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PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Notice given for Monday, 21 June 2021

    *1    Dr Aly : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the escalation in conflict in the Oromia region of Ethiopia in recent months; and

(b)         that Amnesty International has reported extrajudicial executions, arbitrary arrests and detentions, unfair trials, suppression of the right to freedom of assembly by security forces, forced evictions and unlawful killings; and

(2)         calls on the Australian Government to:

(a)         condemn state-sanctioned military violence against innocent civilians and protestors in Oromia; and

(b)         call on the Ethiopian Government to release all political prisoners, end unlawful imprisonment and engage in genuine dialogue to reduce militarisation and address Oromian concerns.

              ( Notice given 17 June 2021. )

Notice given for Monday, 9 August 2021

         1    Mr Wilkie : To present a Bill for an Act to amend the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 , and for related purposes. ( Commonwealth Electoral Amendment (Cleaning up Political Donations) Bill 2021 )

              ( Notice given 15 June 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

Notices —continued

       1    Ms Coker : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) is currently undergoing its second ten-yearly statutory review;

(b)         the findings from the interim report of the Samuel Review, including that:

(i)           the environment and our iconic places are in decline and under increasing threat;

(ii)         more than 10 per cent of Australia's land mammals are now extinct and a further 21 per cent are threatened and declining;

(iii)        land-use change, habitat loss and degradation, feral animals and invasive plant species place significant pressures on our environment; and

(iv)       our oceans face significant current and future threats from climate change and human activity; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         abandon its attempt to rehash Prime Minister Abbott’s failed amendments to the EPBC Act;

(b)         listen to environment and industry experts’ calls to prioritise robust environmental reform;

(c)         effectively protect environmental matters that are important for the nation;

(d)         improve our environment for current and future generations; and

(e)         provide more certainty for jobs and investment.

              ( Notice given 10 November 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

       2    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges its concerns about the inequitable access to stroke treatment for Australians living in rural and regional areas; and

(2)         notes its support for a national approach to ensuring access to best practice treatment for people experiencing stroke through the establishment of a national mechanical thrombectomy advisory committee.

              ( Notice given 10 November 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

       3    Ms Collins : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the latest Government report indicates there are more than 102,000 older Australians waiting for their approved home care package;

(b)         the report also indicates 41,221 older Australians are waiting for their approved level three package and 15,873 older Australians are waiting for their approved level four package—these are the highest levels of home care;

(c)         the Government only allocated 2,000 level four packages in its 2020-21 Budget;

(d)         the majority of older Australians waiting for level three and level four packages have high care needs;

(e)         some older Australians have been waiting more than two years for their approved package, many of whom are in their 90s and others who have terminal illnesses; and

(f)          more than 60,000 older Australians have either died waiting or entered residential aged care prematurely because they couldn’t access their approved home care package;

(2)         condemns the Government for failing to stop the waitlist growing and drip-feeding home care packages into the system, even though in October last year the Royal Commission into aged care recommended it take urgent action in relation to the home care waitlist, which it described as cruel, unfair and discriminatory; and

(3)         calls on the Government to take urgent action now to fix the home care packages waitlist and properly address this national crisis.

              ( Notice given 30 November 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       4    Mr Albanese : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Prime Minister was the Social Services Minister who designed the illegal robodebt scheme, the Treasurer who maintained the illegal scheme, and the Prime Minister who agreed to pay $1.2 billion to the victims of the illegal scheme;

(b)         the Government maintained the Prime Minister’s robodebt scheme despite knowing it was illegal and was driving people to self-harm and suicide;

(c)         the Prime Minister announced his robodebt scheme would save the budget $2 billion but it has in fact cost taxpayers at least $1.2 billion; and

(d)         no one in this eight-year-old Liberal-National Government is willing to take responsibility for the Prime Minister’s illegal robodebt scheme and the harm it has caused to thousands of vulnerable Australians; and

(2)         therefore, calls on the Prime Minister to establish a Royal Commission into his illegal robodebt scheme so a disaster like this never happens to the Australian people again.

              ( Notice given 1 December 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       5    Mr Albanese : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the Prime Minister repeatedly fails to deliver on his announcements, including:

(a)         announcing he would deliver higher wages but instead presiding over record low wages growth for those Australians with jobs;

(b)         announcing he would keep aged care residents safe but instead failing to have an aged care plan for COVID-19 which resulted in the deaths of 685 older Australians;

(c)         announcing he would bring stranded Australians home by Christmas but leaving thousands overseas;

(d)         announcing his illegal robodebt scheme would save the Budget $2 billion when it cost taxpayers at least $1.2 billion; and

(e)         announcing the $4 billion Emergency Response Fund for bushfire resilience and recovery but failing to spend a cent from the $400 million available in the past year alone; and

(2)         therefore, condemns the Prime Minister for always being there for the photo op but never the follow-up.

              ( Notice given 1 December 2020. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       6    Ms Rishworth : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises:

(a)         that Channel 44 is a South Australian icon which has become of increasing importance during the COVID-19 pandemic, with many South Australians tuning in to the channel during lockdown; and

(b)         the contributions of Channel 44 in producing local content, fostering local arts, skilling future producers, screen talent, and emerging journalists; and

(2)         condemns the:

(a)         Government for causing needless uncertainty for Community TV with short term licence extensions, which has resulted in the closure of other community television stations around Australia, leaving only Channel 44 Adelaide and Channel 31 Melbourne and Geelong in operation;

(b)         Government’s decision that there be no further renewals of community television licences beyond June 2021 while having no alternative use for the spectrum; and

(c)         Government for effectively abolishing community television in Australia and reducing media diversity when Australia already has one of the most concentrated media markets in the world.

              ( Notice given 2 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       7    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in November 2020, the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications released the Media Reform Green Paper entitled, New rules for a new media landscape - modernising television regulation in Australia , which sets out a potential plan to reform the regulatory framework for free-to-air television;

(b)         the Green Paper is open for submissions until 23 May 2021 and seeks to:

(i)           offer commercial broadcasters a one-time, irrevocable choice to operate under a new commercial television broadcasting licence with a reduced regulatory burden, provided they agree to move at a future point to using substantially less radiofrequency spectrum;

(ii)         introduce an investment in Australian programming obligation for subscription and advertising video-on-demand services;

(iii)        use the proceeds raised from the new reforms to establish new funds to support regional news, Australian drama, documentary and children’s content;

(iv)       legislate the role of the ABC and SBS in commissioning and providing Australian programming consistent with requirements for other sectors of Australian media industry; and

(v)         promote the public interest derived from spectrum by encouraging multiplex sharing by broadcasters;

(c)         90 per cent of content aired on community television is produced in Australia with community television employing local freelancers and providing an important training ground for hundreds of emerging screen practitioners every year, with most programs contributing significantly to the local economies they are produced in;

(d)          during the COVID-19 lockdowns:

(i)           community television viewership increased significantly with one million Australians watching community television in April and Channel 31 in Melbourne/Geelong experiencing an increase of 23 per cent (150,000 viewers) and Channel 44 in Adelaide experiencing an increase of 27 per cent (57,000 viewers); and

(ii)         community television was able to live broadcast religious and cultural events to various faith-based and multicultural communities as well as providing fitness and wellness programs for home-bound senior Australians, such as Move It Or Lose It Australia; and

(2)          calls on the Government to:

(a)         recognise that the community television sector has re-proven itself through the COVID-19 pandemic as an essential broadcast service, reaching audiences that traditional broadcasters or online platforms overlook;

(b)         acknowledge that community television:

(i)           creates high percentage of Australian content and makes a significant contribution to the local media sector as a training ground and employer in the broadcasting sector; and

(ii)         has minimal spectrum requirements and broadcasts with zero cost to Government;

(c)         include the community television sector in its spectrum efficiency process as part of the Media Reform Green Paper; and

(d)         create a pathway for community television that allows for the successful vacation of the 600MHz spectrum band which also sees a continuance of service through to the next phase of broadcast television under the proposed new efficiency models and using new broadcast technologies.

              ( Notice given 2 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       8    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         20 February 2021 marks the anniversary of the establishment of the Royal Commission into National Natural Disaster Arrangements in response to the 2019/2020 Black Summer Bushfires;

(b)         the Black Summer Bushfires started in Australia’s hottest and driest year on record when the Forest Fire Danger Index was the highest since national records began, and caused enormous loss and devastation, including but not limited to the loss of 33 lives due to the fire and the death of nearly 450 people due to the adverse health impacts from bushfire smoke, the destruction of 24 million hectares and nearly 3,000 homes, and the death and displacement of nearly three billion animals including many threatened species;

(c)         the Royal Commission:

(i)           examined the Black Summer Bushfires but looked beyond these fires to consider natural disasters more generally, including floods, bushfires, earthquakes, storms, cyclones, storm surges, landslides and tsunamis, and considered national arrangements and responsibilities and jurisdictional issues relating to state and territory agencies in the context of improving natural disaster mitigation, preparation, response and recovery; and

(ii)         made 80 recommendations (55 directed at the Government) after hearing evidence from more than 270 witnesses, considering more than 1,750 public submissions and almost 80,000 pages of tendered documents;

(2)         calls on the Government to provide an update on:

(a)         its commitment to establish a dedicated National Resilience, Relief and Recovery Agency and to set up a climate and disaster risk information service ('Resilience Services') for Emergency Management Australia by 1 July 2021;

(b)         its commitment to revise the Commonwealth Government Disaster Response Plan (COMDISPLAN) thresholds so that a request for Australian Government assistance, including defence assistance, is able to be made by a state or territory government when needed;

(c)         the roll-out of the Public Safety Mobile Broadband (PSMB) capability and its commitment to explore additional opportunities and technologies, such as satellite communications, that might augment PSMB into the future;

(d)         its commitment to work with the States and Territories to appropriately share the personal information of individuals affected by a natural disaster to reduce unnecessary trauma;

(e)         its commitment to work with States and Territories to develop options on how the disaster recovery funding arrangements could deliver more equitable, needs-based assistance for Australians affected by natural disaster; and

(f)          how it will make telecommunications more resilient in high bushfire risk zones and other disaster-prone areas; and

(3)         further calls on the Government to commit to working with State and Territory governments to develop an Australian-based and registered sovereign aerial firefighting fleet.

              ( Notice given 2 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

       9    Mr Alexander : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the 1991 declaration of independence of the Republic of Artsakh (previously Nagorno Karabakh) by the region’s indigenous Armenians after a democratic and internationally observed referendum, in accordance with international law and the then Soviet Constitution;

(2)         recognises the right to self-determination of all peoples including those of the Republic of Artsakh;

(3)         condemns the military aggression launched on 27 September 2020 by Azerbaijan and Turkey with the declared intention to put to an end the right of self-determination of the indigenous Armenian population of Artsakh, who have lived on those highlands for millennia, whilst welcoming the cessation of that military aggression;

(4)         further recognises the potential ethnic cleansing if Azerbaijan were to be successful in its military actions;

(5)         further condemns the:

(a)         use of indiscriminate shelling, missile attacks, illegal cluster and white phosphorus munitions on the civilian population and infrastructure of Artsakh, including its capital city Stepanakert, as well as the Holy Saviour Armenian Cathedral in Shushi, in complete violation of international law; and

(b)         involvement of mercenaries in the military action against Artsakh and the involvement of other nations in supporting Azerbaijan’s aggression;

(6)         while welcoming the cessation of military action as a result of the Russian negotiated ceasefire agreements, further notes that the provisions of that agreement do not resolve the underlying dispute or the aspirations of the residents of Artsakh to determine their own future and could serve to undermine the integrity of the borders of Armenia;

(7)         calls on the OSCE Minsk Group, with all co-chair countries, to review and revise the agreement in accordance with the principles of self-determination; and

(8)         notes that the international recognition of the Republic of Artsakh and its population’s right to self-determination is the only permanent solution to the conflict, to avoid further attempts of such military aggression and to rectify the historical wrongs imposed on the residents of Artsakh by Josef Stalin and the Soviet Union in transferring the long-standing area of Armenian population to Azerbaijan.

              ( Notice given 2 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    10    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government’s own Western Sydney Needs Rail Scoping Study , commissioned in 2015, recognised the need for a rail line to connect the new Western Sydney Airport to Leppington and Macarthur;

(b)         Infrastructure Australia, through the Infrastructure Priority List, have listed rail connections to Western Sydney Airport as ‘High Priority Initiatives’ since 2016;

(c)         no money was committed in the Government’s most recent budget to deliver a rail line from the electoral division of Macarthur to the new Western Sydney Airport; and

(d)         the Commonwealth and NSW Governments have, through their heavily politicised Western Sydney City Deal, intentionally short-changed South Western Sydney residents, by only funding the northern-component of the critical North-South Link via Western Sydney Airport;

(2)         condemns the Government for consistently ignoring the advice of experts, stakeholders, the scoping study they themselves commissioned and their own department; and

(3)         implores the Government to finally invest in rail connections from Western Sydney Airport to South-West Sydney.

              ( Notice given 2 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    11    Dr Aly : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         there are at present over 14,000 nuclear weapons in existence;

(b)         the 2017 UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons prohibits nations from developing, testing, producing, manufacturing, transferring, possessing, stockpiling, using or threatening to use nuclear weapons, or allowing nuclear weapons to be stationed on their territory; and

(c)         on 22 January 2021 the treaty entered into force;

(2)         recognises that nuclear weapons pose an existential man-made threat to humanity;

(3)         commends:

(a)         advocates for the 2017 UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons; and

(b)         superannuation funds like Crescent Wealth Super for taking a moral stance and proactively choosing not to invest in the weapons industry; and

(4)         urges:

(a)         financial institutions such as banks and super funds to stop the investment and financing of nuclear weapons; and

(b)         the Government to lead international efforts to rid the world of nuclear weapons.

