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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Wednesday, 12 February 2020

The Federation Chamber meets at 10 am

 

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Australian bushfires Condolence Motion: Resumption of debate ( from  11 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Morrison .

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS

Orders of the day

       1    Environment and Energy—Standing Committee Not without your approval: a way forward for nuclear technology in Australia —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 5 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS— continued

Orders of the day continued

       2    VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES—MINISTERIAL STATEMENT—MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 17 October 2019—Mr Ted O’Brien ) on the motion of Mr D. J. Chester —That the House take note of the document.

         3    Anniversary of the national apology to victims and survivors of institutional child sexual abuse: Resumption of debate ( from  3 December 2019 —Mrs Wicks ) on the motion of Mr Morrison —That the House commemorate the anniversary of the national apology to the survivors and victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

         4    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  11 February 2020 ).

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS— continued

Orders of the day continued

       2    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 186: IA-CEPA and A-HKFTA —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 16 October 2019— Ms Wells ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       3    Treaties—Joint Standing Committee Report 187: Oil Stock Contracts—Hungary; MRA UK; Trade in Wine UK; MH17 Netherlands; Air Services: Thailand, Timor-Leste, PNG; Work Diplomatic Families—Italy; Double Taxation—Israel —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 22 October 2019— Mr Broadbent ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       4    Economics—Standing Committee Review of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission annual report 2018 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 3 December 2019— Mrs Wicks ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

       5    Public Accounts and Audit—Joint Committee Report 480: Annual report 2018-19 —MOTION TO TAKE NOTE OF DOCUMENT: Resumption of debate ( from 5 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mrs Wicks —That the House take note of the report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Australian Defence Force cadets: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Hastie —That this House:

(1)         notes the valuable contribution the Australian Defence Force (ADF) cadets make to youth development in our communities;

(2)         recognises cadet leaders and staff who give up their time to mentor and shape Australia’s youth; and

(3)         acknowledges that ADF cadets, in cooperation with the community, benefit the nation by developing an individual’s capacity to contribute to society.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         2    Tasmanian housing crisis: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Collins —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         after being neglected by successive State and Federal Liberal Governments, Tasmania is now in the depths of a housing crisis;

(b)         under the Liberals, the Tasmanian housing market is failing renters, first-home buyers and people at risk of homelessness;

(c)         the average middle-income Tasmanian household is in rental stress, paying about 30 per cent of their income just to put a roof over their head, and 20 per cent more Tasmanians are accessing homelessness and crisis housing services than two years ago;

(d)         sadly, behind these statistics, Tasmanians are hurting;

(e)         the new Federal Assistant Minister for Community Housing, Homelessness and Community Services wants to put a ‘positive spin’ on the housing crisis, which is disgraceful and shows an arrogant contempt for ordinary Tasmanians; and

(f)          these unacceptable comments illustrate the failure and incompetence of the Liberals in Tasmania;

(2)         calls on the Federal Government to outline a plan to address this crisis—if there is a deal with Senator Lambie, the Government should release the details; and

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         this continuing record of neglect is yet another example of the State and Federal Liberals failing to stand up for Tasmania; and

(b)         only Labor can be trusted to take the housing crisis seriously.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         3    National Disability Insurance Scheme Early Childhood Early Intervention approach: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr C. Kelly —That this House:

(1)         notes the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) approach is an evidence-based, best practice approach to early childhood intervention for children aged zero to six years with developmental delay or disability, and there have been some challenges with rolling out the ECEI approach;

(2)         welcomes the Government’s announcement to reduce delays and backlogs in delivering early childhood early intervention supports through the NDIS; and

(3)         notes that:

(a)         a six-month recovery plan to be implemented by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) will include working with ECEI partners to secure additional resources to ensure children are able to receive early childhood supports in a more timely manner;

(b)         the NDIA will provide a standardised interim six-month plan for children who have been found eligible for the NDIS, but who are experiencing significant waiting periods for a plan (that is, where the period between an access decision and getting a plan is greater than 50 days) and that these interim plans will be replaced by a full NDIS plan no later than six months after being issued;

(c)         new participants who are not categorised as complex and who are not transferring from an existing Commonwealth, state or territory disability program will be given a standardised interim plan for $10,000;

(d)         participants who are transferring from an existing Commonwealth, state or territory disability program, their interim NDIS plan and funding package will reflect their existing support levels, however, if that amount is lower than $10,000 they will also receive the $10,000 standardised interim plan for up to six months; and

(e)         participants with complex support needs, will immediately be streamed to an NDIA early childhood specialist to develop their plan and appropriate funding package.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         4    Vision Australia Radio funding: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes that Vision Australia’s radio broadcast is at risk of ending at the end of 2019 due to a lack of funding;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         this organisation is receiving some Government funding, but more is needed to cover running costs; and

(b)         700,000 listeners tune into Vision Australia Radio each year and that there are around 800 volunteers across 10 stations in Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth and regional Victoria;

(3)         recognises that due to changes in the funding received by disability support organisations following the roll out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, Vision Australia needs to secure an extra $700,000 per year to ensure the future of the service;

(4)         believes the Government can play a vital role in ensuring people with a print disability can remain informed and connected to their local community; and

(5)         calls on the Government to provide greater funding support to Vision Australia to continue their radio service.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         5    Cyber security: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         according to IDCARE, in 2019 they will provide support to over 50,000 Australians and New Zealanders who have experienced identity takeover, cybercrimes, scams and cyber bullying;

(b)         in 2018-19, IDCARE’s call centre provided approximately 53,400 hours of specialist identity and cyber security counselling support to Australian residents; and

(c)         Australia is being targeted by international organised crime and we need a strong approach to educating people on how they can protect themselves;

(2)         recognises the commitment by the Government to prioritise cyber security initiatives as part of the Cyber Security Strategy 2016 and the Action Plan that outlines the steps the Government will take to achieve Australia’s cybersecurity goals by 2020; and

(3)         acknowledges the need for continued investment, support and education to protect Australians from being victims of international organised crime.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         6    Public sector integrity commission: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on its commitment to establish a Commonwealth Integrity Commission to investigate and prevent corruption in the public sector;

(2)         congratulates the Opposition on its commitment to establish a National Integrity Commission to investigate and prevent corruption in the public sector;

(3)         notes the major and significant contribution that a robust and well-functioning integrity commission can make to sustain and reinforce public confidence in the integrity of Australia’s democratic government, parliament, and public service; and to help control corruption generally in Australia, in line with our international obligations;

(4)         notes that to achieve these objectives, the design and implementation of a robust integrity commission should include:

(a)         a broad jurisdiction to investigate and help prevent any serious or systematic abuse of entrusted power for private or political gain (‘corruption’) at the Commonwealth level, including but not limited to criminal offences;

(b)         the ability to self-initiate investigations;

(c)         the ability to receive, investigate or refer information about corruption from any person, including directly from Commonwealth staff or other whistleblowers;

(d)         improved measures for the protection of whistleblowers in the Commonwealth public sector and more generally;

(e)         the ability to hold public hearings for investigative purposes, for any corruption concerns within jurisdiction, where in the public interest to do so;

(f)          the other powers needed for effective investigation, including to question people, compel the production of documents, seek warrants to enter and search premises, make public reports including findings of fact and recommendations, and refer matters to relevant prosecutors;

