’s failing health system to the Productivity Commission; and

(3)         calls on the Productivity Commission to:

(a)         conduct a Tasmanian-specific public inquiry to identify the root causes of Tasmania’s failing health system; and

(b)         formulate a solution to fix the systemic and cultural problems within the Tasmanian health system.

              ( Notice given 26 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    19    Mr R. J. Wilson : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that from 2013-14 to 2023-24, the Government will provide a record $6.2 billion under the Roads to Recovery Program, with an ongoing commitment of $500 million each year following; and

(b)         the significant benefits to the 128 Local Government Areas which will receive an additional $138.9 million in Roads to Recovery drought support funding; and

(2)         recognises the real and meaningful difference Roads to Recovery is making to communities right across the country.

              ( Notice given 26 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    20    Mr Giles : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         Government has failed refugees and humanitarian entrants in Australia;

(b)         Government for the past six years has failed to provide effective policy in regard to employment and settlement outcomes for refugees and humanitarian entrants;

(c)         Shergold report, Investing in Refugees, Investing in Australia , was finished in February 2019, and the Government refused to release the report for 10 months;

(d)         the Shergold report highlights the concerning failures of important programs such as the Adult Migrant English Program and Jobactive in supporting social and economic participation; and

(e)         the Shergold report highlights the absence of an effective place-based community sponsorship policy which harnesses the collective strength of whole communities partnering with their local governments, service providers and community organisations; and

(2)         recognises the:

(a)         failure of the Government to provide leadership and policy coordination;

(b)         contribution of state, territory and local governments, front-line service providers and community organisations in supporting refugees and humanitarian entrants; and

(c)         significant social and economic contribution made by refugees and humanitarian entrants in Australia.

              ( Notice given 27 November 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    21    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Australian postage rates for standard letters have near doubled over the past decade;

(b)         Australia Post parcel delivery rates increased in October 2019;

(c)         increased postal rates directly impact on business viability and competitiveness with overseas suppliers;

(d)         higher postal charges are inevitably passed on to Australian households by providers of goods and services; and

(e)         high postal rates have a disproportionate impact on older Australians and migrants because they have a greater reliance on postal services; and

(2)         calls on the Government to consider the whole of society impact when considering future postage rate increases.

              ( Notice given 3 December 2019. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      22    Dr Leigh : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Act 1988 , and for related purposes. ( Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Amendment (ACT Integrity Commission Powers) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 5 December 2019.  Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      23    Mr Wilkie : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act 2007 , and for related purposes. ( National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Amendment (Transparency in Carbon Emissions Accounting) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 4 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      24    Mr Bandt : To present a Bill for an Act to provide that major emitters of greenhouse gases are liable for climate change damage that occurs in Australia, and for related purposes. ( Liability for Climate Change Damage (Make the Polluters Pay) Bill 2020 )

              ( Notice given 4 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    25    Ms Wells : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month in Australia; and

(b)         26 February 2020 is Teal Ribbon Day; and

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate of any women's cancer;

(b)         every year, almost 1600 Australian women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer;

(c)         every year, approximately 1000 Australian women die from ovarian cancer;

(d)         in Australia, the overall five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer is 46 per cent; and

(e)         there is currently no reliable screening test to aid detection and prevention.

              ( Notice given 4 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

    26    Ms Claydon : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Aged Care Assessment Teams (ACAT) are teams of medical professionals which run clinical and psychological checks on older Australians who have applied for home or residential aged care;

(b)         based in hospitals across the country, ACAT are ultimately responsible for assessing which older Australians should receive government-funded care;

(c)         teams usually include a nurse, plus another healthcare worker such as a physiotherapist, occupational therapist or social worker;

(d)         the Government has announced that it will privatise the ACAT workforce from April 2021, when a tender will be put out for organisations to deliver this vital assessment; and

(e)         on 14 January 2020 the Chair of the Royal Commission into Aged Care, Mr Gaetano Pagone QC, issued a statement saying the Royal Commission’s interim report ‘did not endorse the Government’s stated position’ on privatising the aged care assessment teams;

(2)         supports the retention of ACAT as a publicly provided service;

(3)         commends the Health Services Union, United Workers Unions and Australian Nurses and Midwifery Federation for their continued advocacy on behalf of working people in healthcare across Australia, and particularly in the aged care sector; and

(4)         condemns the Government for its continued failings across aged care policy.