              ( Notice given 4 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    12    Mr Bandt : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Government has a responsibility for quarantine;

(b)         international human rights agreements affirm that everyone has the right to return to their home country;

(c)         around 39,000 Australians are stranded overseas, unable to return home due to limited quarantine capacity;

(d)         there have been more than 155,000 travel exemption requests from temporary visa holders seeking to return to Australia, where many have lived for extended periods, with jobs, families, and lives here—of which only around 25,000 have been approved; and

(e)         many of those stranded overseas face significant costs and challenges, are often separated from their loved ones, and have experienced significant distress at being unable to return home; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         expand safe and effective quarantine capacity so that people stranded overseas can safely return home;

(b)         ensure that those stranded overseas can access affordable options to fly home; and

(c)         ensure that everyone is welcomed home with care and compassion.

              ( Notice given 16 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    13    Mr Perrett : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in 2005, the Australian drug syndicate commonly referred to as the ‘Bali Nine’ was intercepted in a joint Australian-Indonesian police operation;

(b)         a large quantity of drugs were seized, thereby preventing them from being sold on Australian streets;

(c)         illicit drugs are a scourge in our community and are responsible for much unnecessary suffering and death;

(d)         of the Bali Nine, Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan were executed in 2015, Tan Due Thanh Nyugen died in custody in 2018, and Renae Lawrence was released later that year; and

(e)         the remaining five members of the Bali Nine remain in prison on indefinite sentences;

(2)         further notes that, the remaining five:

(a)         have already served 16 years in prison;

(b)         have gratefully taken opportunities offered by the Indonesian correctional system to improve themselves as individuals and members of the prison community;

(c)         have long shown genuine remorse for their crimes; and

(d)         their rehabilitation is commendable and reflects well on the efforts of the Indonesian correctional system; and

(3)         calls on the Government to continue engaging with their Indonesian counterparts, to work towards the release of the five reformed Australians.

              ( Notice given 18 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    14    Mr Pearce : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the importance of a robust anti-dumping regime that fits within our international obligations under the World Trade Organization;

(2)         recognises that Australia’s anti-dumping system is designed to remedy injury caused to local manufacturers by the unfair international trade practices of dumping and subsidisation; and

(3)         congratulates Dr Bradley Armstrong on his appointment as the new Anti-Dumping Commissioner.

              ( Notice given 22 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    15    Dr Webster : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the Government’s rescue package for the Murray Basin Freight Rail Network, which includes:

(a)         the Government’s commitment of $195.2 million to re-commence work on Victoria’s stalled Murray Basin Freight Network project; and

(b)         a further $5 million committed to plan for the full standardisation of the network, to be jointly funded with the Victorian Government;

(2)         congratulates the Commonwealth Government investment which will fund the most extensive package of works recommended by the revised business case and the Victorian Government;

(3)         recognises that industry and communities are calling for full standardisation of the network; and

(4)         calls on the Victorian Government to commit $5 million to planning for the full standardisation of the network.

              ( Notice given 22 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    16    Ms T. M. Butler : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that the Productivity Commission has slammed the Government’s management of water in a draft report released in February 2021;

(b)         the several alarming issues raised by the Productivity Commission in relation to the Dungowan Dam proposal, including:

(i)           the decision making process which was described as ‘flawed’;

(ii)         the cost blow-out, which has gone from $150 million to $484 million; and

(iii)        the lack of value for money, with the proposal projected to deliver water at almost 45 times the cost of existing water;

(c)         media reports of leaked documents from the Cabinet of the New South Wales Government which described the Wyangala Dam proposal as having ‘small net benefits’ and a large cost;

(d)         that the Liberals and Nationals said they would build 100 dams when they came to government but have built zero dams in eight years; and

(e)         the Prime Minister’s announcement for the Wyangala Dam and Dungowan Dam proposals came just days after the Member for New England said the Coalition risked ‘political annihilation’ in the bush if they didn’t start building dams;

(2)         condemns the Government for playing politics with water, rather than finding real solutions to water security; and

(3)         calls on the Government to come clean on whether these projects stack-up.

              ( Notice given 23 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    17    Ms Hammond : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that 12 March 2021 marks the 100th anniversary of Edith Dircksey Cowan’s election to the West Australian Legislative Assembly;

(b)         that Ms Cowan was the first woman to be elected to an Australian parliament; and

(c)         Ms Cowan was instrumental in the passage of the Women’s Legal Status Bill, which removed disqualifications for entry into the professions on the basis of sex; and

(2)         recognises that Ms Cowan’s election was a landmark moment in Australian history, which paved the way for women to seek election, to hold leadership positions and to lead governments around Australia.

              ( Notice given 23 February 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    18    Mr K. J. Andrews : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that education is a fundamental human right;

(2)         welcomes the commitment embodied in Sustainable Development Goal 4 (SDG 4): ‘inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all’;

(3)         acknowledges that the world is decades behind in delivering SDG 4—the long lasting impact of COVID-19 on learning is an immense risk to delivering the promise envisioned in Agenda 2030 of leaving no one behind; and

(4)         commits to achieving the goals outlined in the founding declaration of the International Parliamentary Network for Education:

(a)         higher total and better financing for education, ensuring that spending is efficient, accountable and in line with the Sustainable Development Goals;

(b)         prioritisation of the furthest behind, so that no child is denied their right to education simply because of who they are or where they live; and

(c)         higher-quality education which delivers learning outcomes.

              ( Notice given 15 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    19    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         ongoing reports of wide-scale violations of basic human rights against the Uyghur people living in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) of China including:

(i)           the detention of over 1 million people in re-education centres;

(ii)         the forced removal of children who are then placed in state-run institutions;

(iii)        allegations of extensive physical, psychological and sexual abuse including rape, beatings and starvation;

(iv)       the implementation of a mass birth-prevention strategy;

(v)         the destruction of Uyghur religious and cultural institutions and buildings; and

(vi)       a mass surveillance strategy and restricted movement of Uyghur people;

(b)         the difficulty of many Australian Uyghur people in contacting family members in their homeland;

(c)         that China is a signatory to the Genocide Convention and the Vienna Convention;

(d)         the inability of the United Nations Human Rights Commissioner to conduct an unrestricted assessment of the situation in XUAR; and

(e)         report by the Newlines Institute for Strategy and Policy that finds extensive breaches of the 1948 Genocide Convention; and

(2)         calls on the Government to raise these matters with the Chinese Government and within the relevant United Nations forums.