(g)         the power and responsibility to properly coordinate the Commonwealth’s role in a national anti-corruption plan, working with state and territory agencies, other regulatory agencies for the private sector, and civil society;

(h)         the power and responsibility to lead comprehensive corruption prevention policies and procedures across the Commonwealth public sector, procurement and service delivery;

(i)           full jurisdiction over Commonwealth parliamentarians and their staff;

(j)          the creation of the commissioner(s) as an independent officer of the Commonwealth Parliament, appointed by and reporting to a bipartisan joint standing committee of the parliament, and only terminable on address from the parliament for proven misbehaviour or incapacity; and

(k)         sufficiently well-resourced funds and personnel; and

(5)         calls on the Government to work towards implementing an integrity commission that adheres to these key principles.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         7    Education: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         Australian school students who commenced preparatory school when the Coalition formed government are now entering their final semester of primary school;

(b)         Australian school students who commenced high school when the Coalition formed government have transitioned to earning or learning through tertiary or vocational education; and

(c)         the future opportunities of these young Australians have been curtailed by the inability of the Government to address the educational needs of Australian students;

(2)         notes that since the Coalition formed government:

(a)         one of their first acts in government was to cut $30 billion over the decade from projected school funding;

(b)         they failed to restore cuts to public schools;

(c)         the literacy and numeracy of Australian school students has fallen;

(d)         there has been no action by the Government to improve school standards;

(e)         there has been no action by the Government to provide support to students, parents, teachers and principals;

(f)          Australian Vocational education and training (VET) students are paying more for their courses;

(g)         Australian apprenticeships and on-the-job training opportunities have declined;

(h)         the threshold for student loan repayments has been reduced, so that VET and university students are now commencing to repay their student loans when they are earning barely more than the minimum wage;

(i)           university places have been capped;

(j)          penalty rates, relied on by many students trying to earn money while studying, have been cut, resulting in more time away from their studies; and

(k)         nothing has been done to address the disconnect between higher education courses and industry demand for skills; and

(3)         calls on the Government to urgently implement measures to:

(a)         support public education in Australia through fair funding and reversing the cuts;

(b)         address the falling standard of literacy and numeracy of Australian students;

(c)         make sure university and TAFE is affordable for all Australians; and

(d)         ensure that young Australians have the skills required for our future workforce needs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         8    Infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on:

(a)         the extensive urban and regional infrastructure investment of $100 billion announced in the 2019 Budget; and

(b)         its focus on national freight challenges, congestion busting and road safety;

(2)         recognises that every state of the Commonwealth is benefitting from the Government’s infrastructure program; and

(3)         commends the Government on providing the infrastructure that will build our future and generate growth for our economy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 24 February 2020. )

         9    Sydney Metro West project: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that western Sydney is home to two million people, which is nearly 10 per cent of Australia’s population and Australia’s third largest economy;

(b)         that western Sydney’s population is expected to grow by an additional one million people in the next 20 years while the population in the corridor between Parramatta and Sydney is expected to grow by 420,000;

(c)         that more than 300,000 new jobs are expected to be created in the same period and that traffic congestion is expected to cost Sydney nearly $15 billion by 2031;

(d)         that Parramatta is western Sydney’s Central Business District (CBD) and is Sydney’s second CBD;

(e)         the benefit of the proposed Sydney Metro West project to connect Parramatta and Sydney via the Bays Precinct and Sydney Olympic Park; and

(f)          that the project, when operational, is expected to slash travel times between the two CBDs to just 20 minutes (on trains running every two minutes) and reduce traffic congestion;

(2)         recognises the NSW Government’s commitment of $6.4 billion in funding to the project and additional commitment to fast-track the project to begin construction in 2020;

(3)         further notes that Federal Labor committed to $3 billion funding to the project prior to the 2019 federal election; and

(4)         calls on the Federal Government to urgently allocate the funding that will ensure the project can begin construction in the fast-tracked timeframe.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      10    World Ranger Day: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         notes that 31 July 2019 is World Ranger Day;

(2)         acknowledges the significant contribution that Indigenous rangers make to our national parks, including environmental management, restoration and education;

(3)         pays tribute to rangers that have lost their lives while at work;

(4)         supports the Government’s funding of Indigenous ranger groups with $254.6 million invested through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy over three years from 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2021, including $61.8 million in the state of Queensland; and

(5)         welcomes the work of 123 ranger groups nationally, which provided 2,160 jobs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in 2016-17.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      11    Small Amount Credit Contracts legislation: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Dick —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         it has been more than four years since the Government established the independent Review of Small Amount Credit Contracts (SACC);

(b)         the review panel provided the final report to the Government on 3 March 2016, listing 24 recommendations relating to the SACC and consumer leasing laws;

(c)         the Government released its response to the report on 28 November 2016, in which it agreed with the vast majority of recommendations in part or in full;

(d)         the Minister for Revenue and Financial Services at the time said ‘the implementation of these recommendations will ensure that vulnerable consumers are afforded appropriate levels of consumer protection while continuing to access SACCs and leases’;

(e)         the Government released draft legislation on 23 October 2017, whereby the Minister for Small Business and now Deputy Prime Minister said that the ‘Government will introduce legislation this year to implement the SACC and consumer lease reforms’;

(f)          the Assistant Minister to the Treasurer pledged in May 2018 that SACC and consumer leasing laws would be progressed in 2018;

(g)         former Prime Minister Turnbull confirmed the Government supported the vast majority of recommendations from the independent Review of SACC and also pledged to introduce legislation enacting the recommendations in 2018;

(h)         the Assistant Treasurer in December 2018 also noted the importance of protecting vulnerable consumers from harmful financial practices, but would wait until the conclusion of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry;

(i)           the Royal Commission has now been completed, however there is still no legislation before the house to enact the 24 recommendations from the independent Review of SACC;

(j)          on 22 February 2019 the Senate Economics References Committee completed an inquiry into credit and financial services targeted at Australians at risk of financial hardship, which recommended that the National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2017 exposure draft released by Treasury be introduced, and passage facilitated by the Government; and

(k)         the Government has continuously broken its promises to legislate these important reforms; and

(2)         calls on the Government to introduce legislation without any further delay so that Australians are given the protections they need from harmful pay day lending practices.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      12    Disability related health supports: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr C. Kelly —That this House:

(1)         notes the Council of Australian Governments Disability Reform Council met on 28 June 2019 and resolved a number of long-standing issues, including the interaction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) with the health system;

(2)         welcomes the council’s agreement to a range of disability-related health supports that will be provided through the NDIS; and

(3)         notes the:

(a)         NDIS will fund disability-related health supports where the supports are required as a result of the participant’s disability and assist the participant to undertake activities of daily living;

(b)         types of health supports that will be funded by the NDIS include continence supports, dysphagia and nutrition supports, respiratory supports and supports for wound and pressure care; and

(c)         approach agreed to by the council to fund disability related health supports under the NDIS recognises participants need to be placed at the centre of all decisions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      13    Age pensions: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the OECD:

(i)           calculates that Australia’s expenditure on age pensions is currently 4 per cent of public spending, and is projected to be 4 per cent in 2050, which compares with 9 per cent and 10 per cent respectively for the OECD; and

(ii)         has stated that ‘the old age income poverty rate in Australia is high at 26 per cent compared to 13 per cent across the OECD in 2015’;