              ( Notice given 4 February 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

Orders of the day

         1    Constitution Alteration (Freedom of Expression and Freedom of the Press) 2019 [No. 2] ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         2    Constitution Alteration (Water Resources) 2019 [No. 2] ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         3    Australia’s space industry: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Ramsey —That this House:

(1)         notes that this week 50 years ago the human imagination was captivated by the first man to walk on the moon;

(2)         recognises the commitment by the Government to space by the establishment of the Australian Space Agency, which will have the goal of tripling the space industry and creating 20,000 jobs;

(3)         acknowledges the vital role the Woomera range and facilities have played, and will continue to play in Australia’s space industry; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for investing $19.5 million in a Space Infrastructure Fund that will support projects to accelerate growth of Australia’s space industry.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         4    Top athletes: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Ryan —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the incredible performances of Australia’s top athletes in recent times including:

(a)         the Matildas reaching the final 16 in the FIFA World Cup;

(b)         Ash Barty winning the French Open and acing her way to the top of the world tennis rankings;

(c)         Sally Fitzgibbons making waves by winning the 2019 Oi Rio Pro - World Surf League event and surfing her way to the top of the world rankings;

(d)         Hannah Green winning the Women’s PGA Championship and in doing so taking home Australia’s first major win in a women’s golf tournament in over a decade; and

(e)         the Hockeyroos reaching the final of the inaugural Women’s International Hockey Federation Pro League;

(2)         acknowledges the teams that support our athletes including their coaches, managers, physiotherapists, dieticians and their families; and

(3)         encourages Australian athletes in upcoming competitions including:

(a)         the Australian Diamonds who will be competing in the Netball World Cup in Liverpool, England between 12 and 21 July 2019; and

(b)         the Australian Women’s Cricket Team who will be competing in the ICC Women’s T20 Cricket World Cup in 2020.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         5    National Integrity Commission Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

         6    Settlement of refugees funding: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges Australia is a major contributor to the Syria humanitarian response plan, designating approximately $220 million dollars to Syria and neighbouring countries between 2016 and 2019;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         western Sydney is a primary settlement region and has received one-fifth of Australia’s recent humanitarian intake, as a result of years of ongoing conflict in the Middle East; and

(b)         local health, education and migrant service providers, particularly in Fairfield and Liverpool, are running beyond their funded capacity and as a result, have been put under considerable pressure when trying to assist families to settle and integrate into our local community; and

(3)         further acknowledges:

(a)         that the insufficient funding to support these frontline services has widened the gap between supply of and demand for settlement services to support vulnerable individuals, particularly from the minority Christian, Assyrian, Chaldean and Mandaean communities; and

(b)         the need to effectively invest in the settlement of refugees to enable them to integrate into the community, fulfil their potential and make a positive contribution to this country.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

         7    National Science Week: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Allen —That this House:

(1)         recognises National Science Week took place from 10 to 18 August 2019;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         National Science Week is an opportunity to recognise the economic and social contribution of those working in science disciplines;

(b)         National Science Week highlights the importance of sparking an interest in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects from an early age and maintaining participation by students throughout primary and secondary schooling;

(c)         last year almost 1.2 million people participated in more than 2,100 events around the country; and

(d)         Questacon’s leadership role during National Science Week and throughout the year in inspiring young people and promoting STEM study; and

(3)         notes the Government’s ongoing investment in science, research and innovation, which totalled $9.6 billion in 2018-19.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

         8    Prostate cancer: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Gorman —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         according to Cancer Australia an estimated 3,306 men have died from prostate cancer in 2019;

(b)         there is an estimated one in six risk of a male being diagnosed with prostate cancer by his 85th birthday; and

(c)         it is vital that men take their health seriously;

(2)         acknowledges the tireless work of men’s health advocate, prostate cancer survivor and Maylands resident, Mr David Dyke, for raising awareness about prostate cancer and promoting the importance of men’s health in the electoral division of Perth and across Australia;

(3)         commends Mr Dyke for his:

(a)         advocacy in championing men’s health;

(b)         efforts in producing a deeply personal documentary on his battle with prostate cancer; and

(c)         committed work in raising awareness about prostate cancer; and

(4)         encourages Members to watch Mr Dyke’s YouTube documentary ‘David Dyke Prostate Journey: From Diagnosis to Rehabilitation’.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

         9    Australian Bill of Rights Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      10    Fair Work Amendment (Stop Work to Stop Warming) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      11    National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      12    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Real Time Disclosure of Political Donations) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. On 19 September 2019, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters. )

      13    Skills and vocational training: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Kearney —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         more than 6 years of Liberal government has left Australia facing a crisis in skills and vocational training; and

(b)         under this Government:

(i)           more than 150,000 traineeships and apprenticeships have been lost;

(ii)         $3 billion has been slashed from TAFE and training; and

(iii)        75 per cent of businesses are struggling to find qualified Australians to fill jobs; and