              ( Notice given 16 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    20    Mr Thistlethwaite : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         under Australia’s current Constitution our nation’s next head of state will not be an Australian and will not be chosen by Australians;

(b)         continuing to have the English monarch as Australia’s head of state is outdated and does not reflect modern Australian values and democracy;

(c)         that many Australians believe that Australia’s head of state should be an Australian selected on merit, not royal lineage; and

(d)         that the Australian head of state would demonstrate our confidence as a nation and embody our democratic values and our maturity and independence as a nation; and

(2)         calls on Government to:

(a)         launch a public education campaign about Australia’s current constitutional arrangements regarding our head of state; and

(b)         establish a process to consult the Australian public and begin a discussion about amending our Constitution to appoint an Australian as our head of state in future.

              ( Notice given 16 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    21    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Nades and Priya Murugappan are Tamil asylum seekers who settled in the regional Queensland town of Biloela in 2014;

(b)         their children Kopika and Tharunicaa were born in Biloela;

(c)         in March 2018, after asylum claims for Nades, Priya, and Kopika were unsuccessful, the family was removed from Biloela, pending deportation to Sri Lanka;

(d)         the family has been in detention on Christmas Island since August 2019 while their case has been before the court;

(e)         detaining children in a remote offshore location contravenes the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, to which Australia is a signatory; and

(f)          in 2019 the United Nations Human Rights Committee called on the Australian Government to release the family from detention; and

(2)         calls on the Government to release the Murugappan family from immigration detention while their case is before the court.

              ( Notice given 16 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    22    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons reached its 50th ratification on United Nations Day in October 2020 and entered into force on 22 January 2021;

(b)         this is the first treaty to comprehensively ban nuclear weapons and provide a pathway for nations to outlaw and eliminate nuclear weapons;

(c)         there are approximately 13,400 nuclear weapons globally and there have been over 2,000 nuclear tests conducted to date;

(d)         from 1952 to 1963, the British Government, with the permission of the Australian Government, conducted a series of nuclear weapons development tests in Australia—the testing occurred at Maralinga in South Australia, Montebello Islands in Western Australia and Emu Field in South Australia;

(e)         a government-funded study found that 16,000 Australian workers were exposed, with 23 per cent higher rates of cancer and 18 per cent more deaths from cancers than the general population;

(f)          the Aboriginal populations in these areas were even more at risk, as many of them were not properly evacuated or even informed about the nuclear testing; and

(g)         Australia is not yet a signatory or state party to the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons; and

(2)         calls on the Government to sign and ratify the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

              ( Notice given 16 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    23    Mr Watts : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         prior to the 2019 federal election, the Government promised to implement a city deal with North and West Melbourne; and

(b)         almost two years later and the Government has not begun construction on any of the proposed developments, they have not even signed the deal;

(2)         recognises that:

(a)         North and West Melbourne is an important region—one in three Victorians and one in 12 Australians live in the North and West Melbourne region;

(b)         North and West Melbourne is one of the fastest growing regions in Australia—in the next 20 years North and West Melbourne is predicted to be home to 3 million residents, 50 per cent more people than all of South Australia;

(c)         Wyndham City Council alone is expected to be home to as many people as Tasmania by 2036;

(d)         North and West Melbourne needs infrastructure development—almost half of the region’s workers commute to work and the region has eight of Victoria’s ten most congested roads, and a significant portion of these workers commute more than two hours a day; and

(e)         North and West Melbourne has great potential, including significant industrial land and manufacturing capability; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         keep its promise to the people of North and West Melbourne;

(b)         deliver on its announcement, North and West Melbourne is more than a photo opportunity; and

(c)         sign and implement the North and West Melbourne City Deal.

              ( Notice given 16 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    24    Mr Burns : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         asylum seekers are still being held in alternative places of detention, such as hotels, in Australia;

(b)         many of these individuals have now been detained for over eight years and have suffered significant psychological harm as result of their prolonged and indefinite detention;

(c)         this program costs taxpayers tens of millions of dollars each year and continues despite:

(i)           the impact on the physical and mental health of detainees; and

(ii)         repeated offers to resettle asylum seekers from New Zealand; and

(d)         the Minister for Home Affairs acknowledged in comments on 21 January 2021 that ‘it’s cheaper for people to be in the community than it is to be at a hotel or for us to be paying for them to be in detention and if they’re demonstrated not to be a threat’;

(2)         applauds the significant contribution migrants and asylum seekers make to our economy, our democracy, and our vibrant, multicultural community; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         address the issue of the indefinite detention of asylum seekers in hotels in Australia;

(b)         honour the Minister for Home Affairs’ previous comments and ensure that Australians will no longer see an expensive and cruel program of indefinite detention inflicted on people in our care; and

(c)         immediately release Priya, Nades, Kopika and Tharaunicaa from detention on Christmas Island and allow them to return to their home in Biloela, Queensland to the community who loves and supports them, and wants them home.

              ( Notice given 23 March 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    25    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         in March 2021 the NSW Premier, Gladys Berejiklian, announced that the new city at the Western Sydney Aerotropolis will be named Bradfield, after the late John Bradfield; and

(b)         that a number of organisations and places throughout the State of New South Wales have already been named after John Bradfield, paying homage to his contribution to our city; and

(2)         calls on the NSW Government to reverse this decision, and instead consider naming the new Aerotropolis after an Indigenous namesake to pay tribute to our region’s strong Indigenous heritage and culture.

              ( Notice given 11 May 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    26    Mr Christensen : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         the protection of all human life is core to the values we uphold as a nation;

(b)         Australia is a signatory to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Convention on the Rights of the Child recognising every child has the inherent right to life, care and protection including healthcare;

(c)         Australian state-based figures record a number of cases where children are born alive as a result of terminations;

(d)         a child born alive as the result, or not as the result, of a termination is a legal person and is entitled to all the same rights and privileges as any other Australian citizen, for example a prematurely born child; and

(e)         health practitioners have a duty to provide the same medical care or treatment to a child born alive as the result of a termination as they would to a child born alive not as the result of a termination; and

(2)         calls on the House to:

(a)         rectify any breach of its international obligations and enhance its human rights by ensuring that the right to life and healthcare is protected for children born alive; and

(b)         provide clarity and certainty to health practitioner professional standards or guidelines on the duty of health practitioners to provide medical care or treatment to children born alive as a result of terminations.

              ( Notice given 24 May 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      27    Ms Steggall : To move—That the Industry Research and Development (Beetaloo Cooperative Drilling Program) Instrument 2021 made under the Industry Research and Development Act 1986 on 13 May 2021 and presented to the House on 24 May 2021, be disallowed.

