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BUSINESS OF THE FEDERATION CHAMBER

Thursday, 1 August 2019

The Federation Chamber meets at 10 am

 

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Orders of the day

         1    Appropriation Bill (No. 1) 2019-2020 ( Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  31 July 2019 ).

         2    Appropriation Bill (No. 2) 2019-2020 ( Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 July 2019 —Mr Perrett ).

         3    Appropriation (Parliamentary Departments) Bill (No. 1) 2019-2020 ( Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management ): Second reading—Resumption of debate ( from  25 July 2019 —Mr Perrett ).

         4    Grievance Debate: Question—That grievances be noted—Resumption of debate ( from  30 July 2019 ).

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS ACCORDED PRIORITY FOR Monday,

9 September 2019, PURSUANT TO STANDING ORDERS 35 AND 192

11 AM TO 1.30 PM

Notices

    †1    Ms Owens : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         that western Sydney is home to two million people, which is nearly 10 per cent of Australia’s population and Australia’s third largest economy;

(b)         that western Sydney’s population is expected to grow by an additional one million people in the next 20 years while the population in the corridor between Parramatta and Sydney is expected to grow by 420,000;

(c)         that more than 300,000 new jobs are expected to be created in the same period and that traffic congestion is expected to cost Sydney nearly $15 billion by 2031;

(d)         that Parramatta is western Sydney’s Central Business District (CBD) and is Sydney’s second CBD;

(e)         the benefit of the proposed Sydney Metro West project to connect Parramatta and Sydney via the Bays Precinct and Sydney Olympic Park; and

(f)          that the project, when operational, is expected to slash travel times between the two CBDs to just 20 minutes (on trains running every two minutes) and reduce traffic congestion;

(2)         recognises the NSW Government’s commitment of $6.4 billion in funding to the project and additional commitment to fast-track the project to begin construction in 2020;

(3)         further notes that Federal Labor committed to $3 billion funding to the project prior to the 2019 federal election; and

(4)         calls on the Federal Government to urgently allocate the funding that will ensure the project can begin construction in the fast-tracked timeframe.

              ( Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †2    Mr Entsch : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that 31 July 2019 is World Ranger Day;

(2)         acknowledges the significant contribution that indigenous rangers make to our national parks, including environmental management, restoration and education;

(3)         pays tribute to rangers that have lost their lives while at work;

(4)         supports the Government’s funding of indigenous ranger groups with $254.6 million invested through the Indigenous Advancement Strategy over three years from 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2021, including $61.8 million in the state of Queensland; and

(5)         welcomes the work of 123 ranger groups nationally, which provided 2,160 jobs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in 2016-17.

              ( Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †3    Mr Dick : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         it has been more than four years since the Government established the independent Review of Small Amount Credit Contracts (SACC);

(b)         the review panel provided the final report to the Government on 3 March 2016, listing 24 recommendations relating to the SACC and consumer leasing laws;

(c)         the Government released its response to the report on 28 November 2016, in which it agreed with the vast majority of recommendations in part or in full;

(d)         the Minister for Revenue and Financial Services at the time said ‘the implementation of these recommendations will ensure that vulnerable consumers are afforded appropriate levels of consumer protection while continuing to access SACCs and leases’;

(e)         the Government released draft legislation on 23 October 2017, whereby the Minister for Small Business and now Deputy Prime Minister said that the ‘Government will introduce legislation this year to implement the SACC and consumer lease reforms’;

(f)          the Assistant Minister to the Treasurer pledged in May 2018 that SACC and consumer leasing laws would be progressed in 2018;

(g)         former Prime Minister Turnbull confirmed the Government supported the vast majority of recommendations from the independent Review of SACC and also pledged to introduce legislation enacting the recommendations in 2018;

(h)         the Assistant Treasurer in December 2018 also noted the importance of protecting vulnerable consumers from harmful financial practices, but would wait until the conclusion of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry;

(i)           the Royal Commission has now been completed, however there is still no legislation before the house to enact the 24 recommendations from the independent Review of SACC;

(j)          on 22 February 2019 the Senate Economics References Committee completed an inquiry into credit and financial services targeted at Australians at risk of financial hardship, which recommended that the National Consumer Credit Protection Amendment (Small Amount Credit Contract and Consumer Lease Reforms) Bill 2017 exposure draft released by Treasury be introduced, and passage facilitated by the Government; and

(k)         the Government has continuously broken its promises to legislate these important reforms; and

(2)         calls on the Government to introduce legislation without any further delay so that Australians are given the protections they need from harmful pay day lending practices.

              ( Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †4    Mr C. Kelly : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the Council of Australian Governments Disability Reform Council met on 28 June 2019 and resolved a number of long-standing issues, including the interaction of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) with the health system;

(2)         welcomes the council’s agreement to a range of disability-related health supports that will be provided through the NDIS; and

(3)         notes the:

(a)         NDIS will fund disability-related health supports where the supports are required as a result of the participant’s disability and assist the participant to undertake activities of daily living;

(b)         types of health supports that will be funded by the NDIS include continence supports, dysphagia and nutrition supports, respiratory supports and supports for wound and pressure care; and

(c)         approach agreed to by the council to fund disability related health supports under the NDIS recognises participants need to be placed at the centre of all decisions.

              ( Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business time prior to 1.30 pm. )

4.45 PM TO 7.30 PM

Notices continued

    †5    Ms Sharkie : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the OECD:

(i)           calculates that Australia’s expenditure on age pensions is currently 4 per cent of public spending, and is projected to be 4 per cent in 2050, which compares with 9 per cent and 10 per cent respectively for the OECD, and

(ii)         has stated that ‘the old age income poverty rate in Australia is high at 26 per cent compared to 13 per cent across the OECD in 2015’;

(b)         the Benevolent Society:

(i)           released The Adequacy of the Age Pension in Australia: An assessment of pensioner living standards report in September 2016, concluding from its research that ‘the age pension in Australia is inadequate’, and

(ii)         also concludes that ‘home ownership constitutes the single biggest factor contributing to financial hardship among pensioners’ and ‘age pensioners who are renting, in particular those who are single, are the worst off’;

(c)         deeming rates dramatically affect the wellbeing of Australian pensioners; and

(d)         whilst the Government has reduced deeming rates for the first time since 2015, it has not been adequately responsive to changes in the cash rate; and

(2)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         establish an independent tribunal to:

(i)           assess the base rate of the pension,

(ii)         assess the Commonwealth Assistance Rate,

(iii)        assess the deeming rate, and

(iv)       determine the best mechanism for regular review, and

(b)         reduce the financial gap between age pensioners who are home owners and those who are renters.

              ( Time allowed—30 minutes. )

    †6    Mr Thompson : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes the important role Australian small business has in the future of our national and economic security through its integral role in our defence industry;

(2)         recognises the defence industry’s potential for growth in electoral divisions like Herbert and other regional electoral divisions across Australia;

(3)         supports opportunities to maximise the participation of Australian companies in all facets of defence procurement; and

(4)         acknowledges the Government’s commitment to deliver a robust, resilient and internationally competitive Australian defence industry.

              ( Time allowed—40 minutes. )

    †7    Mr Zappia : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         as at 30 June 2019 there were 221,415 applications for Australian citizenship by conferral;

(b)         under this Government the backlog has risen from 27,037 in 2013-14;

(c)         the timeframe for finalisation of 90 per cent of applications is now within 24 months;

(d)         some applicants wait longer than two years for their applications to be finalised; and

(e)         Australian Citizenship provides a number of important benefits including,

(i)           the right to enrol and vote,

(ii)         eligibility for a HECS-HELP loan for university,

(iii)        access to an Australian passport, and

(iv)       sometimes satisfying a requirement for employment; and

(2)         calls on the Government to immediately address the backlog and lengthy wait times for citizenship applications so that people who want to fully participate in Australian civic life are able to do so.

              ( Time allowed—30 minutes. )

    †8    Mr van Manen : To move—That this House:

(1)         notes with concern the growing congestion in our major cities, which makes it harder for workers to commute and takes time away from people to enjoy with their families;

(2)         recognises that governments at every level need to invest in congestion busting infrastructure to provide the best outcomes for their citizens; and

(3)         commends the Government on committing additional funding across urban and regional Australia, in particular the additional $3 billion to the Urban Congestion Fund so that $4 billion is now available through the fund to target pinch points in major cities to further reduce congestion.