(2)         further notes that:

(a)         the Coalition’s answer to the ongoing demise of the VET sector is a $525 million skills package, yet Senate estimates confirmed that only $54.5 million of this is new funding for the sector;

(b)         the business community, unions and the not-for-profit sector are demanding reform and real funding—they know that a strong and growing economy depends on a skilled Australian workforce; and

(c)         with youth unemployment stuck at more than double the national average, young people need a decent skills sector that leads to good, secure and well paid jobs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting days including 24 February 2020. )

      14    Baha’i Faith: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)         considers the Baha’i community a valued part of Australian society;

(2)         commends the contribution that Australian Baha’is make to social cohesion, unity and community building in Australia;

(3)         provides assurance that it holds the Baha’i Faith, its leadership and its practicing members in the highest regard, in light of their focus on serving others with excellence;

(4)         congratulates the Australian Baha’i community on the celebration of the bicentenary of the birth of their founder, the Bab, in October 2019;

(5)         condemns the ongoing persecution of Baha’is across the world, which includes arbitrary arrests and imprisonments, economic isolation and denial of access to higher education;

(6)         acknowledges that 2019 is the bicentenary of the Baha’i Faith;

(7)         notes that the Baha’i Faith teaches core principles of inclusivity, public service and peacefulness;

(8)         recognises that in spite of the openness and peacefulness inherent to their beliefs, members of the Baha’i Faith have suffered significant persecution;

(9)         understands that most, if not all, of the world’s major religions have, at various times including the present, suffered persecution in some form; and

(10)     holds that the importance of freedom of religion is both an individual and a collective right, protected under international and domestic law, whereby all people are free to adopt and hold a belief, as well as manifest that belief in worship, observance, practice or teaching.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      15    Coal Prohibition (Quit Coal) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      16    Crimes Legislation Amendment (Age of Criminal Responsibility) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      17    Visa processing system: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Giles —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government plans to privatise Australia’s visa processing system;

(b)         under the Government’s plan, a private tenderer will be given licence to run Australia’s visa processing system as a for-profit business; and

(c)         the Government will decide the winning tenderer in October 2019;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         visa and citizenship processing times have blown out under this Government;

(b)         more than 230,000 people are on bridging visas;

(c)         more than 220,000 people are on waiting lists for their citizenship; and

(d)         the Government has failed to preserve and enhance the integrity of Australia’s visa processing system; and

(3)         calls on the Government to stop its privatisation of Australia’s visa processing system.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      18    Refugee Protection Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      19    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering Voting Age and Increasing Voter Participation) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      20    Climate change: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr M. C. Butler —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         climate change is a significant threat to our economy, natural environment, farming communities and national security;

(b)         Australia’s annual emissions have been rising in recent years;

(c)         as a global problem, the solution to climate change requires concerted international cooperation to limit the production of greenhouse gases;

(d)         as the only global agreement designed to address climate change, the Paris Accords must play a central role in addressing climate change;

(e)         the Paris Accords require signatory countries to deliver actions consistent with keeping the global temperature rise this century to well below 2 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius;

(f)          based on the latest scientific advice, the world is currently on track for warming of above 3 degrees, and efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions need to be strengthened to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts; and

(g)         as a result of the threat posed by climate change, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Portugal, Argentina and the Republic of Ireland have declared a climate emergency; and

(2)         therefore, affirms that:

(a)         Australia remains committed to delivering on its obligations under the Paris Accords;

(b)         failing to meet the goals of the Paris Accords would have unprecedented and devastating environmental, economic, societal and health impacts for Australia; and

(c)         the threat posed by climate change on the future prosperity and security of Australia and the globe constitutes a climate change emergency.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      21    Education funding: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Hammond —That this House:

(1)         recognises that after more than twelve years at school, year 12 students will soon complete their final examinations and transition to the next phase of their lives—this may include pursuing higher education, engaging with vocational education and training (VET) or entering the workforce;

(2)         acknowledges the valuable contribution hard working teachers have made in our communities in educating, nurturing, encouraging and motivating our 2019 school leavers;

(3)         notes the Government’s record investment in education funding including:

(a)         a record $21.3 billion for state schools, catholic schools and independent schools for the 2020 school year, an increase in funding of $8.5 billion since 2013;

(b)         a record $8.6 billion for child care and $17.7 billion for the university sector in the 2019-20 budget;

(c)         $30.2 million in 2019-20 to establish the Local School Community Fund to support priority projects in local schools that benefit students and their communities;

(d)         $71.6 million to improve outcomes for very remote students by encouraging teachers to teach and stay longer in their schools through remitting the HELP debt; and