              ( Notice given 25 May 2021. Instrument will be taken to have been disallowed unless disposed of within 7 sitting days, including today. )

    28    Mr Georganas : To move—That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         between 1914 and 1923, the then Ottoman Empire undertook a brutal cleansing campaign to rid the region of people of Christian faith;

(b)         as a result, millions of Armenians, Assyrians, and Greeks from the Pontus region and other parts of modern-day Turkey, were deported, massacred, or marched to their deaths, and millions more were displaced; and

(c)         historians unanimously define these events as the first example of systematic genocide in the 20th Century;

(2)         notes and pays tribute to our ANZAC troops who were among the first to witness the atrocities committed against the Greek, Armenian and Assyrian populations, and even assisting in the rescue of the refugees fleeing to safety; and

(3)         calls on this Parliament to:

(a)         join the many European Union member states, Latin American nations and, recently, the United States of America in officially recognising and condemning the atrocious acts committed against Armenians, Greeks and Assyrians between 1914 and 1923 as genocide; and

(b)         reaffirm our shared commitment to prevent such atrocities from ever happening again.

              ( Notice given 25 May 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    29    Dr Freelander : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the profound impacts that COVID-19 is having upon our communities, families and businesses; and

(b)         that a successful roll-out of respective COVID-19 vaccines is paramount to our nation’s recovery; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         immediately begin a targeted and clear advertising campaign, to promote the effectiveness of vaccines and to dispel misinformation in multiple forums and for all targeted groups so that our vaccine roll-out gets back on track; and

(b)         establish built-for-purpose quarantine facilities in all major states to minimise the risks of COVID-19 outbreaks in hotel quarantine.

              ( Notice given 25 May 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    30    Ms Vamvakinou : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         this year marks the 75th anniversary of the Philippines-Australia diplomatic relations;

(b)         the enduring friendship between Australia and the Philippines is based on shared interests and values, supported by strong people-to-people links; and

(c)         9 June 2021 marks the 123rd Philippines’ Independence Day; and

(2)         recognises the contribution of:

(a)         Filipino-Australians to enriching Australia’s multicultural society; and

(b)         the Filipino-Australian community to Australia’s social and economic success.

              ( Notice given 25 May 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    31    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         there is currently no uniform commitment across the states and territories to support young people in care up until the age of 21 years;

(b)         there are studies that highlight the importance of ensuring extended care between the ages of 18 and 21 as many young people who are required to leave their care setting at 18 years of age become homeless, involved with the criminal justice system, unemployed or a new parent within the first 12 months of being exited from care; and

(c)         17 per cent of young people experience homelessness directly after leaving their foster care, kinship care and state government care arrangements according to CREATE Foundation’s national report released this week; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         encourage state and territory ministers to extend care support for young people in all types of care, including foster care, kinship care and state government care, up to the age of 21 years; and

(b)         to work with state and territory ministers to coordinate a consistent national approach to support for young people in all types of care, including foster care, kinship care and state government care, up to the age of 21 years.

              ( Notice given 27 May 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    32    Ms Collins : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the horrific mouse plague continues to significantly impact across multiple states including South Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria;

(b)         NSW Farmers say the cost of the mouse plague on the state’s winter crop will top $1 billion, and has warned the mouse plague crisis could span for two years;

(c)         budget estimates have revealed there is no national response by the Government to help farmers and rural communities address the impact of the shocking mouse plague;

(d)         the New South Wales Agriculture Minister said in relation to the mouse plague that ‘it’s incredibly disappointing to hear the Commonwealth admit they’ve got no national response and throw their hands up as our regions face this problem’;

(e)         the Opposition called on the Government to put the costly mouse plague at the top of the agenda at a meeting of agriculture ministers on 2 June 2021; and

(f)          the previous meeting of agriculture ministers took place virtually in December 2020;

(2)         acknowledges the impact the mouse plague is having on farmers and those living across regional communities;

(3)         conveys its disappointment that the Government has not:

(a)         developed a national response to help farmers and regional communities address the significant impact of the mouse plague; and

(b)         taken any responsibility to help abate the impact of the mouse plague across multiple states; and

(4)         calls on the Government, as a matter of urgency, to develop a national plan that helps farmers and regional communities mitigate the impact of the mouse plague.

              ( Notice given 1 June 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    33    Ms Payne : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         28 July 2021 will mark the 70th anniversary of the Refugee Convention;

(b)         the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees was formally adopted by the United Nations on 28 July 1951; and

(c)         the Convention outlines the rights and obligations member states have towards refugees;

(2)         recognises the ongoing challenge of forced migration across the world, with 80 million, or 1 per cent of the world’s population, forcibly displaced by mid-2020, with 26.3 million of these people identified as refugees; and

(3)         calls on the Government to ensure that Australia upholds its obligations as a party to the Refugee Convention.

              ( Notice given 2 June 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    34    Ms Rishworth : To move—That this House:

(1)         acknowledges the shortage of general practitioners in both outer metropolitan and rural areas of the county and the difficulty that this leads to in accessing health care services;

(2)         recognises the importance of being able to see a general practitioner in a timely manner;

(3)         notes:

(a)         that support programs and systems are not adequate to help medical clinics in some areas classified by the Department of Health as Distribution Priority Areas; and

(b)         the inconsistencies that exists when an area is classified as a Distribution Priority Area but due to its classification under the Modified Monash Model is unable to access the support programs needed to address the medical workforce shortage; and

(4)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         provide medical clinics in Distribution Priority Areas with access to programs to help attract an adequate medical workforce; and

(b)         provide support to build a workforce of general practitioners that will help meet the current and future health needs of our outer metropolitan and rural areas.

              ( Notice given 3 June 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

    35    Mr Hill : To move—That this House:

(1)         calls on the Prime Minister and Foreign Minister to act now and speak frankly with our closest allies, to ensure that Mr Julian Assange is:

(a)         not extradited to the United States of America where he could face the death penalty; and

(b)         released from Her Majesty’s Prison Belmarsh in the United Kingdom where he is currently detained after being denied bail; and

(2)         recognises that it is incumbent on the Australian Government to ensure Australian citizens do not face the death penalty, and that Mr Assange could face the death penalty if extradited to Virginia in the United States; and

(3)         welcomes the priority given to the health and welfare of Mr Assange by the United Kingdom’s court decision which found that: ‘the mental condition of Mr. Assange is such that it would be oppressive to extradite him to the United States of America’; and

(4)         notes that the United Kingdom’s court decision was handed down almost six months ago, and that Mr Assange continues to be imprisoned despite winning his court case; and

(5)         notes with approval the letter sent on 11 June 2021 signed by 24 Members of the United Kingdom House of Commons to the President of the United States appealing for the President to: ‘drop this prosecution, an act that would be a clarion call for freedom that would echo around the globe’; and

(6)         calls on the Australian Government to formally request the United States Government to review Mr Assange’s case and drop the charges; and

(7)         acknowledges that Mr Assange is an Australian citizen and is entitled to the protection of his government.