(b)         the Benevolent Society:

(i)           released The Adequacy of the Age Pension in Australia: An assessment of pensioner living standards report in September 2016, concluding from its research that ‘the age pension in Australia is inadequate’; and

(ii)         also concludes that ‘home ownership constitutes the single biggest factor contributing to financial hardship among pensioners’ and ‘age pensioners who are renting, in particular those who are single, are the worst off’;

(c)         deeming rates dramatically affect the wellbeing of Australian pensioners; and

(d)         whilst the Government has reduced deeming rates for the first time since 2015, it has not been adequately responsive to changes in the cash rate; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         establish an independent tribunal to:

(i)           assess the base rate of the pension;

(ii)         assess the Commonwealth Assistance Rate;

(iii)        assess the deeming rate; and

(iv)       determine the best mechanism for regular review; and

(b)         reduce the financial gap between age pensioners who are home owners and those who are renters.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      14    Small business and the defence industry: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Thompson —That this House:

(1)         notes the important role Australian small business has in the future of our national and economic security through its integral role in our defence industry;

(2)         recognises the defence industry’s potential for growth in electoral divisions like Herbert and other regional electoral divisions across Australia;

(3)         supports opportunities to maximise the participation of Australian companies in all facets of defence procurement; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s commitment to deliver a robust, resilient and internationally competitive Australian defence industry.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      15    Citizenship applications: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         as at 30 June 2019 there were 221,415 applications for Australian citizenship by conferral;

(b)         under this Government the backlog has risen from 27,037 in 2013-14;

(c)         the timeframe for finalisation of 90 per cent of applications is now within 24 months;

(d)         some applicants wait longer than two years for their applications to be finalised; and

(e)         Australian Citizenship provides a number of important benefits including:

(i)           the right to enrol and vote;

(ii)         eligibility for a HECS-HELP loan for university;

(iii)        access to an Australian passport; and

(iv)       sometimes satisfying a requirement for employment; and

(2)         calls on the Government to immediately address the backlog and lengthy wait times for citizenship applications so that people who want to fully participate in Australian civic life are able to do so.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      16    Home care packages: Resumption of debate ( from  9 September 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the latest Government report indicates more than 129,000 older Australians are waiting for their approved home care package;

(b)         more than 75,000 older Australians on the waiting list have no home care package at all; and

(c)         since 2017 the wait list for home care has grown from 88,000 to more than 129,000 older Australians;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the majority of older Australians are waiting for level three and level four packages, who have high care needs;

(b)         some older Australians have been waiting more than two years for their approved package; and

(c)         older Australians are entering residential aged care or even emergency departments instead of receiving their approved home care package;

(3)         condemns the Government for failing to stop the wait list growing; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately fix the home care packages waiting list and properly address this growing crisis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      17    Climate change and health: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Steggall —That this House:

(1)         notes a national health campaign, No Time for Games, comprising the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, Royal Australian College of Physicians, the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine, the Australian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians, the Australian College of Emergency Medicine, the Australian Medical Students Association and other organisations representing over 10,000 doctors and medical students nationwide, is calling for the Parliament to officially recognise that climate change represents one of the biggest and most urgent health threats to our children, requiring immediate and effective action;

(2)         recognises that human health is adversely affected by human induced climate change, and that many in the Australian community, including our children, will be more susceptible to:

(a)         heat related illness and death due to increased temperatures;

(b)         respiratory disease and death caused by burning fossil fuels; and

(c)         deadly hypoallergenic conditions like thunderstorm asthma which is exacerbated by longer allergy seasons and more severe weather events; and

(3)         calls on the Government to reduce the incidence of these health effects by acting to develop and implement a plan to de-carbonise every polluting sector by 2050, which will reduce the incidence of extreme temperatures and more severe weather events.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      18    Tuberculosis: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         24 March is World Tuberculosis (TB) Day, a day to commemorate the precious lives lost due to TB, a disease that is preventable and curable;

(b)         TB is contagious and airborne—it is the world’s leading infectious disease killer and kills more people than HIV/AIDS;

(c)         in 2017 alone, 1.6 million people died from TB worldwide and 10 million people became sick with the disease; and

(d)         there is a funding gap of US$1.3 billion annually in TB research and development and it is critical to develop quicker diagnostic tools, better drugs, and a new TB vaccine in order to end the TB epidemic;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         that the funding that Australia is providing jointly with the World Bank to support testing and treatment in Papua New Guinea is already leading to an initiative to achieve universal testing for TB in Daru; and

(b)         the provision of $75 million over five years for Product Development Partnerships in the Indo-Pacific Health Security initiative to accelerate access to new therapeutics and diagnostics for drug-resistant TB and malaria, building on the successes of Australia’s previous investments; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         develop an action plan to monitor the progress made towards the targets and commitment made at the UN High-Level Meeting on TB; and

(b)         make an increased financial commitment to the Global Fund at its Replenishment Conference in October 2019.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      19    National Police Remembrance Day: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Hayes —That this House:

(1)         notes that National Police Remembrance Day is observed on 27 September;

(2)         acknowledges the crucial role police officers across Australia play in our local communities and the tremendous risk and sacrifice that comes with their duty;

(3)         honours the lives and memories of those police officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the course of their duty and specifically honours the tragic loss of Constable Timothy Proctor of the New South Wales Police Force, who died from injuries sustained in a multiple vehicle collision in Lucas Heights;

(4)         pays tribute to the families and friends of police officers who have been killed in the line of duty throughout our nation’s history;

(5)         commends the valuable work of Police Legacy, who look after the loved ones of police officers who have fallen; and

(6)         reaffirms its support for the nation's police officers and honours their courage, commitment and dedication in ensuring the peace and safety of our communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      20    Sterling Group collapse: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Hastie —That this House:

(1)         recognises those impacted by the collapse of the Sterling First New Life investment scheme and associated companies;

(2)         condemns the Sterling Group for deceptive, scurrilous con-man tactics that were used to prey on vulnerable senior Australians;

(3)         further recognises that the Department of Social Services has introduced a dedicated officer to oversee the Centrelink clients impacted by the collapse and has requested that individuals seek an interview with Centrelink staff, as each personal circumstance is different;

(4)         encourages the people impacted by the collapse to make contact with the department and to make a submission to the Australian Financial Complaints Authority to investigate the financial dealings of the Sterling Group; and

(5)         acknowledges that the company is in administration and that the Australian Securities and Investments Commission has commenced investigations into their activities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      21    Smith brothers and Australian aviation: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Zappia —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         2019 marks the centenary of Sir Ross Smith and Sir Keith Smith’s epic flight from London to Darwin;

(b)         a service was held at St Peter’s Cathedral in Adelaide on 15 June 2019 to commemorate the centenary;

(c)         Sir Ross Smith is one of Australia’s most distinguished airmen, having served with distinction during World War I and then winning the 1919 Great Air Race with his brother, piloting the renowned Vickers Vimy aircraft now on display at Adelaide Airport; and

(d)         on 15 June 1922 more than 100,000 people lined the streets of Adelaide for the funeral cortege of Sir Ross Smith who was tragically killed in 1922 whilst test flying another Vickers aircraft in preparation for another epic flight; and