(e)         a commitment to support the VET sector through a $525.3 million Skills Package; and

(4)         congratulates the Government on its continued commitment and investment in education from early learning through to higher education and VET to ensure our young people have the opportunity to succeed, gain employment and live their best lives.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      22    Private Health Insurance Legislation Amendment (Fairer Rules for General Treatments) Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      23    Public housing: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Burns —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         access to adequate housing is a fundamental right under Article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights which Australia has ratified;

(b)         adequate housing requires safe, secure and affordable accommodation be accessible to all;

(c)         116,427 Australians were homeless on the last census night;

(d)         homelessness affects Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders disproportionately;

(e)         homelessness includes those in crisis accommodation, improvised dwellings, temporary accommodation, boarding houses and other insecure forms of housing;

(f)          inadequate provision of public housing is a major cause of homelessness;

(g)         public housing is a central tenant of an equitable Australia where a fair go requires access to secure accommodation;

(h)         public housing is a determinative factor in education, employment, and health outcomes; and

(i)           public housing is a means of social mobility and opportunity; and

(2)         calls on the Government to help build more affordable homes and ensure every Australian has their own safe place to live.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      24    Geneva Conventions of 1949: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 12 August 2019 marked the 70th anniversary of the opening for signature of the four Geneva Conventions in 1949;

(2)         notes that the Geneva Conventions of 1949, the foundation of modern international humanitarian law, remain as fundamental and relevant to armed conflict today as when they were opened for signature 70 years ago;

(3)         acknowledges that the Geneva Conventions, while universally accepted, are not being uniformly respected in times of war, underscoring the need for ongoing advocacy;

(4)         recalls that the Conventions and their Additional Protocols protect those who are not fighting, such as civilians, medical personnel, chaplains and humanitarians as well as non-military places such as hospitals;

(5)         honours the continuing role of Australian Red Cross in:

(a)         disseminating international humanitarian law;

(b)         assisting successive Australian Governments to ensure respect for and disseminate international humanitarian law; and

(c)         educating the general public about the correct use of the red cross emblem;

(6)         pays respect to the continuing global leadership role of the International Committee of the Red Cross in assisting the victims of armed conflict and working for the greater understanding and advancement of international humanitarian law;

(7)         determines that Australia should remain, now as always, a global leader in advocacy for, and implementation of, the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and all that they stand for; and

(8)         resolves that this resolution has effect and continues in force unless and until amended or rescinded by the houses in this or a subsequent parliament.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      25    Australian Banks (Government Audit) Bill 2019 ( Mr Katter ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2010. )

      26    Live Animal Export Prohibition (Ending Cruelty) Bill 2019 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      27    Climate Change Authority Amendment (Impact of 3 Degrees of Global Warming on Australia) Bill 2019 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      28    Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Lowering the Donation Disclosure Threshold) Bill 2019 ( Ms Sharkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. On 5 February 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this bill be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters. )

      29    People with disability: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Stanley —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         3 December 2019 is International Day of People with Disability; and

(b)         the Human Rights Commission estimates the number of Australians with a disability to be around four million;

(2)         respects the rights of all:

(a)         people with disability in Australia, including having access to services and freedom from discrimination;

(b)         persons with a disability to be welcomed as equal and positive contributors to Australian society; and

(c)         people with disability to have choice and control in relation to any support services they receive; and

(3)         encourages all:

(a)         persons with disability as their own self-advocates;

(b)         groups and individuals that advocate on behalf of people with disabilities; and

(c)         Australians to respect the basic rights of all persons with disabilities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      30    The Honourable Dr Brendan Nelson AO: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the importance of the Australian War Memorial to our nation in commemorating, acknowledging and recording the service of our defence force personnel; and

(b)         that after seven years of service to the Australian War Memorial, the Hon Dr Brendan Nelson AO is retiring as its director;

(2)         acknowledges the outstanding leadership Dr Nelson has provided at the Australian War Memorial, including:

(a)         introducing the daily Last Post ceremony;

(b)         leading the Memorial through the:

(i)           Centenary of ANZAC and World War I commemorations; and

(ii)         50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War commemorations;

(c)         renovating the First World War galleries;

(d)         recognising the need to incorporate the service of our 100,000 younger veterans and therefore introducing the Afghanistan exhibition;

(e)         advocating for and securing, with Australian War Memorial Chairman Mr Kerry Stokes AC, a $500 million investment to expand the memorial to enable the stories of younger veterans to be told; and

(f)          strengthening the relationship the Australian people have with the memorial and the men and women who have served our nation; and

(3)         congratulates and sincerely thanks Dr Nelson for his service to the Australian War Memorial and the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).