              ( Notice given 15 June 2021. Notice will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

Orders of the day

         1    Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) Bill 2020 ( Ms Steggall ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. On 11 November 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy. )

         2    Climate Change (National Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation) (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2020 ( Ms Steggall ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. On 11 November 2020, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy. )

         3    Remembrance Day: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Thompson —That this House:

(1)         notes that Wednesday, 11 November 2020 marks Remembrance Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, when the guns fell silent during the First World War;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         that since the First World War, almost two million men and women have served in our defence forces; and

(b)         the more than 102,000 defence personnel who have tragically died during, or as a result of, warlike service, non-warlike service and certain peacetime operations; and

(3)         acknowledges the service and sacrifice of all those who served in our defence force and the families that supported them by encouraging all Australians to observe one minute’s silence at 11 am on 11 November 2020.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         4    South-west Sydney: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Stanley —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges south-west Sydney:

(a)         is one of the key contributors to economic growth in the Australian economy;

(b)         is in need of investment to support jobs and growth;

(c)         is home to diverse and endangered species;

(d)         has a population of approximately 700,000, which is over 9 per cent of the NSW population; and

(e)         provides over $30 billion in gross regional product to the NSW economy;

(2)         notes that south-west Sydney is chronically underfunded and under-resourced in the following areas:

(a)         road infrastructure and public transport;

(b)         hospitals and health services;

(c)         communications services; and

(d)         schools and universities;

(3)         further acknowledges that investment in south-west Sydney is required to support jobs creation; and

(4)         calls on the Government to provide the necessary support to:

(a)         encourage business growth;

(b)         encourage jobs growth; and

(c)         build infrastructure to sustain growth.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         5    Anniversary of the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Sharma —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         4 November 2020 marks 25 years since Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated at an anti-violence rally in support of the Oslo peace process;

(b)         a condolence motion for Prime Minister Rabin was moved in this House on 23 November 1995 by the Prime Minister, Mr Keating, and seconded by the Leader of the Opposition, Mr Howard, reflecting the deep sense of loss and shock all Australians felt at the news of Mr Rabin’s assassination;

(c)         Yitzhak Rabin served as Israel’s Prime Minister on two separate occasions, from 1974 to 1977 and then again from 1992 until his death in 1995, in addition to being a decorated general who led Israel’s armed forces during the 1967 Six Day War and served as Israel’s Ambassador to the United States; and

(d)         Prime Minister Rabin promoted peace and co-existence in a turbulent time and region, concluding the Oslo Peace Accords with the Palestinians in 1993, for which he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, and the Israel-Jordan peace treaty in 1994; and

(2)         affirms Australia’s ongoing commitment to Mr Rabin’s vision of a peaceful two-state solution to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, mutually negotiated and agreed by the Israelis and the Palestinians.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         6    Nuclear weapons: Resumption of debate ( from  9 November 2020 ) on the motion of

Mr J. H. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         6 and 9 August 2020 will mark, respectively, the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki;

(b)         by the end of 1945, it is estimated that 213,000 people had died in those communities, and the legacy of chronic and terminal illness, stillbirths, birth defects, survivor discrimination, and acute environmental harm and contamination continues to the present day;

(c)         2020 also marks the 50th anniversary of the coming into force of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty;

(d)         the ongoing work of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, an initiative founded in Australia that received the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize for advancing a Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons; and

(e)         since 2017, 81 countries have signed and 38 have ratified the United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which will enter into force after the 50th ratification;

(2)         further notes with concern:

(a)         a number of recent developments that weaken the international system of weapons monitoring, impair progress towards nuclear disarmament, and undermine agreements to prevent nuclear proliferation and explosive testing;

(b)         the fact that the hands of the Doomsday Clock have been moved to within 100 seconds of midnight, representing the greatest yet marked risk of nuclear conflict; and

(c)         a 2019 report by the United Kingdom Parliamentary Committee on International Relations that warns the risk of nuclear weapons is now as great as it was during the height of the Cold War; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         voice its concern about the deterioration in the multilateral framework for achieving nuclear disarmament and for minimising the risk of nuclear conflict;

(b)         voice its concern at indications the United States:

(i)           intends to withdraw from the Treaty on Open Skies;

(ii)         may allow the START agreement to expire in February 2021; and

(iii)        has abandoned the Intermediate Nuclear Forces Treaty; and

(c)         increase our diplomatic focus and the resources needed to play a greater role in global efforts to reduce conflict, build regional and international cooperation, resist the further proliferation of nuclear weapons, and progress their ultimate elimination.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on 21 June 2021. )

         7    National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2020 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         8    Migration Amendment (Common Sense Partner Visa) Bill 2020 ( Mr Hill ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

         9    World AIDS Day: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr T. R. Wilson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         Tuesday, 1 December 2020 is World AIDS Day, an annual day to acknowledge those we have lost to AIDS related conditions and those who are living with HIV;

(b)         the theme for World AIDS Day 2020 is ‘Now More Than Ever’;

(c)         the stigma associated with HIV acts as a barrier to treatment and prevention;

(d)         action is needed to address rising HIV transmission among First Nations, trans and gender diverse people, and other emerging high-risk population groups;

(e)         gay and bisexual men continue to bear the burden of Australia’s HIV epidemic and ongoing health education and awareness among this population group is needed; and

(f)          further bipartisan political action and leadership is required to meet our national target of ending HIV transmission in Australia; and

(2)         recognises and acknowledges the:

(a)         journey that people have made through their diagnosis, treatment and experiences of living with HIV;

(b)         tremendous efforts of peer educators, healthcare professionals, researchers and scientists in developing treatment and prevention regimes that have improved the lives of people living with HIV and prevented a generalised epidemic in Australia;

(c)         success of a bipartisan approach in Australia’s health response; and

(d)         tireless community advocates, civil society organisations and support groups that actively tackle stigma associated with HIV.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      10    Coronavirus pandemic and Services Australia: Resumption of debate ( from  30 November 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Shorten —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that during the earliest onset of the coronavirus pandemic, many Australian families found themselves unexpectedly in need of government support; and

(2)         pays its deepest gratitude and thanks to all the women and men of Services Australia for their efforts in supporting their fellow Australians during this time of crisis.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 2 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      11    Fair Work Amendment (Ten Days Paid Domestic and Family Violence Leave) Bill 2020 ( Ms Burney ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      12    Live Animal Export Prohibition (Ending Cruelty) Bill 2020 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      13    International Day of People with Disability: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         acknowledges that:

(a)         3 December 2020 was International Day of People with Disability; and

(b)         the theme for this year’s International Day of People with Disability was ‘Building Back Better: toward a disability-inclusive, accessible and sustainable post COVID-19 world’;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         the world leading National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is empowering people with disability all over Australia to make decisions about the supports that they receive, and to participate more fully in all aspects of our society as we recover from the COVID-19 crisis;

(b)         the NDIS is now available to all eligible Australians, wherever they live;