(2)         acknowledges heroism of the Smith brothers, their contribution to Australian aviation and the pride they brought to the nation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      22    Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the 74th anniversaries of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki occurred on 6 and 9 August 2019 respectively, causing suffering which continues to this day;

(b)         the ongoing impacts of nuclear weapons on survivors of nuclear testing worldwide, including in Australia;

(c)         that successive Coalition and Labor Governments have joined all other treaties prohibiting inhumane and indiscriminate weapons;

(d)         that nuclear dangers are increasing worldwide, with no significant progress on nuclear disarmament in sight;

(e)         the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons is an urgent humanitarian imperative;

(f)          the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) outlaws the world’s worst weapons of mass destruction, strengthening the international legal nuclear disarmament framework; and

(g)         the TPNW complements and strengthens Australia's existing commitments under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty; and

(2)         urges Australia to work towards signing and ratifying the TPNW.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      23    South-western Sydney infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  16 September 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Freelander —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         south-western Sydney as one of the key growth areas of Australia; and

(b)         south-western Sydney’s cultural and economic contribution to the country; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         ensure south-western Sydney is adequately resourced in terms of vital infrastructure projects and inter-connectivity of the region;

(b)         ensure that major infrastructure projects, such as Western Sydney International Airport, do not isolate business centres such as Campbelltown and Liverpool from the public transport network;

(c)         adequately fund public transport links between the Western Sydney Airport, Western Sydney Aerotropolis, and south-western Sydney growth centres to ensure realisation of the economic benefits of the airport for the local community; and

(d)         build a:

(i)           south-west rail line extension from Leppington through to Western Sydney Airport;

(ii)         a north-south rail link from Western Sydney Airport to Macarthur; and

(iii)        a rapid transit link along 15th Avenue from the Liverpool CBD to Western Sydney Airport.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      24    Pregnancy and infant loss: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Stanley —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         15 October is International Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day;

(b)         on this day, parents, families, friends and healthcare workers will memorialise babies they have lost through miscarriage, stillbirth and infant death; and

(c)         infant loss is a tragic and terrible event to go through for families, healthcare workers and friends and International Pregnancy and Infant Loss Remembrance Day provides an opportunity to mark their shared loss;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         each year around 150,000 women in Australia experience some form of pregnancy or infant loss;

(b)         further issues are commonly faced by those close to these tragic events such as depression, anxiety, changes in relationships, development of unhealthy coping mechanisms and post-traumatic stress disorder;

(c)         these effects, amongst others, are often underestimated and overlooked by healthcare professionals, friends, and even family members, especially concerning pregnancy loss related bereavement and subsequent grief; and

(d)         greater research and understanding is required to aide in the creation and establishment of programs, resources and services that support and provide assistance to survivors of baby loss and their families, and enable them to overcome their trauma and integrate their bereavement into their life in a healthy, helpful, healing manner;

(3)         expresses sympathy to all families who have suffered a miscarriage, a stillbirth or infant death; and

(4)         commends each and every person who has supported parents and families through their journey from the loss of a baby.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      25    Women in the Australian Defence Force: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         outstanding contribution women make to the Australian Defence Force; and

(b)         formation of the new Council for Women and Families United by Defence Service; and

(2)         acknowledges that Defence embraces the concept of diversity, valuing differences, demonstrating fair, respectful and inclusive behaviour and aims to effectively attract and retain women who can support Defence to better reflect the community it serves.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      26    Coastal erosion: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that Australia has:

(a)         more than 59,000km of coastline;

(b)         around 85 per cent of the population living in coastal regions; and

(c)         nearly 39,000 buildings (as at 2011) and hundreds of coastal communities located within 100 metres of ‘soft’ shorelines which are at risk from accelerated erosion;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         coastal erosion presents a social, environmental, economic and existential threat to coastal communities;

(b)         human-induced climate change will accelerate erosion, putting many communities in grave danger; and

(c)         a number of communities are already starting to sustain serious damage from coastal erosion;

(3)         is deeply concerned that there is no national leadership on the issue of coastal erosion and all climate adaptation activities have been defunded under Governments led by Prime Ministers Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison; and

(4)         calls on the Government to take urgent action to support coastal communities seeking to restore their beaches and improve their resilience.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      27    Congestion busting infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr van Manen —That this House:

(1)         notes with concern the growing congestion in our major cities, which makes it harder for workers to commute and takes time away from people to enjoy with their families;

(2)         recognises that governments at every level need to invest in congestion busting infrastructure to provide the best outcomes for their citizens; and

(3)         commends the Government on committing additional funding across urban and regional Australia, in particular the additional $3 billion to the Urban Congestion Fund so that $4 billion is now available through the fund to target pinch points in major cities to further reduce congestion.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      28    Gender equality: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Thwaites —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         11 October 2019 is International Day of the Girl Child, which promotes human rights and supports action on gender inequality across the globe; and

(b)         this year’s theme is ‘GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable’ to celebrate achievements by, with and for girls since the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the Convention on the Rights of the Child;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         movements across the world are stepping up to address discrimination, exploitation and abuse facing girls, including stopping child marriage, promoting girls’ education and standing up to gender-based violence; and

(b)         more needs to be done, with girls across the world still suffering disadvantage in many areas of their lives which can severely limit opportunities and life outcomes;

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         develop policies that will ensure Australian girls have every opportunity to live lives free from discrimination and achieve their potential; and

(b)         actively work to support international communities to end gender-based discrimination and create opportunities for girls’ voices to be heard; and

(4)         urges all Members of Parliament to take the lead in promoting gender equality in their own communities.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      29    Employment, education and training: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Pearce —That this House:

(1)         notes the:

(a)         creation of 1.2 million jobs since the Coalition Government was elected, with 140,000 young Australians securing employment over that time period;

(b)         strong commitment of the Government to reform the vocational education and training sector to better meet the demands of the modern Australian economy; and

(c)         leadership of the Government in November 2018 to commission the Joyce Review, a comprehensive expert review of the Australian vocational education and training system which was delivered in March 2019; and

(2)         welcomes the implementation of the Skills Package, a $525 million suite of measures that includes:

(a)         a National Careers Institute and the appointment of a National Careers Ambassador;

(b)         the Foundation Skills for Your Future program—an initiative which will support workers by improving literacy, numeracy, and digital literacy;

(c)         a streamlined Incentives for Australian Apprenticeships program, which will encourage employers to take on apprentices and trainees;

(d)         additional incentives to both employers and apprentices in areas affected by skills shortages under the Additional Identified Skills Shortage Payment measure;

(e)         establishing ten industry training hubs in areas of high unemployment;

(f)          further addressing youth unemployment in regional areas by funding 400 Commonwealth Scholarships for Young Australians;

(g)         a National Skills Commission and pilot skills organisations that will promote a nation-wide approach to skills development and enhance the role of industry in designing training courses;

(h)         an extension of the National Rugby League’s VET Apprenticeship Awareness Program; and

(i)           Energising Tasmania—a partnership between the Commonwealth and the Tasmanian Government to train a skilled workforce for jobs for the future in pumped hydro and energy infrastructure; and

(3)         welcomes the prospect of creating a further 80,000 apprenticeships in occupations with skills shortages over the coming five years.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      30    Agriculture and climate change: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Haines —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the Government’s commitment to future-proofing Australian agriculture, including the Future Drought Fund, and its action on climate change, including its commitment under the Paris Agreement to achieve a 26 to 28 per cent reduction in Australia’s emissions from 2005 levels by 2030 and to increase ambition over time under the Paris ambition mechanism; and