              ( Time allowed—45 minutes. )

Order of the day

      †1    Home care packages: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Owens —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         the latest Government report indicates more than 129,000 older Australians are waiting for their approved home care package;

(b)         more than 75,000 older Australians on the waiting list have no home care package at all; and

(c)         since 2017 the wait list for home care has grown from 88,000 to more than 129,000 older Australians;

(2)         recognises:

(a)         the majority of older Australians are waiting for level three and level four packages, who have high care needs;

(b)         some older Australians have been waiting more than two years for their approved package; and

(c)         older Australians are entering residential aged care or even emergency departments instead of receiving their approved home care package;

(3)         condemns the Government for failing to stop the wait list growing; and

(4)         calls on the Government to immediately fix the home care packages waiting list and properly address this growing crisis.

              ( Time allowed—remaining private Members’ business prior to 7.30pm. )

PRIVATE MEMBERS’ BUSINESS —continued

Orders of the day continued

         1    National Disability Insurance Scheme annual price review: Resumption of debate ( from  22 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Laming —That this House:

(1)         welcomes the recent outcomes of the 2019-20 National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) annual price review;

(2)         notes the increases in NDIS pricing from 1 July 2019 includes:

(a)         significant increases in the base prices for attendant care and community participation;

(b)         a new temporary transformation payment for providers of attendant care and community participation supports, which will be 7.5 per cent in 2019-20, and will reduce by 1.5 percentage points each year thereafter;

(c)         allowing therapy providers to claim for travel, cancellations and non-face-to-face time for therapy assistant activities;

(d)         clarification of charges for cancellations and providers claiming for non-face-to-face direct care-related activities as hours of support against relevant support items;

(e)         increasing the amount of time providers claim for travel, for up to 30 minutes between appointments within city areas and up to 60 minutes in regional areas; and

(f)          increasing remote and very remote loadings on price limits from 20 per cent to 40 per cent, and from 25 per cent to 50 per cent respectively;

(3)         notes that from 1 July 2019, funding in existing participant plans will be adjusted to reflect the price increases; and

(4)         welcomes the National Disability Insurance Agency’s continued commitment to improvement and transparency in price setting beyond the 2019-20 annual price review.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         2    Trade: Resumption of debate ( from  22 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Ted O’Brien —That this House:

(1)         notes:

(a)         the record monthly trade surplus in May 2019; and

(b)         that the five largest monthly trade surpluses have all been this year;

(2)         acknowledges that trade supports one in five jobs in Australia; and

(3)         calls on Members to vote in support of important trade agreements with Indonesia, Peru and Hong Kong when they come before the House, thereby providing further export opportunities for our farmers and small and family businesses.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         3    Penalty rates: Resumption of debate ( from  22 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Swanson —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         on 1 July 2019, 700,000 Australians had their penalty rates cut again;

(b)         according to the Council of Small Business Australia, cuts to penalty rates have not created one single job;

(c)         penalty rates are not a luxury, they are a necessity for millions of Australians to cope with the rising cost of living;

(d)         cuts to penalty rates disproportionally effect women, young people and those without a tertiary education; and

(e)         reinstating penalty rates would allow low income and highly casualised industries to invest more money into the economy;

(2)         condemns:

(a)         the Government’s failure to protect penalty rates and the millions of Australians who rely on them; and

(b)         Government members and senators who called for, or supported, cuts to penalty rates; and

(3)         calls on the Government to:

(a)         join with the Opposition in making a submission to the Fair Work Commission, arguing that penalty rates should be reinstated; and

(b)         exercise some economic leadership and stand up for low paid workers.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         4    Tax relief: Resumption of debate ( from  22 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mrs Archer —That this House notes that:

(1)          the Government took to the election a plan for tax relief for hard-working Australians which will more than double the low and middle income tax offset from 2018-19, and deliver long-term structural reform by lowering the 32.5 per cent tax rate to 30 per cent from 1 July 2024; and 

(2)         at the 2019 federal election the coalition was returned to office and that our plan for lower taxes was backed by the Australian people.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         5    The economy: Resumption of debate ( from  22 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Leeser —That this House:

(1)         recognises that the fundamentals of our economy are strong thanks to the economic management of the Government; and

(2)         commends the Government for its plan to continue to grow the economy through:

(a)         delivering on a $100 billion infrastructure plan;

(b)         pursuing free trade deals, with the European Union and through the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership;

(c)         creating 1.25 million more jobs over the next five years;

(d)         maintaining budget surpluses and paying down debt; and

(e)         locking in record funding for schools and hospitals.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 7 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         6    Australian Defence Force cadets: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Hastie —That this House:

(1)         notes the valuable contribution the Australian Defence Force (ADF) cadets make to youth development in our communities;