(c)         the NDIS is currently assisting more than 400,000 participants; and

(d)         more than 175,000 NDIS participants are receiving supports for the first time;

(3)         commends the Government on completing the successful roll out of the NDIS to all states and territories; and

(4)         welcomes the Government’s extension of temporary additional supports for NDIS participants during the COVID-19 pandemic until February 2021.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      14    International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women: Resumption of debate ( from  7 December 2020 ) on the motion of Ms Claydon —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         25 November 2020 marked the United Nations’ International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, beginning the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence;

(b)         approximately 45 Australian women have been murdered in a domestic violence homicide this year;

(c)         one in three Australian women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence perpetrated by a man since the age of 15; and

(d)         the COVID-19 pandemic has seen an escalation of domestic abuse, with more women accessing online services, and more men seeking support for abusive behaviour;

(2)         commends the work of the family, domestic and sexual violence sector, which continues to deliver vital services to men, women and children amidst the pandemic;

(3)         acknowledges that many family violence organisations are struggling to meet the demand for services—yet the Government has provided no additional funding in the budget; and

(4)         urges the Government to:

(a)         listen to the family violence sector and respond to their calls for more support to help women and children flee violence; and

(b)         ensure the full resources of Government are used to eliminate family violence from our community.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 3 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      15    Migration Amendment (Common Sense for All Visas) Bill 2021 ( Mr Hill ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      16    Defence Amendment (Parliamentary Approval of Overseas Service) Bill 2021 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      17    National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Amendment (Transparency in Carbon Emissions Accounting) Bill 2021 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      18    Social media platforms: Resumption of debate ( from  15 February 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Webster —That this House:

(1)         is alarmed by the undue pain and distress experienced by Australians who are defamed, bullied or otherwise harassed on social media platforms;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         global technology companies which provide social media platforms inadequately monitor platforms for defamation, bullying or harassment of individuals; and

(b)         global technology companies are slow to respond when complaints are made, increasing the damage to individuals;

(3)         recognises that social media is a global sphere of communication in which vulnerable citizens can be unfairly targeted by individuals, with little consequence to the platform that hosts damaging content;

(4)         expresses concern that current regulations do not adequately address global technology companies which control social media platforms; and

(5)         calls on the Government to develop:

(a)         a public regulatory framework within which decisions about removing content are made by social media platforms, to ensure community expectations around safety and free speech on social media platforms can be met; and

(b)         legislation which holds social media platforms to account as publishers of the content hosted on their sites, impressing the legal responsibilities that designation entails on those platforms.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 4 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      19    Australian Local Power Agency Bill 2021 ( Dr Haines ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2020. On 24 February 2021, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Heritage. )

      20    Australian Local Power Agency (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2021 ( Ms Steggall ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2020. On 24 February 2021, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Heritage. )

      21    Ending Indefinite and Arbitrary Immigration Detention Bill 2021 ( Ms Steggall ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2020. On 24 February 2021, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on Social Policy and Legal Affairs. )

      22    International Holocaust Remembrance Day: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         notes that 27 January 2021 marked International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a day where we remember the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime and its collaborators, and reaffirm our promise to ‘never forget’ the 6 million Jews and 11 million others including Roma, homosexuals, people with intellectual disabilities, political prisoners, Poles, Serbs and Soviet citizens who were exterminated during the Holocaust;

(2)         acknowledges the importance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day in honouring the memory of all Holocaust victims, and the ongoing efforts of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance to advance and promote Holocaust education to ensure the history and stories of its victims are passed on to successive generations; and

(3)         further notes that:

(a)         during the 1940s, tens of thousands of European Jews emigrated to Australia, and Australia has the largest per-capita Holocaust survivor population outside Israel; and

(b)         the Government is committed to supporting Holocaust Museums in each state and territory in Australia, with the most recent museum announced in the ACT on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, 27 January 2021.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      23    Women and COVID-19: Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Plibersek —That this House:

(1)         notes that 8 March 2021 is International Women’s Day and acknowledges the immense contribution Australian women have made during the COVID-19 pandemic, as frontline workers, as parents, and as community members;

(2)         expresses concern that the decisions the Government has taken are making things worse for hardworking Australian women and have set too many women on a path to poverty by:

(a)         using the pandemic as cover to give businesses more power to cut the pay of Australian workers;

(b)         abandoning women in insecure and casual work; and

(c)         robbing women of a comfortable retirement by making people eat into their superannuation savings to get by;

(3)         further notes that this is no way to thank the women whose commitment at home, in the community, and at work has got us through the pandemic; and

(4)         calls on the Government to deliver a COVID-19 response and economic plan that benefits all Australians.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      24    Defence and veteran suicides : Resumption of debate ( from  22 February 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Neumann —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         it is now more than a year since the Prime Minister announced a National Commissioner for Defence and Veteran Suicide Prevention;

(b)         many veterans and families believe the Prime Minister’s national commissioner will not be ‘better than a Royal Commission’ and risks making things worse; and

(c)         the Government was forced to withdraw the enabling legislation for the national commissioner at the end of 2020 after failing to get the necessary support in the Senate;

(2)         recognises that suicide by current and former defence personnel continues to claim at least one life a week, and nothing less than an independent, open and transparent investigation is required to address this crisis; and

(3)         calls on the Government to establish a Royal Commission into defence and veteran suicides as a matter of urgency.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 5 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      25    Sex Discrimination Amendment (Prohibiting All Sexual Harassment) Bill 2021 ( Ms Steggall ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      26    Financial sector: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Falinski —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the final report of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry highlighted widespread misconduct across the financial sector;

(b)         the Commissioner, the Honourable Kenneth Madison Hayne AC QC, made clear that primary responsibility for misconduct in the financial sector lies with the institutions concerned and their boards and senior management;

(c)         the final report made specific note that the transparency and internal governance processes of a number of financial institutions did not meet community standards;

(d)         after a request from the Treasurer on 1 August 2019, the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics has run an inquiry into the review of the four major banks and other financial institutions which seeks to review the financial sector's implementation of recommendations from the Royal Commission; and

(e)         IFM Investors is an Australian investment management company which is wholly owned by 27 Australian superannuation funds and which manages $148 billion as of September 2020;

(2)         is disappointed that IFM Investors has refused to provide information to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics, including the:

(a)         reported $36 million bonus to a single fund manager;

(b)         severance payment and terms for staff alleged to have engaged in sexual harassment;

(c)         details and terms of bonuses paid by IFM Investors to their executives and fund managers, paid from Australian’s compulsory superannuation; and

(d)         deliberate attempt to launder transparency and accountability of the use and misuse of Australians’ compulsory superannuation by keeping information confidential from the Parliament of Australia; and

(3)         calls upon the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics to use its power to compel evidence and documents from IFM Investors to ensure transparency and accountability and to ensure that IFM Investors is acting in the best interests of ordinary Australians, not fund managers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      27    Edith Cowan: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Dr Aly —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         12 March 2021 is the 100th anniversary of Edith Cowan’s election to the seat of West Perth in the Western Australian Legislative Assembly, making her the first woman elected to any Australian parliament;