(b)         the Opposition’s commitment to the future of Australian agriculture and to action on climate change mitigation and adaptation;

(2)         notes:

(a)         that climate change represents a serious and present threat to the Australian agricultural sector’s continued viability and international competitiveness;

(b)         the calls from the National Farmers’ Federation for a coordinated national framework to drive productivity and profitability while recognising environmental stewardship, and for a carbon neutrality plan for all agricultural commodities by 2025; and

(c)         the calls from the Australian Farm Institute and Farmers for Climate Action for the development of a national strategy on climate change and agriculture based on a consultative, co-design process involving government, industry, scientific research bodies, Australian farmers, and rural and regional communities;

(3)         affirms that in order to ensure the continued flourishing of Australian agriculture into the future, the design and implementation of a national strategy on agriculture and climate change should include:

(a)         funding for comprehensive research on the direct and indirect risks climate change poses to Australian agri-food systems, including risks to primary production, biosecurity, food processing, food safety, farmer health, key infrastructure, equity, animal welfare, export markets and farm inputs;

(b)         targets for adapting Australian farming to climate change in the short, medium and long term;

(c)         financial and technical support for a just transition by supporting farmers and regional communities to adapt to future climate conditions including adoption of climate-resilient crops and regenerative farming and land use practices, investment in technology and infrastructure, and development of new rural industries;

(d)         a long term plan to promote clean energy in rural and regional communities, including community and privately owned renewables projects that can provide sustainable, alternative income to land owners during drought;

(e)         a mechanism to compensate farmers and land owners for ecosystem services they provide, including land-based carbon sequestration as a route to achieve net carbon neutrality of other sectors; and

(f)          a plan to accelerate global emissions reductions by exporting Australian technology, research and expertise; and

(4)         calls on the Government to develop a national strategy on climate change and agriculture that reflects these components.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      31    Western Australia and the economy: Resumption of debate ( from  14 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Gorman —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         the importance of Western Australia to the national economy; and

(b)         that when Western Australia does well, Australia does well;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         it is clear that the Government is ignorant to Western Australia’s drive on the national economy;

(b)         without Western Australia there would have been negative national economic growth in the 2019 April-June quarter; and

(c)         without Western Australia, the Government would have a budget deficit in 2019-20; and

(3)         condemns the Government for:

(a)         failing to invest in Western Australia;

(b)         failing to offer any funding for Royal Perth Hospital or the construction of the new women’s and babies hospital;

(c)         refusing to waive historical housing debts for Western Australia, despite doing so for Tasmania; and

(d)         giving Western Australia less than ten per cent of the $100 billion infrastructure package.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      32    Peacekeeping operations: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Entsch —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         14 September 2019 marks National Peacekeeper and Peacemaker Day; and

(b)         20 September 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the deployment of the International Force East Timor (INTERFET), the peacemaking taskforce that came to Timor-Leste to address the humanitarian and security crisis from 1999-2000;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the vital role of Australians in peace operations and their more than 70 years of dedicated service to the international community; and

(b)         the more than 5,500 personnel who contributed to INTERFET—including that of former Governor-General, General Sir Peter Cosgrove, AK, CVO, MC (Retd)—and the important contribution they made at a critical time in the history of Timor-Leste; and

(3)         acknowledges:

(a)         the service and sacrifice of all those who served in peacekeeping operations and the families who supported them; and

(b)         those currently serving in the UN Truce Supervision Organisation, the UN Mission in the Republic of South Sudan, the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus, and the UN Disengagement Observer Force.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      33    Home care packages: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the latest Government report indicates around 120,000 older Australians are waiting for their approved home care package; and

(b)         more than 72,000 older Australians on the waiting list have no home care package at all;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the majority of older Australians waiting for level three and level four packages have high care needs;

(b)         some older Australians have been waiting more than two years for their approved package, many of whom are in their 90s and others who have terminal illnesses; and

(c)         older Australians are entering residential aged care or even emergency departments instead of receiving their approved home care package;

(3)         condemns the Government for failing to stop the wait list growing; and

(4)         calls on the Government to listen to the growing chorus of voices for urgent action to fix the home care packages wait list now and properly address this national crisis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      34    World Suicide Prevention Day: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Martin —That this House:

(1)         notes that Tuesday, 10 September 2019 was World Suicide Prevention Day;

(2)         confirms the Government’s commitment to work with local communities to reduce the number of deaths by suicide in Australia;

(3)         further notes the record level of funding of $736 million provided in the 2019-20 budget for mental health including $503.1 million for the Youth Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Plan to support coordination of Government activities and services including:

(a)         the largest single expansion of the national Headspace network through the establishment of 36 new sites; and

(b)         provision of support to farmers and communities that have been affected by drought to deal with the anxiety, stress and uncertainty of drought conditions; and

(4)         welcomes the establishment of the Office of the National Suicide Prevention Adviser in 2019 to support a whole-of-government approach to suicide prevention, to ensure coordination of delivery of suicide prevention activities that reach Australians in the right way at the right time.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      35    International Labour Organization: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         notes that 29 October 2019 is the 100th anniversary of the International Labour Organization (ILO);

(2)         acknowledges that the ILO:

(a)         was established following the first world war in an effort to bridge the gap between governments, employers and working people;

(b)         was originally an agency of the League of Nations and has continued as a specialised agency to this day where 187 member states work together on improving labour standards and living standards throughout the world; and

(c)         is a tripartite organisation that seeks co-operation between governments, employers and workers through the development of policies, standards and programmes that reflect the views of all the representative groups;

(3)         recognises:

(a)         the historical, cultural and social significance of the ILO over the past 100 years in an Australian context and throughout the world;

(b)         that the work of the ILO has played an important role in:

(i)           improving incomes, working conditions, safety, equality and protections at work as well as improving productivity and living standards; and

(ii)         ending oppressive work practices, removing discrimination and ending child labour; and

(c)         that the ILO has passed some of the most important international agreements that reduce exploitation, discrimination and inequality and promote collective bargaining, including the:

(i)           Forced Labour Convention of 1930, banning forced or compulsory labour;

(ii)         Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention of 1948, providing the right to union organising for collective bargaining;

(iii)        Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining Convention of 1949, protection against discrimination for joining a trade union, and taking collective action;

(iv)       Equal Remuneration Convention of 1951, providing the right to equal pay removal of gender discrimination;

(v)         Discrimination Convention of 1958, providing the right not to be discriminated against on grounds of race, colour, sex, religion, political opinion, national extraction or social origin; and

(vi)       Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention of 1999, prohibiting the worst forms of child labour (slavery, prostitution, drug trafficking and other dangerous jobs); and

(4)         calls on the Government to adopt a more cooperative approach to workplace relations in the ILO tradition to work with unions and employers to improve Australian’s incomes and living standards.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      36    Black Spot Program: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Mr L. S. O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         notes the important, practical contribution the Black Spot Program makes in addressing the nation’s road toll under the National Road Safety Action Plan 2018-2020;

(2)         recognises the need for the Government to continue to invest in the Black Spot Program to improve road safety and reduce the death toll;