(2)         recognises cadet leaders and staff who give up their time to mentor and shape Australia’s youth; and

(3)         acknowledges that ADF cadets, in cooperation with the community, benefit the nation by developing an individual’s capacity to contribute to society.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         7    Tasmanian housing crisis: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Collins —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         after being neglected by successive State and Federal Liberal Governments, Tasmania is now in the depths of a housing crisis;

(b)         under the Liberals, the Tasmanian housing market is failing renters, first-home buyers and people at risk of homelessness;

(c)         the average middle-income Tasmanian household is in rental stress, paying about 30 per cent of their income just to put a roof over their head, and 20 per cent more Tasmanians are accessing homelessness and crisis housing services than two years ago;

(d)         sadly, behind these statistics, Tasmanians are hurting;

(e)         the new Federal Assistant Minister for Community Housing, Homelessness and Community Services wants to put a ‘positive spin’ on the housing crisis, which is disgraceful and shows an arrogant contempt for ordinary Tasmanians; and

(f)          these unacceptable comments illustrate the failure and incompetence of the Liberals in Tasmania;

(2)         calls on the Federal Government to outline a plan to address this crisis—if there is a deal with Senator Lambie, the Government should release the details; and

(3)         recognises that:

(a)         this continuing record of neglect is yet another example of the State and Federal Liberals failing to stand up for Tasmania; and

(b)         only Labor can be trusted to take the housing crisis seriously.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         8    National Disability Insurance Scheme Early Childhood Early Intervention approach: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr C. Kelly —That this House:

(1)         notes the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) approach is an evidence-based, best practice approach to early childhood intervention for children aged zero to six years with developmental delay or disability, and there have been some challenges with rolling out the ECEI approach;

(2)         welcomes the Government’s announcement to reduce delays and backlogs in delivering early childhood early intervention supports through the NDIS; and

(3)         notes that:

(a)         a six-month recovery plan to be implemented by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) will include working with ECEI partners to secure additional resources to ensure children are able to receive early childhood supports in a more timely manner;

(b)         the NDIA will provide a standardised interim six-month plan for children who have been found eligible for the NDIS, but who are experiencing significant waiting periods for a plan (that is, where the period between an access decision and getting a plan is greater than 50 days) and that these interim plans will be replaced by a full NDIS plan no later than six months after being issued;

(c)         new participants who are not categorised as complex and who are not transferring from an existing Commonwealth, state or territory disability program will be given a standardised interim plan for $10,000;

(d)         participants who are transferring from an existing Commonwealth, state or territory disability program, their interim NDIS plan and funding package will reflect their existing support levels, however, if that amount is lower than $10,000 they will also receive the $10,000 standardised interim plan for up to six months; and

(e)         participants with complex support needs, will immediately be streamed to an NDIA early childhood specialist to develop their plan and appropriate funding package.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

         9    Vision Australia Radio funding: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms L. M. Chesters —That this House:

(1)         notes that Vision Australia’s radio broadcast is at risk of ending at the end of 2019 due to a lack of funding;

(2)         acknowledges that:

(a)         this organisation is receiving some Government funding, but more is needed to cover running costs; and

(b)         700,000 listeners tune into Vision Australia Radio each year and that there are around 800 volunteers across 10 stations in Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth and regional Victoria;

(3)         recognises that due to changes in the funding received by disability support organisations following the roll out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, Vision Australia needs to secure an extra $700,000 per year to ensure the future of the service;

(4)         believes the Government can play a vital role in ensuring people with a print disability can remain informed and connected to their local community; and

(5)         calls on the Government to provide greater funding support to Vision Australia to continue their radio service.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

      10    Cyber security: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Wallace —That this House:

(1)         notes that:

(a)         according to IDCARE, in 2019 they will provide support to over 50,000 Australians and New Zealanders who have experienced identity takeover, cybercrimes, scams and cyber bullying;

(b)         in 2018-19, IDCARE’s call centre provided approximately 53,400 hours of specialist identity and cyber security counselling support to Australian residents; and

(c)         Australia is being targeted by international organised crime and we need a strong approach to educating people on how they can protect themselves;

(2)         recognises the commitment by the Government to prioritise cyber security initiatives as part of the Cyber Security Strategy 2016 and the Action Plan that outlines the steps the Government will take to achieve Australia’s cybersecurity goals by 2020; and

(3)         acknowledges the need for continued investment, support and education to protect Australians from being victims of international organised crime.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