(b)         Edith Cowan was an extraordinary and tireless advocate for the rights of women and children, and she sought and won election to the Legislative Assembly in an effort to strengthen those rights; and

(c)         in addition to her elected office, she was also a campaigner for women’s suffrage, a major contributor to many social welfare organisations and a noted jurist;

(2)         recognises Edith Cowan’s remarkable legacy, which is commemorated in the names of Edith Cowan University and the federal electoral division of Cowan, as well as in artistic works such as the play, With Fire in her Heart: The Edith Cowan Story , a retelling of her life which premiered at the 2021 Perth Fringe Festival; and

(3)         commits to upholding Edith Cowan’s contributions to Australian civil society by working to further the rights of women and children in all spheres of Australian life.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      28    NBN and Western Sydney: Resumption of debate ( from  15 March 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         recognises that Western Sydney is Australia’s third largest economy, and accounted for more than half of Sydney’s population growth from 2012 to 2018;

(2)         notes that:

(a)         jobs growth in Western Sydney has been increasingly limited to population-driven sectors like construction, which have been hit hard by COVID-19;

(b)         there is a jobs deficit affecting Western Sydney’s growing professional workforce, which is forced to commute long distances for employment;

(c)         a fast, reliable internet connection is basic infrastructure that is needed to attract new businesses and industries, and therefore essential to promoting jobs growth in Western Sydney; and

(d)         NBN’s recent announcement of 130 ‘business fibre zones’ includes four zones in suburbs on Sydney Harbour, but only one in Western Sydney, in Parramatta; and

(3)         calls on the Government to urgently improve NBN connectivity for businesses and households to support sustainable jobs growth in Western Sydney.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 6 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      29    Charter of Budget Honesty Amendment (Rural and Regional Australia Statements) Bill 2021 ( Dr Haines ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      30    Commonwealth Environment Protection Authority Bill 2021 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. On 25 March 2021, the Selection Committee made a determination that this Bill be referred to the Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy. )

      31    Snowy Hydro Corporatisation Amendment (No New Fossil Fuels) Bill 2021 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      32    Human rights in China: Resumption of debate ( from  22 March 2021 ) on the motion of

Mr K. J. Andrews —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the Canadian House of Commons unanimously passed a resolution that, ‘in the opinion of the House, the People’s Republic of China has engaged in actions consistent with the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 260, commonly known as the “Genocide Convention”, including detention camps and measures intended to prevent births as it pertains to Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslims’;

(b)         the Parliament of the Kingdom of the Netherlands has passed a resolution stating that ‘measures intended to prevent births’ and ‘having punishment camps’ in China fell under United Nations Resolution 260;

(c)         the UK House of Lords has passed a resolution urging the government to uphold all undertakings in and international obligations arising from the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide;

(d)         the then US Secretary of State, Mr Mike Pompeo, issued a determination that Uyghur and other Turkic Muslims are being subjected to a genocide by the Government of the People’s Republic of China, a position reinforced by his successor, Mr Antony Blinken;

(e)         a series of international reports, including by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, the Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights and the Newlines Institute for Strategy and Policy, have concluded that Uyghurs in Xinjiang have and are being forcibly held in ‘re-education’ camps, subjected to torture, forced labour and coercive transfer to other regions; and

(f)          other ethnic and religious minorities are being persecuted by the Chinese Communist Party;

(2)         records its abhorrence that the Chinese Government continues to engage in serious and systematic breaches of the human rights of its peoples;

(3)         calls on the Government of China to respect and abide by universally acknowledged human rights for all its peoples;

(4)         urges the United Nations to investigate the breaches of human rights in China; and

(5)         encourages the Australian Government to continue to protest the ongoing abuse of human rights by the Chinese Government and to take appropriate measures to enforce laws against modern slavery and identify supply chains that use forced labour.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      33    Liability for Climate Change Damage (Make the Polluters Pay) Bill 2021 ( Mr Wilkie ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      34    Independent Office of Animal Welfare Bill 2021 ( Mr Bandt ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ).

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      35    Research and commercialisation: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         recognises the important work being carried out in Australian businesses to research and commercialise new ideas;

(2)         acknowledges that the Government has supported those efforts in many ongoing ways, including:

(a)         fostering business collaboration with the CSIRO;

(b)         the research and development tax incentive; and

(c)         Accelerating Commercialisation grants under the Entrepreneurs Programme; and

(3)         congratulates Australian companies that are developing and commercialising new ideas, including Naturo Pty Ltd, which has developed a way to extend the shelf life of fresh milk up to 60 days and is creating a pilot manufacturing facility as a result of its recent Accelerating Commercialisation grant.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

      36    New South Wales floods: Resumption of debate ( from  24 May 2021 ) on the motion of Ms Templeman —That this House:

(1)         notes the devastating effects of extreme rainfall that caused extensive flooding across areas of New South Wales in March 2021, resulting in disaster declarations in 63 local government areas by the NSW Government and causing more than $1 billion in damage;

(2)         acknowledges the work of emergency services and other groups in assisting throughout the emergency and subsequent clean-up, with particular reference to:

(a)         volunteer-based organisations such as the NSW State Emergency Service, NSW Rural Fire Service, Rapid Relief Team, and various charities;

(b)         supermarket operators that loaded supplies on to helicopters and barges to restock shelves at stores cut off by flood water and landslides; and

(c)         community members who assisted with distribution of supplies and relief efforts during and in the aftermath of the floods; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         provide the support needed to allow businesses reliant on working waterways such as the Hawkesbury River (including turf growers, vegetable farmers and caravan parks) to get back to work;

(b)         act to fix the disastrous environmental damage by announcing specific funding to help address silt and debris build up, erosion and collapsing riverbanks; and

(c)         immediately access the $4 billion Emergency Response Fund, announced two years ago but never spent, for this recovery which can provide up to $200 million per financial year to be spent nationally on natural disaster recovery and mitigation.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 21 June 2021. )

 

 

 

COMMITTEE AND DELEGATION BUSINESS has precedence each Monday in the House of Representatives Chamber from 10.10 am to 12 noon; and in the Federation Chamber from 11 am to 1.30 pm and 4.45 pm to 7.30 pm (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS has precedence from the conclusion of consideration of committee and delegation business each Monday (standing orders 34, 35 and 192).

The SELECTION COMMITTEE is responsible for arranging the timetable and order of committee and delegation business and private Members’ business for each sitting Monday. Its determinations for today are shown under ‘Business accorded priority for …’. Any private Members’ business not called on, or consideration of private Members’ business or committee and delegation business which has been interrupted and not re-accorded priority on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays, shall be removed from the Notice Paper (standing order 42).