(3)         commends the Government for putting road safety at the forefront of infrastructure investment, with further commitments to providing an additional $50 million per year from 2019-20 to 2022-2023 to the Black Spot Program; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s Black Spot Program reduces on average at the treated sites, death and serious injury from crashes by 30 per cent according to data from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      37    Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms McBride —That this House:

(1)         notes that the:

(a)         Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) has assisted generations of Australians to access affordable medicines since its inception by the Chifley Government in 1948; and

(b)         longstanding practice of successive governments has been to accept and act on the advice of the independent experts—the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC)—when listing medicines on the PBS;

(2)         acknowledges that the Department of Health revealed at Senate estimates hearings that there are more than 20 drugs that this Government will never list on the PBS because pricing negotiations with their manufacturers have broken down;

(3)         recognises that there are increasing barriers to Australians accessing affordable medicines, including:

(a)         the failure to act on a number of PBAC recommendations;

(b)         the affordability of PBS co-payments; and

(c)         increasing out of pocket costs to access primary and specialist health care; and

(4)         condemns the Government for failing to recognise and address these barriers and calls on the Government to do so as a matter of urgency.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      38    National Broadband Network: Resumption of debate ( from  21 October 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         after six years of the previous Labor Government, just 51,000 users were connected to the National Broadband Network (NBN);

(b)         under the Liberal National Coalition Government, over 60,000 premises are being connected to the NBN every two weeks; and

(c)         the network roll out is scheduled to be completed in 2020;

(2)         welcomes NBN Co’s announcement that the NBN is now available to more than 10 million homes and businesses; and

(3)         congratulates the Government for adopting a broadband roll out plan which will see the NBN completed four years early and for $30 billion less than had Labor’s approach been continued—meaning that Australians will get access to fast broadband services more quickly, and at lower prices, than what would have occurred under Labor’s plan.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      39    Diabetes: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Stanley —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges:

(a)         that 14 November 2019 is the 12th United Nations World Diabetes Day; and

(b)         UN Resolution 61/225 and the need to improve human health and provide access to treatment and health-care education;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the success of the National Diabetes Services Scheme and the support the scheme provides to people with diabetes;

(b)         the role of families and healthcare workers in caring and supporting people, particularly children, with diabetes;

(c)         the significant cost to healthcare systems as a result of complications associated with diabetes;

(d)         new technology, including flash and constant glucose monitoring, has shown significant improvement in overall control for people with diabetes who have access to this technology;

(e)         the need for supporting people with diabetes to access new technologies to assist in the management of diabetes; and

(f)          that access to these technologies is likely to prevent complications in people with diabetes and reduce the significant social, human and financial burden of this disease on government, health systems, and people and families of people with diabetes;

(3)         encourages all people with diabetes and their advocates, carers and families to continue their important work; and

(4)         calls on the Government to ensure that all people with diabetes have earlier access to new technology, such as flash glucose monitoring and constant glucose monitoring under the National Diabetes Services Scheme.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      40    Recycling: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Allen —That this House:

(1)         recognises the imperative of improving waste management, reducing unnecessary packaging and boosting recycling in Australia;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australians generate about 67 million tonnes of waste each year, of which 37 million tonnes is recycled;

(b)         only 12 per cent of the 103 kilograms of plastic waste generated per person in Australia each year is recycled, mostly overseas;

(c)         for every 10,000 tonnes of waste recycled, more than 9 jobs are created; and

(d)         waste related activities add $6.9 billion to the economy annually;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s recent $20 million commitment for innovative projects under round 8 of the Cooperative Research Centres Projects grants to grow our domestic plastics recycling industry; and

(4)         notes that this is part of the Government’s Australian Recycling Investment Plan, a package of initiatives totalling $167 million designed to grow and strengthen Australia’s domestic recycling industry, and to support industry and community initiatives to lift recycling rates in Australia.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      41    Incarceration rates: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Leigh —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         Australia’s incarceration rate has now risen to 0.22 percent, the highest level since Federation;

(b)         rates of homicide, robbery, car theft and assaults have fallen considerably since the mid-1980s, while the imprisonment rate has more than doubled;

(c)         the direct cost of prisons is almost $5 billion per year; and

(d)         there is a significant indirect cost of prisons, including the impact on the 77,000 children who have an incarcerated parent, adverse effects on the physical and mental wellbeing of inmates, and high rates of homelessness and joblessness among ex-prisoners;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the Indigenous incarceration rate is now 2.5 percent, the highest level on record;

(b)         the Indigenous incarceration rate is now over twice as high as when the 1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody report was delivered;

(c)         among Indigenous men born in the 1970s, 23 percent have spent time in prison;

(d)         the Indigenous incarceration rate exceeds the incarceration rate among African-Americans; and

(e)         Noel Pearson has described Indigenous Australians as ‘the most incarcerated people on earth’;

(3)         notes that in:

(a)         the United States (US), a bipartisan reform coalition at the state level has led to a substantial reduction in that nation’s imprisonment rate over the past decade, with conservative groups such as Right on Crime joining with centrist reformers such as the Pew Charitable Trust’s Public Safety and Performance Project to reduce incarceration in states such as Alabama, Texas and South Carolina; and

(b)         2018, President Trump signed the ‘First Step Act’, which reduces the US federal prison population by expanding compassionate release and increasing credits for good behaviour; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         work with the states and territories to adopt justice targets under the Closing the Gap framework, so that the inequality in justice outcomes can be properly highlighted and to address unacceptable levels of incarceration among First Nations peoples;

(b)         require the Australian Institute of Criminology to project levels of incarceration (and fiscal costs) in 10 years’ time in the absence of meaningful policy reform; and

(c)         engage states and territories in a data-driven conversation—drawing together victims’ rights groups, prosecutors, and criminal justice experts—to identify the policies that are most effective to reduce crime and imprisonment.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      42    Precision medicine: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)         recognises that precision medicine, enabled by advances in genomics, data analysis and artificial intelligence represents an exciting leap in healthcare that will improve the outcomes of preventative and targeted medicine for countless Australians and their families;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         our world class healthcare system ensures Australia is well placed to lead the world in precision medicine innovations;

(b)         Australian researchers, including those at the University of Queensland, are world leaders in their field and their work is at the forefront of precision medicine; and

(c)         research in precision medicine stimulates the economy, leads to growth in highly skilled jobs and supports Australia’s $185 billion healthcare industry;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s significant investment in precision medicine research including as part of the recently announced $440 million in National Health and Medical Research Council grants; and

(4)         encourages the Government and private enterprise to continue to invest in the genomics, data analysis and artificial intelligence research required to grow the precision medicine sector in Australia in order to create jobs, keep Australia at the forefront of medical advances and improve the healthcare outcomes for everyday Australians.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      43    Digital economy: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Watts —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         according to a report released last month, Australia’s Digital Opportunity, Australia is lagging behind global peers and failing to capture the economic opportunities of the rapidly growing global digital economy;

(b)         Australia ranks second last among OECD countries for relative size of our technology sector and its contribution to the economy; and

(c)         the Australian tech sector could create an additional $50 billion per year were Australia successful in catching up and matching the tech sector growth rates of our global peers;

(2)         recognises that the Government released ‘Australia’s Tech Future’ which read more like a promotional brochure than serious strategy—it described initiatives already in train, was vague on targets and outcomes—and, importantly, offers no bold vision to drive growth in our digital economy;