      11    Public sector integrity commission: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Sharkie —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on its commitment to establish a Commonwealth Integrity Commission to investigate and prevent corruption in the public sector;

(2)         congratulates the Opposition on its commitment to establish a National Integrity Commission to investigate and prevent corruption in the public sector;

(3)         notes the major and significant contribution that a robust and well-functioning integrity commission can make to sustain and reinforce public confidence in the integrity of Australia’s democratic government, parliament, and public service; and to help control corruption generally in Australia, in line with our international obligations;

(4)         notes that to achieve these objectives, the design and implementation of a robust integrity commission should include:

(a)         a broad jurisdiction to investigate and help prevent any serious or systematic abuse of entrusted power for private or political gain (‘corruption’) at the Commonwealth level, including but not limited to criminal offences;

(b)         the ability to self-initiate investigations;

(c)         the ability to receive, investigate or refer information about corruption from any person, including directly from Commonwealth staff or other whistleblowers;

(d)         improved measures for the protection of whistleblowers in the Commonwealth public sector and more generally;

(e)         the ability to hold public hearings for investigative purposes, for any corruption concerns within jurisdiction, where in the public interest to do so;

(f)          the other powers needed for effective investigation, including to question people, compel the production of documents, seek warrants to enter and search premises, make public reports including findings of fact and recommendations, and refer matters to relevant prosecutors;

(g)         the power and responsibility to properly coordinate the Commonwealth’s role in a national anti-corruption plan, working with state and territory agencies, other regulatory agencies for the private sector, and civil society;

(h)         the power and responsibility to lead comprehensive corruption prevention policies and procedures across the Commonwealth public sector, procurement and service delivery;

(i)           full jurisdiction over Commonwealth parliamentarians and their staff;

(j)          the creation of the commissioner(s) as an independent officer of the Commonwealth Parliament, appointed by and reporting to a bipartisan joint standing committee of the parliament, and only terminable on address from the parliament for proven misbehaviour or incapacity; and

(k)         sufficiently well-resourced funds and personnel; and

(5)         calls on the Government to work towards implementing an integrity commission that adheres to these key principles.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

      12    Education: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Mr Perrett —That this House:

(1)         recognises that:

(a)         Australian school students who commenced preparatory school when the Coalition formed government are now entering their final semester of primary school;

(b)         Australian school students who commenced high school when the Coalition formed government have transitioned to earning or learning through tertiary or vocational education; and

(c)         the future opportunities of these young Australians have been curtailed by the inability of the Government to address the educational needs of Australian students;

(2)         notes that since the Coalition formed government:

(a)         one of their first acts in government was to cut $30 billion over the decade from projected school funding;

(b)         they failed to restore cuts to public schools;

(c)         the literacy and numeracy of Australian school students has fallen;

(d)         there has been no action by the Government to improve school standards;

(e)         there has been no action by the Government to provide support to students, parents, teachers and principals;

(f)          Australian Vocational education and training (VET) students are paying more for their courses;

(g)         Australian apprenticeships and on-the-job training opportunities have declined;

(h)         the threshold for student loan repayments has been reduced, so that VET and university students are now commencing to repay their student loans when they are earning barely more than the minimum wage;

(i)           university places have been capped;

(j)          penalty rates, relied on by many students trying to earn money while studying, have been cut, resulting in more time away from their studies; and

(k)         nothing has been done to address the disconnect between higher education courses and industry demand for skills; and

(3)         calls on the Government to urgently implement measures to:

(a)         support public education in Australia through fair funding and reversing the cuts;

(b)         address the falling standard of literacy and numeracy of Australian students;

(c)         make sure university and TAFE is affordable for all Australians; and

(d)         ensure that young Australians have the skills required for our future workforce needs.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )

      13    Infrastructure: Resumption of debate ( from  29 July 2019 ) on the motion of Ms Flint —That this House:

(1)         congratulates the Government on:

(a)         the extensive urban and regional infrastructure investment of $100 billion announced in the 2019 Budget; and

(b)         its focus on national freight challenges, congestion busting and road safety;

(2)         recognises that every state of the Commonwealth is benefitting from the Government’s infrastructure program; and

(3)         commends the Government on providing the infrastructure that will build our future and generate growth for our economy.

              ( Order of the day will be removed from the Notice Paper unless called on on any of the next 8 sitting Mondays including 9 September 2019. )