(3)         further notes that under this Government Australia is suffering from record low wages growth, more than a million Australians underemployed and a per capita recession; and

(4)         calls on the Government to urgently take a coordinated approach to the digital economy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      44    Medicare: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Gillespie —That this House:

(1)         notes the Government’s commitment to Medicare;

(2)         further notes:

(a)         the record level of funding to Medicare in 2018-19 of $24.1 billion, which is an increase of 3.5 per cent in benefits paid in the 2017-18 financial year;

(b)         that the national GP bulk billing rate of 86.2 per cent is a four percentage point increase on the 2012-13 figure of 82.2 per cent when Labor were last in office; and

(c)         that patients made 136.5 million bulk billed GP visits in 2018-19, up 3.3 million visits on the previous financial year;

(3)         acknowledges that on 1 July 2019, the Government increased the patient rebate for further GP items on the Medicare Benefits Schedule, and that specialist procedures, allied health services and other GP services such as mental health and after hours services, were indexed; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for ensuring the Medicare Benefits Schedule Review will continue to ensure that Medicare services are effective and appropriate for patients now and into the future

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      45    Vilification of minority groups: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         social harmony is vital to the continuation of a successful Australian democracy;

(b)         all Australians should be able to go about their lives free from discrimination; and

(c)         there is no legislative protection against vilification and incitement to hatred and/or violence based on a person’s religion or religious belief;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         incitement of hatred and violence is a threat to religious minorities;

(b)         vilification of minority groups through online social media is prolific;

(c)         fifty-three per cent of Australian youth have witnessed anti-Muslim harmful content online;

(d)         online vilification normalises negative attitudes against minority groups;

(e)         vilification or inciting hatred is often the initial stage of a hate crime;

(f)          personal attacks are also occurring against religious minorities, including verbal insults, graffiti, targeting religious dress and physical attacks on buildings and individuals;

(g)         women are the main targets of personal attacks based on their religion; and

(h)         almost half of all personal attacks occur in crowded community spaces where women should feel safe; and

(3)         calls on the Government to protect:

(a)         religious communities at risk of endangerment; and

(b)         all Australians from incitement of hatred and violence

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      46    NBN Co and Sky Muster: Resumption of debate ( from  25 November 2019 ) on the motion of Dr Webster —That this House:

(1)         recognises the importance of reliable communications services for rural and regional Australia;

(2)         notes the launch of the Sky Muster satellites in 2015 and 2016 as a way of connecting rural and regional Australia to the National Broadband Network; and

(3)         congratulates NBN Co on the introduction of the Sky Muster Plus service, providing unmetered data for activities including some web browsing, select emailing and PC and Smartphone operating system software updates.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      47    Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety interim report: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Templeman —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety handed down its interim

report on 31 October 2019;

(b)         the commissioners identified three areas where there is a need for urgent action—these include, to:

(i)           provide more home care packages to reduce the waiting list for higher level care at home;

(ii)         respond to the significant over-reliance on chemical restraint in aged care, including through the seventh community pharmacy agreement; and

(iii)        stop the flow of younger people with disability going into aged care and expediting the process of getting those younger people who are already in aged care out;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the commissioners stated in the interim report that they did not see any reason to delay action on these three areas;

(b)         the Government’s own Royal Commission report stated it is ‘neglect’ to not provide more home care packages;

(c)         the commissioners stated in the interim report that they have been alarmed to find that many people died while waiting for a home care package while others prematurely move into residential care;

(d)         the commissioners also stated that funding should be forthcoming from the Government to ensure the timely delivery of home care services;

(e)         more than 16,000 older Australians died waiting for their approved home care package they were assessed for in 2017-18—sadly, that was around 300 older Australians that died each week in that year waiting for care; and

(f)          more than 14,000 older Australians entered residential aged care prematurely because they couldn’t get the care they were assessed and approved for in 2017-18—sadly, that was around 200 older Australians each week having no other choice but to enter residential aged care; and

(3)         calls on the Government to take urgent action immediately and respond to the three areas included in the Royal Commission’s interim report.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      48    Hydrogen industry: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Simmonds —That this House:

(1)         recognises that with research like that occurring at the CSIRO Advanced Research Facility in the electoral division of Ryan, Australia has the potential to be a world leader in hydrogen development, production and export which will create highly paid jobs and an industry potentially worth billions to the Australian economy;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         Australia’s availability of land, high quality renewable energy resources and fossil energy resources, as well as our well-established reputation for undertaking large-scale resource projects, position Australia well for becoming a key exporter in a future global hydrogen market;

(b)         the combined direct and indirect benefits of establishing a hydrogen production and export industry in Australia under a medium demand scenario will deliver to the Australian economy $4.2 billion and over 7,100 jobs by 2040;

(c)         greater use of hydrogen is one way that Australia can contribute to global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, if Australian produced hydrogen replaces traditional fossil fuel sources in end user nations; and

(d)         the National Hydrogen Strategy is to be released by the end of 2019, providing the Government with an opportunity to signal its long term policy and commitment to this industry;

(3)         welcomes the Government’s significant investment of more than $140 million into hydrogen projects, partnering with industry to develop tangible solutions that are important for bringing down energy prices for Australian households and small businesses; and

(4)         encourages the Government to utilise the opportunity of the release of the National Hydrogen Strategy to confirm its long term commitment to the development of our hydrogen capability in order to encourage private investment in the sector, create jobs, create export capability and reduce global carbon emissions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      49    Violence against women: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Wells —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         25 November 2019 was the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women; and

(b)         this year’s focus was ‘Orange the World: Generation Equality Stands Against Rape’;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         sexual violence against women and girls is a widespread and persistent human rights issue;

(b)         1 in 5 Australian women report having experienced sexual violence;

(c)         1 in 6 Australian women report having experienced physical or sexual violence by a current or former partner; and

(d)         according to the United Nations, violence against women remains largely unreported due to the impunity, silence, stigma and shame surrounding it; and

(3)         asks all Members to recognise that violence against women continues to be an obstacle to achieving gender equality in Australia and across the globe.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      50    National Asbestos Awareness Week: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         25 November to 1 December 2019 is National Asbestos Awareness Week;

(b)         despite being outlawed in 2003, the impact of asbestos in Australia is ongoing; and

(c)         an estimated 4,000 Australians die each year from asbestos-related diseases; and

(2)         commends the Asbestos Diseases Society of South Australia and the Asbestos Victims Association South Australia for their tireless and often unrecognised work in raising awareness, training people to safely handle asbestos and supporting victims of asbestos-related diseases.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      51    Traffic congestion and transport infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         recognises the Government’s commitment to reducing traffic congestion through:

(a)         a $4 billion Urban Congestion Fund, removing traffic pinch points;

(b)         better public transport, improving access and liveability in our cities; and

(c)         the dedicated Commuter Car Park Fund aimed at improving access to public transport and taking tens of thousands of cars off our roads;

(2)         urge the New South Wales Government to commit to further congestion busting infrastructure on the Northern Beaches including:

(a)         commencing construction on the Beaches Link Tunnel towards which the Commonwealth Government has already provided $50 million;

(b)         investigate the feasibility of a light rail link connecting the Northern Beaches to Chatswood and the city; and

(c)         improve the public transport bus system, including extending the B-Line to Newport; and

(3)         acknowledges the benefits of local communities having better roads and reliable transport infrastructure as including:

(a)         less cars on the road and therefore less carbon emissions; and

(b)         faster travel time, allowing the Australian people to spend more time with their families than stuck in traffic.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      52    Captain Cook and Aboriginal heritage materials: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Thistlethwaite —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         29 April 2020 is the 250th anniversary of Captain James Cook’s landing in Botany Bay; and

(b)         the Government is planning a range of exhibitions, activities and events to commemorate this occasion;

(2)         acknowledges:

(a)         that during Captain Cook’s expedition to Australia in 1770 a number of Aboriginal artefacts and cultural heritage materials were taken from local Aboriginal people and removed to Great Britain and other countries;

(b)         many of these cultural heritage materials are now on display or housed in museums and colleges in Great Britain and other countries; and

(c)         the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) Return of Cultural Heritage Project has been working to intensify the effort to return material held overseas to their original custodians and owners;

(3)         recognises:

(a)         the historical, cultural and heritage significance of such cultural heritage materials to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Australian history;

(b)         that such cultural items, where possible, should be returned to the original custodians and owners; and

(c)         that these cultural materials:

(i)           play an important role in truth telling about Captain Cook’s expedition and British settlement in Australia; and

(ii)         provide ongoing educational opportunities for all Australians about important Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, culture and connection to country; and

(4)         calls on the Government to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities, AIATSIS, foreign governments and authorities to:

(a)         establish a process for the return of relevant cultural and historical artefacts to the original custodians and owners; and

(b)         identify educational opportunities from the return of these important Australian cultural items.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      53    United Nations Human Rights Day: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 10 December 2019 is United Nations Human Rights Day;

(2)         acknowledges that the:

(a)         United Nations General Assembly’s adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on 10 December 1948 was a milestone moment which formalised mankind’s shared aspiration for the equal dignity and worth of every person;

(b)         declaration was drafted by representatives of diverse legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world; and

(c)         declaration’s values and principles of equality, justice and freedom remain as relevant today as they were in 1948;

(3)         notes that the promise of the universal declaration is yet to be fully realised and that many people worldwide continue to have their rights threatened, denied or impinged; and

(4)         encourages people of all nations to acknowledge Human Rights Day on 10 December 2019 and in their daily lives to stand up for their own rights and the rights of others.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      54    Sikh community: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Mr R. G. Mitchell —That this House:

(1)         recognises that 2019 marks the 550th anniversary of the birth of Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism, with his birth being celebrated worldwide as Guru Nanak Gurpurab on Kartik Pooranmashi, the full-moon day in the month of Katak, October-November;

(2)         joins with all Sikhs in Australia to acknowledge this significant anniversary; and

(3)         notes:

(a)         that the Sikh community forms an important and growing segment of our community, with the Sikh faith being one of the emerging religions in Australia; and

(b)         the contribution that the growing Sikh community makes to our multicultural nation through its commitment to Guru Nanak’s teachings of selfless service and social justice.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      55    Australian Defence Force Parliamentary Program: Resumption of debate ( from  2 December 2019 ) on the motion of Dr McVeigh —That this House:

(1)         notes the outstanding success of the 2019 Australian Defence Force (ADF) Parliamentary Program;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the opportunity provided to both Senators and Members to participate in the ADF Parliamentary Program to experience the professionalism, skill and dedication of our world-class defence force; and

(b)         the exchange element of the ADF Parliamentary Program, where senators and members host an ADF member during a sitting week in parliament; and

(3)         acknowledges the 49 members and senators who participated, including those who hosted one of the 27 ADF members during the October 2019 sitting week.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      56    Turkish military operations in Syria: Resumption of debate ( from  10 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Georganas —That the House:

(1)         notes with great concern:

(a)         Turkey’s military operation targeting Kurds in northern Syria;

(b)         Turkey’s actions which are causing further destabilisation in the region, worsening the humanitarian disaster in Syria, and risk undermining progress against ISIS;

(c)         evidence that innocent civilians are being killed and injured by Turkey’s military operations and forces associated with Turkey in Syria;

(d)         reports of possible war crimes being committed by forces associated with Turkey; and

(e)         reports of Turkish intentions to resettle refugees from Turkey into northern Syria outside of UN-sponsored mechanisms;

(2)         recognises that the Kurdish forces in Syria have:

(a)         been instrumental in fighting Daesh as an ally of the Global Coalition to Defeat Daesh/ISIS; and

(b)         lost over 10,000 fighters in the fight against Daesh in Syria; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         urge Turkey to cease its unilateral military operations in Syria; and

(b)         support international efforts to hold Turkey to account for its actions.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      57    Online safety: Resumption of debate ( from  10 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Connelly —That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that society is more connected online than ever before in history; and

(b)         the importance of keeping Australians safe online;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the Government established the world’s first Children’s eSafety Commissioner in 2015, and expanded this role to cover all Australians in 2017;

(b)         in 2018 the Office of the eSafety Commissioner undertook research to examine some of the challenges faced by young people aged 8 to 17 in Australia online; and

(c)         this research indicated that:

(i)           25 per cent of young people have been contacted by strangers/someone they did not know;

(ii)         13 per cent of young people reported receiving repeated unwanted· online messages from someone; and

(iii)        13 per cent of young people reported having lies or rumours spread about them;

(3)         further notes the bipartisan support for the work of the Office of the eSafety Commissioner; and

(4)         congratulates the Government for this world first initiative.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      58    Captioned telephone handsets: Resumption of debate ( from  10 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Gorman —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the captioned telephone handset, CapTel, is a popular service amongst the Australian deaf and hard of hearing community;

(b)         according to the Department of Communications there are approximately 4,000 CapTel handset users in Australia;

(c)         the average age of people using the service is 80; and

(d)         with an increasing aging population, it can be expected more and more Australians will need to rely on this service to communicate;

(2)         acknowledges the distress and loss that CapTel users and their families are experiencing due to the planned discontinuation of the CapTel service in February 2020;

(3)         condemns the Government for its decision to:

(a)         remove the CapTel service without any consultation with its users; and

(b)         purchase an inferior, outdated, and less user-friendly product, forcing often elderly users to learn a new piece of technology or lose the ability to communicate; and

(4)         encourages CapTel users and their families to contact their federal member of parliament to explain to them the importance of the CapTel service for the deaf and hard of hearing community of Australia.

              ( Order of the will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )

      59    Extradition of Malka Leifer: Resumption of debate ( from  10 February 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That this House:

(1)         notes that Malka Leifer, the former Principal of the Adass Israel Girls School in Melbourne, fled Australia in 2008 as child sexual abuse allegations against her surfaced;

(2)         reaffirms the formal extradition request that was filed by Australia in 2014 requesting she be returned to Victoria to face 74 charges of child sexual abuse;

(3)         acknowledges the bravery of Ms Leifer’s alleged victims - especially Dassi Erlich, Nicole Meyer and Elly Sapper for their tireless pursuit of justice;

(4)         further notes that over five years have elapsed, and over 60 court hearings have been held in Israel, since this extradition request was first lodged, without any significant progress having been made;

(5)         expresses regret and concern at the numerous attempts to prevent and delay Malka Leifer facing justice in Australia; and

(6)         calls for the immediate extradition of Malka Leifer to Australia to face 74 charges of child sexual abuse.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 24 February 2020. )